Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00352

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

17- PS Q.^6/ 9: 1^/3

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER



SI











U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELl


Vol. 15, No. 3


Week Ending
January 22, 1966


SERVICE


MEASLES DOVER, NEW JERSEY


On December 2, 1965, in Dover, New Jersey, a
measles immunization campaign was conducted in the
kindergarten through third grades of all four of the city's
elementary schools. A total of 119 cases of measles had
been reported between September 24 and December 2 in
Dover, with 72 percent of the cases localized in one
elementary school and among children living in one part
of the town. Details of this campaign were recorded in
the MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 48.
In all, 465 children were immunized in the school
clinics, and this represented 80 percent of the known
susceptible children in kindergarten through third grades.
This reduced the total percentage of susceptibles in the


Measles 1* .Jersey ... ... 17
Measles Im.nu .tio nm pain -iodeland .. 18
Influenza i .. 1^* *T ^ 1i
National I i. .l Chart .. .... 19
Influenza- 24

young school-age group from 48 percent to approximately
10 percent. The publicity attendant on the campaign
stimulated an estimated 500 additional immunizations in
private physicians' offices between November 29 and
December 12. The epidemic curve in Figure 1 shows the
occurrence of cases of measles in the schools in relation
to the immunization campaign. A breakdown of the cases
of measles, by schools affected, is given in Table 1.
(Continued on page 18)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
3rd WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 3 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JANUARY 22, JANUARY 23, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis ................. ... 15 32 32 86 104 79
Brucellosis. ... ....... ... ........ 2 6 6 6 16 16
Diphtheria. ..... ................... .. 2 3 3 5 12 14
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ........... 25 27 68 97 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious ...... 13 10 37 34
S769 1,183 2,252 2,967
Hepatitis, serum 20 192 2252 2,967
Hepatitis, infectious ................. 632 7 1,993
Measles rubeolaa) ..... ............... 4.932 6.805 7,306 14,337 18,754 21.112
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 1 1 8
Paralytic ................... 1 7
Nonparalytic .......
Meningococcal infections, Total ......... 63 69 62 220 195 157
Civilian ..... ........... 54 66 199 190 --
Military ................. .. .......... 9 3 --- 21 5 -
Rubella (German measles) ................ ..824 -- -- 2,150 -- -
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 9,616 9,610 8,653 26,382 28,264 23,685
Tetanus..................... .... ....... 2 --- 3 10 -
Tularemia ............... .. .... .... 4 11 12 26 -
Typhoid fever .................. ..... 2 9 8 9 14 15
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 1 7 3 -
Rabies in Animals ....... ............... 61 93 57 200 273 163

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ....................- Botulism: ........................ ......
Leptospirosis: Hawaii 1 .................. .. 1 Trichinosis: N.Y. Up-State 2, Pa. 1 ..... .13
Malaria:. N.J. 1. N.C. -2. N.Mex. 1, Iowa- ........... 13 Rabies in Man: ................
Psittacosis: ............. .. ............... ...... 3 Rubella. Congenital Syndrome: .......... .......... 1
Typhus, marine: ................. ....... ............ ............







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MEASLES DOVER, NEW JERSEY
(Continued from front page)


FIGURE I


MEASLES, DOVER, NEW JERSEY
SEPTEMBER 25, 1965-JANUARY I, 1966


32

28
o 20-
m 16-


/tcc*n Give
12,/S65


WEEKENDING :- : : : "
SEPT OCT NOV DEC JAN
1965 1966

Since December 2, a total of 38 additional cases of
measles have occurred in Dover; 31 cases occurred in the
10 days following the immunization program. Between
December 12 and December 28, seven additional cases
developed. Five of these were in one high school which
was beginning to have a small upswing in measles inci-
dence at the time of the immunization campaign. None of
the seven cases developing after December 21 had had
measles vaccine; two of these cases were of the age group
to have received vaccine at school clinics, but parental
consent had been withheld in both instances.
A postal survey of 16 physicians caring for pediatric
patients in the Dover area was conducted 2 weeks after


Table 1

MEASLES in DOVER, NEW JERSEY
SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER, 1965
Breakdown of Cases by Schools

Number of Cases Between
School 9/24- 12/2- 12/12- Total

12/2* 12/12 1/12**
N.D.............. 0 1 0 1
E.D. ............ 86 11 1 98
S.S............... 3 3 5 11
S.H............ 4 1 0 5
D.J.H ........... 4 1 0 5
Live in Dover,
School elsewhere. 2 0 0 2
Pre-school ....... 20 14 1 35
Total .... 119 31 7 157

*Immunization Program held on 12/2/65.
**No cases have been reported since 12/28/65.


the immunization campaign was completed. Replies were
obtained from 13 of these physicians, and only one post-
vaccine reaction requiring a house call was reported.
(Reported by Mr. William Young, Health Officer, Dover,
New Jersey; Dr. William J. Dougherty, Director, Division
of Preventable Diseases, New Jersey State Department
Health; and an EIS Officer.)


