Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00341

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

Prepared y fe AAln 2 EthI, Dl C MElrose 4-5131


For release April 21, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georg;a Vol. 10), Nio. 15


Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended April 15, 1961


Influenza The isolation of influenza virus, pre-
sumptively identified as influenza A2, from a patient with
clinical respiratory disease, was reported by Dr. Robert
S. Gohd, Head, Virus and Rickettsial Laboratory, Andrews
Air Force Base, Washington, D. C. Although scattered
cases such as this have been reported, as well as lo-
calized outbreaks in New York City (Vol. 10, No. 13) and
Connecticut (Vol. 10, No. 14), influenza epidemics of
national significance have not been reported this year.
The number of deaths due to influenza and pneumonia has
remained within normal seasonal limits for the nation
(Graph, page 2, Vol. 10, No. 14).


Diphtheria Eight cases were reported this week.
Mississippi reported its first 1961 cases with 1 in both
Adams and Hinds Counties. The cumulative 15 week total
stands at 223 cases, a figure slightly less than the 243
cases reported during the comparable period one year ago.
See page 8 for a summary of 1960 cases reported to Diph-
theria Surveillance Unit, Communicable Disease Center.

Hepatitis The sustained high incidence continues.
The 1,693 cases reported this week represent a decline
from the level of 1900-2000 cases reported over the past
7 weeks this year.


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases: United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

15th Week Cumulative
Disease
(Seventh Revision of International Approxl-
Liste, 1955) Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
April April Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 15, 16, 15C-dian -. i9Yt-t point
Data not available 1961. 196: 1 1.i i'- to
Quantity zero 1 95 -,.
Anthrax-------------------062 *
Botulism-----------------.1 ------ --* 3 *
Brucelloele undulantt fever)------ 04 10 2 3 18 237 232 *
Diphtheria----------------------055 8 4 14 243 28 03 780 985 July 1
Encephalitia, infectious------- 082 29 26 28 3 1 90 401 360 Jan. 1
Hepatitie, infectious, and
erunm----------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,693 836 417 26,738 f 7, 41,945 19,386 12,861 Sept. 1
Malaria---------------------110-117 1 10 *
Meaelee---------------------------085 16,989 18,862 20,634 183,291 185,792 226,076 219,501 221,159 262,745 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic----------340 pt. 37 29 --- 361 423 --- 361 423 --- Jan. 1
Meningococal infection---------057 44 51 5/ 752 818 861 1,408 1,511 1,659 Sept. 1
Polioamelitis-------------------080 12 12 19 124 239 331 21 23 38 Apr. 1
Paralytic ---------- 080.0,080.1 8 9 13 76 173 234 16 19 2b Apr. 1
Nonparalytic----- ------080.2 1 1 3 26 38 55 1 2 ? Apr. 1
tUspecified----------------080.3 3 2 3 22 28 42 & 2 5 Apr. 1
Psittacosis------------- 096.2 4 17 3, ** *
Rabies in man---------------- 09 2 *
Btreptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever----050,051 8,966 8,199 --- 142,302 130,666 --- 239,954 -- -- Aug. I
Typhoid fever------------------- 040 11 11 15 IlI 151 205 26 24 25 Apr. 1
Tphus fever, endemic----------101 1 9 6 *
Babies in animals------------------ 102 80 99 1,045 1,260 1,506 1,621 2,243 2,288 Oct. I








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CURRENT US. POLIO INCIDENCE
compared with years 19hb through l10o


PROVIDE BY NATIONAL OFFICE OF VITAL STATISTICS
ANO COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


L\A. v
v-.V' t /


The graph shows reported 1961 polio-
myelitis cases in the United States by
week of onset and compares current
incidence with the years 1956 through
1960. April is the usual poliomyelitis
seasonal low point and current cases
reflect this time of expected low activity.
A cumulative total of 124 cases (both
paralytic and non-paralytic) has been
reported through April 15 which com-
pares with 239 cases during the com-
parable period one year ago.


