Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00387

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER









^"
V,# {

itt .....


Vol. 14, No. 39

SEK! Y



Week Ending
October 2, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


SALMONELLA OUTBREAK Washington


In March 1965 an outbreak of salmonellosis was inves-
tigated among Indians in Yakima County, Washington.
Investigations suggested that the source might be dry
whole egg solids, which were later proved positive on
culture for Salmonella typhi-murium, S. tennessee and
S. oranienburg. Cans of dry whole egg solids were found
in three of the households in which cases had occurred;
cultures from these patients revealed S. typhi-murium,
S. bradeney, and S. schwarzengrund. Subsequently, S.
tennessee was recovered from a 7-month-old infant and
from the dried whole egg powder in his home in Grays
Harbor County, Washington.


CO0\ T'E.\ rT
Salmonella Ouit.r< ,k 0,n-hnlt \ FL K 333
Epidemiologic NoIt-- ..and I p
Arbovirus Encerph.dliri- /. 334
Western Equii.- .ne-ph, f. 335
California Fn, -.r.ha i.. 336
St. Louis Enrel-..halit. l .. 337
Eastern Equin. En"'|.. (3 J. I 338
Laboratory Studlic- l ilu jrm nll.h 339


The cans of whole 'dd eg -.-Liuted to
welfare recipients by the %a aSia e DeIlciritnt of
Public Assistance, had been purchased by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture. Although the canned food was
reported to have been produced under conditions of good
commercial practices in processing plants operating under


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
39th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 39 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE OCTOBER 2, SEPTEMBER 26, 1960-1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 1960- 1964
Aseptic meningitis ......... 80 109 115 1,493 1,512 1,856
Brucellosis .... .*............... 1 2 5 193 318 318
Diphtherna ............... 1 11 113 185 306
Encephalitis, primary infectious 48 90 -- 1,344 2,374 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious ... 9 10 -- 555 699 -
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 735 683 840 25,530 29,038 32,635
Measles ................. 638 628 754 241,266 462,932 397,260
Meningococcal infections ... 25 34 30 2,376 2,112 1,660
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 3 43 44 84 608
Paralytic ............... 2 34 35 69 473
Nonparalytic *** ***....... 1 --- 7 10 ---
Unspecified .......... --- 2 5 -
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ............. 5,082 4,688 4,196 298,598 304,546 246,523
Tetanus ............... 3 4 199 210 -
Tularemia *................ 2 8 --- 192 254 -
Typhoid fever ............. 11 13 20 314 316 474
Rabies in Animals 51 67 53 3,376 3,487 2,893

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ......... ...................... 7 Rabies in Man: ............................ 1
Botulism: ................................ 11 Smallpox: ............................. -
Leptosplrosis: Tenn.-1, Tex.- ................... 35 Trichinosis: Calif.-1............. .............. 78
Malara: N Y C.-1 .......................... 62 Typhus-
Plague: .................................. 6 Murine: ... ....... ................... 22
Psittacosis: Conn.- ............ ............. 36 Rky. Mt. Spotted: N.C.-4, S.C.-1, Ky.-1 ............. 233
Cholera: ...... .. .. .. ... 2


rc


;ry~







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


OCTOBER 24 1965


SALMONELLA OUTBREAK Washington

(Continued from front page)


the supervision of the U.S. Department of Agriculture
inspection services, 34 percent of 161 specimens of
powdered eggs were found positive for salmonella
organisms at the Veterinary Public Health Laboratory at-
CDC. Salmonella tennessee was the most common serotype
isolated; other serotypes isolated included S. oranienburg,
S. montevideo, S. newington, and S. infants. The U.S.D.A.
Laboratory in Chicago recovered salmonella organisms
from 60 percent of the shelf samples of the suspect cans
submitted from Washington, all of which were from 1 to 3
years old. As a result of these examinations, U.S.D.A.
authorities at the plants where these eggs were processed
have studied the effects of substantial modifications
made to equipment and in processing procedures.
Immediate precautionary measures were taken. Hold
orders were placed on further distribution of the dried
whole egg solids from the three surplus warehouses in


the State of Washington. In addition, all state and private
institutions using the dried egg products were notified by
telegram to discontinue use of the product until further
notice.
As of June 1, 1965, the U.S.D.A. requires pasteur-
ization prior to the drying process or testing for the
absence of salmonella in products of processing plants
under their supervision. Effective January 1, 1966, all
egg products except dried whites must be pasteurized and
on June 1, 1966, all egg products, including egg whites,
must be pasteurized.