MEASLES IMMUNIZATION CAMPAIGN
RHODE ISLAND


A statewide measles immunization campaign, spon-
sored by the Rhode Island Medical Society with the
cooperation of the Rhode Island Department of Health, was
held on Sunday, January 23, 1966. Thirty-six clinics
distributed throughout the State were open from 10 a.m.
until 2 p.m. and were staffed by volunteer physicians,
nurses and laymen. The organization was modeled after
that of previous poliomyelitis immunization programs.
Children attending the clinic were first registered and
then screened for any medical contraindications to measles
vaccination. A total of 31,764 children with neither a
history of measles nor of vaccination against, it and


between the ages of 1 and 12 years were vaccinated,
using a live attenuated measles vaccine. This total
represents 65 percent of the target population of 50,000
children estimated to be susceptible to measles. Arrange-
ments have been made to conduct a telephone survey,
after 15 days, of 5,000 children so vaccinated to determine
the number of reactions to measles vaccination requiring
medical attention.

(Reported by Dr. James Bowes, State Epidemiologist,
Rhode Island Department of Health; and the Childhood
Virus Disease Unit, CDC.)


INFLUENZA B CLAXTON, GEORGIA


Type B influenza virus has recently been identified
as the agent responsible for an outbreak of febrile res-
piratory disease during December in Claxton, Evans


County, Georgia, which has a population of 7,000 and is
located in the middle eastern part of the State. Initially
recognized in a predominantly Negro school with some


JANUARY 22, 1966











800 students, the illness spread rapidly throughout the
school during the first week in December. From the
usual expected 5 percent absentee rate, the school ex-
perienced a peak rate of nearly 40 percent within 5 days.
Since the Christmas vacation was scheduled to begin
the following week, the school was closed several days
early. About the same time similar illnesses were being
noted in other schools in Claxton and in Evans County.
Within several days, absentee rates in these other schools
began to rise rapidly and also prompted the closing of
schools for the Christmas holidays a few days earlier
than was planned.
\IlriaL h clinically suggestive of influenza, the
illness was notable for usually observed high fever.
Among well-defined cases in children seen by the phy-
sicians in Claxton and by health investigators working
in the schools, a median temperature of 103.5 F was
reported. Headache was almost uniformly experienced in
typical cases and was accompanied by general malaise
and myalgia. There were no major complications of fatal-
ities reported.


Spread into the adult segment of the population and
into adjoining portions of Evans County was recognized
through mid-January, but evidence of appreciably increased
school absenteeism or of widespread febrile illness have
not been observed elsewhere in Georgia.
Throat swabs collected early in the outbreak from
children who had a typical illness have been investigated
in the Georgia State Virology Laboratory and an Influenza
type B strain isolated. Further study of this strain at the
WHO Influenza Center for the Americas at the Commu-
nicable Disease Center in Atlanta, has shown that the
isolate, B(Georgia ,'i65, is closely related to other
1964-65 strains obtained from Japan, Australia and other
centers in the United States. This characterization has
been based on reciprocal hemagglutination inhibition tests
in which the treatment of serum with Receptor Destroying
Enzyme (RDE) was required for final interpretation.
(Reported by Dr. John E. fc('roan, Chief Epidemiologist
and Dr. Marion Coleman, Chief of the Virology Laboratory,
Georgia Department of Public Health; and by the Res-
pirovirus Unit of the Laboratory Branch, CDC.)


