Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00411

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Within the past wi


EMIOLOGIC NOTES CO,\ TE\ TS
Influenza-State Reports ................... 26
INFLUENZA New Jersey ........................... 26
Connecticut ................... ........ 26
Massachusetts ...................... 26
eek, notifications of focal outbreaks Antimony Poisoning-Virginia . .... 27


of influenza-like illnes-e- have been received from New
Jerse., Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania.
Serological confirmations of influenza A2 infection have
been completed in the former two States but no virus
isolations have yet resulted from laboratory studies.
Generally, the outbreaks have been scattered. whilee at
times insolhing a substantial number of school aged


individuals, there has been little evidence in current
epidemiological comment of spread to adults.
Accounts of the recent experiences in these four
States are printed on pages 26 and 27. Other States in the
Middle Atlantic and New England divisions have not
reported similar findings.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)

3rd Week Ended Cumulative, First 3 Weeks
Disease Median
January 23, January 18, 1960 1964 Median
1965 1964 1965 1964 1960 1964

Aseptic meningitis .......... 32 41 24 100 90 79
Brucellosis .............. 7 3 7 17 10 21
Diphtheria ............... 3 2 5 12 11 40
Encephalitis, primary infectious 25 19 --- 90 80 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious. 10 5 --- 34 19 --

Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 770 872 1,183 2,254 2,366 2,967
Measles ................. .6,805 5,946 8,095 18,754 14,819 21,112
Meningococcal infections 71 62 62 198 155 157
Poliomyelitis, Total . 8 1 27
Paralytic .............. 5 15
Nonparalytic ............ ---. 1 -
Unspecified ............ ---

Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ........... 9,541 8,141 8,508 28,139 23,685 23,546
Tetanus ................. 3 6 *-- 11 15
Tularemia ................ 11 13 --- 24 29
Typhoid fever ............. 9 7 8 13 16 16

Rabies in Animals .......... 93 44 57 273 163 163

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Rabies in Man:
Botulism: Smallpox:
Leptospirosis: Trichinosis: 1
Malaria: Typhus-
Plague: Murine: -
Psittacosis: Ga. 1 1 Rky. Mt. Spotted: Ga. 1 3


Fs .* / ti ,/'








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA State Reports


New Jersey
Focal outbreaks of febrile respiratory disease were
observed among residents of two institutions from ap-
proximatel. middle January: At a State training school
for boys, cases 'with clinical characteristics of influenza
were studied in the State Laboratory. Three of file acute-
convalescent serum pairs demonstrated substantial liter
rises to influenza AV. A similar clinical illness among
some 12-15 percent of patients on t\wo of 13 ward= in a
large psychiatric hospital is currently being investigated
but no laboratory documentation is available preently.
Elsewhere in the State there have been reports of
respiratory illnesses contributing to increased absenteeism
in schools and perhaps industries although this information
has not been full. substantiated on initial survey.

(Reporrtd by Dr. i illiam J. Dougherty, Director, Preve nti..e
Disease Control and Dr. Martin Goldfield. Director,
Laboratories, Neu Jersey State Department ofHealth.)

Connecticut
From middle to late December 1964, moderate amounts
of respirator. illness were noted in eastern Connecticut.
In rrore recent weeks, presumable the same disease has
been responsible for up to 20 percent school absenteeism
in scattered areas over the State. There is little evidence
of progression at the present time.
Diagnostic antibody titer rises to influenza A2 have
recently been described in paired serum specimens sub-


mitted from nine different geographical regions in the
State.

(Reported by Dr. James C. Hart, Director, Preventable
Diseases and Mr. Earle K. Borman, Director, Laboratory
Services, Connecticut State Department of Health.)

