Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00372

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE --


Prepared by the


For release Au
g
usr 1 1 64


COMMUICABL DISUASE C:E


ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THl
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED AUGUST I, I!

TULAREMIA


A coral of 9 cases of tularemia was reported for the
week ended August 1. This brings to 19" the cumulative
total for 1964. For the comparable period of 1963, 1'0
cases were reported. Weekly reporting of cases began in
1962; rhese cases and the annual totals for the past 5
years are shown in the accompanying table.
The 4 States in the West South Central region account
for 66 cases (34 percent of the national total). Arkansas
has reported 37 of these cases; this total is the highest
for any Stare. Missouri has the second highest State total,
22 cases.
To date, cases have been reported in all but the New
England, Middle Atlantic and Pacific regions.


During this time of year, the majority of the cases
occur following tick bites; in the fall and winter, most
cases result from handling infected rabbits.


Cumulative Cases Through 31st Week

1964 1963 1962 1961 1960
197 170 177 NR NR

Annual Totals
298' 328 365 390

Provisional total
NR not reported


Table I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
31st Week Ended Cumulative. First 31 Weeks
Disease August 1, August 3, Median Median
1964 1963 1959 1963 1964 1963 1959 1963

Aseptic meningitis ................. 2 47 --- 969 856 --"
Brucellosis ........................ 6 10 14 241 216 368
Diphtheria ................... ..... I 2 9 159 151 340
Encephalitis, primary infectious .. 42 ) --- 1,149 "-
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... 22 31 6279

Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................ 535 682 694 24,215 26,800 26,802
Measles ........................... 1,744 1,807 2,074 .29,428 352,595 380,528
Meningococcal Infections .......... 43 33 33 1,734 1,618 1,507
Poliomyelitis, Total ................ 3 9 35 62 146 362
Paralytic ...................... 2 8 26 49 121 256
Nonparalytic ................. ........ --- 9 16
Unspecified ................... --- 4 9

Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .................. 3,911 3,333 271,396 232,721
Tetanus ........................... 8 5 --- 151 145
Tularemia ..................... ... 9 9 --- 197 170
Typhoid fever .................... 11 15 18 245 252 406

Rabies in Animals ................. 69 61 62 2,821 2,379 2,377


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 2 Psittacosis: Mass-1, Mich-1, Tenn-1, Calif-I 23
Botulism 10 Rabies in Man:
Leptospirosis: N.Y. Up-State I 24 Smallpox:
Malaria: N.J. 1 1 Typhus-
Plague: Murine: Ala-1 15
Rky Mt. Spotted: Pa-2, NC-2, Ohio-4, Va-4, WVa-l, 119
Okla-I


_ _


1
s I








26


POST-INFECTIOUS ENCEPHALITIS JUNE


A total of 117 cases of post-infectious encephalitis
was reported for the 4-week period ended June 27 (see
table above). This brings to 528 the cumulative total of
post-infectious encephalitis cases reported for the first
half of 1964.
The totals for the previous 5 months, including de-
layed and revised reports, are shown in the table below.
(For earlier reports, see MMWR, Vol. 13, pp 46, 102, 143,
"" and 219.)Mumps and measles continued to account for
a large majority of the cases reported, with mumps the
chief inciting cause in 54 percent of the cases reported
in June.
A comparison of the cases attributed to mumps,
measles and other causes is presented by month in the
table below.
There were 12 cases of post-chickenpox encephalitis
reported; 6 were from California. Chickenpox accounts for
8 percent of the 1964 cumulative total. The monthly inci-
dence in 1964 follows:


January February


March

6


April

15


May June

5 12


The 12 cases of post-rubella encephalitis reported
during June are just one less than the total number re-
ported for the first 5 months of 1964. Thus far, rubella
accounts for 5 percent of the cumulative total. A table of
rubella cases reported by month in 1964 follows:


January February March April May June


0 2 3 5 3 12



Four cases were reported from Illinois and 3 from
Arkansas; these represent the first cases reported from
the East North Central and West South Central States
this year.


