Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00337

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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Morbidity and Mortality



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PfpffO d by DISSI MElrose 4-5131


For release March 24, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia Vol. 10, No. 11

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the UJ fa es U on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended March 1


Anthrax -The first case of human anthrax for 1961 Hepatitis Case e de e l num r the
has been reported by Pennsylvania. The patient, a 54 second consecutive The current tot f ,896
year old female developed a pruritic, painless sore on her cases is, however, not low the peak of cases
left forearm on March 8. She saw a company physician on reached during the week arch 4. ease is
March 10, who took a smear and culture, which subse- reflected in all geographic eZ B i i mountain
quently were reported to be positive for Bacillus anthra- States where every State but ributed to an
cis. She was treated with penicillin, and hospitalized for increase.
three days. Her course was mild and the lesion was re-
ported to be typical for cutaneous anthrax. She has been Poliomyelitis Reporting of poliomyelitis during the
employed as a spinner in a Philadelphia goat hair proc- llth week ir. 1961 remains at a low level with reports of
essing mill for 2', years. Goat hair from middle eastern 11 cases, 9 paralytic. With corrections in these figures
countries is currently being processed. Fjve cases of for delayed reports from 1960, the weekly reporting of
anthrax were reported by the 1lth week in 1960. current cases stands at 7 cases, 6 paralytic. This brings


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases. United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease Ilth Week Cumulative
Disease
(Seventh Revision of International Approxi-
Lists, 1955) First 11 weeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended I seasonal
March March Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 18, 19, 19ae- .. Median .. c5. 1955- point
-Data not available 196F 19 i99.t -,c to.--i ia-i. o
Quantity zero i t 9- -E
Anthrax-------------..... ---062 1 1 1 5 A
Botulism----------------------049.1 3 *
Brucellosis undulantt fever).----044 15 12 L5 105 168 163 *
Diphtheria----------------------055 13 6 10 188 208 221 768 738 941 July 1
Encephalitis, infectious-------082 37 24 26 268 275 249 268 275 249 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
serum-----------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,896 858 435 19,368 8,190 5,636 34,575 16,021 10 ,8-6j Sept. 1
Malaria-----------------O---- 11-117 1 8 11 *
Measles-------------------------.085 13,733 15,508 18,186 121,126 114,805 137,512 157,336 150,611 168,)07 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic----------340 pt. 31 27 --- 248 311 --- 248 311 --- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infections---------057 43 50 61 542 608 634 1,198 1,28- l,+04 Sept. I
Polionmelitis---------------.--.-080 11 5 33 94 188 244 3,159 8,462 8,462 Apr. 1
Paralytic--------------080.0,080.1 9 4 21 56 135 172 2,164 5,636 5,636 Apr. 1
Nonparalytic----------------.-080.2 2 10 20 30 41 6,3 2,1-7 2,1,7 Apr. 1
Unspecified----------------- 080.3 1 2 18 23 31 352 679 679 Apr. 1
Paittacosis--------------- 096.2 1 3 11 22 *
Rabies in man-------------------094 2 *
Btreptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever------050,051 10,025 8,999 --- 105,999 96,122 --- 203,651 --- --- Aug. 1
Typhold fever---------------------040 10 15 15 96 107 159 799 834 1,171 Apr. 1
Typhus fever, endemic -------------101 5 5 *
Rabies in animals-----------.------ 65 123 112 855 913 1,025 1,259 1,894 1,894 Oct. I









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


the yearly total of cases with 1961 onset to 37 cases,
28 paralytic. The largest State total recorded this week
comes from California with 3 paralytic cases, 2 of which
have onset in 1961. No concentration is evident here or
elsewhere, and no winter epidemics have been reported.




EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
.. .


Polioryelitis South Carolina.