Massachusetts
Scattered outbreaks of an influenza-like illness
affecting predominantly school children have been reported
from some six communities in the eastern half of the State
during the past 1-2 weeks. In Clinton, one of the first
towns to be affected, absenteeism in a junior-senior high
school reached nearly 30 percent at its peak. The illness,
characterized bs headache, arthralgias, fever up to 103 ,
cough, and lacrimation has not been reported as affecting
large numbers of adults. Clinical specimens representative
of the major geographical foci are being processed in the
State Virus Laboratory.

(Reported by Dr. Nicholas J. Fiumara, Director, Com-
municable Diseases, lassachusetts Department of
Public Health.)



Pennsylvania
Rapid appearance of febrile respiratory disease in
Allegheny Counti (Southwest Pennsylvania) during recent
weeks resulted in daily school absenteeism rising to 20-40


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES


1100-
Io-

1000-
0o-
900-

800-

700-


ALL
CITIES


WEEK NO 40 44 8 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 4 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
WK ENDED 6 3 1 29 26 23 23 20 18 15 13 10 7 5 2 30 28 25 22 21 18 16 13 11 8 5 3 31 28 2 30 27 27 24 22 19 17 14 11
MONTH O N D J F M A M J A S N J J S N N Di F M A M J J A S
1962 1963 196311964 1964 1965








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


percent in some instances. The clinical illness is de-
scribed as "influenza-like" although laboratory tests
have not yet demonstrated the etiological agent.
In one large high school, it is estimated that perhaps
one-half of the 2000 students reported respiratory illnesses
during the past week. Noteworthy is the observation


that none of the 60 members of the school's football
squad having received commercial influenza vaccine in
the fall of 1964 was ill during this time.
(Reported by Dr. Edwin Brown, Allegheny Con.'i-y Ep-
idemiologist and EIS Officr,' qlirn' to the County
Health Department.)


ANTIMONY POISONING Virginia


Twenty persons experienced nausea, \omiting, ab-
dominal pain and varying degrees of prostration 15-45
minutes after drinking punch poured from a large gray
"granite" enamelware coffee pot while attending an
annual church-school meeting in a Virginia community.
Cherry juice, powdered citric acid mix, sugar, saccharin,
and lemon juice concentrate were mixed in a 2-gallon gray
enamelware coffee pot, and stored in a refrigerator for
24 hours.


Children attending Bible classes were served cookies
and punch by age groups in the order of Kindergarten,
Primary, Junior and Junior High. The Nursery group was
not served because others were already becoming ill by
the time their turn arrived. Cases occurred as follows
within each group:


Classes by order
Of Serving
Kindergarten
Primary
Junior
Junior High
Nursery *


Pupils Teachers
Total Ill Total Ill
17 9 3 0
13 10 3 1
9 0 3 0
5 0 1 0
8 0 1 0

52 19 11 1


* Did not receive punch.


The small quantity of remaining punch, negative for
the ususl bacteriological pathogens, had a pH of 4.6 and
a positive qualitative test for antimony. Simulated punch
made up in the laboratory in the same coffee pot using the


same ingredients and refrigerated for the same length of
time showed a pH of 4.6 and a concentration of antimony
of eleven (11) parts per million or 0.:325 mg per ounce.
The punch was served in 3 oz. cups and most drank onlI
one serving.


Recovery was prompt and uneventful. It is noted that
of the groups who drank the punch, only the first 2 groups
were affected; none of the older children (Junior and
Junior High) were ill and only one of the 11 teachers. In
an effort to explain this phenomenon, consideration was
given to the possibility of armingg concentrations of
antimony at different levels due to settling, However,
samples taken at different levels in the pot of simulated
punch did not show any appreciable variation. V'rginla
State Health authorities postulate that at this low con-
centration of antimony the smaller body weight of the
younger group may have been significant to the development
of disease.


Notably, a similar episode occurred the previous year
during this annual church-school meeting.


(Reported by Dr. J.B. Kenley, Director, Bureau of Epide-
miology, Virginia State Department of Health; Dr. Andrew
F. Scheele, Director, Prince It illiam County Health
Department; Mr. W. French Skinner, Director, Hureiau of
Laboratories, Virginia State Department of Health.)