REPORTED CASES OF POST-INFECTIUS ENCEPHALITIS PFO JSUN
4 WIEKS ENDING 6/4, 413. 4/20, 6 77
REPORTED PRIMARY IPMFCTiaN


.ei I**la
DEPO'TING iigi sense Ck'it keea m.I. Ih.nu. m-.rll-.. i.... pi ...$ I n, c... Pl.ness
MW ECLANO

MIDDOL ATLANTIC
Pe.ylI.1e 2 I 1 3
EAST NORTH CENTRAL
iIeM 12 I t 4
a ..i.g. I
WSIT IIOTH CENTRAL
SOUM ATLANTIC




Tea.. I I
v "-- ', 1
EAT OUT C( TRAL


PACIFIC
4 I
cel*ha. 22 1 1
bllI--13 < II

U S TOTAL uL I 21 I2 I 2
IU.S CMILATIWI TOTAL
2 40 ISO 22 7 4 I I I
- -- .pMk e -e lalel


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF POST-INFECTIOUS ENCEPHALITIS DUE TO MUMPS. MEASLES AND OTHER
OTHER CAUSES IN 1964, BY MONTH

MUMPS MEASLES OTHER
PERCENT PERCENT PERCENT TOTAL CASES
CASES TOTAL CASES TOTAL CASES TOTAL

JANUARY 26 84 3 10 2 6 31

FEBRUARY 40 77 6 11 6 11 52

MARCH 39 57 19 27 11 16 6

APRIL 68 49 51 36 21 15 140

MAY 60 50 46 39 13 11 119

JUNE 63 54 26 22 28 24 117


CUMULATIVE TOTAL 296 56 151 29 81 15 528

* nc luds t. l. id end deolyed reports.







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MALARIA Illinois
Plasmodium falciparum malaria was diagnosed in a
52-year-old Chicago microbiologist, who acquired the
disease while travelling in Africa during January and Feb-
ruary 1963. The patient arrived in Uganda January 19,
and began prophylactic atabrine on an irregular schedule
on January 22.
For the next 4 weeks, he camped and travelled through
Uganda, Kenya, Tanganyika, Northern and Southern Rho-
desia, Zanzibar, and the Union of South Africa. He re-
turned to the United States via Iran, Israel, Jordan, Leb-
anon, Italy, and Greece, arriving in New York City Febru-
ary 18. He was asymptomatic throughout this period.
He resumed work on return to the United Stares, but
3 days later, February 21, he noted a severe headache,
nausea and fever on awakening in the morning. Later, he
vomited and experienced epigastric and right upper ab-
dominal quadrant pain. The initial clinical impression
was "flu." Because of the persistence of these symp-
toms and a fever which spiked to 103 for 3 successive
days, he was hospitalized February 25. Malaria was
diagnosed on peripheral blood smear.
During hospitalization, the patient's course was
complicated by hemolytic anemia, severe bone marrow
depression, and acute renal shutdown, requiring hemo-
dialysis. The patient was treated with chloroquine, and
he has recovered without known sequellae.
P. falciparum was diagnosed on blood smears sub-
mitted to the National Malaria Slide Repository, Com-
municable Disease Center.

(Reported by Norman J. Rose, M.D., Chief, Bureau of
Epidemiology, Illinois Department of Public Health, and
Harry B. Harding, M.D., Clinical Microbiologist, Evanston.)
Editor's Note: This case of malaria is a sharp reminder
of the necessity of starting proper prophylactic anti-
malarials before travelling in a malarious region, and
rigidly continuing such therapy while in danger of such
exposure.



SALMONELLOSIS California

From 5% to 36 hours after sharing a common meal,
June 23, all 10 individuals experienced symptoms of
gastroenteritis in an outbreak of salmonellosis. The patients
were aged 2 to 65 and involved members of 3 families. They
experienced vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea and
slight fever for an average of 4 days. All recovered after
hospitalization. The incubation period and severity of
illness correlated with the amount of the suspect food eaten.
The menu consisted of fried chicken, gravy, canned creamed
corn, green salad with mayonnaise, mashed potatoes, and
cake. All guests ate the chicken and gravy; several did
not eat the other items.


