Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00410

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


I COMUN :L mR I


ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333 /


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SFLt( TFI) NOTIIABIE D)lIAES
DEATHS IN SELICTFD ( ITIFS FOR W'I K ENDI- MA


INFLUENZA ,

Minnesota \

Outbreaks of influenza-like illness commencing in An incrtsi
early to mid-April were reported frorr. a number of counties early and mid-A
in central and southern Minnesota. absenteeism wa
An outbreak at the Faribault State School and Hospi- Outbreaks nere
tal, 40 miles south of Minneapolis, commenced about ern Minnesota c
April 1 with a subsequent sporadic spread of cases tail, Rice, and S
throughout the institution. Some cases were reported from
the immediate community. Influenza A2 was isolated from iReporied by D.
a 17-year-old patient who demonstrated also a significant Disease Pre.eri
rise in complement-fixing antibodies, of Hralbh).


, '1.. .', vol. 13, N.-. 18





-a-
IN 1Hl I-t l STATI, AN[) ON



: % \
2 19 .'






ed ncidence of influenza-like disease in
Lprf -w.ch occasional increases in school
s noted in the Minneapolis-Sr. Paul area.
also recorded in other central and south-
ounties including Morrison, Mower, Orter-
tearns Counties.

S. Fler',:ng. Ml.D.. Director. OD z.isiro nf
i:on and Contro!. .Mliennsota Department


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES


(Cumulative totals include revised and


delayed reports through previous weeks)


18th Week Ended Cumulati.'e. First 18 Weeks
Disease May 2, May 4, Median Median
1964 1963 1959 1963 1964 1963 1959 1963

Aseptic meningitis ................ 30 22 --- 489 392 ---
Brucellosis ............... ....... 3 7 12 133 i18 190
Diphtheria .............. ........ ... 6 3 11 74 107 253
Encephalitis, primary infectious .. 1 37 --- 581 98 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... 33--- 281--

Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................ 747 80s 813 16,131 17,962 17,962
Measles ........................... 25,222 17,338 19.088 253.28- 229,338 243,243
Meningococcal infections .......... 44 75 54 1,092 1.081 1,007
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. I 1 9 2- 48 136
Paralytic ....... .... ....... 1 1 8 18 43 88
Nonparalytic .................... --- 5 2 ---
Unspecified .....................- --- I 3 ---

Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ................. 9,501 7,568 --- 193,201 169.872
Tetanus ............................ 2 11 --- 65 68
Tularemia ......................... 2 6 --- 83 70
Typhoid fever ..................... 7 8 1 118 124 175

Rabies in Animals ................ 131 98 77 1,61Q 1,380 1,43


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 2 Psittacosis: 13
Botulism: 6 Rabies in Man:
Leptospirosis: 7 Smallpox:
Malaria: 30 Typhus-
Plague: Murine: 4
Rky Mt. Spotted: 7


For release Hay 8, 1964


634-5131


C







Moriidity and Mortality a weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

BOTULISM -New York City


Two cases of botulism related to the ingestion of
Canadian tommnrrciall\ canned liver paste were reported
in New York City in Nov\nmber ISee MMIUR, Vol. 12,
P.ige 8(1i. Indirect evidence suggests that these were
due to Type A botulism.

The 2 cases involved a married couple who had pur-
chased 2 cans (" ounce size) of Paragon label lter paste
in t-jrl\ October.

(onilltclng histories were obtained by several ob-
servers as to the dates the couple ate the liver paste.
There seems little doubt that it was eaten on at least 2
occasions between the earliest possible date of purchase,
October 5, until the last recalled date of ingestion.
October 20.