Editor's Note: Antimony is often contained in the binding :
between the enamel and metal of older utensils, t'itrnc
acid can diss.ol e the binding behind a worn enamel coat,
releasing sufficient antimony to cause toxic symptoms.











28 lorbidilt and Mortality Weekly Report



Tabk i CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 23, 1965 AND JANUARY 18. 1964 (3rd WEEK)


Encephalitti Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 196. 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 32 41 25 10 1 3 12

NEW ENC LArUD.......... 1 -
Maine .............. -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont ............ -
Massachusects ...... I
Rhode Island ....... -
Connecticu ........ -- -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... I 3 10 1 1
New 'ork City ...... 6 1
New York, Up-State. 1 1 3
New Jersey......... -
Pennsylvania........ 1 1

EAST NORTH CErTiRAL... 3 7 3 4 1 1
Ohio ............... 1 1 2 -
Indiana............ I I I I
Illinois ........... -
Michigan............. I 1
Wisconsin .......... I -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... I 4
Minne ,ota.......... -
lIowa................ -
Missouri........... 1 1
North Dakota.......
Scuth Dakota....... 2
Nebraska ........... I 1
Kan,a ............. -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 7 9 6 i 1 3
Dela are........... I I -
Maryland...........- --
Dizt. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... -
West Virginia...... -
North Carolina..... -
South Carolina..... -
Georgia............ -
Florida............. 6 8 1 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 4 -
Kentucky........... I -
Tennes-ee........... -
Alabama............ -
Mississippi........ 1

JEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 2
Arkansa ...........- -
Louisiana............ -
Oklahoma........... -
Texas .............. 3 2 2

MOUNTAIN.............. 4 -
M'ntana........... -
Idaho.............. -
Wyoming.......... ....
Colorado........... 4 I -
New Mexico.......... -
Arizona............ -
Utah................ -
Nevada ............. -

PACIFIC............... 13 10 3 5 -
Washington. ........ -
Oregon............. -
California.......... 11 7 2 5
Alaska............. -
Hawaii.............. 2 3

Puerto Rico -










Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report 29


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WE FK ENDED

JANUARY 23, 1965 AND JANUARY 18, 1964 (3rd WEEK) Continued


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningococcal
losis including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
ncl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 7 770 382 341 2,254 2,366 71 198 155 3 11

NEW ENGLAND.......... 44 23 17 137 330 2 8 5 1
Maine.............. 10 5 3 29 128 -
New Hampshire ..... 2 2 11 44 I
Vermont............. 7 2 5 12 44
Massachusetts...... 8 5 2 47 48 1 5 1
Rhode Island....... 6 4 2 12 15 -
Connecticut........ 11 5 5 26 51 1 1 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 162 77 85 443 535 8 27 22 1 1
New York City...... 30 7 23 73 78 3 7 5
New York, Up-State. 71 44 27 211 278 1 6 9 1 1
New Jersey.......... 19 4 15 57 55 2 8 2
Pennsylvania....... 42 22 20 102 124 2 6 6