The family raised its own chickens. Two weeks
earlier, the family killed and dressed 8 chickens, which
were placed in a freezer until the day of the meal. They
were removed during the morning of June 23 and allowed to
thaw. At 3 o'clock, they were fried; at 4:30 p.m., the
gravy was made in the same frying pan in which the chicken
had been prepared. Some gravy was added to the creamed
corn. The chicken and gravy were warmed on the top of the
stove until 7:30 p.m. when the meal was served.
Salmonella newport was isolated from 8 of 9 stool
samples collected from the patients; the negative culture
was from the victim with the mildest symptoms. The same
organism was isolated from a left-over piece of chicken and
from the gravy. A few colonies of S. newport were recovered
from the creamed corn. The organism was not recovered
from other food items remaining from the meal. Attempts to
trace the source of contamination were not reported.

(Reported by Richard 1. Church, R.S., Supervising Sanitarian,
and Philip A. Bearg, M.D., Assistant District Health
Officer, San Joaquin Health District, and Philip K. Condit,
M.D., Chief, Bureau of Communicable Diseases, California
Department of Health.)





CADMIUM POISONING California

From 30-45 minutes after drinking pink lemonade, 23
school children,aged 5 to 9, experienced abdominal cramps
and vomiting in an outbreak due to cadmium contamina-
tion. All recovered within 48 hours. The severity of symp-
toms correlated with the amount of lemonade consumed.
Nine other children, who only tasted or consumed small
amounts of the lemonade, did not become ill. Each child
brought a lunch from home; the lemonade was the only food
common to all 32.
The lemonade was prepared by adding the proper
amount of city water and ice cubes to 3 cans of a commer-
cially prepared concentrate. The mixture was placed in a
3-gallon cadmium plated war surplus container for the
3-1/2 hour interval between preparation and serving.
Laboratory analysis of a sample of the remaining
lemonade revealed 21 parts per million of cadmium, a dos-
age considered sufficient to cause the symptoms in the
children.


(Reported by W. B. Walshe, Chief, Division of Sanitation,
and J. B. Askew, M.D., Director of Public Health, San
Diego County Department of Public Health, and Dr. Philip
K. Condit, Chief, Bureau of Communicable Diseases,
California State Department of Health.)

Editor's Note: An unrelated outbreak of cadmium poisoning
was reported in MMWR, Vol. 13, p. 258.


267










268 (lorlidit and %lortalilt, eel kl 11rporl



I.ihi I ( AM. (% SPI Iil) N01 IFIABLI DISAASF NITLD H IAUtS

)FOR V I-K, MINDED

AL GI'T 1. 1964 AND AL'GUST 1. 1963 (31ST WEEK)


Enricphal r 1
A-, pE lt
nl nc L Primary P,.t lni. P..1 i myel t 1. I T.iit Ciasc P..ll, I v I It s, Paralytic
Cumuldt.lv Cumulative

146- 1963 16. 1'I64 196 196I 3 146 11J Iph, 1'463 19bL4 1963
II t 'i TAT ... 42 u.7 22 3 9 62 1-6 2 8 49 121

1FI- F'iC IAND. ........ .- 3 I 2 -- 1 2
S.............. 1
V.. r mp-, .h r .........
Vur" 'ni . .-
"ja ;, 1, h,, I.t ,. .
.1. l h. er[ ...... I [ 1
Ph .. I land ....... 2
C nn t C I. ....... I -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 7 16 1 3 8 37 2 8 27
.w I rk C t ..... 6 ] -
N, t .. I.r-Slitate. I 7 3 1 1 5 7 -5 5
\. J r -.. ........ 4 1 2 I 1 2 1
F. nn%. Iv in a ...... I 3 29 21

EACT NORl71 CENTRAL... 11 4 2 2 9 21 I 7 14
Oh I, ............... I 2 2 2 7 2 3
Indiana ............ 2 I I 2 -- 1
Illinois .......... 5 2 1 4 7 I 4 6
MichitLan........... 3 4" 1 3 3
u ,-i n' n. ..... I 2 1