In "}-~uy 1960, a moderately se ere epidemic of polio-
myelitis erupted in the north est n part of South Caro-
lina, ith occurrence of 35 ces 25 paralytic. The first
case is early June involved a unvaccinated Cherokee
County Infant an-, -wafreri a Ise of two weeks, cases
began to occu tIfoth in'Chefikee and adjacent Spartanburg
Counties in an epidemic fashion, reaching a peak in mid-
July and declining thereafter. The time interval between
the first case onset and the others suggested a possible
common source spread, but investigation failed to sub-
stantiate this, and favored a personal contact spread.
Two fatalities were recorded, both due to bulbo-spinal
involvement of a school age child and an early adolescent.
Laboratory specimens were submitted on 33 patients with
positive results in 27 of these. Poliovirus type I was
isolated from 24 patients and type III from 3 patients.
Once again, unvaccinated preschool age children ac-
counted for the largest proportion of paralytic cases,
nearly 50 percent. Fully 68 percent of all paralytic cases
were unvaccinated as shown in the Table below, and
only 12 percent had had three injections. No cases had
received the recommended fourth booster injection.
Reported by Dr. G. E. McDaniel, Director, Division
of Disease Control, South Carolina State Board of Health,
bases upon a cooperative field study with CDC.


CHEROKEE SPARTANBURG COUNTIES 1960 PARALYTIC
POLIOMYELITIS CASES DY AGE GROUP BY
AND VACCINATION HISTORY


Paralytic
Doses of Vaccine
Age Group OV IV 2V 3V Total

0-4 12 3 0 1 16
5-9 4 0 0 2 6
10-14 1 I. 1 0 3
15+ 0 0 0 0 0

Total 17 4 1 3 25
Percent
Doses 68.0 16.0 4.0 12.0 100.0


Hepatitis New Jersey and other States

A tabulation of 1961 New Jersey hepatitis cases
through March 2 supplied by Dr. W. J. Dougherty, Director,
Division of Preventable Disease, Stare Department of
Health, has shown a very unusual age distribution.
Individuals 20 and under accounted for only 21 percent of
cases while the 30 39 year old group included 32 per-
cent. More cases than expected (27 percent) were in the
group 40 years and older. There is no localization of the
adult cases within the two month period and geographi-
cally they are widely scattered in all parts of the State.
No obvious explanation for this distribution is apparent.
To determine if this pattern were unique to New
Jersey or a general characteristic of hepatitis during this
year of high prevalence, comparable data were obtained
from several other States. The two following tables indi-
cate that the unusual pattern is apparently restricted to
New Jersey with the more usual childhood distribution
present in California, Florida, Massachusetts, Ohio and
New York City.
The New Jersey State Board of Health is investi-
gating this further to learn whether this pattern is the
result of reporting or some unusual mode of spread of this
disease. If there is any occurrence of unusual age dis-
tribution of hepatitis cases in other States, CDC would
appreciate being notified.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF 1961 HEPATITIS CASES FOR SEVERAL
STATES AND NEW YORK CITY

Age
Group N. J.' Col." Fla."' Mass. Ohioll NYCIII

0-9 35 163 70 28 271 93
10-19 63 160 54 57 307 103
20-29 79 148 35 41 115 119
30-39 134 71 20 32 88 79
+40 113 78 34 24 48 57
Unknown 20 6 72 1

Total 424 620 233 188 901 452



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF HEPATITIS
CASES BY SELECTED AGE GROUPS

Age
Group N.J. Calif. Fla. Mass. Ohio NYC

0-9 8 26 33 15 33 21
10-19 15 26 25 31 37 23
20-29 19 24 16 23 14 26
30-39 "32 11 9 18 11 18
+ 40 27 13 16 13 6 13
SThrough March 7. ** Five counties and Los Angeles through 3.'20
,* Through March II. I Through March 20. If January and
February cases. III Through March 17.
(Continued on page 8)










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE. AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED MARCH 19, 1960 AND MARCH 18, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area Cumulative, nula t ve,fever)
llth week first 11 weeks llth week first 11 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044


1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNITED STATES--------- 11 5 94 188 9 4 56 135 2 31 15

