Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00406

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


For release April 10, 1964


I'lCOMUNCALE ISESEI CEN


ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISE
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDEd

INFLUENZA


The incidence of influenza has declined in the
Pacific Coast States during the past week. Pneumonia
and influenza deaths in 12 reporting cities in the Pacific
Coast geographic subdivision also declined for the second
consecutive week, although this figure remains above
the epidemic threshold.
In Oregon reported cases of influenza-like disease
declined last week for the second consecutive week. The
incidence of influenza-like disease in California appeared
to decrease last week as evidenced by the following
indices: reports of respiratory illness, school absen-
teeism, number of respirovirus specimens submrited for
diagnostic resting, and pneumonia-influenza deaths, all
of which declined from previous weekly totals.


I Please turn page,


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
14th Week Ended Cumulative. First 14 Weeks
Disease April 4, April 6, Median Median
1964 1963 1959 1963 1964 1963 1959 1963
Aseptic meningitis ................ 26 28 --- 369 311 ---
Brucellosis ...................... 10 10 13 100 87 148
Diphtheria ........................ 2 6 7 52 91 214
Encephalitis, primary infectious 42 --- 444 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious .... 25 35 --- 170 345 -
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................ 848 892 938 12,959 14,697 14,697
Measles ........................... 17,596 15,907 17,190 140,318 160,703 166,302
Meningococcal infections .......... 52 84 55 803 844 799
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. 2 9 18 40 112
Paralytic ...................... 2 9 13 35 69
Nonparalytic ................... --- 5 2 ---
Unspecified .................... --- 3-
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .................. 11,776 9,790 --- 151,091 139,570 -
Tetanus ........................... 6 3 --- 51 46 ---
Tularemia ........................ 3 3 --- 73 54 ---
Typhoid fever ..................... 8 14 13 89 93 128
Rabies in Animals ................. 110 99 93 1,141 956 1,112

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Ohio 1 2 Psittacosis: Ohio 1 12
Botulism: 6 Rabies in Man:
Leptospirosis: 6 Smallpox:
Malaria: Pa. L, Wis. 1 27 Typhus-
Plague: Iurine: 2
SRky Mt. Spotted: Va. 1 4


634-5131


OIIEMR


5 Z6(P0/9'0-610j,/1+-







Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS


ANTHRAX Ohio


I nl, case of .nthrax. fatal, was rcporred by Ohio for
the week ended April 4. This is the sLcond case reported
in the United sents the Itirr anthrax fatality in the 'nited States since
l"i'1, and the Irsi cutaneouA anthrax fatality since at
least 1" 2.

The patient was a ;6-)ear-old male who installed
pipe insulation. On the evening of March 2, he noted for
the first time a small, red, slightly raised, itchy, burn-
like area on the left side of his neck. lie considered the
lesion the result of an embedded piece of glass-wool
insulation, and disregarded its presence until the follow-
ing euning when the lesion became larger and somewhat
painful. On the morning of March 4 he consulted a physi-
cian who recorded a temperature of 99.20 and noted a
"luruncLl." surrounded by an eryrhemarous, swollen area
which extended onto the chest. The physician suspected
ibtrglass dermatitis with secondary infection. He at-
tempted unsuccessfully to culture the lesion after incision
with a scalpel. The doctor recommended local therapy
and s. %rtmic penicillin; the patient refused treatment.

1Th patient returned to work, but a co-worker ob-
served that he worked more slowly than usual. When the
atrienr returned home, he went to sleep instead of eating
dinner. Upon awakening, he complained of pain in his
neck. IIc consulted another physician, who described the
patient as acutely ill; his temperature was 102.2F. The
rh ;si ian described a reddish, vesicular area, with sur-
rounding induration. Doughy edema was noted, extending
down onto the left side of his chest, to the level of the
5th or 6th intercostal space. No exudate or swollen lymph
nodes were noted. Physical examination of the heart and
luns, was normal. The patient reluctantly agreed to enter
a hospital at 10:30 p.m.. March 4. After several blood
cultures were obtained, treatment was started with paren-
teral chloramphenicol. On the following morning, the
lesion was more erythematous and edematous; a consul-
tant considered a diagnosis of erysipelas and added
intravenous penicillin to the regimen.

By that afternoon, the edema has spread to the right
side of his chest and to his jaw. The basic lesion was


3 x 1.5 cm.; there was no discharge or eschar. At one
edge a small vesicle developed, followed within the next
12 hours by several additional vesicles. The attending
physicians had increasing difficulty maintaining his blood
pressure during the next 15 hours despite the use of
vasopressors, blood and steroids.