The contents of the first can were consumed by both
the husband and his wife about October 5 or 6; the can
was discarded on ones Reach. No unusual odor or taste
was noted.
Between one and 2 weeks later, the second can of
li tr paste was opened; both husband and wife consumed
portions of it. The following day, the husband took the
remaining portion of the liver paste to work with him for
his lunch. After a few mouthfuls, however, he threw it into
the garbage can because, according to one account, the
product had a bad taste. Only the husband ate any liver
paste that day.
A few days later, he experienced the onset of srmp-
toms which included diplopia, dysphagia, dysarthria,
generalized weakness, a dry mouth and sore throat. He did
not experience gastrointestinal symptoms. He was seen
on 3 different occasions by several physicians, none of
whom considered the diagnosis of botulism. Because of a
red throat and an "upper respiratory infection," he was
gisen antibiotics. Two days after the onset of her hus-
band's symptoms, his wife experienced a transient diplo-
pia, weakness of her hands, and similar, but milder,
symptoms. She continued to work.
The symptoms in the couple persisted. On November
11, the husband went to a pharmacy in New York City to
obtain medication for his fatigue and weakness. The
pharmacist, upon hearing the patient's complaints, sus-
pected botulism and questioned him about eating liver
paste. The pharmacist urged the husband and his wife to
seek medical attention immediately. The patient called
the New York City health Department, its field epidemi-
ologist confirmed the diagnosis clinically, and arranged
for immediate hospitalization through the patient's private
physician.


On admission, the husband's vital capacity was
measured as 75 percent of normal. lie was noted to have
mild dysarthria, peripheral muscle weakness, but no
sensory disturbances. He had slight diplopia on admis-
sion, which rapidly cleared. Cerebral spinal fluid examina-
tion was negative. The patient reacted markedly to a test
dose of the equine bivalent botulinus antitoxin; he. there-
fore, was not treated with the antisera.
The wife was not hospitalized, but observed as an
out-patient. She did not receive antitoxin.
Both have recovered.
On November 17, the husband was well enough to
lead a team of physicians and epidemiologists to the
discarded can on Jones Beach. The can was cultured by
the New York City Health Department Laboratories,
Clostridium botulinum was not recovered.
The can, however, was identified as part of a lot of
liver paste processed in Canada and shipped to the United
States. Because of previous associated cases of botulism
in Montreal (See MMWR, Vol. 12, Page 357), this product
had been withdrawn from sale subsequent to the rime of
purchase by the two New York victims.
Type A botulinus toxin was identified by the New
York City Health Department Laboratories in another can
of the same lot number.
(Reported by Dr. Harold T. Faerst, Director, Bureau of
Preventable Disease, Deparitmrnt of Health, v\cu York
City, Dr. Tibor Fodor, BRrrau ul Pre'enrable Diseases.
Neu York City Health Department. and Dr. Daniel 1ilde-
lock, Associate Director, rN u I ork Cit: HeIalth Depart-
merit Laboratories; Dr. Ed, ard i Hook. \eu York
llospiial. Cornell Medical Center. '%\t I) rk Cir). and an
Fl\ Olicer.)

Fditor's Note: In the Canadian cases, the spores and
toxin of C. botulinum Type B were detected by Dr. Roger
Reed, McGill University, in the remnants of liver paste
sandwiches consumed by 2 victims, who had purchased
3 oz. size cans.
According to Dr. F. S. Thatcher. Chief, Microbiology
Section of the Canadian F.D.A., C boululnum Type B was
identified in unsold 3 oz. size cans of the liver paste.
Type A toxin was identified in unsold 7 oz. size cans.
The Montreal cases were all believed due to Type B.
No cases related to Type A have been reported in Canada.
The New York City cases have been ascribed to
Type A botulism on the basis of the knowledge of the
presence of this toxin in the 7 oz. size cans, although
Tipe A was not specifically identified in one of the cans
allegedly consumed by the couple.


1350






151


Morb;dity and Mortality Weekly Report





SALMONELLOSIS Pennsylvania


Simultaneously, each of 4 members of an Allegheny
County family of 5 were found to harbor different types of
salmonella. A pet turtle appears to have been the source
for 2 types; no source was found for the 2 other types.
On September 10, a 12-year-old boy experienced the
onset of fever to 1030, chills, and mild diarrhea. He was
hospitalized for 2 weeks, during which time both stool
and blood cultures grew Salmonella bredeney. As part of
a routine follow-up, the Allegheny County Health Depart-
ment obtained stool cultures on the remaining members of
his immediate family.
Salmonella panama was isolated from an asympto-
matic 15-year-old brother; Salmonella heidelberg was
isolated from the stool of a 7-year-old brother; and Salmo-
nella paratyphoid B was isolated from their father's stool.
Cultures obtained from the mother were negative for
salmonella on 3 separate occasions.
The family had purchased two small pet painted
turtles from a super market one week prior to the onset of
symptoms in the 12-year-old. He had the duty of changing
the turtle water daily, of removing the turtle, pouring out
the water, refilling the tank with water, and replacing the
turtle. The boy customarily ate breakfast immediately
without washing his hands.


