Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00345

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 15, No. 43







Week Ending
October 29, 1966


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE HEALTH SERVICE
____________'_________^ Tn Ft^___


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES 1966

A total of 2,262 cases of measles were reported for
the 4-week period from September 18 through October 22.
1966 (weeks 38-42). This is 845 less than the lowest
previous total reported for the comparable period in 1960.
For the week ending October 22. 633 cases were,
reported, slightly less than the 679 cases noted for the
previous week. Nineteen states, however, reported an
increase in the number of cases over that of the preceding
week. The 13 counties reporting 10 or more cases of
measles for the 42nd week are listed in Table 1; the
geographic distribution of counties and health districts
reporting measles for the same week is shown in Figure 1.


.............
(irron, JIrc-
.. ,. .. .
\rlo r l ,pi,> lti < li 6196 .
Sta ,rnw'nt oin If .


For the -3rd N.. 29), 72S moasle-
cases were report.l ..r .5 ca-i- oxer the
preceding week and a decrease of 31: case.- from the
comparable week in 1965. Texas, with 149 cases, and
Washington. with 163, reported the highest number of
measles cases for the 43rd week.
(Reported by the (Chldhood Viral Disri e' I nit. kpi-
demiology Branch, ('DC.) (Contioued on page 370)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
43rd WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 43 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE OCTOBER 29. OCTOBER 30, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961- 1965
Aseptic meningitis ... ... ......... 53 43 64 2.508 1.778 1,770
Brucellosis .................. .. ... 1 4 6 202 202 341
Diphtheria ........ . 7 2 10 163 124 223
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ......... 49 66 --- 1,824 1,606
Encephalitis, post-infectious .... ... .. 7 7 637 581
Hepatitis, serum ........ ... 30 1,158 1 35.
Hepatitis, infectious ....... 722 584 851 26432 8049 3912
Measles rubeolaa) ...... 728 1.056 1,208 192.849 245,038 393.066
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 5 3 10 82 5 363
Paralytic ........... ....... ... .... 5 1 10 75 40 311
Nonparalytic .............. 2 -- 9
Meningococcal infections. Total .......... 40 41 41 2.936 2.542 1.98S
Civilian . .. ...... 40 39 -2.655 2,353
Military ....... .. .... 2 281 189 -
Rubella (German measles) ... ... 254 -- 43.070
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever 6.439 6.016 5.218 345.718 322,967 279.209
Tetanus......... .. .... 1 8 160 222
Tularemia ...... .. 1......... 6 9 145 217 -
Typhoid fever ........... .. .... 7 17 10 326 371 451
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 3 2 226 247

Rabies in Animals. ..................... 79 65 1 57 3.423 3,632 3,158

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum Cum
Anthrax: Alaska- ............... .................. 6 Botulism: ... ...... .. ...... 8
Leptospitosis: ......... .. ...... 54 Trichinosis: ........ 84
Malaria: Pa-. NC5 '.1.+-1. Ill-1.Mo-1, Miss-1 Ga-1, owa-2, .. Rabies in Man: ....... 2
Oklj 1,C -l ..... ... .. ........... 378 Rubella. Congenital Syndrome: ... 20
Psittacosis: ............ .. ...... ....... 40 Plague:.. ........ 4
Typhus, murine:...... .... .. .... ........... 24 ..... .....








370


OCTOBER 29, 1966


*The distribution of measles in Alaska is reported by Health Jurisdictions, i.e. SE (Southeast), SC (South Central), and N (Northern).


Table 1
Counties Reporting Highest Number of Measles Cases
For Week Ending October 22, 1966


County
Galveston
Snohomish
Saratoga
Champaign
Wayne
McHenry
King
Clallam
Spokane
Rutland
Lake
Parker
Bastrop


State
Texas
Washington
New York
Illinois
Michigan
North Dakota
A, -h li trr .
Washington
Washington
Vermont
Florida
Texas
Texas


Number of Cases


Total 291

Rutland County, Vermont
Rutland County was mentioned in the MMWR, Vol. 15,
No. 42, as one of nine counties reporting a high number
of measles for the week ending October 15, 1966. The
Rutland County Medical Society, in cooperation with the
Vermont Department of Health, plans to conduct a measles
immunization program (luring the week of October 30
among susceptible kindergarten, first, and second grade
children.
(Reported by Dr. Linus Leavens, State Epidemiologist,
Vermont Department of Health; and the Rutland County
Medical Society.)


