Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00371

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




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Vol. 14, No. 6






Week Ending
February 13, 1965


7i .
,s .b i .


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES

INFLUENZA
Type A influenza continues to be prevalent in much
of New England and in some States of the Middle Atlantic
Division. Its occurrence has also been reported from Iowa,
Missouri, Michigan, Alabama, and Kansas where outbreaks
have generally been more focal. L nuonfirmed but clinically
suspect outbreaks have been reported from Maine, New
Hampshire, and Mississippi.
Influenza viruses identified as Type A2 strains have
been recovered in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut,


CO.\ TE T rs
It.l'Idj ml..lrjaic Notes
Influenza State Reports: Alabama; Iowa;
Michigan; Kansas . .. 54, 55
Rabies in Animals .... . ...... 55


Pennsylvania, Missouri, Kansas, and Michigan. Isolates
from several other regions are presently being studied.
In addition, serological confirmations of Type A influenza
have been reported from Massachusetts, Iowa, Vermont,
and Alabama.


(Continued on page 54)

Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)

6th Week Ended Cumulative, First 6 Weeks
Disease Median
February 13, February 8, 19 Median
1965 1964 1965 1964 1960 1964

Aseptic meningitis .......... 25 22 22 168 158 145
Brucellosis ............... 3 13 11 24 40 40
Diphtheria ............... 3 6 8 18 28 81
Encephalitis, primary infectious. 23 36 ** 170 175 "
Encephalitis, post-infectious .... 9 7 '" 77 38
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ............. 767 1,039 1,285 4,764 5,504 6,606
Measles .................. 8,237 9,361 11,214 42,624 38,363 51,041
Meningococcal infections ...... 70 56 56 388 328 320
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 1 1 6 2 6 52
Paralytic .............. ..1 1 4 2 4 32
Nonporalytic ............. 2 ""
Unspecified ........ ..- -
Streptococcal Sore Throat and FLO/-.
Scarlet fever ............ 11,264 12,072 10,510 62, 53,077
Tetanus ................. 4 3 -2 /
Tularemia ... ............... 4 1 40 0 "
Typhoid fever ............. 6 6 8 41 42
Robies in Animals .......... 99 89 73 AR 9,65 374

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FRELVC Y
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Rabies in Man: -
Botulism: Smallpox: -
Leptospirosis: 3 Trichinosis: N.Y. Upstate 1 19
Malaria: Mass. 1, Pa. 1 3 Typhus-
Plague: Murine: Tex. 1 2
Psittacosis: 2 Rky. Mt. Spotted: 6


.R







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES
INFLUENZA Continued

Inspection of the current pneumonia and influenza
mortality reported to CDC by 122 U.S. cities (below)
shows the U.S. total to be just above the "epidemic
threshold." The number of deaths is noted to be elevated
primarily by reports from the New England and Middle
Atlantic Divisions. Specifically, New England's increase
results from excess mortality in Boston, Springfield, and
Worcester. In the Middle Atlantic States, elevated mortal-
ity in Paterson and Jersey City contributes most sub-
stantially to the Dilisional total. In general, the geo-
graphical distribution of the excess influenza and pneu-
monia mortality corresponds to the areas known to have
been experiencing influenza for the longest time and in
the greatest concentration.
The sum of current reports demonstrates that influ-
enza has become relatively widespread but scattered in
the eastern half of the U. S. In those areas where the
disease has been identified, patterns both of sporadic
outbreaks and of more concentrated epidemics are being
described.


INFLUENZA State Reports

Alabama
A recent outbreak of widespread influenza, particularly
affecting younger age groups, was reported during the
past week from Clarke County. The southern portion of the
County was most heavily involved, and some schools
Were temporarily closed. Adults were likewise affected,
and an increased number of cases of pneumonia were
reported.
A serological survey carried out on unpaired acute and
convalescent serum specimens from cases demonstrated
significantly increased levels of HI antibodies to Type