LFT N'iRTH CENTRAL... 3 3 5 2 4
linnne l .a. .......... 3 2 I 3 3
I'w.. .......... .....
Ml si ..... ...... 2 1
N rth Daj .t ........ .
4.outh DakotI .......* -
N,'br I.a ........... I 1 -
kani ............ 1 1 -

OL'TH ATIANTIC....... 6 2 7 2 2 22 20 2 17 17
Drlaware. .......... -
Maryland ........... -
Dist. of Columbia.. .
Virginia............ 1
West Virginia ...... 1 2 1 1 2
North Carolina...... 3 9 3 5 3
South Carolina.... 3 2 2
Ceor^ gia............. 1 I 4 1 1 3
Florida........ 1 4 8 6 7 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 3 3 4 2 3 2 22
Kentucky........... 2 3 -
Trnnre .......... 2 1 1
Alabama............ 3 2 18 3 1 16
MHl-sisszppi .. 2 2

WEST :OL'TH CENTRAL .. I 2 2 5 1 1 6 19 1 1 6 19
Arkan as ............ 5 I 2 2
L.ut iana .......... 13 13
Ok lah.oma ........... 2 2 -
T xas .............. I 1 2 4 4 4

MOUNTAIN ............. I 2 6 1 3
Montana ............ I.
Idah. ...............
Wyom n it ............ 2 -
C lorad.: ... .......... 3 1 -
New Mex.IcY........... .
Art rz na............ .
Ltah .............. -
Nevada .............

PACIFIC .............. 21 17 1 12 3 17 3 15
Uashingtn. .......... 1 5 I -
Oreg n ............. 1 3 1 2 1
Calif-rnia .......... 17 13 14 2 13
Alaska .............
Hawall ............. -

Puerto Ric. I -









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 269


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES- UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 1, 1964 AND AUGUST 3, 1963 (31ST WEEK) CONTINUED


Infectious Hepatitis
Brucellosis Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitis Typhoid Fever
Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.
1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 6 241 1 159 535 236 259 40 24,215 26,800 11 245

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 1 43 26 12 11 3 2,346 2,895 12
Maine.............. .- 39 3 2 1 763 1,322 -
New Hampshire...... 2 2 170 240 -
Vermont............. 9 3 4 2 301 46 -
Massachusetts ..... 2 1 4 7 3 4 488 836 5
Rhode Island...... 125 69 6
Connecticut........ 5 4 1 499 382 1

MIDDLE ATANTIC ...... 3 7 95 43 52 5,437 5,186 1 35
New York City..... 3 11 3 8 814 750 14
New York, Up-State. 1 27 14 13 2,417 2,300 7
New Jersey......... 2 14 3 11 972 797 1
Pennsylvania....... 2 2 43 23 20 1,234 1,339 1 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 31 8 104 45 47 12 3,736 4,355 3 63
Ohio............... 1 2 33 13 18 2 986 1,197 26
Indiana............ .- 1 1 10 4 6 335 397 12
Illinois........... 1 19 6 25 14 9 2 652 927 1 13
Michigan............ 5 1 25 12 13 1,475 1,640 2 9
Wisconsin.......... 4 -11 2 1 8 288 194 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 112 22 29 16 13 1,325 1,226 20
Minnesota.......... 6 11 4 1 3 136 186 2
Iowa .............. 3 70 -7 5 2 187 225 3
Missouri........... 8 1 4 3 1 331 464 7
North Dakota .... 2 2 1 1 52 36 2
South Dakota ....... 13 1 108 72 1
Nebraska........... 1 33 90 1
Kansas ............ 2 7 13 7 6 478 153 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 1 23 31 49 24 25 2,276 2,752 2 53
Delaware ........... 1 1 43 39
Maryland .......... 10 4 6 434 334 3
Dist. of Columbia. 2 1 37 79 -
Virginia ........... 11 7 6 1 356 583 10
West Virginia ..... 4 4 355 429 -
North Carolina.... 1 3 6 1 5 405 693 14
South Carolina.... 7 2 2 -- 78 116 1 10
Georgia............ 6 20 55 118 1 2
Florida............. 3 4 17 6 11 513 361 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 12 6 35 20 15 1,694 2,646 2 25
Kentucky ........... 3 8 5 3 664 759 7
Tennessee.......... 4 1 13 10 3 574 1,038 2 11
Alabama............ 3 3 8 1 7 301 408 5
Mississippi........ 2 2 6 4 2 155 441 2