i i14, 28 I 4 II 18 25' a I 18 25 15 122 29 6 20' 27' 3 10
Wk. enong- JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN


Poliomyelitis Poliomyelitis continued at a low
seasonal ebb during the past week with reports of 12
cases, 8 paralytic. No State accounted for more than one
case except California with 2 paralytic cases, one each
in Sonomo and Yolo Counties, and New Jersey with one
paralytic case in Union County and one unspecified case.
Nebraska reported a case with onset on April 10, a 49-
year-old unvaccinated white man with bulbospinal in-
volvement. Utah also reported a bulbar case, a 13-year-
old triply vaccinated white female.
A listing of current polio and othop-eerjsatirus isola-
tions reported by State Laboratories is1'nariedyl'?ew.

S: '- r
J-,


ENTEROVIRUSISUlRVEILLAMEE E
REPORTS ON ISOLATION FROM STATE LABORATORIES
ON 1961 SPECIMENS RECEIVEDD APRIL 5 18 .1l
'r________S. 't,; -
Dates of
State Type Isolates Specimens Reported by

Florida Polio III 1 2-261 N. J. Schneider
Polio III 2 4-13-61
Idaho Polio III 1 3-15-61 A. W. Klotz
Marylond Echo II 1 2-23-61 C. A. Perry
Coxsackie B-5 5 2-22-61
Massachusetts Polio I 1 3-16-61 G. Edsall
Minnesota Echo 14 1 1-10-61 H. Bauer
Echo 1 1 2-14-61
New Jersey Polio I 1 3-8-61 E. Shaffer
Ohio Polio I 1 3-7-61 L. F. Ey


1960 PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS FINAL TOTALS

During 1960, the final total of cases of paralytic
poliomyelitis submitted on individual case forms to the
Poliomyelitis Surveillance Unit of the Communicable
Disease Center, has been tabulated and comes to the
figure 2,218. These cases have been corrected for veri-
fication of diagnosis sixty days or longer after onset of
illness. When such a follow-up report was not submitted,
the preliminary diagnosis has been retained. The para-
lytic cases are presented in the following table by age
group and vaccination history. The table includes 2,078
cases with residual paralysis at sixty days, plus 140
cases with a preliminary diagnosis of paralytic polio-
myelitis for which no 60-day report was received.

1960 PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS WITH RESIDUAL PARALYSIS
IN THE UNITED STATES BY VACCINATION HISTORY
AND AGE GROUP


Age Doses of Vaccine
Group 0 1 2 3 4+ Unk Total Percent

0-4 556 100 121 115 41 19 952 43.0
5-9 222 30 52 134 68 8 514 23.2
10-14 52 18 12 56 32 4 174 7.9
15-19 72 9 8 17 4 3 113 5.1
20-29 189 24 14 23 9 5 264 11.9
30-39 105 7 9 10 6 3 140 6.3
40+ 52 1 3 56 2.5
Unk. 4 1 5 -

Total 1,252 188 216 356 160 46 2,218 100.0

% Doses 57.6 8.7 9.9 16.4 7.4 1000
(Continued on page 8)


n.AS


i.?










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED APRIL 16, 1960 AND APRIL 15, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area fever)
Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
15th Week first 15 weeks 15th Week first 15 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044


1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNIED STAS ---------- 12 12 124 239 8 9 76 173 1 1 37 10