A influenza during the convalescent phase. Virus isolation
attempts are under wae.
(Reported by Dr. W.H.Y., Smith, Director, Division of
Preventable Diseases, and Dr. Thomas S. Hosty, Director
of Laboratories, Alabama State Department of Public
Health).
Iowa
During the past week, Type A influenza was sero-
logicallN confirmed in Iowa. Some 3 weeks ago, an abrupt
outbreak of acute febrile respiratory disease developed
in Fairfield, a small town in the southeastern part of the
State. A major proportion of the cases occurred among
students attending a liberal arts college in the community,
many of whom had returned onl. recently from visits in
variouss parts of the East. Paired serum specimens from
0 cases demonstrated a rise in HI Liter to influenza
Type A.
(Reported by Dr. Ralph H. Heeren, Director, Division of
Preventable Disea-es, Iowa State Department of Health,
and Dr. Albert .McKee, Professor of Microbiology, Uni-
viersity of Iowa School of Iedicine).
Michigan
There has been a general increase in acute febrile
respiratory disease during the past few weeks, particularly
in the Grand Rapids, Monroe, Lansing, and Ann Arbor
regions. Illnesses have been recognized primarily among
school children because of "spotty" school absenteeism.
An A: influenza virus antigenically similar to A2.'
Taiwan '64 has been isolated from a student at the Uni-
versit of Michigan where increased numbers of influenza-
like illnesses haxe been observed in the past week.
Additional epidemiological and laboratory investigations
are in process.
(Reported by Dr. George H. Agate, Directorof Epidemiology,
Ifichigan Department of Health, and Dr. Fred Davenport,
ProfessorofEpidemiology, University of Michigan School
of Medicine).


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES
1200-1


1100-

1000-


600-


400-


ALL
CITIES


WEEK NO 40 44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 74 28 32 36 40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16 20 20 28 32 36
WK ENDED 6 3 1 29 26 23 23 20 18 15 13 10 7 5 2 30 28 25 22 21 18 16 13 11 8 5 3 31 28 2 30 27 27 24 22 19 17 14 II
MONTH O N D J F M A M J J A S O N J F M AM J J S ND J F M A M J A
1962 11963 1963I 1964 1964 11965








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Kansas
Influ Ln'it I-like illness has been observed in 5 counties
so far this winter: Lyon, Cloud, Rilpubli, Russell, and
Saline. In LIon and Cloud Counties, the illness has been
confirmed as influenza iqp A by ( F' test. A2 virus has
been isolated by the CDC Laboratory, Kansas C('i Field


Station, Irinin, the in tissue of a fatal casc of pI)nIulonia
In l rinrri i in Kansas City.

(Reported '.,, Don E. Wilcox,, 4.1 Dlirector of Disa.se
Prevention and Control, Kansas State Iepartment of
Health and CDC Kansas City Field Station).


RABIES


During 1964, an epizootic of rabies primarily among
foxes, has been prevalent in 5 southeastern lState.. The
Central and Eastern counties of Tennessee have been
most severely affected. In addition, areas of Kentucky,
Virginia, North Carolina, and Alabama which are contit-
uous to Tennessee have also been involved.


Rabies has been an endemic problem in a number of
southeastern Sate-. during the past 5 years. Between
1960 and 1963 Tennessee, Kentucky, V:rginia, North Car-
olina and Alabama had reported a relatively constant
incidence of the disease. (Table I)

FOX RABIES- 1964

NUMBER OF CASES PER COUNTY
S= I case


Table I
Reported Cases of Animal Hibl,-. in Five Southeastern
States, 19t.1i-i4;
Number of Cases

1960 1961 19,b 1 ii: 1964*

Tennessee 1 186 213 138 '5:
Kentucky 121' 128 143 122 64
Virginia 226 190 136 238 333
North Carolina 19 14 1 15 6
Alabama 91 64 31 35 37
* Totals for 1964 are preliminary


Tennessee led the nation in total number of animal The sharpest increase in numbers of cases has oc-
rabies cases during 1964. A provisional total of 543 cases curred among foxes, which comprised three-fourths of the
has been reported among wild and domestic animals 1964 rabies cases. Cases have increased in domestic
(Table II). During 1963, there were 138 reported rabies animals as well, with 64 cattle, 29 dogs and 15 cats,
cases in Tennessee. reported to have been infected.