EST SOUTH CENTRAL... 24 26 54 34 19 1 1,812 1,867 2 16
Arkansas........... 4 4 2 2 185 204 1 7
Louisiana.......... 2 5 15 10 5 416 363 3
Oklahoma.......... 3 94 90 4
Texas.............. 15 21 35 22 12 1 1,117 1,210 1 2

MOUNTAN ............. 19 2 33 8 3 22 1,473 1,728 7
ontana........... 7 4 1 2 134 233 -
Idaho.............. 12 12 181 275 -
Wyoming............ 45 24 I
Colorado.......... .- 6 6 400 363 -
New Mexico.......... 1 1 6 4 2 208 208 2
Arizona ........... 2 1 2 2 336 414 4
Utah .............. 15 127 198 -
Nevada............ 1 42 1 -

PACIFIC .............. 15 14 110 34 74 2 4,116 4,145 1 14
Washington ......... 13 8 3 5 458 712 1 2
Oregon............. 2 11 2 7 2 462 528 -
California........13 1 87 28 59 2,986 2,773 12
Alaska ........... 3 1 2 129 103
Hawaii ........... -

Puerto Rico 1 9 9 8 1 508 474 9








270 Morbidili and Morialil % cekli Report


Tabhlc CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
AUGUST 1, 1964 AND AUGUST 3. 1963 (31ST WEEK) CONTINUED


Strept coccal
Menlngococcal Sore ThToat and Rabies in
Measles Meningitis Scar le Fever tetanus Tularemia Animals
Art _
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1964 196. 196 1 196 1964 1963 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 1,744 43 1,734 1,618 3,911 3,333 8 151 9 197 69 2,821

NEW ENGLAND.......... 183 1 49 101 377 200 7 1 4 28
Maine .............. 33 5 17 62 8 3 24
New Hampshire..... 2 1 4 17 .
V rmon ............ 20 1 3 16 2 1 2
Massachusett ...... 91 1 20 48 58 17 7 I I
Rhode Island....... 13 7 9 13 8 -
Connecticut........ 24 15 20 211 165 ---

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 227 11 224 223 96 252 2 15 2 81
New York City...... 27 1 32 35 1 10 -
New York, Up-State. 138 3 65 68 84 65 I 5 2 77
New Jersey......... 48 76 32 8 11 5 -
Pennsylvania....... 14 3 51 88 3 166 1 5 4

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 354 5 245 254 349 232 3 27 1 16 9 392
Ohio............... 81 64 73 23 12 2 8 1 4 208
Indiana............ 52 1 38 31 135 87 3 2 19
Illinois............ 33 2 62 45 48 40 1 9 1 10 78
Michigan........... ]14 1 54 78 85 53 6 1 2 39
Wisconsin.......... 74 1 27 27 58 40 1 2 3 48

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 37 2 112 98 111 108 1 9 3 42 21 908
Minnesota........... I 26 20 3 3 1 2 4 271
Iowa............... 8 6 5 15 28 3 1 8 328
Missouri........... 4 53 32 1 1 1 3 1 22 5 144
North Dakota...... 20 1 13 5 72 44 2 48
South Dakota....... 4 5 2 1 2 9 1 72
Nebraska........... 6 21 24
Kansas............. NN 1 8 10 20 30 1 8 1 21

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 76 5 376 304 426 196 1 45 20 12 378
Delaware............ 6 2 1
Maryland........... 1 25 48 17 2 3 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 12 6 4 -
Virginia........... 10 43 72 148 46 5 4 4 205
West Virginia...... 44 26 16 140 79 1 1 24
North Carolina..... 4 1 65 52 2 5 12 4 1 5
South Carolina..... I 49 14 32 24 1 4 I
Georgia............... I 1 52 23 9 3 11 1 78
Florida............. 16 3 98 71 73 40 17 5 65