(Reported by Ernest A. Ager, M.D., Chief, Division of
Epidemiology, Washington State Department of Health;
Carl D. Olsen, D.V.M., Staff Veterinarian, Milk and Food
Branch, DEEFP, USPHA;andthe Salmonella Surveillance
Unit, CDC.)


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS

ARBOVIRUS ENCEPHALITIS 1965


Primary encephalitis, defined as an acute febrile
illness with encephalitic manifestations as an intrinsic
part of the disease, is notified weekly to CDC through
the National Morbidity Reporting System. This category
includes arthropod-borne virus infections as well as
acute encephalitis of other etiology. An Encephalitis
Surveillance Report dealing with primary and post-infec-
tious encephalitis is published annually; that for 1964 is
summarized in MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 29. The following
reports deal mainly with the laboratory confirmed and
presumptive cases of Arbovirus encephalitis in humans
reported to CDC from January 1 to September 30, 1965.




A total of 134 confirmed or presumptive human cases
of Arbovirus encephalitis have been notified in the U.S.
through September 30, 1965. There have been 82 cases of
Western equine encephalitis, 6 of Eastern equine enceph-
alitis, 16 of St. Louis encephalitis, and 30 of California
encephalitis. Table 1 shows the distribution of human
cases by States. Of the 15 states affected, only 2,
Colorado and Texas, have had confirmed infection with
more than one Arbovirus. Colorado has had the largest
number of confirmed cases of Western equine and of St.
Louis encephalitis of any one State.


Table 1
Confirmed and Presumptive Human Cases of Arbo-Virus
Encephalitis Through September 30, 1965

State WEE EEE SLE CE

Minnesota 2 (ID)
North Dakota 12 -
South Dakota 1
Wyoming 15
Colorado 37 8 -
California 1
Texas 14 -6 --
Pennsylvania 1 -
North Carolina 1
Georgia 2 (2D) -
Florida 3-
Ohio -- 16
Indiana -- 7
Wisconsin -
Illinois 1

15 States 82 (ID) 6 (2D) 16 80

TOTAL 134

D Died


334








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS


A total of %-- laboratory confirmed and presumptive
human cases of Ht.-rni equine encephalitis have been
reported through September 30 from seven central and
western States (Table 1). Human outbreaks of some size
have occurred in the four .tIIf-s as listed below:

State Colorado Wionlin i N. DakLot TIni
Cases 37 1, 12 14
Onset first case 7/12/65 7 *2S 65 7.8 65 7, 25 65
Onset last case S 2- 65 9/4/65 8/29 65 9/2 65

W.omning. North Dakota and Colorado have experienced
more human Western equine encephalitis this year than in
any year since encephalitis surveillance was established
in 195h.


The age- of the patients varied from 2 months to 75
years. There was one falnlily in Minnesota.
A concentration of human cases occurred in the Platt
and Arkansas River Valleys of Wyoming and Colorado. In
these areas there was heavy flooding during the -pring of
1965 which gave rise to unusually large mosquito popula-
tions. Western equine encephalitis virus was recovered
from pools of Culex tarsalis early in July (1IMIHH, Vol.
14, No. 29). Mosquito indices have now fallen dramatically
following frosts in early September.
In the map, Figure 1, are shown the .-;atr, reporting
Western equine encephalitis in horses. The number of
confirmed and presumptive human cases ofHe-tern equine
encephalitis are also included.


Figure .


WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS IN THE UNITED STATES

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 1965


SENCEPHALITIS IN HUMANS (confirmed and presumptive only)
C:. ENCEPHALITIS IN HORSES (clinical evidence only)
ED ENCEPHALITIS IN HORSES serologicc evidence)


See Table, Page 7


335


OCTOBER 2, 1965







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CALIFORNIA ENCEPHALITIS


Confirmed and presumptive human cases of California
virus encephalitis have been notified from three mid-
western States through September 30. Ohio reported 16
cases, with Wisconsin and Indiana each reporting 7 (Fig-
ure 2). All the patients were children under 16 years 'of
age, the youngest being 3 years old; all lived in rural
areas or had been camping in forested areas prior to the
onset of illness. There were no fatalities or sequelae.
Figure 3 denotes the dates of onset of the cases in Wis-
consin and Indiana.