He convulsed and died on the morning of March 6,
4 days after clinical onset. Ar autopsy the only signifi-
cant finding was the previously noted local lesion and
edema. Pre-mortem blood cultures grew Bacrllus anthracis
after the patient's death.

Extensive epidemiological studies of possible home
and occupational exposures to infected material indicated
but a single suspect source, hair-felt material which he
used to insulate pipes. Ordinarily, the company used hair-
felt composed of "5 percent jure and 25 percent cattle
hair; substitute material, however, had been employed
recently which contained 50 percent imported raw goat
hair, the remainder being cattle hair.

The particular roll of hair-felt the patient had used
during the 7 days preceding his illness was located.
B. anthracis was isolated from 9 of 15 samples obtained
from both the original roll and from pipes he had covered
during this period. Four samples of raw imported goat
hair of the type used in the involved hair-felt were cul-
tured; B. antbracis was isolated from 2. Five cultures of
the usual hair-felt normally employed in the business
were negative for B. antbracis.

Although cases of anthrax have been reported from
other felt companies, this was the first known case among
employees of this particular concern.


(Reported by Harold Decker. M.D.. Chref. Communicable
Disease Dirn'slon, and Charles Croft, l.D., Chief, Drii-
sion of Laboratories, Ohio Slate Dept. of Health; T. A.
Cockburn, M.D., Asst. Conmmssroner. Cincinnati Board
of Health. J. Eduln Reed, M.D., Commissioner. Hamilton
County Health Department, Louis W'. Gaker, M.D., Com-
missioner, Rtller County Health Department, and the
Communicable Disease Center.)


118








119


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





TYPHOID FEVER Texas


An outbreak of 6 cases of typhoid fever due to
Salmonella typbi, Phage Type E, was traced to well
water apparently contaminated by a carrier.


The 6 patients were among 20 relatives who had
attended a family gathering near Raywood, Texas, for a
few hours July 4. Fifteen to 17 days later, 3 of the chil-
dren, 2 of the women, and one of the men attending this
gathering became ill with symptoms suggestive of typhoid
fever. Two of the patients lived in Louisiana, 2 in Hous-
ton, Texas, and 2 in Raywood, Texas. The Houston cases
were confirmed by blood and stool cultures, which demon-
strated S. typhi, Phage Type E; the remaining 4 cases
were clinically consistent with the diagnosis of typhoid
fever.


Although no food had been consumed at the reunion,
it was learned that the women and children had drunk
water from a private well. Only one man consumed water,
and he contracted typhoid fever.


The well was 16 ft. in depth, with a 1% inch pipe
imbedded in sand. The surrounding hole was much larger


than the pipe, thus easily allowing surface drainage to
enter.


Investigation of the suspected premises revealed
human feces strewn in the yard from slop jars used during
the night, and feces deposited behind trees and out-
buildings. Although an outside toilet was available, it
apparently was rarely used.


Of fecal specimens obtained from occupants of the
house, S. typhi, Phage Type E, was isolated from an
asymptomatic male member of the family. Cultures of the
well water revealed S. typhi E.

Texas health officials concluded that the male host,
an unsuspected typhoid carrier who had never been known
to have had the disease, had probably served to contami-
nate the well water.



(Reported by J. E. Peavy, M.D., Commissioner of Health,
and M. S. Dickerson, M.D., Epidemiologist, State of
Texas Department of Health.)


SUMMARY OF PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS

The weekly average number of pneumonia-influenza
deaths for the four-week period ending April 4 was 538
as compared with an expected weekly average of 541.


NUMBER
6000"
OF 9W.
DEAThS I
BOOw .


00~a ld


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

Week Ending
-Week Ending 4 Week Weekly
3/14 3/21 3/28 4/4 Total Average

Observed 572 554 475 550 2,151 538
Expected 552 545 537 528 2,162 541
Excess 20 9 -62 22 -11 -3


*a PACE occmveceC


CALCULATE S INC E IN 1I I
CInrlCUaITO nfOM nM r" IEi


(See Table, page 123)


PNEUMONIA -INFLUENZA DEATHS in 108 US. CITIES
Average Number per Week by Four-Week Priods









120 MIorlidit) and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPL(IFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 4, 1964 AND APRIL 6, l96? ( 14th WEEK)


