Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00386

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


/ ."; ..- .. 4
.... .. ..

21 00


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


DIPHTHERIA CO\ 7E TS


No cases of diphtheria were reported in the United
States during the week ended June '6, this being the
fourth occasion in a period of 6 weeks that no cases have
been reported. The cumulative totals of cases through
the 25th week of 1'6.5 and the previous 4 years are
shown in the table at right. An analysis of the numbers
of cases reported and their origin during 1965 shows that
of the 80 cases in the United St,~te,., 67 or S.L. percent
have originated in 4 census regions. In these census
regions, the States of Texas and Alabama had 15 and 11
cases respectively; there were 8 cases in Georgia, 7
each in Minnesota and South Dakota, and 6 in Florida.


Diphtheria ........ ....... ... .........
Salmonella Surveillance Summary for April .
Salmonella Gastroenteritis, \...n]rV ',r,, D.C. Area. .
Staphylococcal Food Poisoning, Petersburg, Virginia .
Poliomyelitis, Arizona . . .
International Notes . . .


. 209
. 210
. 211
. 211
. 216
. 216


Diphtheria (Cumulated Weekly) through 25th Hctek, 1961-65

1965 1964 1963 1962 1961


Weeks 1-25* 80 136 133 213 303

Annual Totals 307* 314 444 617

* Preliminary


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
25th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 25 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JUNE 26, JUNE 20, 1960- 1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 1965 1964 1960- 1964

Aseptic meningitis .... .. 37 32 32 692 725 667
Brucellosis ... ............... 6 8 11 117 186 195
Diphtheria .............. 2 4 80 136 213
Encephalitis, primary infectious 33 33 --- 743 883 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious 21 17 --- 407 490 -

Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 558 577 672 17.685 20.850 23,015
Measles ................. 3,999 11,827 10,966 224,164 434,467 357,511
Meningococcal infections .... 52 50 44 1,920 1,555 1,218
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 1 2 11 21 38 .186
Paralytic ...... ......... 1 1 9 17 30 144
Nonparalytic ....... 1 --- 4 7 ---
Unspecified ............. --- 1 -

Streptcoccal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ........ ..... 5.029 5,498 4,104 239,867 246,225 204,650
Tetanus *...************** .5 7 --- 107 116 ---
Tularemia ................ 5 6 --- 116 137
Typhoid fever ... 7 9 14 182 169 227

Rabies in Animals ****....** 69 100 87 2,389 2,324 2,002

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ...... ....... ...................... 6 Rabies in Man: ........................... .... 1
Botulism: ............ ....................... 8 Smallpox: ............................... 1
Leptosairosis: ................................ 17 Trichinosis: Calif.- ................ .......... 57
Malaria: Va.-2, Ga.-1, Calif.-1 .................. 35 Typhus-
Plague: ................................. Murine: Texas-1 ....................... .. 10
Psittacosis: Calif.-1 I ....................... 19 Rky. Mt. Spotted: N.J.-2, I11.-1, Md.-2, N. C.-5, ...... 68
Cholera: ............................... 1 Wyo.-2, Colo.-2, Va.-4, W. Va.-1, Ga.-1


1>~c~c


Vol. 14, No. 25







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA
IN THE UNITED STATES


650-

600-

550-

500-

450-

400-

350-

300-

250-

200-

150-

100-

50-

e%


JFMAMJ JASOND
1963


J FMAMJ JA SOUND
1964


J FMAMJJ ASOND
1965


SALMONELLA SURVEILLANCE Summary for April

During April a total of 1,274 isolation of salmonellae of 1965 is continuing with total isolations running approx-
from human sources were reported to the Salmonella Sur- imately 2 percent fewer than the human recoveries during
veillance Unit for an average weekly total of 318. This the same period last year.
represented a slight increase of 15 recoveries per week
over March 1965 and a decrease of 57 isolations per week The seven most commonly reported serotypes from
over April 1964. The trend observed in the first quarter human sources during April were:

RANK
RANK SEROTYPE NUMBER PERCENT A
LAST MONTH

1 S. typhi-murium & S. typhi-murium var. copenhagen ................ 384 30.1 1

2 S. heidelberg ....................... ...................... 115 9.0 2
3 S. derby...... .......................... ...... ........... 67 5.3 3

4 S. infants ............. ............. ............ ......... 65 5.1 4

5 S. newport .................. ......... ..... ...... 62 4.9 6

6 S. enteritidis .......... ... ... .................. .......... 59 4.6 8
7 S. typhi ..................................... .......... ...... 49 3.8 5

Total.................... ..... ........ ..... ....... .801 62.8

Total salmonellae isolated (April) 1,274


I I I I I I I


-650

-600

-550

-500

-450

400

-350

300

250

200

150

-100

50

-0


. . .


%Jh W. .. .


v


210


June 26, 1965


I. V 0








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL NOTES
SALMONELLA GASTROENTERITIS Washington, D.C. area


A lair~eu outbreak of gastroenteriti- due to ,le,. ..., ".'.;
oir /tlea.'rid,, is currently under inMe-tiit;ion in the metro-
politan area of W1i-.lhinii'ii, D.C. Over ':'1I cases have
been reported with onsets of illness between May 11 and
.June 8. Ca';.-i- are known to have occurred in the District
of Columbia, \lilr\l.inl. New Jersey, and \ ri-iim.. Incu-
bation periods rMirinld from 12 to 36 hours. The illnesses
have been mild, only three persons reillringr hospital-
ization; there have been no deaths. The niili!ptointLlt.
has been that i' moderately severe diarrhea, abdominal
cramps and low ciradv fe' ei, bloody diarrhea was not a part
of the clinical picture. \nn'iin ill persons, S. meleagridis
has been recovered I'ri stool cultures in over 30 instances.
Inm\e-tia.tiin- to date indicate that the common
source in this outbreak was in a lar-e1 restaurant-deli-
catessen in Wa-hingtin. D.C., 'inil'.inL. 116 persons, and
offering restaurant facilities on the :ironii-cv. retail sale
of food and home rcit-rinr services. All cases reported to
date had consumed food either in the restaurant, or sold
retail, or served at private parties catered by the deli-
catessen. Attack rates of about .',I percent have been
documented anoni persons attending the catered parties.
Salmonella nifl,.::-.:i,:s has been recovered from a


wide ,.i iW fv of foodstuffs .,ri-,iTI h i ir in this I .i. -r 1in.
center. I'hvI include coleslaw, sliced salami, corned
beef, roast beef, tirlkc and iii'-- i lil.iink. t". 'I'
date, I:, of the persons employed as food handlers have
been iiltiivlfiL' as excreters of .' .;,.r ,j:. '. only one
of whom has admitted to clinical illness. I.\iriin-,i
environmental cultures have been obtained within the
establishment, two of these .iclilinle S. meleagridis from
oneof 5 meat slicers and from a food grinrlrr, respectively.
The premises were closed for 2 weeks and an exten-
sive revision of the phi .iAl plant was instituted. All
employees are hlirnc required to have two successive
rectal swabs nctg.itive for salmonella before r.'lturrinc to
work. Inv,-tiga ion- are t ontinuing.
(Reported by Dr. Murray Grant, Director of Public Health
andhis colleagues in the District of Columbia Department
of Public Health; Dr. John H. Janney, Acting 'lA.f,
Division of Epidemiology and his colleagues in the
Maryland Department of Health; Dr. J.D. Kt ,liy,, D.-rr -
tor of the Bureau of Ep;.fl r.:oi,,,:,', Viry ini.: State De-
partment of Health; Dr. Ralph Beachley, Director,
Arlington Cuintt Health Department, and a team from
the Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Georgia.)


STAPHYLOCOCCAL FOOD POISONING Petersburg, Virginia


An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by hemolytic
Staplhyl/ucoccu aureus, phaae tppe 54/6/7/47/81, has
been reported by the Virginia State Department of Health.
Twelbe persons are known to have become ill following
the consumption of ham sandwiches.

By midnight on the date of onset the twelve cases
had been reported by physicians and by the local hospital
in patients who ranged in age from 19 to 47 years. S.mrp-
toms included nausea, \omitine, abdominal pain and
slight diarrhea without fever; three patients showed signs
of shock and six were hospitalized. Rectal swabs and
stool specimens were obtained from hospitalized patients
at 1:130 a.m. All affected had consumed ham sandwiches
with mayonnaise at a local sandwich shop. The incubation
period was estimated to be between 2 and 4 hours.

The owner of the sandwich shop was called at his
home around midnight, and an inspection of the shop
was made. Samples of food eaten by those affected were
collected. The restaurant was noted to be in good con-
dition with excellent refrigeration. All items of sanitation
met the requirements of state and local regulations.
The food handlers were examined and throat, nasal and
rectal swabs were taken; an infected burn on the finger
of one individual was noted, and a swab was taken for
culture. This individual had cooked and prepared the
ham, starting about 6:00 a.m. on the day of the outbreak.
The ham was ready for serving at noon; it was sliced and


served from a steam table (temperature of about 140'F).
Eight\ ham sandwiches were prepared and served. Only
those who consumed ham after 2:00 p.m. became ill,
and it was noted that the illness was more severe amongst
those eating as late as 4:00-5:00 p.m.

All specimens were taken to the Virginia State Health
Department Laboratory for culture. The mayonnaise
showed no growth. The ham which had been removed
from the steam table at 2:00 p.m. to cool, grew coag-
ulase positive, S. aureus, phage type 54/6/7/47/81.
Cultures were negative for other pathogens, i.e., strep-
tococcal fecalis, clostridium perfringens, salmonella and
shigella.
In excess of a billion organisms per gram of ham
were recovered. Rectal and stool specimens from four of
the six patients, and the swab taken from the food han-
dler's burn grew the same strain of staphylococcus.
Other cultures from patients and food handlers were
negative for pathogens.
Prompt reporting by the hospital and physicians,
the immediate action by the health department, and the
cooperation of the sandwich shop owner prevented the
development of any subsequent cases.

(Reported by Dr. J.B. Kenley, Director, Bureau of Epide-
miology, Virginia State Department of Health, investigated
by Mr. Stanley R. Hutcherson, Chief Sanitarian and Dr.
C.J. Stuart, Health Officer, Petersburg.)


June 26, 1965


211










212 Morbidity and Morlality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 26, 1965 AND JUNE 20, 1964 (25th WEEK)


Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 37 32 33 21 1 21 38 1 17 30 80

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 2 3 1 1 1*
Maine................ 1 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ 1 -
Massachusetts ... 1 1 1
Rhode Island....... 2
Connecticut........ 1 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 3 10 3 1 5 5 4
New York City..... 3 1 1 1 2
New York, Up-State. 2 1 1 2 2 -
New Jersey.......... 1 5 2 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 4 2 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 4 9 3 1 3 3 3
Ohio............... 1 3 3 2 2 1
Indiana............ 3 2
Illinois........... 1 3 2 1 1 -
Michigan............ 1 1 1 -
Wisconsin........... -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 2 1 1 4 2 4 1 18
Minnesota.......... 2 1 1 1 1 7
Iowa................ 1 -
Missouri........... 1 2 I I
North Dakota ...... -
South Dakota....... 7
Nebraska............ 3 3 I
Kansas.............. I

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 4 4 3 16 11 18
Delaware........... .- -
Maryland........... I -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3
Virginia........... 1 1 -
West Virginia...... 1 1 -
North Carolina..... 1 1 4 -
South Carolina..... -
Georgia................ 1 1 8
Florida............ 1 3 1 3 5 4 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 1 3 2 12
Kentucky........... -.
Tennessee.......... 1 -
Alabama............ 2 2 2 11
Mississippi ........ 1 I

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... I 2 2 5 2 5 2 19
Arkansas........... I 1 2
Louisiana .......... 1 1 2
Oklahoma .......... 1 1- -
Texas.............. 10 1 1 4 1 4 1 15

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 1 1 5 4 1 3 3 -
Montana.............. 1 -
Idaho............... -
Wyoming............. 2 2 -
Colorado........... i 1 -
New Mexico......... 1 I 1 -
Arizona ............ 1 4 1 2 -
Utah............... -
Nevada............. .

PACIFIC .............. 12 14 3 6 5 2 5 2 5
Washington......... 5 3 3 -
Oregon ............. 1 1 1 1 1 1
California ........ 9 9 3 5 1 1 1 1 4
Alaska.............. -
Hawaii............. 2 1 -

Puerto Rico 6- - 6









Mlorhidiity and Mortality weekly Report 213


Table CASES OF PiI ( I1I 1) NOTIFIABLE DIMI AI% UNITED STATES

M)R X% lhks INI)II)

JUNE 26, 1965 ANI JIIUN 20, 1964 (25th WEEK) Continued


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Menlngsococca
loss including Setum Hepatitis Infections Tltanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulal ive Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1 ,

UNITED STATES... 6 558 251 272 17,685 20,850 52 1,920 1,555 5 107

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 47 24 22 1,078 2,144 1 95 42 5
Maine.............. 6 3 3 205 719 1 11 5
New Hampishir ..... 2 1 1 101 153 5 1
Vermont.............. 16 8 8 61 265 2 1 -
Massachusetts...... 1 14 8 5 412 441 32 19 3
Rhode Island ...... 5 3 2 137 113 14 4 -
Connecticut........ 4 1 3 162 453 31 13 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 102 42 60 3,069 4,728 9 259 189 1 8
New York City...... 20 5 15 576 686 1 44 26
New York, Up-State. 31 14 17 1,241 2,136 1 65 53 1 3
New Jersey......... 18 5 13 566 853 3 73 64
Pennsylvania....... 33 18 15 686 1,053 4 77 46 5

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 111 60 48 3,438 3,165 11 248 213 9
Ohio................ 28 8 18 978 830 4 67 59 1
Indiana............ 4 4 285 280 1 35 33 5
Illinois........... 16 11 4 647 548 2 63 52 1
Michigan............... 59 38 21 1,311 1,278 3 54 46
Wisconsin.......... 4 3 1 217 229 1 29 23 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 27 12 14 1,136 1,173 2 103 90 2 8
Minnesota.......... 3 1 1 114 107 1 20 19 1 5
Iowa................ 8 5 3 427 171 1 6 5 1
Missouri........... 4 2 2 223 296 47 46 1
North Dakota....... 15 45 7 9 -
South Dakota...... 16 104 2 -
Nebraska........... 1 5 3 2 38 27 10 5 1 1
Kansas............... 1 7 1 6 303 423 11 6 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 65 28 26 1,824 1,971 15 380 334 1 29
Delaware............ 1 1 58 41 1 5 4 -
Maryland ........... 15 10 5 345 381 1 37 23 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 21 31 1 6 10 -
Virginia........... 12 4 6 441 289 1 46 36 5
West Virginia ...... 12 5 3 280 326 23 24 I
North Carolina..... 1 2 2 150 364 2 70 56 2
South Carolina..... 4 1 2 71 70 1 53 48 3
Georgia............ 1 3 1 2 63 42 6 51 44 1 4
Florida............ 16 7 5 395 427 2 89 89 13

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 20 8 9 1,265 1,426 2 146 137 15
Kentucky........... 5 1 1 436 598 61 48 3
Tennessee.......... 5 2 3 453 495 45 45 5
Alabama............. 10 5 5 215 213 27 27 6
Mississippi........ 161 120 2 13 17 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 39 20 19 1,510 1,544 7 281 195 1 20
Arkansas........... 1 7 3 4 214 167 1 14 15 4
Louisiana.......... 8 4 4 260 343 4 157 99 2
Oklahoma........... 1 1 38 84 17 5 1
Texas.............. 23 13 10 998 950 2 93 76 1 13

MOUNTAIN............. 45 22 7 1,078 1,295 60 53 2
Montana............ 3 1 2 80 118 2 -
Idaho.............. 1 157 139 7 2 -
Wyoming............ 1 1 32 45 4 3 -
Colorado............ 12 10 2 215 348 13 11 1
New Mexico......... 12 7 231 187 10 21 -
Arizona............ 9 206 299 16 3 1
Utah............... 6 4 2 151 118 6 5 -
Nevada............. 1 6 41 2 8 -

PACIFIC.............. 102 35 67 3,287 3,404 5 348 302 11
Washington......... 8 5 3 277 378 1 27 24 -
Oregon............. 7 2 5 269 378 1 28 18 2
California......... 82 25 57 2,565 2,471 2 273 246 9
Alaska............. 5 3 2 151 112 1 13 6 -
Hawaii............. 25 65 7 8 -

Puerto Rico 32 25 7 642 479 3 26 18










214 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JUNE 26, 1965 AND JUNE 20, 1964 (25th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. um.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 3,999 224,164 434,467 5,029 5 116 7 182 69 2,389

NEW ENGLAND........... 350 35,994 14,749 458 1 3 4 30
Maine............... 22 2,690 2,585 10 3
New Hampshire...... 3 376 223 2 1 1
Vermont............. 71 1,132 2,085 3 24
Massachusetts...... 138 19,002 4,379 124 ] 2 1
Rhode Island....... 24 3,825 1,718 51 1 -
Connecticut ....... 92 8,969 3,759 271 I

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 487 12,767 48,564 252 31 2 94
New York City...... 146 1,740 14,350 15 17 -
New York, up-State. 150 3,509 11,047 197 6 2 86
New Jersey......... 108 2,149 11,486 27 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 83 5,369 11,681 13 6 8

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,417 49,822 96,872 500 1 9 24 9 339
Ohio................ 79 8,442 18,812 32 6 165
Indiana............. 32 1,634 21,779 83 1 3 8 3 31
Illinois........... 59 2,253 15,683 71 5 5 2 68
Michigan........... 545 24,632 26,988 204 3 2 33
Wisconsin.......... 702 12,861 13,610 110 1 2 2 42

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 84 15,978 29,091 134 12 1 5 19 470
Minnesota........... 14 610 302 4 1 4 93
Iowa................ 31 8,868 22,813 34 1 5 136
Missouri........... 9 2,474 830 14 8 1 4 5 67
North Dakota....... 27 3,-,68 4,335 31 23
South Dakota ...... 1 109 3 15 1 1 34
Nebraska........... 2 449 808 4 29
Kansas............... N NN NN 36 2 88

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 431 22,990 36,316 628 1 26 38 8 326
Delaware............ 10 491 362 4 4 -
Maryland........... 35 992 3,318 125 12 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 57 350 2 -
Virginia........... 66 3,636 12,275 122 4 3 4 245
West Virginia...... 181 12,809 7,972 156 1 11
North Carolina..... 12 313 1,076 3 1 5 10 2
South Carolina..... 15 972 4,125 8 3 4 2
Georgia............ 9 596 155 5 14 2 2 29
Florida............ 101 3,124 6,683 203 2 2 34

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 217 13,049 65,194 823 15 18 10 581
Kentucky........... 21 2,308 17,993 60 3 6 2 54
Tennessee.......... 122 7,459 22,592 700 11 6 8 516
Alabama............ 74 2,249 18,004 48 1 3 8
Mississippi........ 1,033 6,605 15 3 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 304 29,414 68,766 519 2 41 2 27 11 394
Arkansas........... 4 1,078 1,042 2 26 1 10 53
Louisiana.......... 5 90 89 1 1 1 4 62
Oklahoma........... 27 196 930 11 7 2 1 70
Texas.............. 268 28,050 66,705 507 7 11 10 209

MOUNTAIN............... 316 18,206 16,464 785 1 11 13 2 44
Montana............ 55 3,464 2,597 25 2 3
Idaho............... 72 2,519 1,667 80 -
Wyoming............. 2 822 232 7 1 2 1 -
Colorado........... 116 5,212 2,860 390 2
New Mexico......... 5 604 338 88 8 1 10
Arizona............. 40 1,069 6,146 95 4 1 28
Utah................ 24 4,324 1,665 100 7 1
Nevada............. 2 192 959 -

PACIFIC .............. 393 25,944 58,451 930 2 3 23 4 111
Washington......... 29 7,145 19,720 82 2 -
Oregon.............. 48 3,029 7,333 6 3 2
California......... 176 12,220 29,987 674 2 2 16 4 107
Alaska.............. 2 133 1,053 13 1 I 2
Hawaii.............1 138 1 3417 358 155 1 -

Puerto Rico 72 1,966 4,838 20 3 10









Morbidity and Mortalit Weekl) Reporrt


Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UINITIl) STATtS CITIES FOR WEEK I NI)F) JUNE 26, 1965


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)
---- A -- 17 I


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgtprt, Conn.-----
Cambridge. Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Harriord, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.-----
Erie, Pa.--------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Il1.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio---------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, 11.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


All I L UI .