NEW ENGIAND------------ ---- 2 6 2 6 -
Maine--------------------- 2 2 -
New Hampshire----------- -
Vermont-------------------- -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 4 1 4 -
Rhode Island------------- -- -- --
Connecticut------------- -- 1- -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 1 1 9 30 1 1 8 21 6 2
New York------------------- 3 27 2 18 1
New Jersey----------------- 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 6 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 4 4 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 1 1 14 23 8 4 1 1 4
Ohio---------------------- 7 13 3 2 -
Indiana-------------------- 1 -
Illinois------------------ 2 3 2 2 1 1
Michigan------------------- 1 1 5 1 1
Wisconsin------------------ 1 3 2 1 1 2
WEST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 1 2 10 1 2 7 2 3
Minnesota------------------ 1 6 1 6 1
Iowa------------------- -- 2 1 1 2
Missouri------------------- 1 -
North Dakota--------------- -
South Dakota--------------- 1 -
Nebraska------------------- 1 1 1 -
Kansas--------------------- 1
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 8 36 6 29 -
Delaware------------------- 1 1-
Maryland------------------- 1 --
District of Columbia------- -
V,rginla------------------- 1 -
West Virginia-------------- 2 2 1 2 -
North Carolina------------ 2 12 2 12 -
South Carolina------------- 2 2-
Georgia-------------------- 1 1 1 -
Florida-------------------- 2 18 1 12 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL----- -- 1 12 7 1 1 6 9 -
Kentucky------------------- 1 12 5 1 1 4 3 -
Tennessee-------------- --- 3 -
Alabama----------------- 1 1 1 -
Misiissipp---------------- 1 1 2 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL--------- 2 11 9 1 5 7 1 3 4
Arkansas------------------ -- 1 1
Louisiana------------------ 3 4 2 3 -
Oklahoma------------------- 1 1 -
Texas---------------------- 2 7 4 1 3 3 1 3 3
MOUNTAIN--------------------- 2 1 15 11 2 1 9 7 2 2
Montana-------------------- 1 4 1 3 -
Idaho---------------------- I 3 4 1 1 1 -
Wyoming-------------------- -
Colorado------------------- 3 3 2
New Mexico----------------- -
Arizona-------------------- 2 2 1 2 -
Utah----------------------- 1 1 5 1 1 1 3 1 1
Nevada-------------------- -
PACIFIC---------------------- 3 2 21 56 3 2 15 48 7
Washington---------------- 4 4 1
Oregon--------------------- 2 2 10 2 1 6 -
California----------------- 3 18 41 3 13 37 6 -
Alaska-------------------- .
Hawaii-------------------- 1 1 1 -

Puerto Rico----------------- 4 1 22 4 1 22 -










4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED MARCH 19, 1960 AND MARCH 18, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,1998.5 pt. Measles
infectious
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
11th week first 11 weeks 082 11th week first 11weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


