Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00401

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

FC ~'


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER






da 41J
y ^rd ** *


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,


Vol. 14, No. 38


E



Week Ending
September 25, 1965


WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


PLAGUE
OCT I
Shasta County, California O

Another case of human plague, the sixth the ted
States this year, has been reported from Cali a. e
patient is a 5-year-old boy who on September 13 tra
with his mother from their home in Viola, Shasta County,
on the borders of the Lassen Volcanic National Park,
to visit in Santa Rosa. The following day in Santa Rosa
the boy first complained of being unwell. By September
16, the boy was suffering from a high fever and general
prostration and was taken to see a physician in Santa
Rosa. The physician made a diagnosis of septicaemia and
arranged for hospitalization.


S'(s\ 7\ Trs
Ia Shasta County, California .
ir ti. I- Summary
Snelle July 1965 ......... ....
i jdr Ilogl Notes and Reports
., cM MNningili, Chattanooga, Tenn.
national Notes Quarantine Measures ..
rratum . . . .


. 25
...... .. 327
. 327
. 332
.... .. 332


A white blood count of 45,000 was noted on admission
to the Santa Rosa Hospital where blood and bone marrow
specimens also were obtained for examination and sent to
the Berkeley State Laboratory. There were no pulmonary
symptoms and a chest X-ray was normal. A course of
penicillin was started but there was little improvement
over the next few days.
(Continued on back page)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
38th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 38 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE SEPTEMBER 25, SEPTEMBER 19, 1960-1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 1960-1964
Aseptic meningitiss .......... 75 72 107 1,413 1,403 1,741
Brucellosis ........... ..* 9 11 11 192 316 316
Diphtheria ..... ........... 2 3 12 112 184 290
Encephalitis, primary infectious 74 114 --- 1,296 2,284 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious -* 7 6 --- 546 689 ---
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 671 676 898 24,798 28,355 31,872
Measles .. ................. 624 554 733 240,628 462,304 396,521
Meningococcal infections ** 35 34 31 2.351 2,078 1,630
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 2 5 29 44 81 565
Paralytic .. ............... 2 4 23 35 67 439
Nonparalytic ........ ..... --- 7 9 ---
Unspecified **.......* .. --- 1 2 5
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .............* 4,691 4,525 4,004 293,515 299,858 242.932
Tetanus ***............* 4 6 --- 196 206 -
Tularemia ...............* 3 6 --- 190 246 -
Typhoid fever ............ 5 12 19 303 303 447
Rabies in Animals .... **' ***85 61 61 3,325 3,420 2,840

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ....... .. ................ .......... 7 Rabies in Man: ............................. 1
Botulism: ................................ 11 Smallpox: ............................. .
Leptospirosis: Ohio-1, Ga.-1 .................... 33 Trichinosis: .............................. 77
Malaria: Conn.-I, Fla.-1 ...................... 61 Typhus-
Plague: Calif.- 1....... ..................... 6 Murine: .............................. 22
Psittacosis: Md.-1 ............................ 35 Rky. Mt. Spotted: N.C.-1, W.Va.-1, Tenn.-l ........ 227
Cholera: ..................................... 2







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SEPTEMBER 24, 1965


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SALMONELLA July 1965


DuringJuly there were 1,800 recoveries of Salmonellae
from human sources and 769 isolations from non-human
sources; the comparative figures for June were 2,174 and
315 respectively. The large increase in the non-human
total is due partly to delayed reports for June and part,
to the addition of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
as a reporting center.
Among the human salmonella isolations there were 65
different serotypes, seen of which accounted for 66
percent of the 1,800 violations reported. The commonest
serotype was S. typhi-murium and S. typhi-mur;um var.
copenhagen. These findings are consistent with previous
experience as are the age and sex distribution of persons
harboring salmonella. Of special interest are that o\er'60
percent of the individuals affected were less than 20
years of age, that there is a predominance of males in the
groups less than 20 years of age and that there is a greater
number of females in the groups of 20 years and more.
A broadly3 similar distribution of serotypes is also
noted among the non-human isolates, and seven of the