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES


ALL
CITIES


700-

600-

500-

400

300-

WE* T: 4*.. '; L 4 : .. :. a ." I .' Jo g s ..* -. .' ji -** r, :* -. 2 16
WX Er5ci 5 2 30 28 25 22 21 IS 16 13 it 8 5 3 31 28 2 30 27 27 24 22 19 17 4 II 9 6 4 1 29 26 26 23 21 18 16 13 10
MONTH 0 N 0 J F M A M J J A S 0 NO J FM AM J J A S N D J M A M A S
196311964 1964 965 9651966





Editorial Note: The basis of the construction of the National Pneumonia-
Influenza Mortality Chart is described in the Ml\ItR, Vol. 14, No. 1 of January
9, 1965, pp. 8-9. It will be noted that the chart currently shows no evidence of
increase in mortality, which is within seasonal expectations throughout the
country as a whole.


JANUARY 22, 1966


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report








20 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 22, 1966 AND JANUARY 23, 1965 (3rd WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 15 32 2 25 27 13 2 3 20 632 769

NEW ENGLAND .......... 1 2 1 2 1 37 44
Maine............... 14 10
New Hampshire...... 2
Vermont............. 7
Massachusetts...... 1 1 1 1 17 8
Rhode Island ....... 1 1 6
Connecticut........ 1 5 11

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 1 6 10 1 9 96 161
New York City...... 1 3 6 1 6 18 30
New York, Up-State. 2 1 1 3 29 71
New Jersey......... 2 1 2 10 19
Pennsylvania....... 1 39 41

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 3 2 3 1 1 138 111
Ohio................ 1 1 2 2 23 34
Indiana............ 1 10 -
Illinois............ 2 24 20
Michigan........... 1 1 1 71 45
Wisconsin............ 10 12

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 2 1 1 23 52
Minnesota .......... 1 1 1 1 2 11
Iowa................. 4 21
Missouri........... 5 6
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska........... -- 4 -
Kansas............. 1 8 13

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 7 6 6 1 1 1 57 68
Delaware ........... 1 1 2 1
Maryland ........... -- 6 18
Dist. of Columbia.. -- 1
Virginia........... 1 1 14 11
West Virginia...... 3 16
North Carolina..... 1 1 1 13 3
South Carolina..... 1 3
Georgia ............ 1 1
Florida............. 1 6 4 4 1 1 18 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 1 1 62 63
Kentucky ........... 1 17 23
Tennessee.......... I 39 26
Alabama ........... 1 2 10
Mississippi........ 4 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 4 I 1 64 85
Arkansas........... 2 8
Louisiana.......... 1 10 19
Oklahoma........... 1 1 4
Texas............... 3 3 1 51 54

MOUNTAIN............ 3 32 39
Montana............ 2 3
Idaho............... 3
Wyoming............ 1 7
Colorado........... 1 6
New Mexico......... 2 13 7
Arizona............ 9 7
Utah............... 6 6
Nevada............. 1 -

PACIFIC.............. 2 13 6 3 9 9 123 146
Washington......... 9 17
Oregon.............. 1 1 14 18
California......... 11 5 2 9 9 98 103
Alaska.............. 8
Hawaii.............. 2 -

Puerto Rico.......... 6 9








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


(ASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 22, 1966 AND JANUARY 23, 1965 (3rd WEEK) Continucd


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOM
MEASLES (Rubela) TOTAL
I 10AL Total
AREA

1966 166 965966 19 196666 1966 1965
1966 1965 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 4,932 14,337 18,754 63 220 195 -

NEW ENGLAND .......... 81 203 5,331 4 16 10
Maine............... 11 27 698 2 -
New Hampshire...... 1 4 115 3 6 1
Vermont............. 33 80 20 I -
Massachusetts...... 14 42 2,957 4 5
Rhode Island....... 11 20 571 1 2 1
Connecticut ........ 11 30 970 1 3 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 830 2,447 660 9 44 27
New York City...... 420 1,160 99 2 13 7
New York, Up-State. 51 310 207 1 6 6
New Jersey......... 17 258 113 3 13 8
Pennsylvania....... 342 719 241 3 12 6