Table II
Reported Cases of Confirmed Rabies in Tennessee 1959-64

Year Fox Skunk Bat Raccoon Cattle Cat Dog Other Total
1959 68 4 33 7 24 3 139
1960 108 3 33 6 30 8 188
1961 100 9 2 41 7 23 4 186
1962 110 17 3 53 10 19 1 213
1963 51 13 5 1 36 4 27 1 138
1964* 382 29 14 64 15 29 10 543
* Provisional data


The Tennessee State Game and Fish Commission and
the Tennessee State Department of Public Health with
the cooperation of State Health Departments and State
Predator Control Agencies in the epizootic area as well
as Federal Health and Predator Control Agencies have
planned a comprehensive program attempting fox reduction


(Continued on back page)










56 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 13, 1965 AND FEBRUARY 8, 1964 (6TH WEEK)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 25 22 23 9 1 2 6 1 2 4 3 18

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 2 1 1
Maine.............. -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ .
Massachusetts...... 2 1 1 1
Rhode Island....... 1 -
Connecticut........ -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 5 3 2 1 -1 1 1 2
New York City...... 1 2 1
New York, Up-State. 1 1 1 1 -
New Jersey......... 2 -- -
Pennsylvania....... 3 1 -. 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 3 4 1
Ohio................ 2 -
Indiana............ I 1
Illinois........... 2 -
Michigan............ 2 2 -
Wisconsin......... -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 5 3
Minnesota.......... 1 2 -
Iowa................ -
Missouri............ -
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska ........... -. .
Kansas............. 3 .

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 9 3 8 3 2 4
Delaware........... -
Maryland........... -
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 2 1 -
West Virginia...... .
North Carolina..... 1 1
South Carolina ..... -
Georgia............. .
Florida............. 8 7 2 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 1 1 i 1 3
Kentucky........... 1 1 -
Tennessee .......... 2 1 -
Alabama ............ 1 2
Mississippi ........ .

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4
Arkansas ........... 1 1 1
Louisiana.......... -
Oklahoma........... ..
Texas.............. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3

MOUNTAIN ............. 1 3 -
Montana............ .
Idaho............... .
Wyoming ............ .
Colorado............ 2 -
New Mexico......... .
Arizona............ 1 1 -
Utah............... .
Nevada...............

PACIFIC.............. 4 6 6 1 1 -
Washington......... 1 .
Oregon............. -
California......... 3 5 6 1 1 -
Alaska.............. -- -
Hawaii............. 1 .

Puerto Rico -










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Heport 57


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOIII IAHIl I)IMIA I I N IT;I) STATES

FOR I I kI I NI) l)

FEBRIIARY 13, 1965 AND FIBRL'ARY 8, 1964 (6TH WFIK)- (ON1 IN[II)


Bruce1- Intfetious Hepatitis MHningoc' c a 1,
loss including Serum Hepatitis In fectins Tetauns
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
ncl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 3 767 402 308 4,764 5,504 70 388 328 4 21

NEW ENGLAND.......... 42 21 20 294 678 4 21 10 1
Maine.............. 8 5 3 67 280 4 -
New Hamp-hir .... 5 2 3 25 71 1 1
Vermont........... 1 1 30 67
Massachusetts...... 18 9 9 90 131 2 10 3
Rhode Island....... 6 3 3 35 25 1 2 2 -
Connecticut........ 4 2 1 47 104 1 4 5 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 101 53 48 895 1,206 9 53 41 1
New York City...... 23 8 15 151 161 1 11 7
New York, Up-State. 46 30 16 426 602 1 10 14 I
New Jersey......... 9 2 7 106 168 6 23 7
Pennsylvania ....... 23 13 10 212 275 1 9 13 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 187 112 72 930 792 13 52 48 -
Ohio............... 58 43 12 308 235 2 16 15 -
Indiana............. 13 9 4 57 58 3 9 7 -
Illinois........... 25 14 11 171 97 3 12 10 -
Michigan............ 90 45 45 347 374 2 8 14 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 47 28 3 7 2 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 35 15 17 328 357 1 18 13 2
Minnesota.......... 1 4 1 1 28 21 3 3 1
Iowa............... 2 14 6 7 159 51 -
Missouri.............. 8 4 4 56 73 9 5 1
North Dakota....... 2 21 3 2 -
South Dakota....... 1 1 6 39 1 1 -
Nebraska........... 1 1 7 7 -
Kansas............. 7 3 4 70 145 2 3 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 74 32 38 459 523 16 85 73 2 8
Delaware........... 5 5 12 6 2 -
Maryland........... 9 5 4 80 91 2 5 11 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 9 1 3 -
Virginia........... 8 2 5 78 66 2 13 7 1
West Virginia ..... 15 14 1 106 96 6 5
North Carolina..... 6 3 3 55 116 13 9 1 1
South Carolina .... 7 1 6 20 18 3 8 12
Georgia............ 20 10 2 15 6 3
Florida............ 24 7 14 84 111 6 20 23 1 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 67 44 17 315 396 3 24 28 2 3
Kentucky........... 18 11 2 108 194 7 5 -
Tennessee.......... 34 23 11 121 126 3 10 13 1
Alabama............ 9 5 3 53 53 7 6 1 1
Mississippi ........ 6 5 1 33 23 4 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 76 46 29 482 357 10 47 47 3
Arkansas............ 24 13 11 75 50 1 4 4 1
Louisiana........... 15 8 7 74 73 6 17 19
Oklahoma........... 1 I 24 22 6 2 -
Texas.............. 36 24 11 309 212 3 20 22 2