Collections of mosquitoes and of sera from a wide
variety of vertebrates have been made in the three States.
To date there has been only one California virus isola-
tion; it was obtained in Ohio from a pool of Aedes tri-
seriatus.* This isolate is apparently closely related to
the strain isolated in 1964 by Thompson et al. from a
fatal human case in Wisconsin (MMWR, Vol. 13, No. 47,
p. 414).

*Reported by Dr. C. Spencer and Dr. H. Stlgmiller, Ohio.


Figure 3.

CALIFORNIA ENCEPHALITIS IN THE UNITED STATES
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 1965


O ENCEPHALITIS IN HUMANS (confirmed and presumptive only)


336


OCTOBER 2, 1965






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


FIGURE 2

CASES OF CALIFORNIA VIRUS ENCEPHALITIS
BY DATE OF ONSET, 1965*

WISCONSIN


10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II
JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER


INDIANA


10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II
JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER


CASES IN OHIO ARE NOT YET AVAILABLE.


ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS
There have been 16 confirmed and presumptive cases It is of
of St. Louis encephalitis, 8 of which occurred in Colorado, of St. Louis
6 in Texas, and one each in Illinois and Pennsylvania. or Camden, 1
In Texas three of the cases occurred in Corpus Christi, epidemics in
while the other three appeared sporadically throughout of Enfield in
the State. In Illinois there was one case in Enfield; St. alitis outbre!
Louis encephalitis virus has been isolated from a single
pool of Culex pipiens collected in this area. There has Figure 4
also been one confirmed case reported from Collegeville, confirmed a
Pennsylvania, with the onset of illness during the first
week in September.


interest that there have not been any cases
encephalitis reported from Houston, Texas,
New Jersey, both of which experienced major
1964. McLeansboro, which is 12 miles west
Illinois, was the site of a St. Louis enceph-
ak in 1964.
shows the geographic distribution of the
nd presumptive cases notified this year.


(See Figure 4, page 338)


*DATES OF ONSET OF THE 16


337


OCTOBER 2, 1965






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Figure 4.


ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS IN THE UNITED STATES

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 1965


O ENCEPHALITIS IN HUMANS (confirmed and presumptive only)


EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS


North Carolina, Georgia and Florida have reported
one, two and three laboratory confirmed human cases of
Eastern equine encephalitis respectively. Two fatalities
occurred, both in Georgia. The latest confirmed human
case this year was reported from Florida, the date of
onset being July 24.
There is, however, continued evidence of Eastern
Equine encephalitis virus activity in the eastern U.S.
Equine epizootics have been reported from nine States,
most recently from New Jersey and Delaware (Figure 5).
Eastern equine encephalitis virus has been isolated from
pools of Culiseta melanura collected in Florida, North
Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey; it has also
been recovered from one pool of Anopheles crucians in
New Jersey.* Activity in birds has been demonstrated by
the recovery of Eastern equine encephalitis virus from a


sparrow in North Carolina and from four avian species in
New Jersey, namely the house sparrow, woodthrush,
Carolina Chickadee, and red-eyed vireo.*
*New Jersey data reported by Dr. M. Goldfield.

Editorial Note: This report has been made possible
only through the interest and helpful cooperation of the
Directors of the State Health Department, the State
Epidemiologists, the Directors of State Laboratories, and
of State Arbovirus Research Units in the States
concerned. The epidemiological and laboratory data have
been collated by the Arbovirus Unit and the Encephalitis
Surveillance Unit of CDC. Material and reports have
also been provided by the Greeley and Kansas City Field
Stations of CDC, and the Center for Zoonosis Research,
Urbana, Illinois.


338


OCTOBER 2, 1965






Mlorbidity and Mortality weekly Report


Figure 5.


EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS IN THE UNITED STATES
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,1965


0 ENCEPHALITIS IN HUMANS (confirmed and presumptive only)
[ ENCEPHALITIS IN HORSES (clinical evidence only)
M ENCEPHALITIS IN HORSES serologicc evidence)


LABORATORY STUDIES BOTULISM in Idaho


Three clinical cases of botulism in Twin Falls,
Idaho, were reported in the MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 27. At
that time sera had not been obtained proir to administration
of antitoxins. Neither the uneaten sandwich with two
slices of the implicated luncheon meat nor the package
from which it came were obtained for laboratory exam-
ination. However, samples from vacuum-sealed packages
and from 10-pound cans of the luncheon meat in the same


consignment as the meat used in the sandwiches have
been examined for the presence of Clostridium botulinum
toxin and forthe organism. All examinations were negative.
Samples were examined both at the Federal Drug Admin-
istration Laboratories in Washington, D.C. and at CDC.
(Reported by the Microbiology Division FDA, Washington.
D.C.; and the Bacteriology Section of Laboratory Branch,
CDC.)