NEW ENGAND---------------- 1 3 7 1 3 7 1
Maine--------------------- 1 3 1 3 -
New Hampshi re-------------- -
Vermont-------------------- -
Massachusetts-------------- 2 4 2 4 1
Rhode Island--------------- -
Connecticut--------------- 1 1 -- -
MIDDLE ATIANTIC-------------- 3 2 9 36 2 2 7 25 3 1
New York------------------- 3 29 2 19 3 1
New Jersey----------------- 2 2 4 5 1 2 3 5 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 1 2 2 1 2 1 --
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 1 2 17 29 1 2 11 9 5 2
Ohio----------------------- 8 15 4 3 -
Indiana-------------------- 1 2 1 2 --
Illinois------------------- 1 3 4 1 3 3 2 2
Michigan------------------- 1 1 8 1 1 3 3
Wisconsin------------------ 3 2 1 -
WET NORTH CENTRAL ---------- 2 4 13 1 3 7 3 4
Minnesota------------------ 1 8 1 6 1 -
Towa---------------------- 1 1 3 1 2 1
Missouri------------------- 1 -
North Dakota------------- -
South Dakota--------------- -- .
Nebraska------------------. 1 2 1 2 --
Kansas--------------------- 3
SOUTH ATLAiN IC--------------- 1 13 42 1 9 35 -
Delaware------------------- 2 -
Maryland------------------- 1 -
District of Columbia------- -
Virginia------------------- -
West Virginia-------------- 2 3 1 3
North Carolina------------- 3 13 2 13
South Carolina------------- 1 1 2 1 1 2 -
Georgia-------------------- 2 2 2 2
Florida-------------------- 3 21 2 15 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 14 8 3 7 1
Kentucky------------------- 13 6 2 5 1
Tennessee------------------ --
Alabama------------------ 1 1
Missiasippi-------------- 1 1 2 1
WEST SOUTH CfTRAL ---------- 1 1 15 18 1 6 15 1 4
Arkansas------------------- 1 1
Louisiana------------------ 1 4 5 2 4 1 -
Oklahoma------------------ 1
Texas---------------------- 1 10 12 1 4 10 -
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 1 2 16 14 1 10 8 4 2
Montana------------------- 1 4 1 3 1- -
Idaho--------------------- 3 4 1 1
Wyoming------------------- 1 .
Colorado----------------- 3 1 3 1 4 1
New Mexico----------------- 1 1 1 ..
Arizona-------------------- 2 2 1 -1
Utah---------------...------ 1 6 1 1 4 1 -
Nevada--------------------.
PACIFIC---------------------- 3 4 33 72 2 3 24 60 1 14
Washington----------------- 1 2 6 6 -1
Oregon------------------- 1 2 12 1 1 8 1
California---------------- 2 3 28 53 2 2 22 45 1 12
Alaska---------------------
Hawaii--------------------- 1 1 1 1

Puerto Rico----------------- 4 2 51 4 2 50










4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED APRIL 16, 1960 AND APRIL 15, 1961 Continued

(Py place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,N998.5 pt. e
infectious
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
15th Week first 15 weeks 082 15th Week first 15 weeks 085