more commonly encountered serotypes accounted for 53
percent of the total. Again S. typhi-murium and S. typhi-
marium ear. copenhagen constituted the commonest single
serot pe.
Several rare serotypes were reported during the month.
Salmonella gatow. reported in 1963 from a human source in
Louisiana,. was recovered from a turtle in Pennsylvania.
S. manila was recovered from fish meal in Indiana whereas
pre ious recoveies of this serotype since 1963 have been
from feed or fertilizer in Tennessee and Texas and from
'domestic fowl'ifMissourn. A single isolate of S. manila
was also 90tained from a man in North Carolina during
1964. S. mission isolated from meal scraps in Mississippi
ha. been reported previous. from swine, chicken and
buffdlo. Two human isolates of S. mission were reported
from' lorida. S. drypool, reported for the first time in the
U.S., was recovered from a cow in Florida.
Figure 1 shows the reported human isolations in the
U.S. since 1963.
(Reported by the Salmonella Surveillance Unit, CDC.)


Figure /

REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA
IN THE UNITED STATES


326


650-

600-

550-

500-

450-

400-

350-

300-

250-

200-

150-

100-


.650

-600

-550

-500

-450

-400

350

-300

-250

-200

-150

-100

-50

-0


JJFMAMM J JA SON DJ FMA MJ J A SO ND J F MAM J J ASOND
S1963 1964 1965


..


. . 1


%fV0


I '


Illllllllll


I I







SEIPTiFMBER 24, 1965


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS

ASEPTIC MENINGITIS Chattanooga, Tennessee


Bi "trin the middle of June and the middle of Aii'u -.
h5, cases of aseptic niininiii li due to F. III viruss tLpe-
9 were reported in Hamilton CijIII.. Tennessee. Infor-
mation obtained through telephone surveys of medical
facilities -er\ nL' the -'Ai.619 people of the (1i.iii I "''li..
metropolitan area revealed that the ii..,itrity of patients
were in the 1 to 9 age group and none were older than 19
years.
ln e-tiation-. indicated a .,nim'.-wide distribution
of cases with major concentration in an area within a
one-mile radius ilrnil.tlnii a l.iriev low-rental housing
projej t. This area corresponds with census tract No. 3
which has a population of 3,l.12 persons, of whom 412
are children under 5 years of age. \ithin the census
tract the attack rate was 1.4 percent; outside this area
the rate was Ii.1:i percent. Age specific attack rates in
both areas are shown in Table 1. There were 66 cases in
males and 19 in females, a male predominance of 3.5 to
1; Figure 2 shows the distribution of cases by sex and
by week of onset.
The major clinical features, fever, omiting. headache
and stiff neck, were generally consistent with those of
previously described outbreaks due to ECHO virus type-9.
There was a low incidence of rash of about 7 percent and
neurological complications were few. Two of the patients
in the series with such complications developed con-
vulsions, and one of then, a 3-year-old girl, died; neither
of these two patipnLs were laboratory confirmed cases of
ECHO type-9 infection.
To date, ECHO virus type-9 has been recovered in
the State Laboratories from specimens from 35 patients;


1L0111, I
ASEPTI( MkI-:ItiI'I- -I ( II \TTANOOGA, TEN .---I.I,
\~e 'Specific Attack Rate (Percent)


lHo -ing)
Proj,., I
Area
(C.T. 3)*


Rest, of
City
(Excluding
C.T. 3)


Total


<1 3.2 0.20 .
1- 4 3.3 0.05 0.10
5- 9 1.0 0.08 0.10
10-14 0.2 0.02 0.02
15-19 0.4 0.01 0.02
20+ 0.0 0.00 0.00
0-19 1.4 0.05 0.07

*C.T. 3 = Census Tract No. 3.

isolations have been made from cerebrospinal fluid,
throat washings, and stool cultures. Further laboratory
studies are proceeding.