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 143 2 154 122 733 678 15 1 22 5 345
Kentucky............. 31 1 51 26 70 39 2 1 1 47
Tennessee.......... 64 51 53 590 608 8 1 15 4 283
Alabama.............. 43 1 34 21 26 2 4 3 15
Missssippi........ 5 18 22 47 29 1 3 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 233 3 156 156 512 562 1 15 3 68 8 400
Arkansas ........... 19 10 5 1 5 3 37 1 99
Louisiana.......... 2 105 63 3 3 3 32
Oklahoma........... 9 7 29 10 7 18 1 69
Texas............... 224 1 25 5 497 551 1 7 10 6 200

MOUNTAIN............. 198 2 64 55 748 644 4 1 28 4 101
Montana............. 45 3 49 16 16 -
Idaho............... 19 3 4 50 57 -
Wyoming............. 2 5 4 11 10 4 -
Colorado............ 35 11 14 303 214 2 8
New Mexico......... 26 4 171 177 1 47
Arizona............. 48 5 9 85 56 1 44
Utah............... 51 6 14 79 56 1 1 8 -
Nevada............. 8 3 58 2

PACIFIC.................. 293 12 354 305 559 461 14 4 188
Washington......... 8 1 26 24 51 75 1 -
Oregon............. 60 20 22 10 10 6
California......... 207 10 289 240 438 356 12 4 182
Alaska.............. 7 11 10 -
Hawaii.............. 18 1 12 8 50 15 1 -

Puerto Rico 68 28 6 4 10 48 15









271


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





T.ibh -4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS L NDFR I YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area Ae 1 w Area --
7/11 7/18 7/25 8/1 7/11 7/18 7/25 8/1


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.............
Bridgeport, Conn..........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass.........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass .............
Lynn, Mass...............
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass.........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y...............
Allentown, Pa .............
Buffalo, N.Y..............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, 11.J............
Erie, Pa..................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa................
Rochester, N.Y............
Schenectady, N.Y..........
Scranton, Pa.............
Syracuse, N.Y.............
Trenton, N.J ...............
Utica, N.Y ................
Yonkers, N.Y ..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAl:
Akron, Ohio ...............
Canton, Ohio..............
Chicago, Il ..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio.............
Dayton, Ohio..............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, tl ch ..... .........
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis.............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn. ............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo............
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn..........
Omaha, Ilebr...............
St. Lou Es, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans ............


11
1
1







2
1
1


2
2
2


2
3




3
I


7
3
3
7
89
9
9
36
10
4
5


3
4

3


2
1
65
5
13
7
5
36
1
3
3
3
2
13
5
6
2
2

5


2

2
6
8

7
5
7
2
2


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 7 11 11 15
Baltimore, Md............ 30 18 24 16
Charlotte, N.C........... 3 3 4 9
Jacksonville, Fla........ 7 7 5 7
Miami, Fla............... 1 2 3 6
Norfolk, Va............... 5 6 6 8
Richmond, Va.............. 6 7 11 9
Savannah, Ga.............. 6 2 3 1
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 2 3 1
Tampa, Fla............... 2 5 3 8
Washington, D.C........... 15 13 43 15
Wilmington, Del.......... 2 3 3 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala ......... 7 7 10 9
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 5 4
Knoxville, Tenn ......... 1 3 4 3
Louisville, Ky........... 3 5 3 17
Memphis, Tenn........... 6 15 7 17
Mobile, Ala............... 11 3 5 2
Montgomery, Ala........... 1 1 4
Nashville, Tenn.......... 3 10 3 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex............... 3 4 1
Baton Rouge, La.......... 4 9 3 1
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 2 2 1
Dallas, Tex .............. 12 7 10 13
El Paso, Tex............. 2 2 2 7
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 7 8 9 3
Houston, Tex............. 29 12 9 23
Little Rock, Ark......... 3 4 8 6
New Orleans, La.......... 7 22 9 19
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 11 7 4 8
San Antonio, Tex......... 9 7 4 10
Shreveport, La........... 12 7 6 2
Tulsa, Okla............... 4 6 3 5