St. Louis, Missouri
During a measles immunization program held October
21-27, 1966, approximately 27,000 children attending
public and parochial schools in St. Louis were immunized.
At clinics set up in the schools, the children received
the live attenuated measles virus vaccine (Schwarz
strain) with the jet injector gun.
(Reported by Dr. J. Earl Smith. Health Commissioner, and
Dr. Helen Bruce, Director of School Health, both of the
St. Louis Health Department; and Dr. F.A. Belden, Con-
sultant, Communicable Disease Control, Missouri De-
partment of Public Health.)





Detroit, Michigan
An estimated 170,000 doses of measles vaccine were
given to children from 1 to 12 years of age in the Detroit
metropolitan area on October 23, 1966, in the largest
concentrated measles campaign conducted to date in the
United States. The 200 inoculation centers in Wayne,
Oakland, and Macomb Counties were staffed by volunteer
physicians, nurses, and citizens. The number immunized
exceeded estimates in all of the Counties.
(Reported by Dr. Bernard Berman, Director of Health of
Oakland County; Dr. John Hanlon, Director of Health,
Detroit City and Wayne County; Dr. Oscar Stryker,
Director of Health of Macomb County; and Dr. George
Agate, State Epidemiologist, Michigan Department of
Public Health.)


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



Figure 1
COUNTIESS OR HEALTH DISTRICTS REPORTING MEASLES
WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 22, 1966

_, 1 :, .








OCTOBIR 29, 1966


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ARBOVIRUS ENCEPHALITIS 1966


A total of 195 human cases of arboxirus infections
has been reported from 20 states through the .I4rd week
(ending October 29, 1966). Of these, 414 were St. Louis
encephalitis (SLE).41 Western Equine encephalitis (WEE),
3 (California encephalitis (CEV), and one Eastern Equine
encephalitis (EEE). Table 2 (page 376) compares the
number of cases reported this year with averages for the
5-year period, 1961-65. The geographic distributions of
the SLE and CEV cases are shown in Figure 2 and those
of WEE and EEE in Figure 3.
Large urban epidemics of SLE occurred in Dallas
(180 cases) and Corpus Christi (102 cases) during this
past summer (MMWR. Vol. 15, No. 39). In addition, three


other urban areas recognized human SLE infections:
New Orleans (20 case)., Fort Worth (17 cases), and St.
Louis (6 cases). Thus i25 SLE infections mai he con-
sidered "urban," while h)9 cases were reported from rural
areas. The total of 114 SLE cases reported so far this
year represents the third largest total notified in any
year since reporting Nwas instituted in 1955: in 1964,
470 cases were reported, and in 1956. 503 cases.
Only minimal activity of WEE was recognized this
summer in contrast to last year when the largest docu-
mented human outbreak occurred involving 172 human
cases (MMWR, \ol. 14, No. 39). To date, 13 western
(Continued on page 376)


Figure 2
CALIFORNIA AND ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS 1966














r-*


SCASES OF ST LOUIS ENCEAL COUNTY
...ST LOUIS ECEELIT\S
CASES .C-LIFORNI -ENCEP L .TIS
i -`-

(M I ,I ."


Figure 3
EASTERN AND WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS 1966
HUMAN CASES REPORTED BY COUNTY










372 Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 29, 1966 AND OCTOBER 30, 1965 (43rd WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 53 43 1 49 66 7 7 2 30 722 584

NEW ENGIAND.......... 5 1 1 33 19
Ma ine...... 5 2
New Hampshire...... 1
Vermont........... 1
assachusetts...... 4 16 7
Rhode Island....... 1 1
Conncticut........ 1 1 12 7

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 5 11 11 15 11 137 96
New York City...... 2 2 8 4 7 40 12
New York, Up-State. 7 2 3 -- 1 34 38
New Jersey......... 1 1 1 8 3 32 14
Pcnnsylvania....... 2 1 31 32