:3 9


OCTOBER 2. 1965








340 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 2, 1965 AND SEPTEMBER 26, 1964 (39th WEEK)


Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 80 109 48 9 44 84 35 69 113

NEW ENGLAND.......... 4 2 1 2 2 2
Maine.............. I 1 -
New Hampshire...... 1 -
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 3 2
Rhode Island....... 2 1 -
Connecticut....... 1 -1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 7 20 13 2 4 13 3 12 5
New York City...... 8 4 1 1 1 3
New York, Up-State. 5 6 2 2 10 9 -
New Jersey........... 1 5 4 3 2 3 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 3 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 26 30 11 2 3 18 2 15 4
Ohio................ 5 13 7 2 2 1
Indiana............ 1 2 6 5 2
Illinois........... 7 11 1 1 2 5 1 5 -
Michigan............ 11 5 1 1 1 3 1 2 -
Wisconsin.......... 3 2 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 9 9 1 10 8 7 6 18
Minnesota........... 3 5 1 1 3 1 2 7
Iowa................ 1 2 4 2 1
Missouri........... 1 3 2 1
North Dakota....... 1 1 1 -
South Dakota....... 1 7
Nebraska........... 3 1 3 3 1
Kansas............. 1 4 1 1 1 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 4 1 21 1 16 29
Delaware .......... -
Maryland............. 1 1 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. -- 3
Virginia............ -
West Virginia...... 1 1 1 1 -
North Carolina..... 10 6 2
South Carolina..... 1 1 -
Georgia............. I 14
Florida............ 2 8 7 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 1 2 1 6 1 5 17
Kentucky........... 2 1 -
Tennessee.......... 2 1 3 1 2 -
Alabama............ 1 2 2 15
Mississippi....... 1 1 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 6 6 1 16 7 14 7 29
Arkansas........... 2
Louisiana........... 3 1 1 6
Oklahoma.......... 1 2 1 2 -
Texas.............. 6 3 1 14 5 12 5 21

MOUNTAIN............. 3 4 8 5 6 3 3 --
Montana ............ 3 -
Idaho.............. -
Wyoming ............ 2 2 -
Colorado........... 4 -
New Mexico......... 1 3 1 -
Arizona............ 3 1 4 -
Utah................ 4 -
Nevada............. -..

PACIFIC............... 28 31 3 2 4 3 4 3 9
Washington......... 2 1 1 2 2 3
Oregon.............. 1 1 1 1 1 1
California......... 25 30 1 2 1 2 1 2 5
Alaska ............. .
Hawaii............. .

Puerto Rico 2 12









Morbidity and Mortaliit Weekly Report 341


(AI N OF NHP( I II) NO I IIAHlI I DISI. AI UNITED STA II

F()R WI lk ENDED

OCTOBI R 2, 1965 AND sl Pl MIlllH 26, 1964 (39th l II ) Continued


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningoocccal
loss including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 1 735 380 317 25,530 29,038 25 2,376 2,112 3 199

NEW ENGLAND........... 25 12 13 1,493 2,690 120 59 5
Maine.............. 2 1 1 265 853 16 5 --
New Hampshire...... 4 1 3 153 211 7 1 1
Vermont............ 80 335 7 3 --
Massachusetts...... 8 4 4 589 585 40 24 3
Rhode Island....... 1 1 168 149 14 9 -
Connecticut........ 10 5 5 238 557 36 17 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 145 82 63 4,542 6,456 5 311 268 1 13
New York City...... 15 5 10 895 994 1 54 35
New York, Up-State. 92 58 34 1,746 2,824 3 90 75 1 5
New Jersey......... 13 4 9 858 1,106 80 93 1
Pennsylvania....... 25 15 10 1,043 1,532 1 87 65 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 152 87 54 4,905 4,554 8 340 289 28
Ohio.............. 46 25 15 1,351 1,206 3 92 74 2
Indiana............ 11 5 4 425 392 1 43 45 7
Illinois........... 30 16 12 931 829 1 93 73 13
Michigan........... 55 33 22 1,884 1,804 2 74 67 3
Wisconsin.......... 10 8 1 314 323 1 38 30 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 23 9 14 1,470 1,559 1 123 126 1 18
Minnesota.......... 7 4 3 153 172 1 27 29 1 8
Iowa............... 5 3 2 519 237 9 6 4
Missouri........... 1 1 309 385 52 57 2
North Dakota..... 27 58 11 17 --
South Dakota....... 2 2 20 120 3 3 -
Nebraska........... 1 1 64 42 10 6 2
Kansas............. 7 1 6 378 545 11 8 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1 83 46 31 2,649 2,733 4 456 412 1 46
Delaware........... 64 53 7 6 -
Maryland........... 18 9 6 464 515 44 30 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 38 50 9 13 -
Virginia............ 1 19 11 7 622 431 54 46 7
West Virginia...... 1 1 373 402 24 32 1
North Carolina..... 12 7 5 254 458 2 93 69 6
South Carolina..... 3 1 2 122 101 59 50 6
Georgia............. 93 80 57 62 1 5
Florida............. 30 17 11 619 643 2 109 104 20