UNITED STATES---------- 13 6 188 208 37 24 1,896 858 19,368 8,190 13,733 15,508

NEW ENGAND----------------- 2 5 2 3 43 31 593 280 1,236 1,118
Maine--------------- 1 1 2 4 31 20 10 141
New Hampshire------------- 4 43 5 55 8
Vermont------------------- 3 93 5 17 11
Massachusetts-------------- 2 3 2 13 16 183 143 587 592
Rhode Island--------------- 1 1 10 8 82 53 384 23
Connecticut---------------- 1 11 3 161 54 183 343
MIDDLE ATLANTIC- ------- 4 6 8 6 314 95 2,911 781 2,879 2,375
New York----------- 3 1 6 3 111 59 1,172 400 1,286 1,956
New Jersey--------------- 1 1 105 4 669 53 520 274
Pennsylvania--------------- 1 5 1 2 98 32 1,070 328 1,073 145
EAST NORTH CENTRA--------- 5 19 2 3 324 .157 3,732 1,561 3,543 3,357
Chio----------------------- 12 2 107 55 1,499 427 762 686
Indiana------------------ 3 1 75 21 585 233 182 280
Illinois------------------ 4 2 52 24 615 334 456 587
Michigan ------------ 1 2 1 72 53 922 458 758 767
Wisconsin------------------ 1 18 4 111 109 1,385 1,037
WEST NORTH CENTRAL------- 2 11 12 1 163 84 1,914 737 519 430
Mfnnesota------------------ 1 6 3 57 9 465 71 6 246
Iowa----------------------- 1 2 40 42 446 151 154 39
Missouri------------------ 1 23 17 454 248 229 81
North Dakota--------------- 1 3 7 41 74 104 59
South Dakota--------------- 3 4 2 1 94 87 4
Nebraska------------------ 1 1 26 195 54 26 1
Kansas------------------- 1 1 12 8 219 52 NN MN
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------- 6 1 34 50 7 1 259 85 2,198 924 1,613 781
Delaware--- ----------- 1 2 52 45 99 26
Maryland------------------- 1 1 28 20 203 94 110 164
District of Columbia----- 4 22 7 6 86
Virginia------------------- 6 8 2 33 25 272 236 404 186
West Virginia------------- 1 1 1 42 8 478 195 214 104
North Carolina------------- 1 4 1 1 80 5 521 46 319 93
South Carolina------------- 12 6 5 159 25 126 35
Georgia-------------------- 3 6 8 43 7 240 85 12 7
Florida------------------ 2 1 16 20 3 22 13 251 191 323 80
EAST SOUTH CENRAL------- 1 5 20 1 1 319 94 3,378 1,329 875 1,709
Kentucky------------- 2 107 37 1,067 588 364 593
Tennessee------------------ 2 3 127 36 1,408 403 441 814
Alabama-------------------- 1 1 11 45 14 527 263 19 139
Mississippi------------- 6 1 1 40 7 376 75 51 163
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL-------- 4 5 123 71 1 1 138 62 1,297 574 695 2,919
Arkansas------------------- 1 25 2 271 27 190 33
Louisiana---------------- -. 2 12 13 17 89 23 4 16
Oklahoma------------------ 2 5 8 13 100 97 1 31
Texas-- ----------- 4 3 109 52 1 1 88 47 837 427 500 2,839
MOUNTAIN------------ 4 24 1 173 80 1,316 756 702 552
Montana ----------------- 2 10 5 144 36 75 41
Idaho--------------------- 11 13 2 76 109 47 60
Wyoming------------------- 5 23 1 38 5 7 -
Colorado------------------- 2 2 61 31 436 211 87 124
New Mexico-------------- 2 12 12 213 126 NN -
Arizona-------------------- 1 1 16 23 127 182 435 100
Utah---------------------- 3 31 6 242 71 45 198
Nevada--------------------- 7 40 16 6 29
PACIFIC--------------------- 1 15 8 163 170 2,029 1,248 1,671 2,267
Washington----------------- 2 14 14 245 148 223 835
Oregon----------- ------- 31 26 361 247 117 267
California----------------- 13 8 114 75 1,347 748 1,328 878
Alaska------------------ 1 3 52 58 73 1 108
Hawaii------------------ 1 3 18 32 2 179

Puerto Rico------------ 10 6 21 52 31 41 110 239 16 30

WN-Not Notiflable










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED MARCH 19, 1960 AND MARCH 18, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
coccal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
Menlngoccocal Psltta-
Malaria inectos cosist sore fever Rabies in
throat, endemic anims
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 llth week first 11 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNITSD STATES--------- 1 43 50 1 10,025 10 15 96 107 65 123