(Reported by Dr. M.M. Young, Director, Chattanooga-
Hamilton County Health Department; Dr. Cecil Tucker,
Director of the Division of Preventable Diseases; Dr.
George M. Cameron, Director of Laboratories, Tennessee
Department of Health; and Dr. Hossein Massoud, Director
of Medical Education, Children's Hospital, Chattanooga,
Tennessee; and an EIS Officer.)



Figure 2


REPORTED CASES OF ASEPTIC MENINGITIS
CHATTANOOGA, TENN.-- SUMMER, 1965


/


/


- 1 1//
i///


1 I I
12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31
JUNE JULY


MALE

I FEMALE


/


7 14 21
AUGUST


327








328 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 25, 1965 AND SEPTEMBER 19, 1964 (38th WEEK)


Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 75 72 74 7 2 44 81 2 35 67 2 112

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 4 2 2 2 2
Maine............. 1 1 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 2 1 2
Rhode Island...... 1 -
Connecticut ....... 1 2 1 I -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 4 8 16 1 4 12 1 3 11 5
New York City...... 2 6 1 1 1 3
New York, Up-State. 1 6 9 8 -
New Jersey......... 2 4 1 3 2 1 3 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 6 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 13 11 19 1 3 18 1 2 15 4
Ohio................ 5 2 13 2 2 1
Indiana............ 6 5 2
Illinois........... 4 6 5 2 5 1 5 -
Michigan............ 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 2 1 2 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 10 5 13 10 7 7 6 18
Minnesota.......... 8 2 1 1 2 1 2 7
Iowa................ 1 4 2 1
Missouri............ 2 1 3 2 I
North Dakota....... 2 9 1 I -
South Dakota....... 7
Nebraska........... 3 3 1
Kansas............. 3 1 1 1 1 I

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 5 5 2 1 21 1 16 29
Delaware........... -
Maryland........... 1 2 1 1 1 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3
Virginia........... -
West Virginia...... 1 i 1 -
North Carolina..... 10 6 2
South Carolina..... 1 1 1 1
Georgia............ .- 1 14
Florida........... 3 1 1 8 7 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 7 13 1 6 1 5 17
Kentucky.......... 3 10 -
Tennessee.......... 1 1 1 3 1 2 -
Alabama............ 2 2 2 2 15
Mississippi ......1 1 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 7 2 1 16 6 14 6 1 28
Arkansas ........... i i 2
Louisiana.......... .- 1 1 1 6
Oklahoma............ 1 2 1 2
Texas.............. 6 2 14 4 12 4 20

MOUNTAIN ............. 3 14 5 6 3 3
Montana............ -
Idaho.............. -
Wyoming............. 2 -- 2 -
Colorado............ .- 12 1 -
New Mexico......... I 1 3 -
Arizona.............. 2 4 2 -
Utah................ 1 -
Nevada............... .

PACIFIC.............. 24 24 9 5 4 3 4 3 1 9
Washington......... 3 1 2 2 1 3
Oregon............. 3 1 1 1 1 1
California......... 21 23 6 5 1 2 1 2 5
Alaska............... -
Hawaii............... ..

Puerto Rico 10








Morbidilt and Mortalily Weekly Report 329


CASES 01 .PF( II11) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
,I PI tMNH R 25, 1965 ANI) NIPI IMB N R I. 1964 ( tch Il k) Continucd


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningococcal
losis including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 9 671 320 301 24,798 28,355 35 2,351 2,078 4 196

NEW ENGLAND........... 40 19 21 1,468 2,636 3 120 57 5
Maine.............. 3 2 1 263 838 16 5
New Hampshirt...... 6 4 2 149 208 7 1 1
Vermont............. 4 2 2 80 331 1 7 2 -
Massachusetts...... 18 5 13 581 570 1 40 23 3
Rhode Island....... 3 3 167 143 14 9 -
Connecticut ........ 6 3 3 228 546 1 36 17 I

