Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00397

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 14, No. 22


.:yi '' 1
vv}! .* f


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


WATER-BORNE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM
Riverside, California

The extensive outbreak of gastroenteritis in Riverside,
California (See MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 21) has now been
shown to have been caused by Salmonella typhimurium,
apparently transmitted through the municipal water supply.
Several thousand cases have been recorded; S. typhi-
muium has been isolated from over 100 of the cases.
The clinical syndrome has varied widely. In children,
diarrhea and fever occurred in almost all cases. Fever of
102-1030 was common, and in a few cases was as high as
106. Diarrhea was frequently bloody and in one case
blood loss was sufficient to have necessitated transfusion.


CONTENTS-
Water-Borne Salmonella Typhimurium Riverside,
California ..................................... 185
Meningococcal Infections................... ....... 187
Clostridium Perfringens Food Poisoning -
Georgia ................................... ... 187

Nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramps were also common
complaints. Adults generally suffered a milder illness
with severe abdominal cramps and fever of 101-1020
being the most common symptoms; diarrhea was also
common, but nausea and vomiting were infrequent. In
both children and adults, the duration of illness varied
with the severity, lasting 10 days or longer in the most
severe.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
22nd WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 22 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE MEDIAN
DISEASE JUNE 5, MAY 30, 1960-1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 5 1960 1964
Aseptic meningitis .......... 27 42 26 595 630 558
Brucellosis ...............* 1 1 9 94 165 165
Diphtheria ................ 1 9 5 76 113 199
Encephalitis, primary infectious 22 39 --- 669 758
Encephalitis, post-infectious 18 34 352 412
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 463 655 655 16,000 19,005 21,001
Measles .............. .... 7,304 24,628 15,553 206,331 393,453 316,180
Meningococcal infections ...... 51 37 36 1,768 1,400 1,099
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 2 1 16 13 32 152
Paralytic .............. 2 1 12 10 26 115
Nonparalytic ....... --- 3 5 -
Unspecified .............*** 1
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .......... 5,718 6,795 5,607 222,292 226,621 191,357
Tetanus ***............*.* 2 6 -- 89 91 -
Tularemia .............*. 3 13 --- 86 110 -
Typhoid fever ............. 13 10 10 153 147 193
Rabies in Animals ...... *' 93 83 67 2,185 2,032 1,778

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ..................... ............ 5 Rabies in Man: ............................ --
Botulism: Wash. -5 ................... ...... .. 8 Smallpox: *** *........................... 1
Leptospirosis: Mich. -1, Ark. -1 ..... .......... 15 Trichinosis: .............................. 52
Malaria: Mass. -1, N.Y. City -1, La. -1 ............ 26 Typhus-
Plague: .... ............................... Murine: Texas -1 .... ............ .......... 8
Psittacosis: N.Y. City -1, Calif. -2 ............ 16 Rky. Mt. Spotted: Pa. -1 ................... 23








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



WATER-BORNE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM
(Continued from front page)


House-to-house sample surveys were conducted
throughout the city proper and in adjacent communities.
These revealed that the epidemic occurred primarily in the
city proper with the highest attack rates evident in the
northern areas. There was no apparent concentration of
cases by socioeconomic area.
An epidemic curve based on the sample surveys is
presented in the accompanying figure. The epidemic began
in mid May, reaching a peak on May 26. New cases,
presumably resulting from secondary spread, continue to
occur.
Age specific attack rates were remarkably uniform,
although somewhat higher among infants and young children.
An intensive telephone survey of 47 early cases, none
of whom had had prior contact with any known cases of
gastroenteritis, was conducted to determine a possible
common source. These cases were selected from all age
groups and from all parts of the city. Most of them were
culturally confirmed by the isolation of S. typhimurium.
No food item, store, or public event in common could be
identified within this group. Such widely used items as
milk and eggs were eliminated by the diverse sources of
these items and the significantly large number of the


infants who had never consumed them. All but two of
these cases regularly drank the city's unchlorinated tap
water.
The community water supply consists of a series of
deep wells both inside and outside the city. Because of
the purity of this water, it had never been chlorinated.
Regular monitoring of the water supply by standard coliform
counting techniques, even during the outbreak, had never
revealed coliform organisms in excess of acceptable
numbers. Nonetheless, water samples obtained on May 31
and June 2 from five locations in the city were shown to
contain S. typhimurium. The geographic distribution of
cases corresponds with that of the city water supply.
The water supply was chlorinated on June 2. An
intensive investigation is underway to determine the
source of contamination. Measures are also being taken
to minimize secondary spread within the community.

(Reported by Dr. Philip Condit, Director, Division of
Communicable Diseases, California State Department of
Public Health, and Dr. Everett Stone, Director, Riverside
County Health Department, Riverside, California and a
team from the Communicable Disease Center.)


EPIDEMIC CURVE- HOUSE TO HOUSE SURVEY

PRIMARY CASES ALL AGES

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA


7A7V72Tl


rQ'd"&4C1zA I I I I II I I


I' '3' '5' '7' '9' '11' '13' '15' '17' '19' '21' '23 '25'
MAY


27 *29' '31'


2' '4' '6' '8'
JUNE


186


IIII~NIIIIIIIIINI/)I~lllrlNIAIII~IIIIIIN








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Figure 1
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS BY WEEK OF REPORT
Ist QUARTER, 1965 AND MEDIAN, 1960-64
UNITED STATES


120-


100-


80-


60-


40-


20-


0-


J F M 'A' M' J i A S O N D


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS


The weekly number of reported meningococcal infec-
tions has decreased markedly during April and May, and
is now approaching the weekly median level for the years
1960-1964 (Figure 1). A total of 1,768 cases have been
reported through the 22nd week of 1965, as compared to
1,400 cases during the comparable period of 1964, an
increase of 26.3 percent. The observed decrease during
the preceding 8 weeks reflects the normal seasonal
fluctuation in disease incidence and cannot be interpreted
as indicating the end of the current cyclic increase.
The annual rates for meningococcal infections in the
United States for the years 1920 to 1964 are shown in
figure 2. Although the case rate for 1964 was quite low,
1.6 per 100,000, it represented an increase of 2?' percent
over the preceding year. Cyclic increases have occurred
at intervals of 8 to 12 years, with a duration of 4 to 6
years. Accordingly, it may be anticipated that this disease
will continue to show increased activity in the United
States during the next year or two and possibly longer.


Figure 2
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS ANNUAL RATE PER 100,000
UNITED STATES, 1920-64

14,

12-



8

6I


1920 '25 1930 '35 1940 '45 1950 55 1960 '65


CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FOOD POISONING
Georgia


An outbreak of Clostridium perfringens food poison-
ing occurred among students and teachers following lunch
in a high school cafeteria on May 5, 1965. Of the 447 who
ate the suspected meal, 256 were affected for an attack
rate of more than 57 percent.
The illness was characterized by diarrhea, abdominal
cramps, nausea, but seldom vomiting and a median in-
cubation period of 14% hours. Symptoms were generally
mild, although causing considerable discomfort and some
disruption of normal activity for 12 to 24 hours.


Of the foods served, roast beef was incriminated.
Laboratory work confirmed these findings. On bacterio-
logical examination a sample of leftover roast beef
yielded a viable count of 80,000 C. perfringens per gram
and numbers seen on direct microscopic smear -upe.-ted
that the count had previously been much higher. Other
known food poisoning organisms were not found in the
roast beef.
The raw beef was received frozen from government
surplus stock, thawed for 2 or 3 days in the walk-in
(Continued on back page)


I4 0 I

- %%I


n '


187










188 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 5, 1965 AND MAY 30, 1964 (22nd WEEK)


Aseptic Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 27 42 22 18 2 13 32 2 10 26 1 76

NEW ENGLAND........... 2 I 1 1
Maine.............. 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 1 1
Rhode Island....... 1 -
Connecticut........ -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 6 5 7 5 1 5 5 4
New York City...... 2 2 3 1 1 1 2
New York, Up-State. 3 2 1 2 2 -
New Jersey......... 1 2 2 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 5 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 3 2 1 3 3 3
Ohio............... 1 2 2 1
Indiana............ 2
Illinois........... 1 1 1 1 1 -
Michigan........... 1 2 2 -
Wisconsin.......... -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 4 1 1 4 18
Minnesota.......... 1 1 1 I 7
Iowa............... 1
Missouri............ -1 1
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... 7
Nebraska........... 1 3 1 3 1
Kansas............ 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 5 4 7 3 12 9 15
Delaware........... 1 -
Maryland............ 1 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. -3 3
Virginia........... 2 1 -
West Virginia...... 1 1 1 -
North Carolina ..... 3 5 2 1
South Carolina ..... 1 -
Georgia............ 1 8
Florida............ 1 1 5 3 4 4 3

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 10 3 2 1 11
Kentucky........... 2 6 -
Tennessee.......... 3 1 -
Alabama............ 1 2 2 1 10
Mississippi........ 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 1 3 3 2 3 2 19
Arkansas............ 2
Louisiana.......... 2
Oklahoma........... 1 1 -
Texas............. 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 15

MOUNTAIN............. 2 1 3 3 1 2 -
Montana........... -
Idaho............... .
Wyoming............ 1 -
Colorado........... 1 1 1 -
New Mexico.......... -1 1 1 -
Arizona............ 1 2 -
Utah................ 1 -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC.............. 7 17 3 4 1 2 2 1 2 2 5
Washington......... 4 1 1 1 -
Oregon........... 1 1
California......... 5 12 3 4 1 1 1 1 4
Alaska............. .
Hawaii............. 2 1 -

Puerto Rico I 1- 6










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 189


Table 3. CASESS OF1- sP(l 11l) NOI IIIAIh11 DI'I A%[ UNI II) STATES

.I)R X I I.K I IM)Il)

JUNE 5, 1965 AND MAY 30, 1964 (22nd lK) Continued


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis MeningRcoccal
loss including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 1 463 200 237 16,000 19,005 51 1,768 1,400 2 89

NEW ENGLAND.......... 27 8 18 967 1,957 3 90 37 1 5
Maine............... 4 1 3 195 670 9 5 -
New Hampshire...... 3 2 1 90 140 5 1
Vermont............. 42 248 2 1
Massachusetts...... 8 2 6 368 386 1 30 16 3
Rhode Island....... 4 1 3 125 105 13 2 -
Connecticut........ 8 2 5 147 408 2 31 13 1 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 74 25 49 2,776 4,316 6 239 159 1 5
New York City...... 23 5 18 513 618 4 42 21 -
New York, Up-State. 28 8 20 1,155 1,927 60 45 2
New Jersey......... 14 7 7 495 794 1 69 52 -
Pennsylvania....... 9 5 4 613 977 1 68 41 1 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 66 38 24 3,074 2,909 9 222 195 8
Ohio................ 13 9 4 901 757 2 61 55 1
Indiana............. 17 10 5 259 249 2 31 32 4
Illinois........... 7 2 5 584 504 1 58 44 1
Michigan........... 23 14 9 1,132 1,188 4 45 46
Wisconsin.......... 6 3 1 198 211 27 18 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 33 14 19 1,066 1,067 1 93 77 3
Minnesota.......... 3 2 1 96 94 19 14 2
Iowa................ 13 7 6 413 161 5 3
Missouri .......... 7 2 5 208 260 44 42 1
North Dakota....... 14 42 4 8
South Dakota....... 1 16 104 2 -
Nebraska........... 32 24 9 5
Kansas.............. 10 3 7 287 382 1 10 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 54 25 23 1,637 1,816 7 348 305 25
Delaware........... 57 40 4 4
Maryland............ 9 7 2 312 348 32 21 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 20 30 4 10 -
Virginia........... 10 2 5 403 268 3 41 33 4
West Virginia...... 7 3 4 248 304 23 20 1
North Carolina..... 5 3 2 134 331 1 64 48 2
South Carolina..... 2 2 60 65 1 51 46 2
Georgia............. 1 1 58 41 45 42 3
Florida............ 19 6 10 345 389 2 84 81 12

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 27 18 9 1,195 1,318 4 135 127 14
Kentucky........... 7 5 2 414 563 58 44 2
Tennessee.......... 5 4 1 432 457 3 43 43 5
Alabama............. 11 9 2 192 186 1 23 23 6
Mississippi........ 4 4 157 112 11 17 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 53 23 28 1,371 1,376 8 255 179 16
Arkansas........... 7 2 5 193 153 13 13 4
Louisiana.......... 9 6 3 231 300 4 139 87 2
Oklahoma........... 34 77 17 4 -
Texas............... 37 15 20 913 846 4 86 75 10

MOUNTAIN............. 23 6 5 963 1,202 58 48 2
Montana............ 1 1 70 112 1 -
Idaho............... 1 152 127 7 1 -
Wyoming............ 1 1 31 38 3 3 -
Colorado........... 4 3 1 195 331 13 10 1
New Mexico......... 2 2 186 175 10 20 -
Arizona............. 11 190 272 16 3 1
Utah................ 3 2 1 134 110 6 4 -
Nevada............. 5 37 2 7 -

PACIFIC.............. 106 43 62 2,951 3,044 13 328 273 11
Washington.......... 13 3 10 249 334 1 25 21
Oregon.............. 11 3 7 243 343 2 25 17 2
California.......... 80 36 44 2,300 2,219 9 261 222 9
Alaska.............. 2 1 1 141 90 1 10 6
Hawaii............. 18 58 7 7 -

Puerto Rico 34 27 7 552 414 3 26 17










190 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 5, 1965 AND MAY 30, 1964 (22nd WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 7,304 206,331 393,453 5,718 3 86 13 153 93 2,185

NEW ENGLAND.......... 622 34,528 12,384 641 1 3 26
Maine.............. 84 2,497 2,059 53 2 3
New Hampshire...... 13 369 189 -
Vermont............ 58 891 1,969 1 21
Massachusetts...... 215 18,500 3,529 123 1 1
Rhode Island....... 80 3,727 1,341 84 -
Connecticut........ 172 8,544 3,297 381 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 785 10,770 44,406 317 2 27 5 83
New York City...... 128 1,297 13,273 9 1 14 -
New York, Up-State. 203 2,952 9,935 157 6 4 76
New Jersey......... 83 1,790 10,494 52 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 371 4,731 10,704 99 1 5 1 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2,254 43,783 85,822 839 8 2 21 23 316
Ohio............... 240 7,857 17,038 102 6 18 165
Indiana............. 152 1,482 19,648 173 2 2 6 2 24
Illinois........... 147 1,982 14,514 139 5 4 2 60
Michigan........... 691 22,075 22,725 286 3 1 28
Wisconsin.......... 1,024 10,387 11,897 139 1 2 39

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 251 15,022 26,632 236 8 3 26 416
Minnesota.......... 40 568 246 10 2 85
Iowa............... 57 8,181 20,890 53 7 126
Missouri........... 40 2,372 815 25 5 3 9 57
North Dakota....... 59 3,352 3,886 98 1 18
South Dakota....... 26 102 3 13 1 3 31
Nebraska........... 29 447 792 1 24
Kansas............. NN NN NN 37 2 3 75

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 629 21,492 33,963 634 24 3 35 10 302
Delaware........... 15 459 328 35 3 -
Maryland........... 17 898 3,169 19 1 10 1 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 52 342 2 -
Virginia........... 173 3,359 11,268 168 3 3 8 233
West Virginia...... 289 12,082 7,477 227 1 9
North Carolina..... 12 267 1,029 6 4 2 10 2
South Carolina..... 38 937 3,965 37 3 4 1
Georgia............ 1 584 152 11 14 2 1 26
Florida............ 83 2,854 6,233 129 2 28

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 254 12,248 60,197 682 14 15 9 555
Kentucky........... 74 2,229 17,230 112 3 6 3 47
Tennessee.......... 114 6,966 20,468 476 10 3 6 498
Alabama............ 35 2,051 15,988 29 1 3 7
Mississippi........ 31 1,002 6,511 65 3 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 860 28,159 64,040 686 3 23 2 20 14 354
Arkansas........... 6 1,053 1,011 1 2 12 8 1 49
Louisiana.......... 3 73 75 1 2 1 58
Oklahoma........... 10 166 861 27 5 2 3 67
Texas.............. 841 26,867 62,093 658 1 5 2 8 9 180

MOUNTAIN............. 724 16,495 14,679 938 9 13 2 37
Montana............ 57 3,227 2,345 22 1 3
Idaho............... 112 2,226 1,493 97 -
Wyoming............ 10 794 207 6 1 1
Colorado........... 264 4,609 2,529 319 1
New Mexico......... 19 544 263 258 8 6
Arizona............. 61 907 5,609 114 4 2 26
Utah............... 190 4,001 1,314 122 7 1
Nevada............. 11 187 919 -

PACIFIC.............. 925 23,834 51,330 745 4 18 1 96
Washington......... 266 6,843 18,248 175 1 2
Oregon............. 77 2,882 6,146 10 1 4 2
California......... 386 11,104 25,627 513 2 11 1 93
Alaska............. 3 125 1,005 26 1
Hawaii............. 193 2,880 304 21 1 -

Puerto Rico 60 1,657 4,298 1 3 10

















Week No.
22


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and I year
Ages and over Influ e aes Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa,-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio ----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill..*.-----
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


707
246
47
21
20
69
17
22
29
49
56
16
34
22
59

3,163
49
41
139
33
37
34
65
95
1,607
43
472
174
41
88
21
38
57
61
31
37

2,377
55
30
746
137
193
120
61
351
37
42
38
11
55
113
26
133
23
26
36
93
51

729
44
24
36
105
25
106
85
212
52
40


423
133
22
14
14
41
10
15
21
26
36
12
22
16
41

1,836
24
27
92
12
21
24
37
38
930
24
274
96
27
53
13
23
38
33
25
25

1,330
31
19
399
81
116
73
24
188
19
17
23
6
39
58
11
83
18
16
24
51
34

438
30
16
21
65
16
67
50
114
33
26


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. P [ersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.--
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.--
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif ..------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,029
100
211
45
68
80
54
90
24
74
76
168
39

504
65
47
22
94
128
37
23
88

1,016
43
18
20
131
42
62
180
54
172
75
124
47
48

324
22
15
101
21
63
20
42
40

1,439
23
46
29
43
66
422
136
35
95
70
70
178
35
116
34
41


67
4
12
7
9
4
5
4
1

5
16


36
4
2
3
8
10
3

6

88
6

2
11
5
6
10
3
13
10
10
7
5

19
1

9
2
3
2
2


Total 11,288 6,298 380 659

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 284,098
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 161,838
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 12,898
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 16,579


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED Jl'NE 5, 1965


" '









192


CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FOOD POISONING
(Continued from page 187)


cooler, and cooked on May 4, the day prior to serving.
After cooking, the beef was allowed to cool at room tem-
perature for about 1% hours and then refrigerated over-
night. The next morning, the day of serving, it was re-
moved from refrigeration and transported some 2 miles
to a local grocery store for machine slicing. After ap-
proximately 2 hours had lapsed, the meat was returned to
refrigeration where it remained until served cold for
lunch.
In addition to being eaten at the noon meal, a portion
of the roast beef was retained in the walk-in refrigerator
and served to coaches and students from several neigh-
boring schools who participated in a regional track meet
that night. Information regarding illness has been more
difficult to obtain from this group and is less complete
than that from the group who ate the meat for lunch. How-
ever, at least 14 persons from visiting schools are known
to have experienced typical C.perfringens food poisoning.


(Reported by Dr. John E. McCroan, Chief Epidemiologist,
and Mr. Byron W. Mixson, Assistant Epidemiologist,
Georgia Department of Public Health.)


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I IIIlllllll llllllli lllllllII lll l 111111
3 1262 08864 2417


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 13.000 IS PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333.
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING. PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN ,'M.S.
CHIEF SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY: COMPILED
DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIDAY.
SYMBOLS:---DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
VOL. 14. NO. ,.


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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




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