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 111 65 39 382 301 7 22 16
Ohio............... 34 22 10 122 101 2 10 6 -
Indiana............. 8 13 2 2 1
Illinois........... 20 11 9 74 34 1 6 3
Michigan........... 45 26 19 148 139 1 1 5
Wisconsin.......... 12 6 1 30 14 1 3 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 52 31 21 161 146 5 13 5 2
Minnesota........... 11 6 5 14 5 2 2 2 1
Iowa............... 3 21 13 8 86 25 -
Missouri............ 3 6 2 4 26 31 2 6 2 1
North Dakota...... 1 1 1 1 3 1 -
South Dakota....... 2 12 -
Nebraska............ 3 7 -
Kansas............. 13 9 4 29 65 1 2 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 68 34 31 234 205 20 45 42 1 5
Delaware............ 1 1 4 2 1 2 -
Maryland............ 18 10 8 45 36 2 2 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 2 2 -
Virginia........... 11 2 7 44 22 3 6 4 1 1
West Virginia...... 16 11 5 48 23 1 3 4 -
North Carolina..... 3 1 2 23 43 3 5 6
South Carolina..... 3 2 1 9 4 3 3 7 -
Georgia............ 1 1 19 5 2 11 6 3
Florida............. 14 8 5 40 68 5 13 12 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 63 34 25 131 176 3 14 12 -
Kentucky........... 23 12 8 44 84 7 4 -
Tennessee.......... 26 18 7 48 56 2 4 6 -
Alabama............ 10 4 6 27 26 1 3 2 -
Mississippi ....... 4 4 12 10 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 85 46 35 239 133 8 24 21 1 1
Arkansas........... 8 3 5 25 17 2 1 -
Louisiana.......... 19 8 11 36 17 2 6 6
Oklahoma........... 4 1 3 9 7 2 5 2 -
Texas.............. 54 34 16 169 92 4 11 12 1 1

MOUNTAIN............. 1 39 12 10 134 167 3 6 11 -
Montana ............ 3 3 10 17 --
Idaho.............. 3 28 14 1 -
Wyoming............. 7 2 3 13 3 I -
Colorado............ 6 3 3 9 30 1 1 3 -
New Mexico......... 7 2 2 28 39 2 5 5 -
Arizona............ 7 31 29 -
Utah................ 1 6 2 2 15 31 1 -
Nevada............. .- 4 .

PACIFIC.............. 146 60 78 393 373 15 39 21 1
Washington.......... 17 6 11 33 47 2
Oregon............. 18 6 12 47 38 1 -
California.......... 103 48 55 277 264 15 37 18 1
Alaska............ 8 36 14 1 -
Hawaii.............. 10 1 -

Puerto Rico 9 5 4 11 10 -










30 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 23, 1965 AND JANUARY 18, 1964 (3rd WEEK) Continued


StrEpt.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies In
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES.. 6,805 18,754 14,819 9,541 11 24 9 13 93 273

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,584 5,331 816 976 3 5
Maine.............. 203 698 75 158 -
New Hampshire...... 28 115 5 -
Vermont............ 20 207 3 3 4
Massachusetts...... 991 2,957 189 102 -
Rhode Island....... 209 571 37 45 -
Connecticut........ 153 970 303 668 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 238 660 2,861 452 2 2 3 10
New York City...... 32 99 1,192 16 1 1 -
New York, Up-State. 50 207 567 261 1 1 3 8
New Jersey.......... 59 113 458 70 -
Pennsylvania....... 97 241 644 105 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,286 3,017 2,645 992 3 13
Ohio............... 361 658 364 107 -
Indiana............. 89 142 557 159 1 4
Illinois........... 36 92 987 148 -
Michigan........... 583 1,526 482 400 2 4
Wisconsin........... 217 599 255 178 5

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 413 1,238 381 370 1 2 19 55
Minnesota........... 7 15 3 14 5 13
Iowa................ 143 573 104 69 5 17
Missouri........... 47 129 32 29 1 1 6 10
North Dakota....... 150 427 239 127 6
South Dakota....... 16 3 45 2 3
Nebraska........... 66 78 1 4
Kansas............. NN NN NN 86 1 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 1,254 2,886 1,789 1,263 4 9 4 5 17 39
Delaware............ 15 66 20 21 -
Maryland............ 11 29 303 96 3 3 1 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 27 13 -
Virginia........... 329 485 345 332 1 3 11 33
West Virginia...... 836 2,102 616 525 1 1
North Carolina..... 6 56 48 14 2 -
South Carolina..... 4 21 271 23 2 -
Georgia............. 17 28 49 30 3 4 1 1
Florida............ 36 99 112 209 3 3