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ..... 131 60 71 4,399 6,288 3 306 264 12
New York City...... 27 8 19 880 974 2 53 35 -
New York, Up-State. 33 21 12 1,654 2,754 87 74 4
New Jersey......... 37 13 24 845 1,085 1 80 91 1
Pennsylvania....... 34 18 16 1,020 1,475 86 64 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 148 79 62 4,754 4,462 5 332 283 1 28
Ohio............... 41 19 20 1,305 1,182 1 89 74 2
Indiana............ 6 2 3 415 388 42 42 7
Illinois........... 2 23 9 13 901 813 2 92 72 1 13
Michigan.......... 50 30 20 1,829 1,764 2 72 65 3
Wisconsin.......... 1 28 19 6 304 315 37 30 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 22 7 14 1,447 1,529 3 122 122 17
Minnesota .......... 3 2 146 169 2 26 29 7
Iowa............... 2 4 1 3 514 228 1 9 6 4
Missouri........... 3 1 2 308 380 52 56 2
North Dakota....... 27 57 11 16 -
South Dakota....... 1 1 1 18 116 3 1 -
Nebraska........... 3 3 63 42 10 6 2
Kansas............. 8 4 4 371 537 11 8 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC ...... 51 21 27 2,566 2,665 4 452 407 2 45
Delaware........... 4 4 64 52 7 6 -
Maryland........... 4 3 1 446 503 1 44 27 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 38 47 9 13 -
Virginia........... 21 8 10 603 415 54 46 7
West Virginia ..... 2 1 1 372 394 24 32 1
North Carolina..... 2 2 242 453 1 91 69 6
South Carolina..... 5 2 3 119 97 1 59 50 6
Georgia............ .- 93 75 57 62 4
Florida............ 13 7 6 589 629 1 107 102 2 20

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 66 33 17 1,797 1,968 4 185 170 24
Kentucky........... 35 17 2 640 735 2 71 56 6
Tennessee.......... 15 7 8 603 680 2 60 55 7
Alabama............ 12 7 5 325 358 34 35 9
Mississippi ....... 4 2 2 229 195 20 24 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 72 43 23 2,168 2,197 307 239 1 44
Arkansas........... 4 3 1 284 213 15 21 10
Louisiana.......... 1 5 2 3 350 518 170 118 5
Oklahoma........... 48 108 19 9 1
Texas.............. 63 38 19 1,486 1,358 103 91 1 28

MOUNTAIN............. 2 42 15 10 1,400 1,705 1 73 70 3
Montana ........... 2 1 105 150 2 -
Idaho.............. 1 178 229 8 3 -
Wyvming .......... 1 1 39 53 5 5 -
Colorado ........... 6 4 2 301 454 14 12 2
New Mexico......... 20 9 8 299 248 11 28 -
Arizona............ 2 12 295 380 16 6 1
Utah................ 175 141 14 7 -
Nevada............. .. 8 50 1 3 9 -

PACIFIC.............. 99 43 56 4,799 4,905 12 454 466 18
Washington......... 2 2 376 518 33 30 -
Oregon............. 7 3 4 404 533 1 33 21 4
California.......... 87 38 49 3,797 3,582 11 363 396 14
Alaska.............. 2 2 183 174 18 7 -
Hawaii............. 1 1 39 98 7 12 -

Puerto Rico 52 46 6 1,083 744 5 31 2 41








330 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
SEPTEMBER 25, 1965 AND SEPTEMBER 19, 1964 (38th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 624 240,628 462,304 .4,691 3 190 5 303 85 3,325