Cultures of water from the turtle's tank revealed
S. bredeney and S. panama. The turtle food was negative
for salmonella. No source of S. paratyphoid B and S.
heidelberg could be demonstrated.
Well water, which the family used, was tested and
found to be negative for salmonella. No other cases of
salmonellosis were detected among individuals who also
used the same well water.
It is surmised that the turtles may also have harbored
S. paratyphoid B and S. heidelberg, as well as the 2 other
serotypes.
One other case of S. paratyphoid B occurred in a 12-
year-old boy from an unrelated family in Allegheny County.
This boy had obtained a turtle from the same super market
about 2 weeks earlier than the first family. Cultures of
his turtle were negative for salmonella.
Cultures from within the super market have not been
possible.

(Reported by Edwin Brown, M.D., Chief, Division of Dis-
ease Control, and Herbert R. Domke, M.D., Health Officer,
Allegheny County Health Department; and, Dr. W. D.
Schrack, Jr., Director, Division of Communicable Disease
Control, Pennsylvania State Department of Health.)


SUMMARY OF PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS

The weekly average number of pneumonia-influenza
deaths for the four-week period ending May 2 was 487
as compared with an expected weekly average of 503.



Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths in 108 Cities


Week Ending 4 Week Weekly

4/11 4/18 4/25 5/2 Total Average
Observed 536 496 490 424 1,946 487
Expected 518 508 498 487 2,011 503

Excess 18 -12 -8 -63 -65 -16


NUMBER

DEATHS
800.-


PNEUMONIA -INFLUENZA DEATHS in 108 U.S. CITIES
Average Number per Week by Four-Week Periods

INFWNZA A
-l/ -RI


100-

6 10--" B\
6 aO l |
NoA Filln> I


Period No


196'
eev TAVC OPCRRNO


(See table, page 15 )


B Uliu -al- 1-lLUgi-li
I I [-I 1_1 VII IL IT i-L-1-IL
i r6 .?. -e
w*CALCUTeYO FROS b9S*R~S0 WEXReic








1.2 %lirlidiill uLnd Mlnrtalit. U1r'kly Report



Ihabl ( %1% ()Of NPH( 1HhF) %()I IlAHI I DIMI A lt I %11t1) I Al .S

FOR WHIKS FNI)fi)

MAY 2. 19,4 AM) MAY 4. 1,. ( 1 ith WIFFK


En, rphal I i I
,lrplli -
Menin ttle- Pr tmar P,.t-Inl. P I I *Mve l is. T. al Ca i F ]s.. ,- ll i s, Paralytic

Cu. ulaIt vr Cumulative
1 qb- 1l' 3 146- lJ l J L_]_ 6.4 1964 1963 196I 1b.63 1964 1963


L'IITYD TATES... 30 22 1.l 33 1 1 24 48 1 1 Is 63

FWIA%. ......... 3 1 -
Ve.1 L I. .............
M,- i LI r .
Vc.r .r l ...... c 1t

Rhn ,. I landl .....
L'.nnt t l t ........ -

DDLE ATLANTIC I...... 1 1 6 4 5 & 5
i r '.' C r ... 1 I
\. y ,-rk. Ip-'%tate. I 2 4
S r ...... 3 1 I
P, nn l ini. .. 1 4 1

EA T NOR;RT iENiRAL... 5 8 8 1 3 11
: ............. 2 4 2 3
Indna." ............. .

icJlna ............ 3 2 1 3 -

1Wisr n n ......... I



I ;. ... .............
I1 1Clin. . 3 2- 3


'ii-,.uyT 1 6 l



N rch Dnn ... ....
N rth Dakic a .
sut h Da '[ i ... I
nfbra .d . .



KDAna re ........... .
1-01TH ATLANTIC 2 3 13 .- ll 5 8 5
N> l31. sre r. . 1
.i r v I a nd...........
Dis i Ci.lurmb a..
Vircinia............ 1 2
uWei Virginia. .. .. 1 -
%,rth Carollna.... 2 5 2 2 2
,ourh Carolina- I- I
Ge r ia............ 1 I
Florida ........... 1 3 10 3 2 3 2

EAST IOLTH CENTRAL... 3 3 I 2 3 1 1 2
Kentucky....... ..... .. 1
T nnes.ee .......... I I 1 1 1 1
Alaba-mia............. 1 1 1 2 1 I I
MLSSL sst ppi ........ 1 I

WTST SOL'TH CENTRAL... 2 I 2 10 1 10
Arkansa ............
LVL tisI d na .......... -1 8 8
Ol la h ima........... 2
Trxas.............. 2 I -2 2 1 2

O 'NT IN l .............- 2 1 I
Mo'n ana............
Idah .............. -
%.*- I n .............. 3
C-l-rado............ -
NeVi. Ml. c ........ .
Ari na ............ .
Liah............... -
';"va i1 1 ..............

F C IF:C .............. 15 9 1 110 9
'.a hinrt .n ......... 3 3 [
LTegon.... .... ........ I
Calif rnia......... 1. 6 1 1: 1 8 1 7
Alaska.............
HawaiL.............


Pirrc;. Rico 2 2


j p t r ,;, Rt=:O








Mlorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 153


Table i CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 2, 1964- AND MAY 4. 196 ( IHrh WrEEK) Conrinurd


Infectioua Hepatitis
Brucellosis Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitis Typhoid Fever

Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.

1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1964

UNITED STATE'... 3 133 6 74 747 350 362 35 16,131 17,962 7 118

NEW ENGLAND........... 1 2 I 6 70 29 11 1.710 2,097 7
Maine.............. I 3 20 11 9 597 967
New Hampshire...... 3 3 131 147
Vermont............. 7 4 3 212 29 -
Massachusetts ...... I 2 3 16 14 339 617 4
Rhode Island....... 5 2 3 81 49 3
Connecticut........ 19 7 12 350 288

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 4 183 82 101 3,693 3,59 2 20
New York City...... 1 28 9 19 537 447 6
New York, Up-State. 1 71 34 37 1,629 1,530 4
New Jersey......... 2 35 12 23 674 551 1 1
Pennsylvania ....... 1 49 27 22 853 931 1 9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 17 6 125 72 .6 7 2,437 2,835 1 26
Ohio............... 30 15 14 I 641 841 1 17
Indiana............ 1 15 12 3 215 256 4
Illinois........... 12 6 12 4 8 372 611 3
Michigan............ 2 52 33 19 1,034 979 2
Wisconsin........... 2 16 8 2 6 175 18 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 70 4 14 38 15 16 7 938 821 10
Minnesota.......... 2 4 6 6 5 1 79 136
Iowa............... 40 7 6 1 139 150 3
Missouri........... 4 10 2 6 2 235 327 3
North Dakota ....... 2 37 21
South Dakota....... 11 1 5 2 3 97 34 -
Nebraska............ 10 I 1 20 61 -
Kansas.............. 7 9 5 4 331 92 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1 8 1 19 69 32 36 1 1,562 1,914 1 26
Delaware........... I 34 27
Maryland............ 16 6 10 300 213 I
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 I- 1 27 60 -
Virginia............ 2 7 3 4 229 422 6
West Virginia...... 7 7 272 280 -
North Carolina..... 1 20 13 7 300 510 9
South Carolina..... 3 2 2 56 78 2
Georgia............ 1 3 1 14 1 1 36 76 1
Florida............ 2 2 14 2 12 308 248 1 7

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 8 4 46 24 22 1,107 1,874 2 15
Kentucky........... 3 14 6 8 485 554 8
Tennessee.......... I l 1 20 13 7 384 755 4
Alabama............ 3 2 7 3 4 149 273 1 2
Mississippi ........ I 5 2 3 89 292 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 13 43 25 18 1,161 1,204 7
Arkansas........... 1 2 2 129 148 3
Louisiana.......... 1 3 8 2 6 236 218
Oklahoma........... 1 3 2 1 71 64 3
Texas............... 6 10 30 19 11 725 774 I

MOUNTAIN............. 10 I 28 3 5 20 1,049 1,231 -
Montana............ 3 1 2 102 188 -
Idaho.............. 2 83 180 -
Wyoming............ 1 3- 20 -
Colorado............ 7 1 6 322 253 -
New Mexico........ I 1 2 1 1 162 15 -
Arizona............. 8 8 223 274 -
Utah............... 7 -4 1 2 I 94 152
Nevada............. I I 29 10 -

PACIFIC............ .7 7 145 68 77 2,474 2,527 1 6
Washington........ 6 22 9 13 267 424 -
Oregon............. 23 11 12 282 348
California........ 6 1 98 48 50 1,799 1,688 1 5
Alaska............. 2 2 77 54 -
Hawaii............. I 49 13

Puerto Rico 3 13 8 5 263 258 6








I 1 ~lorhiiliti and Mlorlalit 1 ev klh I report


.lahl ( ASIS OSF SP[(IFIII) NOTIFIABLF DISEASES I NIT1 ) STATES

FOR WH KS FNDFD

MAY 2 I161! AN) MAY I. 1'96 ( INih 'WE.K) (.unrinuLd


'I rrp[i i it i I
M.ni n~a. L Tcal S.-rr Thr1a and Ralbes in
MI .l l M nal I Cumu I Ivt w Cum. Cumr. Cur.

16. lQh. 19b6. Iqb3 Ib64 1963 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964

UNITED -1ATE... .5~ .. 2 .. 1.U2 1.1081 ',501 1.568 2 65 2 83 131 1.619

NF. ENCLAN D......... 510 JI 71 I.' 7 736 3 10
Main ............... 125 3 1 160 1 8
N IlHamps .h ir ...... 3 -2 3 "
Vi rm,,n ............ 51 1 1 I -
M s, h3, lu I ....... I I 13 34 110l 164
Rh,.I, 1I1 ind ........ 103 6 39 52
L: nn tl I. ........ 87 12 16 721 503

MIDDLE ATLANTI( ...... 2,551 102 l1b6 742 q99 3 2 32
NeJt Y.rk I- ty. ...... 609 19 19 40 34
';cw Y..rk, ULp-,tate. .96 3 38 48 499 27 2 31
Ni, Jr-.y.......... 628 14 23 108 10 -
Penn-vlvania....... 818 1 31 56 15 69 1 -

EA T NORTH CENTRAL... 5,190 8 172 178 1,189 965 4 8 22 196
Ohi ................ 1.,0 2 .8 50 229 116 -I I 8 101
Indiana............ 51 2 30 22 138 132 1 9
Ill nois ........... 993 2 37 27 180 154 -5 9 48
Mithagin .......... 1,572 3 ; 57 373 329 I 1 3 15
W ist.c n- in.......... 632 1 15 22 269 234 1 1 23

W.EST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,621 5 66 64 272 255 3 21 44 518
Minneso. t i .......... 3 1 13 11 28 20 15 156
I.wa ................ 1,306 3 3 q0 91 1 I 12 179
Missour ........... 56 3 36 25 12 4 -2 13 7 93
North Dakota....... 222 1 5 I 104 129 2 23
South Dal.,I ta....... 4 11 3 4 45
!l braska ........... 34 4. 16 1 1 11
Kansas, ............. NN 5 4 26 8 6 3 11

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2.680 9 242 210 933 557 2 29 15 10 241
Delaware.......... 26 3 I 15 6
Maryland........... 81 1 18 29 187 43 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 7 7 10 -
Virginia.......... 1,112 1 27 51 152 212 3 157
West Virginia...... 670 1 18 11 216 126 1 13
North Carolina..... 21 2 42 32 13 19 8 2
Rtuih Carolina..... 301 3 39 12 76 25 3
G .,rgia ............ 18 II 2 I 8 4 39
Florida........ ... 55 1 70 59 264 124 1 11 1 30

EAFT SOUTH CENTRAL... 3.140 4 112 88 1,314 1,211 9 b1 13 246
Kentucky........... 323 2 39 20 180 157 I 1 3 35
Tennessee.......... 1479 38 39 1,067 1,017 ,- 11 10 201
Alabama............. 419 18 13 10 16 3 10
Mississippi........ 919 2 17 16 57 21 -1 1

WE T SnOlTH CErTRAL... 5.000 5 101 114 663 616 8 I 17 22 245
Arkansas............ 9 1 10 7 3 14 2 1 5 7 64
Louisiana.......... 5 2 79 48 3 3 3 25
Oki. ah-ms........... 34 3 22 30 25 11 3 32
T(e as.............. 4, 12 2 9 37 627 57 3 1 9 124

MOUNTAIN................ 1,007 3 2 39 1.935 1,291 1 6 I 55
Montana............ 124 2 57 24 -
Idaho .............. 54 I 3 84 133
Wviming............. 10 1 3 I 2 57 1 2
C ,lorado........... 221 1 9 11 1,023 373 -
New Mexico........ 19 18 2 399 346 1 25
Arizna............ 30 3 6 136 201 1 30
Utah............... II& l 2 11 234 156 I 3
N vada............. 35 6 3 I- -

PACIFIC.............. 3.523 6 224 171 1."06 1.438 7 14 76
Washington.......... 1.308 18 13 500 543
Orenon............. 491 1 16 9 41 19 -
California........ ... 1,696 5 177 139 814 703 7- 14 75
Alaska............. 5 6 5 19 78
Hawai ............. 23 7 5 32 95 -


Puertr- Rico 210 1- 19 & 9 38 9






Morbiditv and Mortality Weekly Report





T.habi (B) RFPOR1ID PNIt MONIA.INILUENZA DEATHS IN RI:P()R1N(, CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


155


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 1 II Area
./ll ilBa 4/25 5/2 4/11 4/18 4/25 5/2


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.............. 12 7 9 6
Bridgeport, Conn........... 5 4 4 2
Cambridge, Mass........... I
Fall River, Mass .......... I 2 7
Hartford, Conn............ 1 1 2
Lowell, Mass............... 1 -
Lynn, Mass................ 3
New Bedford, Mass ......... I I 1
New Haven, Conn.......... .. 2
Providence, R.I........... 3 2 3
Somerville, Mass........... 3 1 1
Springfield, Mass.......... 3 7 5
Waterbury, Conn............ -
Worcester, Mass............ 8 5 3 6

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y............... 3 1 2
Allentown, Pa............. I 2 1 4
Buffalo, N.Y............... 4 6 7 6
Camden, N.J............... 3 2 4
Elizabeth, N.J ............ I 1 1
Erie, Pa .................. 2 -
Jersey City, N.J.......... 5 3 6 1
Newark, N.J................ 6 4 5 3
New York City, 11.Y........ 71 54 66 56
Paterson, N.J............. 3 10 2 2
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 20 19 18 23
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 4 4 5 8
Reading, Pa............... 5 5 2
Rochester, N.Y ............ 12 10 13 12
Schenectady, I.Y.......... 2 3 I -
Scranton, Pa................. I 1
Syracuse, N.Y............. 2 1 3 1
Trenton, N.J.............. 4 3 1 1
Utica, N.Y................ 1 1 2
Yonkers, N.Y .............. 4 2 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio.............. .. I 1 -
Canton, Ohio............... 2 4 5 4
Chicago, Ill.............. 39 35 46 38
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... 4 8 2 3
Cleveland, Ohio............ 2 2 6
Columbus, Ohio............. 4 2 2 2
Dayton, Ohio.............. 4 2 2 1
Detroit, Mich.............. 16 17 19 5
Evansville, Ind........... 4 2 3 1
Flint, Mich............... 2 5 5
Fort Wa/ne, Ind........... 6 7 5 1
Gary, Ind................. 5 2 1
Grand Rapids, Mch ........ 5 3 3 5
Indianapolis, Ind......... 3 6 5 2
Madison, Wis.............. -
Milwaukee, Wis............ 3 5 2 2
Peoria, Ill............... -
Rockford, IIl............. 2 I 1
South Bend, Ind........... 3 3 3 3
Toledo, Ohio............... 6 4 2
Youngstown, Ohio........... 1 I

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.......... 4 3 5 -
Duluth, Minn .............. 1 I
Kansas City, Kans.......... 2 3 2 -
Kansas City, Mo............ 5 5 10 5
Lincoln, Nlebr............. 3 -
Minneapolis, Minn......... 8 5 4 1
Omaha, Nebr............... 4 2 4
St. Louis, Mo ..... .... 5 5 6 6
St. Paul, Minn............. 8 6 6 3
Wichita, Kans............ 9 7 5 8

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTF: All deals by place ol occurrece.


SOUTH ATIANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 2 5 2 4
Baltimore, Md............ 10 4 7 6*
Charlotte, N.C............ 2 1 2
Jacksonville, Fla........ 2 3 2 2
Miami, Fla............... I I
Norfolk, Va.............. 1 6 1 2
Richmond, Va............. 4 3 1
Savannah, Ga.............. 5 5 2 4
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 8 9 3 8
Tampa, Fla............... 7 7 7 10
Washington, D.C.......... 12 9 9 2
Wilmington, Del.......... 3 3 5 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 2 4 1 3
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 4 2 1 2
Knoxville, Tenn........... 4 1 2 2
Louisville, Ky........... 13 7 8 14
Memphis, Tenn............ 7 7 5 10
Mobile, Ala............... 1 1
Montgomery, Ala.......... 5 3 4 2
Nashville, Tenn........... 3 10 3 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 4 2 8 4
Baton Rouge, La.......... 1 1 1 1
Corpus Christi, Tex...... -
Dallas, Tex.............. 5 7 4 1
El Paso, Tex.............. 4 3 1
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 4 4 1 -
Houston, Tex.............. 3 1 11 6
Little Rock, Ark.......... 4 5 3 5
New Orleans, La.......... 8 5 3 6
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 3 4 2 2
San Antonio, Tex.......... 6 3 3 3
Shreveport, La........... 2 4 9 4
Tulsa, Okla.............. 5 2 1 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 3 4 1 1
Colorado Springs, Colo... 4 2 2 2
Denver, Colo............. 10 7 5 3
Ogden, Utah............... 2 4
Phoenix, Ariz............. 3 1 4 4
Pueblo, Colo.............. 3 2 1 2
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 2 1 1 -
Tucson, Ariz............. 2 1 3 1

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... -
Fresno, Calif............ 1 3 3
Glendale, Calif.......... 1 -
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 1 6 1 1
Long Beach, Calif........ 4 4 1 3
Los Angeles, Calif....... 30 25 29 16
Oakland, Calif........... 6 4 3 3
Pasadena, Calif.......... 1 -
Portland, Oreg............ 1 4 2
Sacramento, Calif........ 3 2 4 2
San Diego, Calif......... 4 7 2 1
San Francisco, Calif..... 8 13 3 1
San Jose, Calif.......... 8 14 10 6
Seattle, Wash............. 4 7 2 4
Spokane, Wash............. 2 2 1
Tacoma, Wash.............. 1 2 1 2

San Juan, P.R............... 2 2 (---)


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages...................
.(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages.......
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


11,460
424
741
6,316








156


Morbidity and Moria


INTERNATIONAL NOTES -QUARANTINE MEASURES

Irumneration Ifnlfouratin fr nlernaetiona I rat,.
1 "-64 ieditiro rIPJ'. HNealtl Service Publication No. -,4

The following information should be added to the
l-.t of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:

Page 72


City:


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08864 2 83
lily Weekly Report




In addirron tohe established procedures for reporting morbidity
and mortality, the Communicable Disease Center welcomes
accounts of Interesting outbreaks or cases. Such occountr should
be addressed to


Lawrence K. Alrman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanao, Georgia 30333


IHo.ron. Massachusetts


The Logan Internarional Airport
Medical Stati, n of the
Massachusetts c.neral Hlospital
Logan International Airport
Gate -2
Tel. LA 1-820u x 2641 and 26i12


Nores- Thse provlaJonal dao aor based on weekly telegram.s r Lhe Commaun
cable Dioseas Cenrer by rhe individual Slore heafr deparmenes.
Symbol: -. Doat noe avanloble
Ouantity rro
Procedures for construcion of various mortality Curves mir be abtalnad firm
Siolixics Section, Communicable Disease Conse. PuboIc Helth Service,
U. 5. D.parl-mwe of Health, Education. and Welfare. Atlanta, Gealre 30333.


Clinic Hours: Tuesday & raturda., ll:a.m. 12:00 a.m.


Yes


I T"sEPO TO1 --





_ US DEPOSITORY


The Morbdty and Mortaliy Weekly Report, with a circulation
of 11.000 Is published by the Communicoble Dsease Center,
Atlanta, Georg;a
Chef, Communicable Dsease Center Jaes L. Goddard. M D.
Chref. Epidemiology Branch A D. Longmuir, M.D
Chief, Sttistics Section R. E. Serlling. Ph.D.
Asst. Chief. Statistics Section I. L. Sherman, M.S.
Chief. Surveillance Section D A. Henderson. M.D.
Editor. MMWR L. K. Altman, M.D.


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