Encephalit l
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Poliomyelitis. Total Cases Pol imyel Iis, Paralytic
Area
a Cumulative Cumulative
1964 1963 196. 1964 1964 1963 1964 1963 196. 1963 1964 1963
UNITED STATES... 26 28 42 25 2 18 40 2 13 35

NEW ENIAND............ 1 1 -
Maine .............. -
New Hampshire...... -- -
Vermont............ -
Massachuse ts...... -
Rhode Island....... -
Connecticut...... -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 3 6 2 4 5 4 5
New York City...... 2 2 I -
New York, Up-State. I 2 2 4 2 4
New Jersey......... 1 I 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 3 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 7 3 7 1 1 10 1 1 8
Ohio............... 5 2 1 3 1 2
Indiana............. -
Illinois ........... 2 5 1 5 1 4
Michigan........... 4 2 1 2 2
Wisconsin.......... -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 I 4 1 I
Minnesota........... I 1 -
Iowa............... -
Missouri ............ 1 -
North Dakota........ -
South Dakota........ -
Nebraska ........ ... -
Kansas ............. -

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 5 18 9 3 6 2
Delaware............ -
Maryland........... -
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia............ -
West Virginia...... .
North Carolina..... I 4 2 1 2
South Carolina..... I -
Georgia.............. 1 I 1 -
Florida............. 5 15 3 3 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 3 5 1 1 2 1
Kentucky........... 2 .. -
Tennessee .......... -
Alabama ............ 1 ----2 -
Mississippi........... 5 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 3 1 9 9
Arkansas........... -
Louisiana............... 1 8 8
Oklahoma............ .
Texas.............. 1 2 1 I 1

MOUNTAIN .............. 3 1 1 1
Montana............ .
Idaho...............- i 1
Wyoming ............ .
Colorado ........... 2 .- 1 1
New Mexico......... .
Arizona............ -
Utah ...... ....... .
Nevada............... -

PACIFIC... ........... 7 11 6 15 1 1 9 1 1 8
Washington......... I I 1 I
Oregon............. 1 I
California......... 6 10 5 15 1 1 7 1 1 6
Alaska....... ...... -
Hawaii............. -

Puerto Rico 2 2










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 121


Table 5. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES- UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL -I, 1964 AND APRIL 6, 1965 ( 14th WEEK) Continued


Infectious Hepatitis
Brucellosis Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitis Typhoid Fever

Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.

1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 10 100 2 52 848 422 355 71 12,959 14,697 8 89

NEW ENGLAND......... 1 1 2 3 66 29 32 5 1,447 1,812 1 7
Maine............... I 18 9 6 3 511 842 -
New Hampshire...... 3 2 1 121 119 -
Vermont............ 5 3 1 1 176 26
Massachusetts ...... I I 2 21 13 7 1 284 541 1 4
Rhode Island....... 3 3 63 44 3
Connecticut........ 16 2 14 292 240

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 2 4 185 75 110 2,896 2,883 5 16
New York City...... 1 13 3 10 395 332 3 5
New York, Up-Stare. I 83 43 40 1,315 1,319 3
New Jersey......... 2 48 10 38 518 451
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 41 19 22 668 781 2 8

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... I 14 6 133 69 51 13 1,927 2,306 I 19
Ohio.............. 37 16 16 5 519 693 14
Indiana............ 1 11 9 2 154 204 2
Illinois........... 10 6 21 8 13 302 481 1 3
Michigan............ 1 1 45 28 17 838 800
Wisconsin.......... 2 19 8 3 8 114 128

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 4 53 8 38 22 6 10 776 634 9
Minnesota.......... 2 1 4 2 2 56 110 -
Iowa............... 1 26 5 1 3 1 113 108 3
Missouri........... 4 8 6 I 1 194 263 2
North Dakota....... 1 3 3 35 14 -
South Dakota....... 1 9 81 15 I
Nebraska........... 2 10 18 52 -
Kansas............. I 7 18 12 6 279 72 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 6 11 95 53 39 3 1,271 1,584 18
Delaware........... 5 2 3 29 24
Maryland........... 20 16 4 240 173
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 26 57 -
Virginia........... 2 15 6 7 2 188 355 4
West Virginia...... 14 10 4 227 236
North Carolina..... 21 11 10 233 426 9
South Carolina..... 3 3 2 1 40 69 1
Georgia............. 2 6 3 1 2 29 53 -
Florida............ 2 13 5 7 1 259 191 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 4 4 86 54 27 5 908 1,511 10
Kentucky............ 38 27 7 4 402 462 5
Tennessee.......... 1 27 18 8 1 309 577 4
Alabama............. 1 3 2 12 4 8 125 235 1
Mississippi........ I 1 9 5 4 72 237

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 10 56 32 22 2 918 980 1 6
Arkansas............ 3 3 109 119 1 3
Louisiana.......... 1 2 18 13 3 2 182 169
Oklahoma............ 1 5 3 2 56 56 3
Texas............. 1 8 30 13 17 571 636

MOUNTAIN.............. 3 10 I 55 23 3 29 865 1,049
Montana............ 4 2 1 1 77 164 -
Idaho.............. 4 4 66 160 -
Wyoming............. ---- 32 14
Colorado........... 20 14 2 4 256 227
New Mexico........ 1 1 6 4 2 141 126
Arizona............ 1 16 16 189 230
Utah................ 2 7 3 3 78 119
Nevada............. I I 2 2 26 9

PACIFIC.............. 6 5 134 65 65 4 1,951 1,938 4
Washington......... 5 14 5 7 2 202 315
Oregon............. 1 13 2 10 1 202 291 -
California......... 5 102 56 46 1,441 1,281 4
Alaska............. 4 2 1 1 61 42
Hawaii ............. 1 1 45 9 -

Puerto Rico 3 25 17 8 169 182 5









122 11l rbidily and Mortalilt W'cekilk K nort


Table 3. CASES OF SP('IFIEI) NOTIFIABLI Di)lASFN I NII I) STATI%

I)OR W','IFK- NDID

APRIL 4. 1964 AND APRIL 6, 1963 ( 14th WIl ) Continued


Nt rept ,i ot 1,i]
Mrning.~~~" cal Sore Throat and Rabies in
Measles Meningitis Scarlet Fever Tetanus Tularemia Animals
Arei--- -----_--------- ----------- _________-- _________ -- -----------
Cumul It ive (.um. uIam. Cum.
146L 196& 196. ]b3 164 1963 1964 Iq6- I16 196h 19h4 1964

UNITED STATES... 17,596 52 803 844 11,776 9,790 6 51 3 73 110 1,141

NEW ENGLAND........ 537 1 26 57 1,281 1,061 1 3
Maine............. 80 2 10 90 86 -- 1 1
New Hampshire...... 15 2 9 8 -- 1
Vermont............. 126 1 1 2 19 4 1
Massachusetts...... 107 13 23 171 181 -
Rhode Island....... 55 2 6 188 68 -
Connecticut........ 154 8 14 804 714 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 2,21 4 76 109 602 749 1 2 22
New York City...... 807 2 12 13 40 57 -
New York, Up-State. 504 1 29 37 345 488 2 21
New Jersey......... 407 14 18 65 131 -
Pennsylvni ......... 494 1 21 41 152 73 1 I

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5,014 12 136 143 2,062 1,419 5 1 8 18 115
Ohio................ 855 2 42 42 389 283 1 1 11 59
Indiana............ 1,313 5 24 17 236 194 1 7
Illin is ........... 684 1 28 24 232 205 I 5 4 19
MH thilg n...... ..... 1,365 31 41 846 372 1 1 1 12
W cr.rnsLn...... .... 797 II 19 359 365 1 2 18

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 883 3 40 "8 401 292 2 21 32 358
MinnEsta ........... 8 10 26 22 1 9 104
Inwa ............... 615 2 2 152 46 1 14 126
Mi ss uri ........... 29 I 18 21 48 11 2 13 5 71
North Dakota....... 197 3 1 157 123 I 17
',.uth Dak ta ....... 3 2 14 3 27
N. braska ........... 33 2 10 6 1 8
KInsa s. ......... NN I 10 75 6 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2,235 I1 180 178 1,062 1,010 3 20 I 13 10 190
Delaware .......... 10 2 1 10 11 -
Maryland ........... 177 I 14 26 142 66 -
Disl. of Columbia.. 17 5 3 10 3 -
Virginia............ 702 2 16 46 277 249 1 3 7 137
West Virginia...... 379 1 14 9 205 183 1 8
North Carolina..... 92 I 31 27 25 30 7 3 2
South Carolina..... 254 4 23 11 165 2L. I 3 -
Gcnrgia............ 7 15 10 5 I 1 I 7 I 19
Florida............ 597 2 60 45 223 444 1 7 I 24

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2,977 6 76 71 2,041 1,346 1 7 16 20 183
Kentucky............ 1,585 1 19 17 310 126 1 2 25
Tenne ssee .......... 1,147 2 30 31 1,635 1,071 3 11 16 152
Alabama ............ 77 3 16 11 21 47 3 3 2 6
Mississippi........ 168 11 12 75 102 1 1 -

LEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 247 7 69 99 1,162 845 1 8 1 11 22 185
Arkansas ........... 99 2 6 5 12 1 2 1 3 43
Loui siana.......... 7 5 60 45 32 3 3 1 20
Oklahoma........... 141 3 17 58 I 10 6 20
Texa ............... 32 1,060 842 3 12 102

MOUNTAIN ............. 963 34 27 1,768 1,457 2 4 1 45
Montana............ 132 I 62 63 1
Idaho...... ...... .. 97 1 58 150 -
Wyoming............ 24 I I 12 72 1 I
Colorado............ 252 7 6 985 444 -
New Mexico......... 9 16 2 307 324 I 1 24
Arizona............. 407 2 5 210 293 21
Utah............... 37 1 10 13u 111 2 -
Nevada............. 5 6 2 -

PACIFIC................. 2,528 8 166 112 1,397 1,611 1 6 4 40
Washington......... 1,067 I 15 11 547 507 -
Oregon.............. 324 2 9 5 38 25 -
California ......... 1,111 5 133 91 731 754 1 6 4 40
Alaska ............. 3 5 4 17 45 -
Hawaii ............. 23 4 1I 64 280 -

Puerto Rico 321 8 9 6 3 19 2 5










123


Morbidity and Moriality Weekly RIeporl





Ta.hli (B) RIPHOR DI PNII MO(NIA.INFLIEN/A DFA1HS IN REPORTING CIT11S



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 31 Area

3/14 3/12 3/28 4/4 3/14 3/21 3/28 4/4


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.............. 6 10 6 13
Bridgeport, Conn.......... 3 3 6 4*
Cambridge, Mass............ 2 2 -
Fall River, Mass........... 2 1 2
Hartford, Conn............. 2 1 -
Lowell, Mass.............. 1 2 2
Lynn, Mass................. -
New Bedford, Mass......... I
New Haven, Conn........... 1 2 2
Providence, R.1 ........... 4 3
Somerville, Mass.......... -
Springfield, Mass......... 5 8 4 6
Waterbury, Conn............ -
Worcester, Mass........... 11 6 7 6

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................ 2 1
Allentown, Pa............. 1 2 1 2
Buffalo, N.Y ............. 11 7 3 7
Camden, N.J.............. 4 4 4
Elizabeth, N.J........... I I 1
Erie, Pa.................. 2 5 3 4
Jersey City, N.J.......... 4 6 3 5
Newark, N.J............... 3 5 6 7
New York City, N.Y........ 67 69 54 73
Paterson, N.J............. 5 3 1 9
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 20 14 7 17
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 2 3 6 8
Reading, Pa............... 3 3 2 5
Rochester, N.Y............. 14 13 14 8
Schenectady, N.Y.......... 1 4 3 3
Scranton, Pa.............. 1 1 2 2
Syracuse, N.Y............. 4 1 1 2
Trenton, N.J.............. 5 7 3 4
Utica, N.Y................ 2 1 1 1
Yonkers, N.Y.............. I 3 4

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio............... -
Canton, Ohio............... I 6 2 3
Chicago, Ill.............. 34 38 30 45
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... 6 3 5 3
Cleveland, Ohio............... 3 2 6 2
Columbus, Ohio............. 2 3 2 1
Dayton, Ohio............... 2 3 3
Detroit, Mich.............. 18 13 15 23
Evansville, Ind .......... 1 1 3 3
Flint, Mich............... 5 5 4 3
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 3 1 2
Gary, Ind................. I 2 1 3*
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 5 2 3 2
Indianapolis, Ind......... 6 3 3 4
Madison, Wis............... -
Milwaukee, Wis............ 6 3 1 4
Peoria, Ill............... 1 2 -
Rockford, Ill............. 2 4 1 3
South Bend, Ind........... 3 3 2
Toledo, Ohio.............. 9 8 3 2
Youngstown, Ohio........... 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa........... 5 6 1 2
Duluth, Minn. ............. 1 1 -
Kansas City, Kans......... 2 5 1 3*
Kansas City, Mo........... 2 6 4 3
Lincoln, Nebr............. I 1 1 2
Minneapolis, Minn......... 2 4 8 3
Omaha, Nebr................ 4 4 3 2
St. Louis, Mo.............. 10 15 13 6
St. Paul, Minn............. 1 2 4 4
Wichita, Kana.. .......... 2 8 3 4

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTF: All deaths bV place occurrence.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga..............
Baltimore, lMd............
Charlotte, N.C...........
Jacksonville, Fla........
Miami, Fla...............
Norfolk, Va..............
Richmond, Va.............
Savannah, Ga..............
St. Petersburg, Fla......
Tampa, Fla...............
Washington, D.C..........
Wilmington, Del..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala...........
Chattanooga, Tenn........
Knoxville, Tenn..........
Louisville, Ky............
Memphis, Tenn............
Mobile, Ala..............
Montgomery, Ala..........
Nashville, Tenn...........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex...............
Bacon Rouge, La..........
Corpus Christi, Tex......
Dallas, Tex..............
El Paso, Tex.............
Fort Worth, Tex..........
Houston, Tex.............
Little Rock, Ark..........
New Orleans, La...........
Oklahoma City, Okla......
San Antonio, Tex.........
Shreveport, La............
Tulsa, Okla...............

MOUNLTAIII:
Albuquerque, N. Mex......
Colorado Springs, Colo...
Denver, Colo.............
Ogden, Utah..............
Phoenix, Ariz............
Pueblo, Cola.............
Salt Lake City, Utah.....
Tic ison, Ariz ..............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif..........
Fresno, Calif............
Glendale, Calif..........
Honolulu, Hawaii .......
Long Beach, Calif .......
Los Angeles, Calif.......
Oakland, Calif...........
Pasadena, Calif..........
Portland, Oreg...........
Sacramento, Calif........
San Diego, Calif.........
San Francisco, Calif.....
San Jose, Calif ..........
Seattle, Wash...........
Spokane, Wash...........
Tacoma, Wash.............

San Juan, P.R..............


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(---)


'Current Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 12,305
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 550
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 739
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,971




illIiVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 111111111111111111111 III Ii262 08
3 1262 08864 3035


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

YELLOW FEVER Ethiopia

Ethiopia officially declared itself free of yellow
fever, March 10. This is the first time Ethiopia has de-
clared itself free of this disease since the International
Sanitary Regulations were adopted by the Fourth World
Health Assembly in 1951.
(Reported by Division of Foreign Quarantine, U.S. Public
Health Service, Washington. D. C.).

Immunization Information for International Travel
1963-64 Edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384

The following information should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


PAGE 73


CITY:


CENTER:


Traverse City, Michigan


Thirlby Clinic
116 Cass Street
Tel: 946-8850


In addition to the established procedures for reporting morbidity
and mortality, the Communicable Disease Center welcomes
accounts of interesting outbreaks or cases. Such accounts should
be addressed to:

Lawrence K. Airman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanta, Georgia 30333



Notes- These provisional data are based on weekly telegrams to the Communi-
cable Disease Center by the individual State health departments.
Symbols: Date not available
SQuantity zero
Procedures for construction of varous mortality curves may be obtained from
Statlstics Section. Communicable Disease Center. Public Health Servic,
U. S. Department of Health. Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.


UIIV r FL LIB
DOC M .NT E PT





u z DEPOSITORY


CLINIC HOURS: By appointment only


FEE:


ERRATUM

The case of chloroquine resistant Plasmodium fal-
ciparum malaria reported in MMWR, Vol. 13, page 70, on
the basis of available evidence, should not be considered
resistant. Gametocytes may persist for as long as one
month after completion of chloroquine therapy. Definitive
proof that a strain of malaria is resistant requires the
demonstration that asexual parasites persist despite the
completion of several courses of therapy with the parti-
cular drug in question. Further studies of the causative
strain in this case would this be required.
(Based on personal communication from Geoffrey fe//er).
Sc.D., Assistant Chief, Laboratory of Parasite Chemo-
therapy, N.IAID. .NIH, Dr. Francois Dresse, WHO-PAHO.
San Salzador, El Salvador, and Howard B. Shookboff. M.D.,
Chief, Division of Tropical Diseases, New York City
Department of Hcalth.)


The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, with a circulation
of 10,800 is published by the Communicable Disease Center,
Atlanta, Georgia.
Chief, Communicable Disease Center James L. Goddard, M.D.
Chief, Epidemiology Branch A. D. Longmuir, M.D.
Chief, Statistics Section R. E. Serfling, Ph.D.
Asst. Chief, Statistics Section I. L. Sherman, M.S.
Chief, Surveillance Section D. A. Henderson, M.D.
Editor, MMWR L. K. Altman, M.D.


124


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