NEW ENGLAND.......... 19 36,817 16,959 301 1 4 1 39
Maine.............. 4 2,796 3,013 18 4
New Hampshire...... 381 251 10 I
Vermont............ 1,257 2,329 6 1 31
Massachusetts...... 14 19,295 5,314 54 1 3 2
Rhode Island....... 3,938 1,932 21 1 -
Connecticut........ 1 9,150 4,120 192 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 49 14,796 52,171 176 2 53 3 132
New York City...... 21 2,399 15,335 6 1 26 -
New York, Up-State. 10 4,135 12,704 119 13 2 119
New Jersey......... 9 2,574 12,208 43 1 7 -
Pennsylvania....... 9 5,688 11,924 8 7 1 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 147 55,802 102,870 384 13 38 7 503
Ohio............... 16 8,883 19,623 12 9 257
Indiana............ 10 1,838 22,751 174 5 8 3 59
Illinois........... 41 2,742 16,622 72 5 10 1 80
Michigan............... 32 26,473 28,923 81 2 6 1 51
Wisconsin.......... 48 15,866 14,951 45 1 5 2 56

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 70 16,527 30,251 250 23 10 12 677
Minnesota........... 38 674 333 2 1 2 137
Iowa................... 14 8,997 23,318 48 2 1 192
Missouri........... 2,588 1,019 7 18 7 3 94
North Dakota....... 17 3,702 4,741 134 42
South Dakota ....... 115 28 4 2 3 51
Nebraska........... 1 451 812 1 35
Kansas............. NN NN NN 55 2 3 126

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 38 24,731 38,317 747 1 31 63 9 454
Delaware........... 503 410 11 4 -
Maryland............ 1 1,161 3,403 92 18 22
Dist. of Columbia.. 771 354 3 -
Virginia........... 14 3,865 12,707 140 1 8 8 2 280
West Virginia...... 17 13,715 8,637 258 3 21
North Carolina..... 1 390 1,161 16 6 15 3
South Carolina..... 1 1,017 4,253 115 3 8 2
Georgia............ 617 195 2 14 3 3 57
Florida........... 4 3,386 7,197 110 4 4 69

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 14q 13,911 67,709 967 20 1 31 30 724
Kentucky........... 93 2,574 18,452 97 3 9 2 74
Tennessee.......... 43 7,896 24,207 769 16 10 4 597
Alabama............ 3 2,325 18,363 51 1 1 7 1 16
Mississippi........ 1 1,116 6,687 50 5 23 37

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 68 30,886 72,072 392 2 78 42 17 532
Arkansas........... 1,084 1,124 3 1 52 13 2 79
Louisiana.......... 1 106 105 1 1 5 6 69
Oklahoma........... ... 203 1,018 2 10 6 6 112
Texas.............. 67 29,493 69,825 386 11 17 9 272

MOUNTAIN ............. 29 19,717 18,624 788 15 1 25 1 73
Montana............ 10 3,724 3,049 16 4 1 5
Idaho............... 4 2,787 1,931 64 -
Wyoming............ 845 261 3 1 -
Colorado............ 7 5,634 3,230 341 9
New Mexico.......... 677 452 186 9 14
Arizona............ 6 1,315 6,647 57 1 12 1 43
Utah................ 2 4,531 2,064 124 8 I
Nevada............. 204 990 2 1

PACIFIC.............. 64 27,441 63,331 686 9 1 37 5 191
Washington.......... 16 7,238 20,013 105 4 7
Oregon.............. 5 3,236 8.644 12 5 1 6 1 7
California.......... 28 12,970 33,028 450 4 26 4 175
Alaska............. 3 185 1,102 16 2
Hawaii............. 12 3.812 544 103 1 -

Puerto Rico 19 2,407 6,149 10 1 8 13









331


Morbidity and Mortality NWeekly R'In-rI






Week No. Table 4. MDATHS IN 122 INITtD STATES ( ITIES FOR W l'K INI)DD sl I I I MHIi R 25, 1965


(Bs place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Hass.--------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