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 440 999 2,226 1,412 3 5 1 1 25 98
Kentucky........... 49 59 1,253 85 1 5
Tennessee........... 248 659 855 1,210 2 3 23 88
Alabama............. 107 169 89 81 1 1 1 1 2 5
Mississippi........ 36 112 29 36 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 655 1,507 859 829 3 6 1 3 17 38
Arkansas........... 4 6 29 12 1 3 2 3 5
Louisiana.......... 1 1 3 5 11
Oklahoma ........... 12 17 12 76 2 3 1 1 4 8
Texas............... 639 1,483 817 738 5 14

MOUNTAIN ............ 434 1,722 711 1,381 2 1 1 1 5
Montana ............ 102 570 227 83 -
Idaho............... 99 295 106 197 -
Wyoming............. 2 56 6 43 1 1 -
Colorido ........... 64 245 63 477 -
New Mexico......... 4 51 42 210 -
Arizona............ 13 43 172 183 1 5
Utah............... 150 459 65 188 2 -
Nevada.............. 3 30 -

PACIFIC.............. 501 1,394 2,531 1,866 1 5 10
Washington......... 184 325 1,068 353 -
Oregon.............. 61 365 331 30 -
California......... 177 526 873 1,378 5 10
Alaska............. 16 25 235 4 -
Hawaii............. 63 153 24 101 1 -

Puerto Rico 26 84 189 8 -










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JANUARY 23, 1965

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and I year
AgesInfluenza All Influenza All
All Ages Causes Ages and over All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.-------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.-------
Cincinnati, Ohio-----
Cleveland, Ohio------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.-----
Flint, Mich.--------
Fort Wayne, Ind.-----
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-----
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.----------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.-------
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


795
229
57
41
31
54
32
36
23
64
60
20
57
29
62

3,765
57
45
174
32
42
44
68
106
1,946
41
562
202
60
109
25
39
78
68
28
39

2,650
64
40
789
147
244
122
82
350
46
41
38
24
54
188
32
118
35
37
36
94
69

921
51
34
44
128
30
144
74
252
98
66


521
129
42
28
23
33
18
26
14
43
42
14
40
22
47

2,258
40
30
105
19
23
28
41
52
1,179
20
307
121
45
73
11
26
49
41
23
25

1,485
30
31
412
84
143
72
44
189
31
26
25
6
38
106
19
75
14
20
16
60
44

529
31
16
21
80
18
101
43
142
56
21


50
13
13
1
1

1
4
2

3

6

6

181

3
4
6
3
3
3
7
80
8
23
7
6
9

1
3
7
4
4

115
1
9
42
6
4
i
3
22

2
2
2
6
5

1
1
6
1
2



28
2
2
1
1
4

13

5


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


''


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.---------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah*--
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,201
132
284
55
79
78
44
99
32
83
88
184
43

643
82
31
41
171
132
54
45
87

1,236
46
29
17
162
40
77
256
56
213
103
118
52
67

442
43
19
134
18
107
19
55
47

1,825
12
60
43
50
64
688
78
36
119
72
119
210
34
165
44
31


Total 13,478 7,740 582 803

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 41,936
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 23,810
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------ 1,947
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 2,526


Week No.
3


618
64
135
28
37
38
15
56
12
69
53
87
24

340
38
21
22
95
63
27
19
55

615
23
15
11
75
16
43
117
28
107
52
64
22
42

252
22
8
83
12
57
7
33
30

1,122
9
34
34
24
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UIIIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



3 1262 08864 2516
32 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report







THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 13,000 IS PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING, PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION 1. L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF, SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON, M.D.
ASSISTANT EDITOR, MMWR PAUL D. STOLLEY, M.D.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLiSHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTAL T, TH-E COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES, SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY; COMPILED
DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIDAY.
SYMBOLS:---DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
VOL. 14, NO. 1, JANUARY 15I 1965.








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