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 5 6 4 1
Colorado Springs, Colo... 1 2 3
Denver, Colo ............. 13 13 10 9
Ogden, Utah............... 3 1
Phoenix, Ariz............. 7 3 2 6
Pueblo, Colo.............. 1 1 1
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 8 2 4 1
Tucson, Ariz.............. 3 2 1 2

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 1 1 -
Fresno, Calif............ 3 3 5 4
Glendale, Calif.......... 2 3 1
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 3 4 5 5
Long Beach, Calif........ 1 7 5 3
Los Angeles, Calif....... 34 55 38 26
Oakland, Calif........... 6 7 6 5
Pasadena, Calif.......... 2 1
Portland, Oreg............ 4 12 9 6
Sacramento, Calif........ 4 4 4 3*
San Diego, Calif......... 11 4 9 5
San Francisco, Calif ..... 7 4 5 8
San Jose, Calif.......... 3 4 2 5
Seattle, Wash............. 11 5 7 4
Spokane, Wash............. 4 4 3 4
Tacoma, Wash.............. 2 4 5 2*

San Juan, P.R............... (---) (---) (---) (---)


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 11,743
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 400
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 796
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,588


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTF: All deaths b) place of occurrence.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIOA

111111111111111111
3 1262 08864 2821


272 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




DEAT1N LIERm ONE -.AR Oo AmE IN xO U S CITIES
INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES o ....., o .... _a- .,in C


The .rckil\ ajLcragi number of infant deaths in 108 -- --- ---
cities for the four-week period ending Augui 1I was "82 as "" '
compared with an cxp.cced weekly a' 'rae- of 717, an excess o a -
of 65. t, ..... -

Wek Ending .1 1 1i' /
Week Ending 4 Week Weekly o

7 11 7 18 7/25 8 1 Total Average

Observed 785 797 749 796 3,127 782
Expected 714 716 718 720 2,868 717

Excess 71 81 31 76 259 65

The table below which presents tour-week averages
since the first of the year for each geographic division -.., '''1 r t_
shows that in the past four-week period, all divisions
reported an increase over the previous period, especially (See table, page 271)
the Middle Arlantic, East Norh Central and South Atlantic.
The reported increase may reflect delayed processing of / D L6 -T
death cerrificares or an actual increase in the number of
infant deaths. .



FOUR-WEEK AVERAGE NUMBER OF INFANT DEATHS US o. Ti --
by Geographic Division, 1964- F' V


1964
U.S.
1964 NE MA ENC WNC SA ESC WSC MT PAC Obs. Exp.

12/28-1/18 46 177 156 50 70 51 104 27 79 760 766

1/25-2/15 38 192 148 46 77 46 90 28 92 757 756

2/22-3/14 39 175 162 52 76 42 80 30 90 745 741

3/21-4/11 44 181 154 54 74 50 88 25 79 748 726

4/18-5/ 38 174 153 52 68 40 87 28 77 717 716

5/16-6/6 38 178 144 51 78 36 90 21 79 714 709

6/13-7/4 36 170 138 48 62 39 82 26 85 686 712

7/11-8/1 42 190 160 52 84 44 92 29 88 782 717




THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 12.000 IS PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L.GODDDARD.M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION R E. RULING, PD.,
AIST. CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION 1, L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF. SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A, .ENDEfRSON, M.D.
EDITOR. MMWR L. K. ALTMAN, M.D.
hI ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES POR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES, SUCH
ACCOUiNT SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO!
LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN, M.O,, EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTES: THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE*
GRAMS TO THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS.
SYMBOLS:- -* DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
PROCEDURES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF VARIOUS MORTALITY CURVES
MAY BE OBTAINED FROM STATISTICS SECTION. COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 303335


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