S 4 4 44 4~


All I L.'I%**


Al I
Ages


6ad arer
and over


Piinum.n a
and
Influenza
All Ages


L'nd r
I year
All
Causes


Ared


All I .auh..e*

AllI 6i vars
Ages and over


Pf.n unm.lI n l ll-id r


.indl
Inl lurnza
All Ages


C t I I Ftri


664
221
47
17
26
32
27
12
25
47
73
12
45
29
51

3,063
56
47
119
48
38
41
45
112
1,556
35
438
176
44
113
29
25
58
36
15
32

2,563
27
30
737
148
220
136
86
372
36
46
40
60
40
180
30
109
38
30
38
95
65

762
42
26
31
105
31
118
71
221
72
45


415
128
28
11
20
17
16
8
21
28
50
7
28
17
36

1,749
27
26
67
29
21
29
22
46
890
22
243
96
27
74
21
17
33
25
12
22

1,398
16
20
375
87
117
77
51
204
22
24
20
30
20
99
9
69
22
14
22
58
42

454
28
15
11
66
24
77
44
117
50
22


19
6



I



1
2

2

7

89
1
2
2
4

4
4
2
31
2
7
3
4
12
2


4
3
2

69

4
21
2
2
3
1
1I
2
1
1
5
1
2

5

3
1
3
1

19
1

2
1
1
4
1
3
2
4


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.*----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.--------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,077
95
266
44
50
80
54
80
39
81
47
200
41

583
93
59
41
109
101
42
40
98

1,062
27
40
34
129
29
66
176
70
197
77
116
43
58

372
40
15
97
14
87
22
53
44

1,554
15
56
35
47
59
494
62
38
116
68
84
205
28
155
58
34


1 yinr
All
Causes


Total 11,700 6,504 359 697

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 469,019
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 264,576
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 19,166
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 27,919


1 7


'


- -rr ------







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


PLAGUE (Continued from fronc page)


On September 20, the attending physician noted a
tender swelling in the patient's left groin. A provisional
diagnosis of bubonic plague was made and a course of
tetracycline and streptomycin started immediately. The
next day, because of suppression of urinary output, the
patient was transferred to the University of California
Medical Center in San Francisco. The patient's condition
is now satisfactory and he is making a good recovery.
The specimens submitted from the Santa Rosa
Hospital to the Berkeley State Laboratory had yielded,
by September 20, isolates of Pastuerella pestis; serological
studies have given a hemoagglutination inhibition titer of
1/256 against plague.

A team from the Vector Control Bureau of the
California State Health Department is presently in Viola
conducting field investigations. On September 27 two
carcasses of golden-mantled squirrels (Citellus callo-
spermophilus) were found in close proximity to the child's
house in an area where he habitually played. Further
field studies are proceeding and laboratory examinations
of the squirrels and other material are underway at the
California State Laboratory in Berkeley and at the CDC
Plague Field Station in California.
(Reported by Dr. Henry Renteln, Chief, Bureau of Com-
municable Diseases, California State Health Department;
and an EIS Officer.)



INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1963-64 edition-Public Health Service Publication No. 384


The following information should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


Page 78


City:


Center:


Clinic Hours:


Wichita Falls, Texas


Wichita Falls City-Wichita
County Health Unit


Thursday, 3:00 4:00 p.m.


Fee:


ERRATUM, Vol. 14, No. 36, P. 310:


The Importance
High Levels of


of Measles and Methods for Achieving
Measles Immunization in the Community


In sub-paragraph No. 4, the reference (Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 14, No. 5) should read
(Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 14. No. 7).


SEPTEMBER 24. 196!


e.- .4
i==

THE MORBIDITY AND MORTAL.TV WEEKLY REPORT WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 14.000, IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA. GEORGIA.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.5.
CHIEF, SURVEILLANCE SEC TION D. A HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F.R.C.P.E.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
VESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS APE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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