191 19C60 1961 1'9. 19E1 1960 1961 1 F.C i1961 19E.C 1961 1960


UNITED STATES---------- 8 4 223 243 29 26 1,693 836 26,738 11,567 16,989 18.862

EW EGLAD----------------- 1 2 7 2 39 18 759 368 1,721 2,129
Maine------------------ 2 5 39 27 30 190
New Hampshire------------- 2 47 L1 21 12
Vermont------------------- 6 111 6 18 166
Massachusetts------------- 1 2 4 1 14 12 258 191 886 1,091
Rhode Island-------------- .- 1 1 9 4 102 66 488 72
Connecticut--------------- 5 202 67 278 598
MIDDIE ATLANTIC -------- 10 7 4 3 199 92 3,930 1,12. 3,077 3,128
New York------------- 3 1 1 63 46 1,587 569 900 2,604
New Jersey---------- 1 1 1 67 8 982 84 868 369
Pennsylvania-------------- 7 5 3 1 69 38 1,361 471 1,309 155
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 7 22 2 2 318 151 ,5,136 2,293 5,140 5,561
Chio----------------------- 1 14 1 108 63 1,975 707 877 1,002
Indiana------------------- 1 3 1 57 11 874 336 250 323
Illinois------------------- 4 2 39 44 804 481 547 1,048
Michigan---------------- 1 3 2 109 32 1,352 646 1,811 1,356
Wisconsin----------------- 5 1 131 123 1,655 1,832
WEST NORTE CENTRAL------- 3 1 16 13 2 229 59 2,736 1,013 677 433
Mfnnesota----------------- 1 7 3 38 3 632 99 14 277
Iowa------------------- 1 2 87 9 757 196 225 80
Missouri------------------ 1 2 56 24 620 370 344 19
North Dakota--------------- 2 2 1 2 1 52 83 81 54
South Dakota--------------- 5 4 3 4 107 95 -
Nebraska----------------- 1 19 9 268 83 13 3
Kansas------------- 1 2 24 9 300 87 NN UN
SOUTH ATLANTIC----------- 1 41 53 5 5 235 169 3,190 1,389 1,309 883
Delaware--- -------- 4 2 93 62 13 5
Maryland------------------- 1 1 19 10 289 141 155 182
District of Columbia------- 2 1 1 33 11 9 57
Virginia-------------- ---- 7 8 32 9 402 294 271 225
West Virginia------------ -- 1 1 50 19 681. 275 253 126
North Carolina------------ 5 2 1 63 22 740 97 212 38
South Carolina---------- 13 15 213 30 94 18
Georgia-------------------- 1 8 8 20 3 364 116 56 2
Florida--------------- 17 21 4 2 31 104 375 363 246 230
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL----- 2 8 28 3 207 88 4,536 1,816 842 1,446
Kentucky------------------- 3 27 32 1,300 790 40 569
Tennessee------------------ 2 5 3 97 30 1,910 561 555 768
Alabama-------------------- 1 16 36 14 742 337 150 58
Mississippi---------------- 2 2 7 47 12 584 128 97 51
WEST SOUTB CENTRAL----------- 2 1 134 85 2 1 154 84 1,877 879 639 2,555
Arkansas------------------ 1 1 2 41 5 392 40 48 97
Louisiana------------------ 13 20 19 4 17 33 19
Oklahoma------------------- 2 5 8 12 125 136 4 26
Texas------------------ 2 1 118 59 1 86 63 1,213 670 587 2,413
MOUTArN--------------------- 1 5 27 133 49 1,732 974 823 816
Montana------------------- 2 2 16 191 44 41 69
Idaho--------------------- 11 7 5 95 140 102 104
Wyoming-------------------- 5 10 1 74 8 4 -
Colorado----------------- 3 2 62 28 579 301 112 169
New Mexico--------------- 2 5 7 240 167 NN -
Arizona-------------------- 2 7 4 186 211 470 195
Utah----------------------- 3 24 4 311 86 59 194
Nevada--------------------- 2 56 17 35 85
PACIFIC-----.----------.- 1 9 15 179 126 2,842 1,711 2,761 1,911
Washington----------------- 43 17 387 202 235 452
Oregon--------------------- 29 30 513 335 179 412
California---------------- 9 15 105 74 1,809 1,059 2,333 903
Alaska-------------------- 1 3 112 78 10 45
Haai -------------------- 1 2 21 37 4 99

Puerto Rico----------------- 1 1 26 64 10 8 185 314 35 52

XN-NOL NOLttllble










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED APRIL 16, 1960 AND APRIL 15, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
coccal Typhoid fever 040 'Typhus
Menlngoccocal Psitta-
Malaria infections csis sore fever, Rabies in
infections cosis throat, endemic a
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 15th Week first 15 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

sUNTD STAES ------- 44 51 8,966 11 11 141 151 102 80

NEW ENGIAND----------------- 5 5 712 1 1 4 2 -
Maine---------------------- 1 34 1 -
New Hampshire------------- 11 -
Vermont-------------------- 8 -
Massachusetts-------------- 3 4 216 1 1 2 -
Rhode Island--------------- 56 1 -
Connecticut---------------- 2 387 1 1 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC ------------ 7 12 1,340 -- 8 3 20
New York------------------- 4 8 974 3 4 2 20
New Jersey----------------- 1 3 158 1 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 2 1 208 4 2 -1 -
EAST NORTH CBETRAL..------. 11 8 1,091 6 3 21 21 7 14
Chio----------------------- 2 1 211 2 6 1 6
Indiana--------------------. 2 2 181 1 2 7 3 1
Illinois-------------------. 3 5 149 4 11 4 1 1
Michigan------------------ 4 370 1 1 5 3 4
Wisconsin.----------------- 180 1 1 4 2
WEST ORTH CENTRAL--------- 3 4 297 12 9 42 12
Minnesota --------------. 1 11 4 1 3 1
Iowa---------------------. 50 1 13 6
Missouri----------------- 1 145 5 7 9 4
North Dakota--------------- 1 33 3 1
South Dakota--------------- 1 1 11 -
Nebraska ----------------- 2 3 -
Kansas--------------------- 1 58 2 -
SOUTH ATLANTIC ------------ 8 8 713 1 25 20 19 7
Delaware------------------ 3 -
Maryland------------------- 1 2 109 -
District of Clumbia------- 1 1 -
Virginia--------.-------.. 1 111 3 5 4
West Virginia-------------- 1 340 4 1 9 2
North Carolina------------- 3 2 40 6 7 -
South Carolina-----------. 1 23 2 6 -
Georgia ------------------ 7 1 10 1
Florida-------------------- 1 4 79 2 2 5 -
EAST SOUTH CETERAL---------- 1 3 1,217 1 20 29 8 7
Kentucky------------------ 1 103 4 10 4 1
Tennessee------------------ 1,038 1 14 17 3 5
Alabama------------------ 1 17 2 2 1 1
Mississippi---------------- 1 1 59 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 1,112 5 20 40 16 17
Arkansas------------------ -- 10 1 2 14 2 4
Louisiana--------------- 5 2 3 12 3 -
Oklahoma------------------- 80 2 2 -
Texas---------------------- 1 1,017 2 13 12 11 13
MOUAIN-------------------- 1 I 1,623 1 1 14 10 2 1
Montana-------------------- 35 1 5 -
Idaho--------------- --- 164 -
Wyoming-------------------- 55 1 -
Colorado------------------- 1 754 5 1
New Mexico----------------- 314 3 4 1
Arizona--------------- ------ 1 211 2 1 -
Utah--------------------- 86 1 2 -
Nevada--------------------- 4 1 -
PACIFIC-------------------- 8 9 861 1 1 17 14 5 2
Washington----------------- 1 380 1 -
Oregon------------------ 4 73 -
California---------------- 6 5 348 1 1 16 14 5 2
Alaska--------- ------- 56 -
Hawaii ------------------ 4 -

Puerto Rico---------------- 7 6 14 1








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


l li F T I I I I T i I T i T


JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
1960 1961


I II T I I I T i l I T I l T


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas.Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS


(By place of occurrence and weekof filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shownin arentheses in table 4)

15th 14th Percent Cuatie, first 15 weeks
week week Adjusted change,
ended ended a vera adjusted
Area April April 5 aver
15, 8, week to 1961 1960 Percent
19er i9f i 19.6-6' current change
week

TOTAL, 117 REPORTING CITIES---------------------- 11,58. 11,134 11,558 + 0.2 180,901 191,058 5.3

New England-------------------------------(14 cities) 745 769 690 + 8.0 11,129 12,159 8.5
Middle Atlantic---------------------------(20 cities) 3,229 3,538 3,231 0.1 51,974 52,066 0.2
East North Central------------------------ (21 cities) 2,553 2,720 2,446 + 4.4 38,036 40,920 7.0
West North Central--------------------------(9 cities) 811 815 813 0.2 12,139 13,282 8.6
South Atlantic----------------------------(11 cities) 1,031 1,011 979 + 5.3 15,613 16,936 7.8
East South Central------------------------ (8 cities) 499 516 524 4.8 8,352 8,867 5.8
West South Central------------------------(15 cities) 1,031 921 1,013 + 1.8 15,603 17,034 8.4
Mountain--------------------------- --- (8 cities) 326* 418 369 -11.7 5,779 5,849 1.2
Pacific---------------- -------------- (15 cities) 1,359 1,426 1,493 9.0 22,276 23,945 7.0

*Includes estimate for missing reports.









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7

Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(y place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

15th 14th cumulative 15th 14th Cumulatve,
week 1week week week
week week first 15 weeks first 15 weeks
ended ended Areaended ended
Area April April April April
15, 8, 15, 8,
1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960


HEW ENGIAND:
Boston, Mass.-----------
Bridgeport, Conn.--------
Cambridge, Mass.--------
Fall River, Mass.--------
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.-------------
New Bedford, Mass.-------
New Haven, Conn.--------
Providence, R.I.--------
Somerville, Mass.--------
Springfield, Mass.-------
Waterbury, Conn.---------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.-----------
Allentown, Pa.----------
Buffalo, N.Y.-----------
Camden, N.J.-------------
Elizabeth, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.------------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.----------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgh, Pa.---
Reading, Pa.------------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.--------
Scranton, Pa.-----------
Syracuse, N.Y.----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.-------------
Yonkers, N.Y.-----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio--------------
Canton, Ohio-------------
Chicago, Ill.-----------
Cincinnati, Ohio---------
Cleveland, Ohio---------
Columbus, Ohio-----------
Dayton, Ohio-------------
Detroit, Mich.----------
Evansville, Ind.-----
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.---------
Gary, Ind.---------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.------
Indianapolis, Ind.-------
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.------
Peoria, Ill.-------------
Rockford, Ill.-----------
South Bend, Ind.--------
Toledo, Ohio-------------
Youngstown, Ohio---------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Duluth, Minn.-----------
Kansas City, Kans.-------
Kansas City, Mo.--------
Lincoln, Nebr.----------
Minneapolis, Minn.-------
Omaha, Nebr.-------------


249
42
35
28
56
20
27
22
52
69
18
42
27
58


45
35
144
50
21
36
51
108
1,709
32
506
151
24
80
22
41
63
41
33
37

46
40
782
186
203
130
70
308
48
46
32
34
54
159
20
130
37
34
41
99
54


54
25
39
118
(18)
115
74


265
46
42
25
62
16
16
26
59
71
12
43
28
58


42
46
166
53
30
49
63
123
1,847
47
511
175
16
114
36
46
60
47
30
37

53
26
891
182
214
132
87
331
35
43
52
30
51
153
37
150
34
26
23
101
69


52
37
60
130
(27)
120
69


3,815
600
465
414
728
374
354
421
719
967
204
740
438
890


737
530
2,259
665
454
615
1,063
1,629
26,846
595
8,147
2,942
328
1,572
387
576
937
710
467
515

862
481
11,499
2,440
3,217
1,745
1,275
5,145
562
659
617
476
705
2,289
474
1,878
456
436
433
1,523
864


795
406
604
1,962
(437)
1,890
1,087


4,264
675
523
507
775
393
429
403
732
1,056
248
795
454
905


698
560
2,348
719
485
597
1,153
1,594
26,326
646
8,042
3,195
389
1,654
383
612
1,028
669
464
504

909
594
12,526
2,660
3,546
1,965
1,163
5,663
619
625
601
477
672
2,366
501
2,031
487
450
469
1,678
918


902
412
573
2,101
(403)
1,950
1,237


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.----------
Wichita, Kans.---------.

SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.-----------
Charlotte, N.C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-------
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.--- -----
Washington, D.C.-----
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTE CENTRAL:
ilrmingham, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.------
Memphis, Tenn.-----------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.------
Nashville, Tenn.- ----

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.------------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.--------
Shreveport, La.----------
Tulsa, Okla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.----
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.------------
Ogden, Utah-------
Phoenix, Ariz.----------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.---------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-----
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.--------
Honolulu, Hawail-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.------
Sacramento, Calif.---.
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.-------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------

San Juan, P. R.----------


234
72
41


102
257
37
51
80
66
78
33
(69)
45
220
42


93
53
34
77
118
45
41
55


37
34
31
124
32
69
127
46
154
68
105
45
49


37
20
131
18
95
19
53
45


14
(36)
(44)
55
57
475
103
45
113
69
83
184
37)
139
47
42

(43)


3,678
1,033
684


1,815
3,903
567
922
1,166
776
1,251
537
(1,199)
1,072
2,992
612


1,390
784
438
1,776
1,858
648
514
944


525
449
382
1,939
577
1,039
2,684
850
2,639
1,203
1,613
822
881


480
257
1,830
241
1,315
250
765
641


259
(676)
(509)
620
911
7,999
1,502
516
1,570
968
1,381
3,187
(543)
2,057
689
617

(522)


4,233
1,154
720


1,934
4,310
736
1,072
1,221
734
1,349
636
(1,272)
1,118
3,179
647


1,462
790
493
1,911
1,918
698
599
996


611
506
422
2,037
642
1,104
2,827
1,030
3,038
1,250
1,725
857
985


494
271
1,948
281
1,249
234
786
586


285
(779)
(646)
658
886
8,764
1,579
580
1,731
973
1,522
3,259
(462)
2,242
751
715

(544)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

11111111111 III
3 1262 08864 0262


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


DIPHTHERIA IN THE UNITED STATES 1960

Data on 862 diphtheria cases and 245 carriers (asymp-
tomatic persons with positive pharyngeal cultures) occur-
ring ifi 40 States have been reported by individual case
line listing to the Diphtheria Surveillance Unit, CDC.
These figures include three sizeable outbreaks: Blackfoot,
Idaho (16 cases, 74 carriers); Scott County, Kentucky (53
cases, 80 carriers); and Hale County, Texas (56 cases,
26 carriers). During 1959, data on 868 cases were reported
to the Unit.
Most cases occurred during the months of October,
November, and December (136, 110 and 126 cases), in
keeping with the usual seasonal distribution of diphtheria.
Over 80 percent of all cases occurred in the South
Atlantic, East South Central, and West South Central
States. Texas reported the most cases, 223, an increase
of 70 cases over 1959. Children under 10 accounted for
59 percent of the cases. Seventy-seven percent were
children under 15, and 13 percent were adults, 20 years
and older.
Analysis of immunization data show that 10 percent
of cases were fully immunized (either a primary series or
a booster within 4 years). Seventy-two percent of cases
had a history of no immunization. Nineteen percent of
cases occurred in persons with a preceding primary but
no subsequent booster dose within 4 years of onset.
Immunization status of carriers was uniformly better than
cases.
Of 617 cases with known severity, 53 percent were
clinically "mild," 36 percent were severe and 11 percent
were fatal. Only one fatality had a history of a primary
series (26 years preceding illness).
Type of infecting organism was predominantly milns
in Southern Stares and gravis in Western States. Of 355
strains isolated from confirmed cases, 331 (93%) were
toxigenic and 24 (7%) were non-toxigenic.


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA

These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each State and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table I shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


UNIV OF FL Lid.
DOCUMENTS DEP'




U.S DEPOSITORY


0

Sa- > M

ri
A Z-

a M
-n


INTERNATIONAL NOTES


Influenza Canada: The isolation of influenza A2
virus from 5 Armed Force personnel in Ottawa, Canada
was reported by the Epidemiology Division, Department
of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa, Canada.

Yellow Fever Peru: The World Health Organiza-
tion reports that during the period March 26 through April
12, 18 cases of jungle yellow fever were reported in
Tingo Mana District, Huanuco Department.


^1 ii
CI:
Fibopl 1


I ;6




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