All 65 years
Ages land over


and
Influenza
All Ages


llnd r
I year
All
Causes


Area


All I an..


All
Ages


65 years
and over


and
Influenza
All Ages


1 yearly
All i
Causesi


I I II I -4-


727
251
31
31
37
34
24
31
25
49
64
16
43
29
62

3,272
44
31
138
25
32
42
80
76
1,699
44
487
200
50
101
24
31
68
54
21
25

2,478
66
28
753
141
197
120
65
341
45
36
44
25
43
151
44
109
38
40
36
92
64

806
49
28
40
133
24
115
67
232
82
36


444
132
23
23
28
13
12
25
19
31
38
11
31
23
35

1,910
25
19
83
9
19
23
53
36
1,017
23
265
102
27
59
17
21
41
31
18
22

1,399
35
18
399
91
109
59
37
191
32
21
24
14
26
86
24
63
25
20
19
58
48

458
37
18
21
76
14
64
40
125
48
15


42
15
2
2

5
2

1
3
8

1
2
1

162
2

6
2
2
1
7
2
80
2
25
11
1
12

3
4

2


144
1
2
58
6
7
7
2
18
1
2
3
1
3
13
4
5
1
3
4
2
1

58
2
3
6
12
1
6
3
14
9
2


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.---
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.--------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.---------
Fort Worth, Tex.------
Houston, Tex.---------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.--
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif!----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.t-
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


Total


1,084
112
262
36
56
94
52
73
30
62
76
194
37

560
70
59
38
120
100
43
39
91

1,012
29
30
33
123
42
83
168
48
159
69
115
40
73

397
44
24
113
13
77
18
66
42

1,438
17
42
24
49
58
483
79
34
86
57
94
173
35
134
47
26

11,774


6,643


Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 319,566
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 181,608
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 14,102
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 18,779


Week No.
25


215









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


POLIOMYELITIS


Arizona
Two cases of paralytic poliomyelitis have occurred
recently in Yuma County, Arizona and both cases were in
unimmunized preschool age children. Type I poliovirus
was isolated from stool specimens submitted on both
cases which are listed below:

Virus Disease Vaccine
Age Sex Onset Type Status IPV OPV
1. 8 months Female May 18 I Paralytic 0 0
2. 4 years Male May 26 I Paralytic 0 0

Yuma County (population 47,000) conducted a mass
oral poliomyelitis vaccination program in 1962, when more
than 90 percent of the populace received Type I polio-
virus vaccine. On Sunday, June 27, last, a vaccination
program utilizing Type I poliovirus vaccine from the Com-
municable Disease Center epidemic reserve was con-
ducted in Yuma County, with emphasis on the preschool
and school age groups. More than 30,000 doses of vaccine
were administered in the one day.
(Reported by Dr. Philip M. Hotchkiss, State Epidemi-
ologist, Arizona State Department of Health and a team
from the Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Georgia.)



INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1963-64 edition-Public Health Service Publication No. 384

Page 74


Delete


Center


Clinic Hours


Fee


Add


Center


Clinic Hours


Idlewild International Airport
New York

Pan American World Airways, Inc.
Hanger No. 14, New York
International Airport
Telephone OLympia 9-0400,
Ext. 692


Thursday 1:30 -3 p.m.


No


Jamaica
Long Island, N.Y.


Pan American World Airways, Inc.
Hanger No. 14, JFK International
Airport.
Telephone 995-2121, Ext. 692


Thursday 1:30 p.m. by appt.


Fee Yes


J.uimp 2 lOqA
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1 l III llII1lIlll III 1 l1 11111IIIII 11111ll 1 1I
3 1262 08864 2128


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 13000 IS PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333.
C.lEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING. PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
CHIEF SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F.R.C.P.E.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO T-HE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY; COMPILED
DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIDAY.
SYMBOLS ---DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
VOL. 14. NO. 1.


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