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,799 5,900 3,017 15 39 22
Ohio............... 156 368 658 5 15 9
Indiana. ........... 48 269 142 1 4 2 -
Illinois........... 281 1,259 92 2 5 7
Michigan........... 267 755 1,526 7 13 1
Wisconsin........... 1,047 3,249 599 2 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 226 457 1,238 3 11 13
Minnesota.......... : 164 230 15 3 2
Iowa.............. 9 77 573 1 2
Missouri.......... 14 30 129 2 3 6 :
North Dakota...... 38 114 427 3
South Dakota...... 1 16 1 -
Nebraska.......... 1 5 78 -
Kansas............. NN N N N 2 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 609 1,574 2,886 11 37 45
Delaware........... 9 26 66 2
Maryland............ 73 198 29 4 2 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 31 63 j
Virginia........... 92 112 485 1 1 6
West Virginia...... 288 847 2,102 1 1 3
North Carolina..... 17 30 56 4 8 5 -
South Carolina..... 13 85 21 2 9 3 -
Georgia............. 4 24 28 4 11
Florida............. 82 189 99 3 10 13 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 585 1,592 999 3 4 14
Kentucky........... 211 493 59 2 2 7
Tennessee.......... 370 1,057 659 1 2 4 -
Alabama............. 2 11 169 3
Mississippi........ 2 31 112 -


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 313
Arkansas............ 3
Louisiana.......... 2
Oklahoma............ 9
Texas.............. 299

MOUNTAIN.............. 136
Montana............. 24
Idaho.............. 35
Wyoming............ 5
Colorado........... 12
New Mexico......... 1
Arizona............ 58
Utah ............... 1
Nevada .............

PACIFIC.............. 353
Washington......... 96
Oregon............. 34
California......... 215
Alaska............. -
Hawaii ............ 8
Puerto Rico........... 61


I1


805 1,507
21 6
12 1
10 17
762 1,483

544 1,722
103 570
142 295
12 56
39 245
3 51
233 43
8 459
4 3

815 1,394
228 325
99 365
473 526
25
15 153

169 84


YELITIS
Sy RUBELLA
Paralytic


S1966


1966 1966
S 824

S 113
7
7
1
27
20
19
39

56
31
23

2


10 LU 24
S 1 2
3 5 6
5
7 14 11

1 9 1 58
1 1 4

3
8 1 16
35
-2


7 40 39 198
79
1 3 1 40
6 27 37 74
7 1
2 5
2 -2__ 5








22 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 22, 1966 AND JANUARY 23, 1965 (3rd WEEK) Continued


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)

1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 9,616 3 4 12 2 9 7 61 200

NEW ENGLAND........... 1,924 2 2
Maine............. 110
New Hampshire...... 47
Vermont............. 71 2 2
Massachusetts...... 375
Rhode Island ....... 65 .
Connecticut ........ 1,256

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 225 1 3 1 8 19
New York City..... 21 1 2 -
New York, Up-State. 135 1 8 18
New Jersey ........ .
Pennsylvania........ 69 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 873 2 3 15
Ohio............... 142 2 2 7
Indiana............ 239 3
Illinois ........... 104 2
Michigan ........... 263 2
Wisconsin.......... 125 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 470 2 1 19 55
Minnesota.......... 34 4 13
Iowa ............... 138 4 11
Missouri........... 31 7 20
North Dakota....... 152 3
South Dakota ....... 10 3 7
Nebraska ........... 7 1 1
Kansas ............. 98 2 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC ...... 1,148 2 1 5 1 1 5 3 21
Delaware ........... 53 -
Maryland........... 126 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 39 -
Virginia........... 284 2 1 1 13
West Virginia...... 360 1 1 1 3
North Carolina..... 18 2 3
South Carolina..... 32 -
Georgia............ 2 1 4
Florida............ 236 1 1 1 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,461 3 3 12 39
Kentucky........... 185 1 1 2 5
Tennessee.......... 1,197 2 2 -- 9 32
Alabama............ 68 1 2
Mississippi ....... 11

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 901 I 9 38
Arkansas........... 1 1 3
Louisiana .......... 1 1 4
Oklahoma............ 29 1 2
Texas.............. 870 7 29

MOUNTAIN ............. 1,411 1 1 3
Montana............. 39 1 1
Idaho............. 71 -
Wyoming ............ 7
Colorado........... 766
New Mexico ......... 289 -
Arizona............. 93 I 1 2
Utah............... 145 .. -
Nevada .......... .. I

PACIFIC.............. 1,203 1 7 8
Washington ......... 38 -
Oregon ............. 28 -
California ......... 897 1 7
Alaska............. 160 -
Hawaii............. 80 -
Puerto Rico..........10








AMorbidity and Mortality W ecklN Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JANUARY 22, 1966

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
and Iy yeaA
Area All 65 years and Area All 65 year and year
A Influenza All Influenza All
Ages and over All Ages and ov All Ages
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-- ---
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.---
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.-------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