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 13 6 8 1 111 101
Ohio........... .. 3 3 4 22 28
Indiana ............ 3 1 1 6 8
Illinois........... 2 5 2 3 1 28 24
Michigan........... 1 4 -- 46 34
Wisconsin.......... 1 9 7

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 5 1 9 14 46 27
Minnesota.......... 7 5 2 2 4 3
Iowa.............. i 2 2 3 6
Missouri........... 1 3 31 6
North Dakota....... 3
South Dakota....... 1 -
Nebraska........... 1 5 4
Kansas............. 3 1 4 8

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 5 6 1 5 4 3 2 96 51
Delaware........... 5 1 2
Maryland ........... 26 9
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 1 1 -- 5 6
West Virginia...... 6 6
North Carolina..... 11 13
South Carolina..... 4 -
Georgia............. 3 2 32 4
Florida............. 5 1 4 2 10 11

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 2 2 1 38 40
Kentucky ........... 2 2 19 19
Tennessee.......... 2 1 8 12
Alabama............ 10 5
Mississippi........ 1 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 6 2 9 6 4 1 4 52 42
Arkansas........... 1 7 3
Loisiana.......... 2 4 4 3 12 10
Oklahoma............ I 3 2
Texas.............. 4 2 5 6 30 27

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 9 41 40
Mo itana ............ 3 8
SIdah.............. 7 1
W ming............. 2
Colorad ........... 1 2 8 4 12
Nw m xic ........ 11 4
Ar i ........... 1 10 5
Sta .............. 4 4
Nevada............. -- 6

PA IFIC.............. 16 4 11 6 2 12 168 168
KWhinltnn......... 3 2 1 24 7
Oon ........ 17 24
alifo rnia......... 12 4 9 6 1 12 121 133
AIRls ka.............. 5 3
Iawa i i ............ 1 1 1

Puertt Rico.......... 24 26










373


Morbidity and lMortality Weekly Heporl l


CASES OF SPECIFIC) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: I NITEl) STATl'S

FOR WEl K.S ENDlD)

OCTOBER 29, 1966 AND O(TOBER o0, 1965 (tSrd W\IEK) ((ONT INUIII)


AREA



UNITED STATES...

NEW ENGLAND..........
Maine...............
New Hampshire......
Vermont ...........
Massachusetts ......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut ........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania.......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio ...............
Indiana............
Illinois...........
Michigan...........
Wisconsin..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota ..........
Iowa ..............
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska ...........
Kansas..............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware...........
Maryland............
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia. .........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia.............
Florida............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky...........
Tennessee .........
Alabama ...........
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas.. ........
Louisiana. .........
Oklahoma ..........
Texas...............

MOUNTAIN.............
Moncana ...........
Idaho ..............
Wyoming............
Colorado...........
New Mexico.........
Arizona............
Utah...............
Nevada. ...........

PACIFIC ..............
Washington .........
Oregon ............
California .........
Alaska.............


Puerto Rico.........


-- u ------------i v
Cumulative
1966 1965
192,849 245,038

2,377 36,969
235 2,835
80 382
292 1,319
795 19,327
72 3,943
903 9,163

18,186 15,327
8,325 2,533
2,578 4,227
1,882 2,771
5,401 5,796

69,251 56,882
6,373 8,930
5,749 2,017
11,422 2,880
14,684 26,745
31,023 16,310

8,825 16,802
1,648 713
5,347 9,089
536 2,601
1,177 3,831
40 115
77 453
NN NN


34 15,507
S 260
4 2,120
2 386
2,197
12 5,381
6 511
S 658
2 236
8 3,758

40 19,902
9 4,745
20 12,418
10 1,709
1 1,030

160 25,136
1 972
99
10 513
149 23,552

43 12,152
7 1,848
13 1,642
170
10 1,331
2 1,141
8 5,325
645
3 50

236 21,513
163 4,084
19 1,887
43 14,836
9 560


62 3,028


25,569
507
1,174
80
4,127
14,093
399
1,086
618
3,485

14,257
2,728
8,053
2,341
1,135

31,239
1,085
111
211
29,832

20,091
3,794
2,846
854
5,765
679
1,362
4,583
208

27,902
7,306
3,325
13,153
190
32,3

2,573


MENINGOCOCCAL INFETIONS,
TOTAL

Cumulative
1966 1966 1965

40 2,936 2'542

5 132 130
1 11 17
9 7
4 8
2 53 46
1 16 14
1 39 38

8 362 327
3 53 55
2 101 94
1 106 83
2 102 95

10 468 373
3 132 100
2 81 46
2 83 102
3 125 82
47 43

154 129
35 30
22 12
S 60 52
11 11
5 3
8 10
13 11


499
4
48
14
60
36
130
52
64
91

255
90
87
54
24

396
36
148
21
191

90
5
5
6
49
10
10

5

580
43
36
480
17


16


CuCni ii l iv

1965 1966 b 66

3 f5 75


- 1


25

S- 14
4


1 4 5'9
1 14
1 4
2 7
S 14
20

1 16
4
7
1
4


480
10
46
9
59
25
100
62
58
111

195
77
63
33
22

327
16
181
20
110

90
2
11
5
24
11
17
17
3

491
38
34
393
18


11


I I


3



2

4 63


3 60
3 60


- Zo
S- 10


S 6

S- 10



S3 75
S 2 49
13
1 10
- 2
1 5 -
- 1 1 I 5 |










374 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 29, 1966 AND OCTOBER 30, 1965 (43rd WEEK) CONTINUED



STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)
1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 6,439 1 160 6 145 7 326 3 226 79 3,423

NEW ENGLAND.......... I 1,001 4 1 10 3 1 80
Maine.............. 29 25
New Hampshire...... 16 1 28
Vermont............ 1 23
Massachusetts...... 179 2 1 6 1 4
Rhode Island ....... 61 -
Connecticut........ 715 2 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 190 14 1 54 41 1 202
New York City...... 14 5 1 23 -1
New York, Up-State. 144 2 12 13 1 189
New Jersey......... NN 2 7 12
Pennsylvania ....... 32 5 12 16 12

EAST NORTH CENTRAL. 507 19 1 19 39 1 18 13 452
Ohio............... i 60 4 3 19 9 1 193
Indiana ............ 66 4 1 9 4 6 103
Illinois........... i 176 4 6 4 1 9 2 65
Michigan........... 141 5 6 1 39
Wiconsin .......... 64 2 1 6 3 52

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 240 12 2 18 1 30 4 22 778
Minnesota.......... 14 3 1 1 1 1 5 180
Iowa............... 121 2 5 1 148
Missouri........... 11 6 10 14 3 4 234
North Dakota....... 80 4 43
South Dakota....... 7 1 3 5 89
Nebraska........... 2 2 1 23
Kansas............. 7 1 2 7 1 2 61

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 674 32 12 1 63 2 109 6 435
Delaware........... 7 1 2
Maryland........... 124 3 2 10 26 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 157 6 2 1 14 31 2 224
West Virginia...... 203 I 1 2 52
North Carolina..... 10 4 3 6 27 4
South Carolina..... 6 2 1 13 5
eorgia............ 11 7 3 4 2 18 2 95
Florida............. 156 10 12 57

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,166 1 19 1 23 2 43 39 9 435
Kentucky........... 31 2 2 10 9 2 92
Tennessee.......... 969 3 1 13 2 22 24 7 302
Alabama............ 114 7 4 6 6 20
Mississippi......... 52 1 7 4 5 21

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 766 40 1 62 32 8 11 689
Arkansas........... 3 4 47 3 2 78
Louisiana.......... 1 10 1 4 10 3 46
Oklahoma............. 61 3 7 9 5 171
Texas.............. | 701 23 4 10 1 8 394

MOUNTAIN............. 1,196 2 1 7 2 16 3 1 90
Montana............ 89 2 7
Idaho.............. 100 -
Wyoming........... 69 1 -
Colorado ........... 566 2 -- 1 4 2 -18
New Mexico......... 209 1 2 1 -14
Arizona ........... 78 1 1 5 39
Utah............... 84 2 4 3
Nevada ............. 1 9

PACIFIC............. 699 18 -3 39 1 15 262
Washington......... 371 11 14
Oregon............. 25 1 4
California......... 252 17 3 25 1 15 244
Alaska.............. 34 -
Hawa ii ........... 5 17
Puerto Ri .......... 51 1 16 17
-- -- -- -










Nlorbidit% and Niortalitl \\eekl Relportl






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED OC(OBFR 29. 19,6

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa. ----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


737
246
56
23
23
53
26
15
21
66
62
12
53
31
50

3,382
47
37
143
51
35
65
65
109
1,704
34
551
178
34
99
31
37
62
36
25
39

2,579
74
24
775
166
214
138
79
333
26
55
39
37
41
158
30
129
31
35
34
107
54

878
67
37
41
127
29
105
69
277
62
64


65 years
and over


442
144
36
15
17
19
18
13
13
31
30
8
40
20
38

1,944
25
23
76
27
19
32
39
54
988
23
310
95
25
63
23
27
31
21
17
26

1,504
40
17
445
96
127
79
56
184
18
29
23
21
27
83
19
74
17
25
26
67
31

559
47
22
16
78
19
73
39
177
43
45


and
Influenza
All Ages


1 year
All
Causes


Area


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-----------
Norfolk, Va.----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ca.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex------------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.- -----
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


Total


1,051
121
231
51
57
78
39
74
29
75
68
186
42

651
88
35
64
111
158
53
35
107

1,121
38
44
18
144
38
88
205
49
186
80
116
63
52

459
43
31
122
20
121
21
50
51

1,589
23
57
39
34
72
475
75
56
109
67
106
205
37
133
58
-3


12,447
Cumulative Tota
including reported correction'


d ov-r


538
59
Ill
21
28
42
23

12
58
34
13
22

356
50
20
32
65
84
28
23
54

590
17
27
9
73
20
49
101
30
84
44
76
35
25

266
19
21
63
11
80
13
27
32

965
15
37
28
17
47
286
37
33
67
39
66
113
25
89
41
25


i ri


Week No.


3;75


fcr previous weeki


All Causes, All Ages -------------------------
All Causes, Age 65 and over-------------------
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages-------------
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age---------------


539,394
309,058
22,384
28,761


i


Influrn7za
All Ages


31
4
7
3




3



2
3

37
2
2
5
11



6

45



8
2
3
5
2
5
1
5
8
5

22
4
7
2
1
4
1

1

39

4

1

9




4
5
4
4


i i


L










376


ARBOVIRUS ENCEPHALITIS 1966
(Contlinued from page 371)


Table 2
Reported Cases of Arbovirus Encephalitis

Number of Cases
i 1961 65
1966 through Oct. 9 -ear Aerage
5-year Average


Total 495 258

*No cases of ( CE l wer, ri> i- nized in 1961 or 1962, and only
one in 1963.

states have reported 41 WEE infections in humans.
However, virus activity appears to be widespread geo-
graphically and the incidence of disease in the endemic
areas of the Texas plains and the central valley of
California has been comparable to that recorded in pre-
vious years.
(Reported by the Neurotropic Viral Diseases Unit, Epi-
demiology Branch. CDC.)



STATEMENT ON THE ERADICATION OF MEASLES
Conference of State and Territorial Epidemiologists


The ,. .. statement was issued by the Executive
Committee of the Conference of State and Territorial
Epidemiologists who met in Atlanta, Georgia, on Sep-
tember 29 and 30, 1966.


The development of effective safe measles vaccines
and recent trends in measles epidemiology now indicate
it is possible that measles can be eradicated in the
United States. To accomplish this purpose it is incum-
bent on state health departments, state medical societies,
local health departments and local medical societies to
exert leadership in measles surveillance and immuni-
zation activities.
It is recommended that this effort include surveys to
determine susceptibles in ages one to nine and on
evidence of susceptibility to measles, the institution
of appropriate immunization activities.
It is considered desirable that measles be incorpo-
rated in the general immunization procedure at the end of
the first, year of life.
During the measles epidemiological year 1966-67,
special emphasis should be given to immunizing sus-
ceptible children in kindergarten, first, second, and third
grades.
It is further recommended that intensive effort to
improve measles reporting be carried out because evi-
dence now exists that outbreaks of measles can be halted
by the prompt immunization of susceptible children.


< c
OCTOBER 29, 1966 0 c
=o t
u.. ---------

0 a
i--C


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15.600, IS PUBLISHED- AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER. M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF COM-
MUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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