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 36 17 16 1,833 2,025 185 171 24
Kentucky........... 15 8 4 655 748 71 56 6
Tennessee.......... 13 6 7 616 704 60 55 7
Alabama............ 6 3 3 331 370 34 36 9
Mississippi ........ 2 2 231 203 20 24 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 62 37 24 2,230 2,254 4 311 243 44
Arkansas........... 6 4 2 290 217 15 22 10
Louisiana.......... 13 9 4 363 543 1 171 118 5
Oklahoma........... 1 1 49 109 1 20 9 I
Texas .............. 42 24 17 1,528 1,385 2 105 94 28

MOUNTAIN............. 35 14 4 1,435 1,733 1 74 71 3
Montana............ 4 3 109 152 2 -
Idaho.............. 5 183 233 8 3 -
Wyoming............ 1 1 40 55 5 5 -
Colorado........... 4 3 1 305 464 1 15 12 2
New Mexico......... 8 5 1 307 249 11 29 -
Arizona............. 8 303 385 16 6 1
Utah............... 4 3 1 179 144 14 7 -
Nevada............. 1 9 51 3 9 -

PACIFIC.............. 174 76 98 4,973 5,034 2 456 473 18
Washington......... 11 6 5 387 533 1 34 31 -
Oregon.............. 19 8 11 423 543 33 21 4
California......... 139 57 82 3,936 3,684 1 364 402 14
Alaska............. 5 5 188 175 18 7 -
Hawaii............. 39 99 7 12 -

Puerto Rico 27 22 5 1,112 778 2 7 31 1 42









342 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 2, 1965 AND SEPTEMBER 26, 1964 (39th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 638 241,266 462,932 5,082 2 192 11 314 51 3,376

NEW ENGLAND.......... 22 36,839 16,990 441 1 4 39
Maine.............. 6 2,802 3,015 21 4
New Hampshire...... 381 255 -
Vermont............. 11 1,268 2,331 31
Massachusetts...... 3 19,298 5,331 77 1 3 2
Rhode Island....... 3,938 1,935 28 1 -
Connecticut........ 2 9,152 4,123 315 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 47 14,843 52,217 141 2 55 7 139
New York City...... 17 2,416 15,350 6 1 27 -
New York, Up-State. 8 4,143 12,711 77 13 7 126
New Jersey......... 3 2,577 12,218 46 7 -
Pennsylvania....... 19 5,707 11,938 12 1 8 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 89 55,891 102,985 366 13 1 39 12 515
Ohio............... 12 8,895 19,628 11 9 5 262
Indiana............. 9 1,847 22,787 142 5 8 5 64
Illinois........... 22 2,764 16,632 50 5 10 1 81
Michigan........... 26,473 28,949 103 2 1 7 51
Wisconsin.......... 46 15,912 14,989 60 1 5 1 57

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 51 16,578 30,272 220 23 1 11 10 687
Minnesota.......... 14 688 333 12 1 1 1 2 139
Iowa............... 4 9,001 23,327 32 2 3 195
Missouri........... 3 2,591 1,019 6 18 7 2 96
North Dakota....... 29 3,731 4,752 113 1 43
South Dakota....... 115 29 5 2 1 52
Nebraska........... 1 452 812 1 35
Kansas............. NN NN NN 52 2 1 127