MOUNTAIN................ 59 21 8 264 363 3 13 17 1
Montana............ 4 4 28 36 -
Idaho.............. 7 44 35 --
Wyoming ............ 4 1 3 20 7 1 -
Colorado........... 11 9 2 31 80 2 3 6 1
New Mexico......... 9 5 1 44 74 1 6 5 -
Arizona............ 20 67 80 2 1 -
Utah............... 4 2 2 28 45 11 -
Nevada.............. 2 6 1 2 -

PACIFIC.............. 126 58 59 797 832 11 75 51 2
Washington......... 8 6 2 67 96 4 -
Oregon.............. 10 8 73 84 3 6 1 -
California ........ 93 47 46 584 605 8 68 42 2
Alaska............. 15 5 3 68 31 1 2 -
Hawaii.............. 5 16 2 -

Puerto Rico 26 19 7 72 39 2 2 3 4










58 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
FEBRUARY 13, 1965 AND FEBRUARY 8, 1964 (6TH WEEK) CONTINUED


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 8,237 42,624 38,363 11,264 4 35 6 39 99 557

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2,016 10,876 2,178 1,004 1 8
Maine............... 155 1,222 266 185 -
New Hampshire...... 28 184 11 3 -
Vermont............. 4 105 563 4 1 7
Massachusetts...... 1,238 6,430 391 162 -
Rhode Island....... 250 1,277 155 47 -
Connecticut........ 341 1,658 792 603 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 307 1,477 7,290 526 2 1 17
New York City...... 36 174 2,845 25 1 -
New York, Up-State. 133 515 1,467 331 1 1 15
New Jersey......... 36 238 1,486 81 -
Pennsylvania....... 102 550 1,492 89 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,571 7,564 7,805 1,388 2 5 6 28
Ohio................ 221 1,378 1,285 145 2 2 -
Indiana............. 62 328 1,608 140 1 5
Illinois........... 33 230 2,379 190 1 3 6
Michigan........... 957 4,156 1,872 676 1 1 8
Wisconsin.......... 298 1,472 661 237 1 1 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 900 3,381 985 597 2 1 2 20 105
Minnesota......... 4 55 21 14 4 30
Iowa............... 684 1,882 410 135 11 35
Missouri........... 91 347 94 21 1 1 2 3 14
North Dakota....... 120 983 451 162 7
South Dakota....... 23 3 44 6
Nebraska............ 1 91 6 4
Kansas............. NN NN NN 221 1 2 9

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 926 5,994 3,993 1,482 12 1 12 26 96
Delaware.......... 5 79 46 15 1 -
Maryland........... 40 116 640 169 1 5 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 9 65 19 -
Virginia........... 108 829 900 255 3 1 24 81
West Virginia...... 594 4,377 1,189 633 1 1 2
North Carolina..... 13 102 133 19 2 4 -
South Carolina..... 15 55 659 67 2 -
Georgia............. 67 161 97 85 5 1 5
Florida............ 84 266 264 220 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 312 2,109 5,258 1,385 1 9 1 3 30 197
Kentucky............ 13 156 2,814 87 1 1 7
Tennessee.......... 200 1,388 2,084 1,200 1 7 1 2 29 185
Alabama............ 75 407 163 47 1 1 5
Mississippi........ 24 158 197 51 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,104 4,157 3,198 1,260 2 8 1 9 12 74
Arkansas........... 102 142 90 15 1 4 3 6 16
Louisiana.......... 1 8 12 1 1 1 2 3 22
Oklahoma........... 9 38 31 121 3 1 3 14
Texas.............. 992 3,969 3,065 1,124 3 22

MOUNTAIN ............ 569 3,569 1,777 1,879 1 4 4 14
Montana............ 135 1,252 396 46 -- 2
Idaho............... 107 540 273 171 -
Wyoming............ 4 95 16 30 1 -
Colorado............ 132 489 198 744 -
New Mexico......... 26 86 53 253 1 -
Arizona............ 22 95 613 379 2 12
Utah............... 143 1,006 149 250 1 4 -
Nevada............. 6 79 6 -

PACIFIC .............. 532 3,497 5,879 1,743 2 3 18
Washington.......... 110 942 2,057 84 -
Oregon............. 65 651 702 32 -
California......... 261 1,467 2,522 1,497 1 3 18
Alaska.............. 5 38 558 35 -
Hawaii.............. 91 399 40 95 1 -

Puerto Rico 59 186 407 13 1










Morbidity and Mortality ~W eklh Hleporl


Table 4. I)IATHS IN 122 I NITL) STATES ( IT1 I()R WIIK INI)lD) HIRI'ARY 13, 1965

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Area


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Br ldi p.rt, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.---------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.- ------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.---------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.---
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.---------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans. ---
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


All ausrs

All 65 years
Ages and over


Pneumonia
and
Influenza
All Ages


Under
1 year
All
Causes


I I ,


65 years and
and over Influenza
All Ages


~II 1 f 1 1-


938
337
47
32
30
73
28
36
39
54
74
16
57
25
90

3,368
66
43
160
46
31
57
91
113
1,632
44
509
160
67
101
22
47
52
62
30
35

2,664
65
32
714
168
215
112
98
396
33
70
40
29
61
168
54
148
40
25
42
86
68

804
57
26
38
152
23
116
59
212
73
48


620
222
24
25
23
46
20
27
32
27
48
12
39
15
60

1,975
40
29
107
30
20
34
50
54
945
25
281
82
47
63
14
31
38
40
22
23

1,527
37
22
416
108
116
60
44
215
23
38
19
19
44
87
30
87
21
10
25
57
49

484
36
18
19
95
18
74
32
122
40
30


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.*--------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii*------
Long Beach, Calif.----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.--------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,322
127
279
47
76
181
47
84
34
113
99
210
25

672
78
59
41
161
114
60
49
110

1,193
29
41
36
167
42
100
188
81
211
87
122
37
52

423
39
19
134
7
97
21
62
44

1,510
11
47
49
41
67
490
80
32
95
58
95
184
39
131
60
31


I year
All
Causes


Total 12,894 7,439 688 727

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 81,597
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 46,558
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 3,914
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 4,821


Week No.
6










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


RABIES (Continued from page 55)

in epizootic areas, as well as in buffer zones surrounding
these areas. In addition, dog vaccination in the epizootic
areas and buffer zones will be continued.
(Reported by Dr. R.H. Hutcheson, Commissioner of Public
Health and Dr. Cecil B. Tucker, Director and Assistant
Commissioner Preventive Diseases, Tennessee Depart-
ment of Public Health and a team from the Communicable
Disease Center.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

llllllllllllllllllllll ll1262 08864 2508lll ll
3 1262 08864 2508


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 13.000 15 PUBLISHED BN THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333.
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF. STATISTICS SEC TION R. E. SERFLING. PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF. SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.
ASSISTANT EDITOR. MMWR PAUL D. STOLLEY. M.D.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITy AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY: COMPILED
DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIDAY.
SYMBOL S.--DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
VOL. 14. NO. I.


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