816 511 33 46
263 158 10 14
46 30 6 3
39 25 2
40 30 1
57 29 2 4
27 17 2 2
30 21 1
35 24 4 1
53 32 1
71 42 1 8
19 14 -
38 24 3 4
35 18 4
63 47 5 1

3,520 2,117 191 168
74 33 2
44 21 2 3
135 77 3 4
54 33 3 2
21 13 1 -
51 38 11 2
91 47 16 2
72 33 4
1,770 1,044 101 96
35 24 3 3
530 335 16 17
199 129 6 7
68 39 3 4
115 81 6 8
26 18 -
46 24 2 3
69 49 3
49 28 3 4
28 24 8 2
43 27 7 2

2,712 1,534 134 165
67 41 2
38 21 4 1
820 442 53 54
202 124 10 11
219 115 2 23
139 75 1 4
72 40 8 9
362 202 19 12
35 23 5 1
56 29 1 1
44 24 3 2
23 8 1 6
46 32 3 -
170 91 8 10
16 8 -
118 75 2 9
58 32 6
31 20 6 3
36 26 1 3
102 68 6 4
58 38 1 4

901 559 37 37
74 50 2 4
27 17 2 -
38 18 5 6
109 70 4 5
30 24 2 1
131 86 3 2
75 43 5 1
269 156 9 10
95 60 1 4
53 35 4 4


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-----------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.*--------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.*-----
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.*------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,143
131
262
39
73
88
45
72
34
79
76
205
39

687
113
49
33
148
146
35
49
114

1,252
54
71
20
153
34
64
264
61
182
104
126
74
45

441
40
13
109
17
143
31
49
39

1,834
19
53
41
45
93
609
149
34
118
74
112
213
40
146
54
34


593
49
137
18
39
53
24
37
10
66
42
95
23

357
45
27
17
91
86
15
20
56

635
35
36
8
76
14
32
120
30
98
51
72
33
30

255
18
7
53
8
87
22
36
24

1,156
12
30
32
23
66
375
93
20
67
52
67
144
27
92
36
20


Total [ 13,306 7,717 623 717

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 40,569
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 23,399
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------ 1,949
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 2,113


Week No.














EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS

INFLUENZA-LIKE DISEASE Massachusetts


During the week beginning January 16, rapid in-
creases in school absenteeism to some three times the
expected seasonal level, with peals of 20 to 30 percent,
were noted in the South Shore area of the southeastern
part of Massachusetts. Most pronounced in the areas of
Pembroke, Duxbury, and Fall River, a febrile influenza-
like illness affected students and teachers alike with
headache, sore throat, arthralgias, and, in'some instances,
a mild accompanying diarrhea. The mdot severely in-
volved schools were closed late in the week.
Similar illnesses have also -been' recorded from the
Newton and Brookline regions, which are western suburbs
of the Boston metropolitan area. Absenteesim of up to
25 percent had affected some Brookline schools by the
end of the week.
A survey of industries in the eastern part of the
State revealed up to 10 percent absenteeism in some,
which is more than twice the seasonal expectation; there
was evidence that there may be also an increased inci-
dence of respiratory illness.
Unpaired, acute-convalescent serum specimens and
throat washings for virus isolation have been collected
from typical cases in the involved areas for study by the
Massachusetts State Laboratory. Although the illness is
clinically compatible with influenza, a specific etiology
has not yet been determined.
In retrospect it is of interest that there was an out-
break of comparable illness affecting the community of
Taunton, Massachusetts, also located on the South Shore,
which appeared late in December 1965.
(Reported by Dr. Nicholas Fiumara, State Epidemiologist,
Massachusetts Department of Health.)





INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1965-66 edition Public Health Service Publication No. 384

The following change should be made:


Section 5


AMERICA


Brazil, page 37
Add
Cholera vaccination required from arrivals from infected
local areas, one year of age and over.


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY RE
TION OF 15.300. IS PUBLISHED AT THE
CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION
CHIEF. SURVEILLANCE SECTION
EDITOR: MMWR


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
VESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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JANUARY 22, 1966 9





PORT. WITH A CIRCULA.
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE

JAMES L. GODDARD, M.D.--
A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D. Z
IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
D.A. HENDERSON, M.D.
D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F.R.C.P.E.




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