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 152 24,883 38,367 661 31 1 64 6 460
Delaware........... 2 505 411 14 4 -
Maryland........... 2 1,163 3,408 68 1 19 22
Dist. of Columbia.. 77 354 -
Virginia........... 7 3,872 12,713 131 8 8 4 284
West Virginia ..... 124 13,839 8,663 185 3 21
North Carolina..... 390 1,161 16 6 15 3
South Carolina..... 1 1,018 4,261 29 3 8 2
Georgia............ 617 195 9 14 3 1 58
Florida............ 16 3,402 7,201 209 4 1 70

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... -37 13,948 67,844 1,021 20 1 32 4 728
Kentucky........... 12 2,586 18,475 36 3 9 2 76
Tennessee............. 14 7,910 24,314 879 16 1 11 2 599
Alabama............ 10 2,335 18,366 66 1 7 16
Mississippi........ 1 1,117 6,689 40 5 37

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 72 30,958 72,138 562 2 80 1 43 10 542
Arkansas........... 1,084 1,124 2 2 54 13 79
Louisiana.......... 1 107 105 5 6 1 70
Oklahoma........... 203 1,018 5 10 6 5 117
Texas.............. 71 29,564 69,891 555 11 1 18 4 276

MOUNTAIN ............. 100 ,19,817 18,697 955 15 2 27 1 74
Montana............ 7 3,731 3,073 26 4 1 5
Idaho.............. 7 2,794 1,938 83 -
Wyoming............ 3 848 262 21 3 1 -
Colorado........... 44 5,678 3,235 398 9
New Mexico......... 677 456 257 2 11 14
Arizona............ 17 1,332 6,675 54 12 1 44
Utah ............... 22 4,553 2,068 116 8 1
Nevada............. 204 990 2 1

PACIFIC.............. 68 27,509 63,422 715 9 2 39 1 192
Washington.......... 7 7,245 20,040 158 4 7
Oregon............. 25 3,261 8,661 7 5 1 7 7
California......... 33 13,003 33,065 491 4 1 27 1 176
Alaska.............. 1 186 1,102 48 2
Hawaii............. 2 3,814 554 11 -

Puerto Rico 28 2,435 6,291 8 1 9 13








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


3.13


Week No. Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK FNDFD OC 1()O IR 2, 1965

39 (By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Sand Ii year Iand !1 year
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and u enz a
Ages and overInfluenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.---..
Cambridge, Mass.---...
Fall River, Mass.---..
Hartford, Conn.------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.--------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.----
Pittsburgh, Pa.------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.-----
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.--------
Syracuse, N. Y.------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio----------
Canton, Ohio---------
Chicago, Ill.--------
Cincinnati, Ohio-----
Cleveland, Ohio------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.-------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.--------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


739
265
43
25
28
56
28
17
25
44
72
15
38
35
48

2,994
56
29
145
35
33
33
57
99
1,508
40
420
187
37
98
35
37
42
40
28
35

2,396
50
46
691
125
216
123
70
330
39
37
43
29
40
147
32
118
31
27
34
110
58

843
49
32
32
145
29
104
102
221
69
60


436
144
21
19
18
33
18
12
16
26
40
12
21
21
35

1,723
30
19
87
16
20
26
39
39
865
20
236
86
26
69
24
24
22
28
21
26

1,343
35
29
371
76
120
65
44
159
20
19
28
16
24
87
15
73
15
15
20
74
38

503
29
22
14
84
19
64
60
133
45
33


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.----------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii*------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,068
131
257
33
86
53
39
83
29
67
82
176
32

530
79
47
29
98
124
43
33
77

1,043
38
29
30
154
39
64
183
77
151
87
103
43
45

361
37
15
104
28
78
19
48
32

1,489
13
41
23
40
61
447
118
39
127
74
94
159
36
136
45
36


Total 11,463 6,381 1 391 685

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 480,491
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 270,975
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 19,555
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 28,596










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


OCTOBER 2, 1965


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 14 000 IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA. GEORGIA.


CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SEC T ION
CHIEF SUR VEILL ANCE SEC TION

EDITOR MMAR


JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.

D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F.R.C.P.E.


IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
VESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO

THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333

NOTE THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE COC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS APE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.

xz
m



I

M-4 1


-*> >

P O
> S >

C i. Z-


z zI







m


UNV OF L LI
DOCUMENTS DEPST..


fIS ID -T




U.S DEPOSITORY


344




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EVA60Q3DZ_KYSKYP INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T18:17:10Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00387
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES