Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00368

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


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Vol. 14, No. 28







Week Ending
July 17, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


CHOLERA District of Columbia


A second case of laboratory acquired cholera in-
fection is reported from a research laboratory in tta-h-
ington. D.C. The patient is a 43-:ear-old male technician
who was exposed on July 12 and 13 to the same strain of
Vibrio cholera which ga\r rise to the first case reported
(MMlHR Vol. 14, No. 23). The infection is thought to have
been acquired on July 13 during vacuum filtration of a
culture when, during the manipulation of a rubber stopper
in a filtration flask, a few drops of contaminated fluid
leaked on to the patient's hand. It is uncertain if any of
the fluid made contact with his face. He washed his
hands promptly and thoroughly and he did not at any time
knowingly ingest infected material.


('CO TEN TS
Cholera District of Columbia . ..... 237
Anthrax New Jersey . ..... .. 238
Salmonella Gastroenteritis 1 >-hin.lt.rn, D.C. Area .. 238
Primary and Secondary hll . . 239
International Notes Quarantine Measures ... 244

On Thursday morning, July 15, he awakened earlier
than usual because of cramps and watery diarrhea; the
diarrhea persisted and occurred at about hourly intervals.
However, he went to work and a culture was taken at the
laboratory. He went home in mid-afternoon but, in spite
of anorexia and persistent diarrhea overnight, he again
reported for work on Friday morning, July 16. His stool
culture, taken the previous day, was by then positive for
Vibrio cholerae and he was immediately hospitalized.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
28th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 28 WEEKS
MEDIAN
JULY 17, JULY 11, 1960- 1964 MEDIAN
S i 1965 1964 1965 1964 1960- 1964


Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .
Tetanus .................
Tularemia ................
Typhoid fever .............

Rabies in Animals ......


4,515
5
10
6


566
4,047
38
5
5



4,278
2
15
8

94


54
15
4



607
4,886
38
25
14



3,395

20

84


789
127
88
825
440


19,155
231,963
2,044
26
20
6


253,259
124
133
198

2,627


833
214
151
1,003
569


22,566
449,997
1,672
53
42
8
3

259,662
130
170
197

2,578


24,792
378,053
1.352
252
180



213,686


273

2,194


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ... ... ... ... ............. .... ...... 6 Rabies in Man: ................ ..... ....... .. .. 1
Botulism: ................................. 11 Smallpox: ........ ................... .... 1
Leptospirosis: .................... ........ 17 Trichinosis: Pa.-l .......................... 66
Malaria. ................................. 37 Typhus-
Plague: ................................. Murine:Ark.-1, Texas-1 ........... ......... 16
Psittacosis: ................................. 21 Rky. Mt. Spotted: Pa.-2, 111.-1. Del.-1. Md.-4, N.C.-1,- 114
Cholera: .................... ......... 1 Ark.-l, S.C.-3, Va.-2 I


.,-i.r. ,
.r.






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


July 17. 1965


CHOLERA District of Columbia
(Continued from front page)


On admission the patient was noted to be dehydrated
but his vital signs were not compromised although he
was passing copious amounts of clear, colorless and
odorless stool. More than 20 liters of fluid were required
on the 16th and 17th of July for rehydration and he was
also given tetracycline. Recovery has been uneventful.
There has been no evidence of further spread of the
infection. The family is isolated at home and so far all
cultures have been negative. Other contacts have also
been identified and are under strict surveillance.
The patient thought he had received cholera vaccine
during military service in World War II but he has had


none since. There is no history of previous gastrointes-
tinal disease except for an infection with Salmonella
typhimurium in the distant past. However, he had had a
20-pound weight loss during the previous 2 months, due
to a suspected viral myocarditis from which he has
recovered.
(Reported by Dr. Murray Grant, Director of Public Health,
District of Columbia Department of Public Health, Dr.
John H. Janney, Acting Chief, Division of Epidemiology,
Maryland State Health Department, Dr. Roy P. Lindgren
and Dr. Joseph Bell, Montgomery County Health De-
partment.)


ANTHRAX New Jersey


Two cases of cutaneous anthrax have been reported
during the past 3 months from employees of the same
tannery in New Jersey. Both employees handle raw
imported goat skins as part of their assigned jobs. It
is six years since cases last occurred in this tannery
and none of the employees in the plant have been im-
munized with the cell free anthrax vaccine.
The first case, a 24-year-old male, noted a lesion
on his forehead on March 28. He saw his physician on
March30 who, due to the appearance of a "typical lesion",
suspected the diagnosis was anthrax. Cultures were
taken and reported as positive on the following day.
The patient was hospitalized on March 31, treated with
penicillin, and made an uneventful recovery.
The second patient, a 30-year-old male, developed
a lesion on the dorsal aspect of his right forearm on
May 14. Four days later he visited his physician who


diagnosed cutaneous anthrax which was later confirmed
by smear. Treatment consisted of penicillin and achromycin
to which the patient responded.
The history of cutaneous anthrax at this plant is
as follows:


1939 to 1948 19 cases
1949 to 1958 6 cases
1959 1 case
1965 through July 17 2 cases


Total 28 cases

(Reported by William J. Doughtery, M.D., Director, Division
of Preventable Disease Control, New Jersey Department
of Health).


SALMONELLA GASTROENTERITIS
Washington, D.C. Area


Further details are now available of the common
source salmonella outbreak arising in a large delicatessen-
catering establishment and reported in the MMWR Vol. 14,
No. 25. A total of 198 people out of 580, who attended a
series of catered parties during a 2-day period, are re-
ported to have developed gastroenteritis. In addition to
the above group, an estimated 3,500 people purchased
food at the delicatessen during the same weekend. Sub-
sequent to newspaper publicity, 125 other persons stated
that they had suffered illness after consumption of food-
stuffs from the delicatessen.
Of the 115 food handlers from whom specimens were
taken, 64 were excreting salmonella; 17 out of 29 items of
a variety of prepared foodstuffs gave positive cultures of
Salmonella meleagridis.
During a 2-week voluntary closure of the premises,
the physical plantwas extensivelyrechecked and a course
of 6 lectures on sanitation and food hygiene, lasting 2
hours each, was given to the employees engaged in food


handling. When the premises were reopened, continuing
checks brought to light one further environmental source
of contamination, a meat slicer, and the fact that 11 out
of 63 food handlers, returning to work after two successive
negative rectal swabs, were again excreting salmonella.
The premises were voluntarily closed for a second time
and only reopened after extensive further checks were
negative and all food handlers had had an additional
three successive negative rectal swabs. The primary
source of contamination responsible for the outbreak
remains unknown.
A survey was conducted early in July by the District
of Columbia Department of Health to determine the status
of five similar firms in relation to salmonella infection.
All specimens from food, environment and employees
were negative for salmonella.
The main serotype recovered during this outbreak was
S. meleagridis. All environmental and food cultures
yielded this serotype with one exception which was S.
(Continued on back page)


238









July 17, 1965


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS


The monthly n...rl.iilio. reports for the last 3 years
have shown small but persistent increases in infectious
cases of \ phill- in the United lari- as a whole. This is
in kltepineL with the trend in m.nAn other countries. How-
ever, there are certain S:uie- in the United .rante- which
are rleporting -_lli1f'i Linly large increases or decreases
in incidence.

Certain areas report large increases during June 191;.'
compared to June 1964. In Alabama, while part of the
increase can be attributed to better ca-l.finljnt and re-
porting these increases, generally are believed to rcnl't. i
an actual rise in the incidence of infectious syphilis.
On theother hand, some areas are r',poriing decreases
in the incidence of early syphilis. Since there has not
been any relaxation of control activities anywhere in the
United Staie-, these decreases are believed to represent a
true fall in incidence. For e\annple, in Philaidtlphii, the
numbers of cases of early syphilis have been steadily
declining over a period of months although there has been
no le and reporting.


SUMMARY OF REPORTED
CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS:


\n~Imin the States r'.reorti ng increases or decreases, no
regional pattern has been noted except in the kIn-I .Nlurh
Central area where the ci'nligiuou1 SI.Ii,- of Tennessee,
Alabama and Mississippi have reported large increases,
both for the month of June and for the 6-month period
ending June -.3. 11..:,. (Table I) This increase in numbers
of cases over the 6-month period represents a 71 percent
rise over the similar period in 1964.
TABLE I
\I \. S REIP( ) IIMN( 1. %\(iE IN(CR \'F'ES IN
INFL'-TI()l SYPHILIS


C'uiiiul:ive Totals Month of

Jan.- Jan.-
June JuneJune
1964 1965 1964 1965

Alabama 388 792 71 235
Tennessee 216 301 33 :1.
Mississippi 123 27! 28 55
Chicago 436 620 66 112


TABLE II
CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS JUNE 1965 JUNE 1964
By Reporting Areas June 1964 and June 1963 Provisional Data


Cumulative Cumulative
Reporting Area June Jan June Reporting Area June Jan June
1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964
NEW ENGLAND................ 38 53 234 253 EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 362 143 1,447 794
Maine.................... 2 1 Kentucky ................ 14 11 76 67
New Hampshire............ 4 18 6 Tennessee................ 55 33 301 216
Vermont ................. 1 3 Alabama .................. 238 71 792 388
Massachusetts............ 19 38 136 157 Mississippi.............. 55 28 278 123
Rhode Island............. 2 9 8
Connecticut .............. 15 13 68 78 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 206 216 1,161 1,260
Arkansas ................. 20 22 122 105
MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 380 459 2,313 2,745 Louisiana................. 53 59 327 321
Upstate New York........ 33 47 241 337 Oklahoma.................. 11 29 72 82
New York City........... 230 293 1,397 1,615 Texas..................... 122 106 640 752
Pa. (Excl. Phila.)....... 22 11 93 63
Philadelphia............. 11 20 121 167 MOUNTAIN.................. 39 59 286 279
New Jersey................ 84 88 461 563 Montana .................. 9 8 16
Idaho.................... 1 3
EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 268 176 1,509 1,100 Wyoming.................. 2 7
Ohio..................... 62 43 320 266 Colorado................. 3 4 17 14
Indiana.................. 7 5 32 30 New Mexico ............... 6 16 56 114
Downstate Illinois....... 15 15 116 75 Arizona.................. 25 24 160 102
Chicago................... 112 66 620 436 Utah..................... 2 8 6
Michigan ................ 62 41 380 269 Nevada................... 5 4 34 17
Wisconsin................ 10 6 41 24
PACIFIC................... 184 176 1,024 1,157
WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 37 22 250 255 Washington............... 5 9 42 35
Minnesota................ 9 5 51 67 Oregon ................... 2 4 18 37
Iowa.................... 10 14 California............... 176 159 948 1,070
Missouri ................ 18 12 126 111 Alaska................... 5 6
North Dakota............. 1 Hawaii................... 1 4 11 9
South Dakota.............. 3 1 26 24
Nebraska................. 6 1 30 23 U. S. TOTAL............... 2,098 1,905 11,611 11,323
Kansas................... 1 3 6 16
TERRITORIES............... 81 88 401 415
SOUTH ATLANTIC............. 584 601 3,387 3,480 Puerto Rico.............. 76 87 393 403
Delaware................. 5 4 30 43 Virgin Islands........... 5 1 8 12
Maryland.................. 43 44 206 254
District of Columbia .... 42 43 252 393
Virginia................. 47 22 176 136
West Virginia............ 8 6 36 24
North Carolina........... 76 102 505 525 Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
South Carolina............ 74 62 427 442 through previous months.
Georgia.................. 115 128 558 631
Florida .................. 174 190 1,197 1,032


239










240 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 17, 1965 AND JULY 11, 1964 (28th WEEK)


Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic.
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 33 37 24 16 2 26 53 2 20 42 3 88

NEW ENGLAND........... 3 1 1 2 2 1
Maine............... 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont........... -
Massachusetts...... 2 -1 1
Rhode Island....... -
Connecticut........ 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 1 7 4 1 7 7 1 5
New York City...... 1 4 1 1 1 1 3
New York, Up-State. 4 4 4 -
New Jersey......... 2 2 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 6 5 3 1 7 6 3
Ohio............... 2 2 2 1
Indiana............ 1 2
Illinois........... 3 2 1 4 4 --
Michigan......... 4 3 1 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 1 5 3 1 5 2 18
Minnesota.......... 3 1 1 1 1 7
Iowa............... I 1 1 1 1 1
Missouri............. 2 1 1
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... 7
Nebraska........... 3 3 1
Kansas............. 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 1 3 18 13 1 23
Delaware............. -
Maryland........... 1 1 I -
Dist. of Columbia.. -- 3
Virginia........... 1 -
West Virginia...... 1 I -
North Carolina..... 1 8 4 1 2
South Carolina..... 3 1
Georgia............ 1 1 11
Florida........... 1 7 6 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 6 4 3 1 14
Kentucky............. -
Tennessee........... 2 1 --
Alabama............. 2 2 1 13
Mississippi ....... 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 1 1 2 1 11 4 1 9 4 19
Arkansas......... 2
Louisiana.......... 1 2 1 1 2
Oklahoma........... I 1 1 -
Texas............... 3 1 1 10 3 1 8 3 15

MOUNTAIN ............. 1 1 3 5 6 3 3 -
Montana............ -
Idaho............... -
Wyoming ............ 2 2 -
Coloradoo........... 1 1 -
New Mexico......... 1 3 -
Arizona............. 1 4 2 -
Utah............... 3 -
Nevada............ -

PACIFIC .............. 16 17 4 6 3 2 3 2 5
Washington.......... 1 1 2 2 -
Oregon............. 1 I 1 1
California......... 13 16 3 6 1 1 1 1 4
Alaska .............. -
Hawaii ............. 2 -

Puerto Rico -6










Mlorliility and Mortality % weekly Report 241


Table 3. CASES OF !PI( I 111) N) I IIAHI I DISEASES: UNITED STATES

F)R 1 I'ks INI)1I)

JULY 17. 1965 AND JULY Ii, 1964 (28th ~ I 11) Continucd


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningcooccal
losis including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
ncl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 4 512 234 261 19,155 22,566 40 2.044 1,672 5 124

NEW ENGLAND.......... 27 13 13 1,161 2,259 4 103 47 5
Maine.............. 3 2 1 217 744 12 5
New Hampshire ..... 2 1 106 166 5 1 I
Vermont............. 1 1 64 283 3 5 1
Massachusetts...... 17 10 7 453 465 34 19 3
Rhode Island....... 1 1 146 120 14 7
Connecticut........ 3 1 2 175 481 1 33 14 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 103 52 51 3,372 5,101 6 271 200 8
New York City...... 9 4 5 631 752 1 46 28 -
New York, Up-State. 38 18 20 1,349 2,308 3 72 55 3
New Jersey......... 24 15 9 623 912 73 69
Pennsylvania....... 32 15 17 769 1,129 2 80 48 5

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 95 52 40 3,695 3,427 10 270 230 2 13
Ohio............... 21 12 9 1,044 906 71 62 1
Indiana............ 14 9 5 316 305 1 37 35 1 6
Illinois........... 23 10 10 685 594 6 71 55 1 4
Michigan........... 35 19 16 1,416 1,379 1 57 52 -
Wisconsin........... 2 2 234 243 2 34 26 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 33 19 13 1,199 1,237 1 106 103 8
Minnesota.......... 2 2 115 117 21 22 5
Iowa............... 6 1 4 442 177 7 6 1
Missouri........... 22 16 6 255 316 1 48 52 1
North Dakota ..... 17 47 7 11 -
South Dakota........ 1 16 106 2 -
Nebraska............ 1 1 42 32 10 6 1
Kansas............. 2 1 1 312 442 11 6 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1 52 20 27 1,971 2,129 5 402 354 2 35
Delaware........... 59 41 5 6
Maryland........... 4 4 369 413 38 24 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 26 33 1 7 12
Virginia............ 1 7 2 5 459 328 1 48 39 7
West Virginia...... 5 4 294 339 23 26 1
North Carolina..... 4 2 2 159 381 1 78 59 2 5
South Carolina..... 3 1 2 79 71 56 48 3
Georgia............. 8 3 2 74 51 51 46 4
Florida............. 20 7 12 452 472 2 96 94 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 34 18 13 1,370 1,570 1 163 147 18
Kentucky........... 18 11 4 476 646 67 49 4
Tennessee.......... 10 5 5 487 531 1 47 49 5
Alabama............ 4 2 2 235 255 30 31 8
Mississippi........ 2 2 172 138 19 18 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 47 22 25 1,647 1,679 1 288 208 21
Arkansas........... 4 2 2 223 174 14 19 4
Louisiana........... 11 7 4 285 382 1 162 102 3
Oklahoma............ 1 39 90 17 7 1
Texas.............. 31 13 18 1,100 1,033 95 80 13

MOUNTAIN............. 10 5 1 1,130 1,376 61 59 1 3
Montana............ 1 1 83 126 2 -
Idaho.............. 159 152 8 3
Wyoming............ 32 45 4 3 -
Colorado............ 227 373 13 11 1 2
New Mexico......... 4 4 244 197 10 23 -
Arizona............ 3 221 317 16 5 1
Utah............... 2 1 158 124 6 6
Nevada............. 6 42 2 8

PACIFIC............. 2 111 33 78 3,610 3,788 12 380 324 13
Washington.......... 9 3 6 295 436 3 31 25 -
Oregon............. 12 5 7 298 410 28 18 3
California......... 2 86 24 62 2,825 2,744 9 301 265 10
Alaska.............. 3 1 2 163 122 13 6 -
Hawaii............. 1 1 29 76 7 10 -

Puerto Rico 44 31 12 745 546 4 30 3 21










242 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 17, 1965 AND JULY 11, 1964 (28th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 2,180 231,963 449,997 4,515 10 133 6 198 124 2,627

NEW ENGLAND.......... 118 36,473 15,758 357 3 30
Maine.............. 11 2,753 2,726 29 3
New Hampshire...... 1 378 236 -
Vermont............. 43 1,231 2;230 24
Massachusetts...... 22 19,131 4,796 33 2 1
Rhode Island....... 11 3,881 1,815 20 -
Connecticut........ 30 9,099 3,955 275 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 331 13,736 50,960 248 1 33 6 106
New York City...... 67 2,024 15,005 4 17 -
New York, Up-State. 130 3,820 12,131 229 1 8 3 95
New Jersey......... 62 2,341 11,983 10 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 72 5,551 11,841 5 6 3 11

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 885 52,816 100,201 431 1 10 1 27 44 396
Ohio............... 62 8,694 19,263 17 6 37 202
Indiana............ 23 1,701 22,380 159 3 9 3 37
Illinois........... 81 2,405 15,977 57 5 6 2 72
Michigan........... 237 25,530 28,204 120 1 1 3 39
Wisconsin.......... 482 14,486 14,377 78 1 1 3 2 46

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 88 16,222 29,885 126 14 5 25 532
Minnesota........... 3 617 325 2 1 7 108
Iowa............... 14 8,935 23,157 20 1 3 152
Missouri........... 37 2,550 1,005 13 10 4 1 71
North Dakota....... 34 3,562 4,581 72 5 32
South Dakota....... 109 5 1 1 1 38
Nebraska........... 449 812 29
Kansas............. NN NN NN 18 2 8 102

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 231 23,840 37,374 486 27 41 19 355
Delaware........... 3 498 378 4 -
Maryland............ 31 1,067 3,367 47 12 2 5
Dist. of Columbia.. 5 69 352 16 -
Virginia........... 24 3,722 12,545 77 5 3 4 253
West Virginia...... 97 13,230 8,280 137 1 4 17
North Carolina..... 8 369 1,136 5 5 12 2
South Carolina..... 13 993 4,207 18 3 4 2
Georgia............ 6 604 157 42 14 2 2 34
Florida............. 44 3,288 6,952 144 3 7 42

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 92 13,353 66,588 1,004 15 2 21 5 605
Kentucky............ 13 2,386 18,234 45 3 6 1 59
Tennessee.......... 69, 7,644 23,527 891 11 1 7 4 533
Alabama........... 2,252 18,168 43 1 4 10
Mississippi........ 10 1,071 6,659 25 1 4 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 105 29,985 70,504 336 6 49 30 11 420
Arkansas........... 1,080 1,051 4 32 10 3 58
Louisiana.......... 91 95 1 5 1 64
Oklahoma............ 1 200 972 1 1 8 2 74
Texas.............. 104 28,614 68,386 335 1 8 13 7 224

MOUNTAIN............ 186 19,012 17,428 698 1 13 1 14 3 50
Montana............ 30 3,613 2,774 18 2 3
Idaho.............. 29 2,636 1,789 32 -
Wyoming............ 3 834 240 9 1 3 1 -
Colorado............ 53 5,475 3,038 380 2 4
New Mexico.......... 5 657 382 118 8 11
Arizona............. 27 1,173 6,385 68 1 5 1 31
Utah................ 29 4,422 1,848 73 8 I
Nevada.............. 10 202 972 -

PACIFIC.............. 144 26,526 61,299 829 2 5 1 24 11 133
Washington.......... 10 7,179 19,906 125 2 1 5
Oregon............. 18 3,113 8,159 8 2 2 3 3
California.......... 82 12,538 31,757 562 3 1 17 10 123
Alaska............. 4 142 1,067 37 1 2
Hawaii............. 30 3,554 410 97 1 -

Puerto Rico 44 2,140 5,242 10 3 11








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Week No. Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES (ITIS H)R WI K INI)I I) JULY 17, 1965


(By place o( occurrence and week of Iiling certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


A !l I I I I ,

\ll 65 years and
S n Influenza
kges and over
All Ages


P'-,,h I
I year
All
Causes


A I I

All
Ages


65 years
and over
VIA[,~

V. r:cvc


SI I i I I I


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.----------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.---------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabehth, N. J.------
Erir, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.--------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, II1.--------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio---------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.---------
Fort Wayne, Ind.*-----
Gary, Ind.-----------
Grand Rapids, Mich.--
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, MinnA.---
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


682
225
38
27
27
63
20
15
28
41
51
14
51
37
45

3,213
55
38
145
39
33
38
58
96
1,574
32
539
211
55
88
29
43
50
41
19
30

2,506
51
37
723
143
211
111
76
344
41
62
38
25
55
127
26
135
38
24
51
120
68

831
65
31
37
122
34
123
78
227
57
57


420
134
24
16
19
33
14
13
21
22
30
11
31
24
28

1,840
30
24
78
26
18
27
30
47
912
17
295
108
39
62
15
30
25
26
13
18

1,401
23
30
370
92
112
64
51
191
27
34
24
11
37
65
15
86
17
18
24
74
36

488
39
23
15
68
25
76
44
125
38
35


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla. ----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.---------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-----------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.-*-----
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.JL-------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


Total


1,131
125
259
44
61
90
56
90
42
74
66
184
40

668
94
49
49
144
137
60
48
87

1,116
35
29
30
170
34
78
180
43
195
88
120
44
70

386
37
11
127
14
88
21
40
48

1,448
20
29
31
46
74
379
113
30
116
62
80
213
39
126
53
37


__11,981 6,765

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for


All Causes, All Ages ------------------------
All Causes, Age 65 and over-------------------
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age---------------


and
Influenza
All Ages


36
5
10

1
2
1

1
3
7
4
1

29

2
2
11
4

6
4

38
2
1
I
4
4

1
1
8
3
4
3
6

21
3
1
2
1
7

4
3

39



1

17
2


1
5
4
3
4
1
1


1 year
All
Causes


69
10
15
5
3
3
4
12

4
9
3
1

35
6
3

8
11
2
3
2

88

2
5
14
5
4
12
5
23
5
6
2
5

26
2
1
12

5
2
2
2

77

2
2
8
5
20
5
1
3
3
12
5
4
5
2


2 13


732


previous weeks


354,499
201,241
15,295
20,989


" "


a


II


' '








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SALMONELLA GASTROENTERITIS
(Continued from page 838)


typhimurium recovered from a rest-room toilet. Among the
employees, only four out of the total of 115 examined
yielded other serotypes. Two had a dual infection with S.
meleagridis and S. typhimurium; one had S. typhimurium
only and the fourth had a dual infection of S. meleagridis
and S. tennessee.


(Reported by Dr. Murray Grant, Director of Public Health,
District of Columbia Department of Public Health and a
team from CDC.)


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES


Immunization Information for International Travel
1963-64 edition-Public Health Service Publication No. 384


The following changes should be made in the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


Page 72
DELETE


City: Baltimore, Maryland


U.S. Public Health Service Hospital,
Inoculation Clinic
Wyman Park Dr. & 31st Street


U.S. Public Health Service Hospital,
Inoculation Clinic
Wyman Park Dr. & 31st Street
Telephone BElmont 5-3930


Clinic Hours: Friday, 1:30 p.m.


Fee: No


(Further changes in the list of Yellow Fever Vaccination
Centers will be notified in the report for the 29th week.)


July 17, 1965


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 13.900 IS PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333.
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING. PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
CHIEF. SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F R.C.P.E.

A1N ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY; COMPILED
CATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIDAY.
SYMBOLS: -- DATA NOT AVAILABLE
'UANTITY ZERO
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
VOL. 14. NO. 1.

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UNIV OF FL LIB.
DOCUMENTS DEPT.




U.S DEPOSITORY
U.S DEPOSITORY


244


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in


Center:


Clinic Hours: Tuesday, 10 a.m.


Fee: No


ADD


City: Baltimore, Maryland


Center:




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