EW NG ------------------ 1 3 761 2 1 -
Maine--------------------- 9 1 -
New Hampshire------------ 25 -
Vermont ----------------- 21 -
Massachusetts-------------- 3 248 1 -
Rhode Island--------------- 89 -
Connecticut---------------- I 369 -
MIDDIE ATANTIC ------------ 1 9 5 1 1,251 9 5 19
New York------------------- 1 1 2 1 718 3 3 19
New Jersey----------------- 5 1 259 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 3 2 274 5 2 -
EAST NORTH CBTRAL ------- 10 10 1,267 2 7 9 5 3
Ohio----------------------- 3 5 350 4 1 2 -
Indiana----------------- 181 1 1 1
Illinois------------------- 3 2 215 2 3 2 1
Michigan--------------- 2 1 273 1 4 1 -
Wisconsin------------------ -- 2 2 248 1 1
WEST NORTH CENTRAL --------- 3 5 321 1 8 7 12 27
Minnesota--------------- 1 23 3 1
Iowa----------------------- 58 1 7 2
Missouri------------------- -- 1 3 20 3 7 5 11
North Dakota-------------- 99 3
South Dakota-------------- 7 7
Nebraska----------------- 1 1 1 3
Kansas--------------------- 1 113 1 -
SOUTH ATILATIC-------------- 8 7 797 4 2 16 19 9 17
Delaware------------------ 10 -
Maryland ----------------- 1 1 59 -
District of Columbia------- 1 4 1 1 1 -
Virginia------------------- 2 2 242 3 5 9
West Virginia------------- 1 247 1 1 2 1 3 5
North Carolina------------- 5 65 2 7 1
South Carolina----------- 21 1 5 1
Georgia-------------------- 1 6 2 9 1 1
Florida------------------- I 143 1 1 2 -
EAST SOUTH CTRAL------ 4 4 1,464 1 17 26 8 18
Kentucky-------- -- 2 2 306 1 4 10 3 9
Tennessee ---------------- -1 1 1,138 11 14 5 5
Alabama------------------ 1 6 2 2 4
Mississippi---------------- 1 14 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 2 9 1,126 2 9 15 23 15 34
Arkansas------------------- 2 8 1 3 2 7 6 10
Louisiana--------------- 1 7 11 5 2 9 3 1
Oklahoma------------------ 36 2 1 -
Texas--------------------- 1 1,071 1 1 9 6 6 23
MOUNTAI--------------------- 1 2,046 1 1 11 8 3 1
Montana------------------ 105 1 4 -
Idaho---------------------- 141 -
Wyoming ----------------- 121 -
Colorado---------------- 1 579 5 2 -
New Mexico----------------- 654 1 1 4 1
Arizona-------------------- 246 1 2 1
Utah---------------------- 198 1 -
Nevada-------------------- 2 1 -
PACIFIC-------------------- 5 7 992 2 11 9 13 4
Washington----------------- 374 1 1
Oregon----------------- 102 1 -
California----------------- 5 7 472 2 10 9 8 3
Alaska -- ------- ----- 35 4 -
Hawaii-------------- 9 -

Puerto Rico---------------- 2 7 2 1 5 13 2 1









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
1960 1961


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS


(By place of occurrence and weekof filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shown in parentheses in table 4)

th 1th Percent Cumulatlve, first 11 weeks
week week Adjusted change,
ended ended average, adjusted
Area March March 11th average
18, 11, week to 1961 196 Percent
i,961 196. 1E 6-60 current change
week

TOTAL, 117 EPORING CITIES---------------------- 11,767 11,697 11,981 -1.8 134,108 144,790 -7.4

New England-------------------------------(14 cities) 716* 703 727 -1.5 8,239 9,261 -11.0
Middle Atlantic-----------------------------(20 cities) 3,538 3,307 3,328 +6.3 38,229 39,013 -2.0
East North Central-------------------------(21 cities) 2,481 2,441 2,508 -1.1 28,103 31,110 -9.7
West North Central-------------------------(9 cities) 738 766 855 -13.7 9,033 10,193 -11.4
South Atlantic------------------------------(11 cities) 950 964 1,022 -7.0 11,630 12,910 -9.9
East South Central---------------------------(8 cities) 506 "8 558 -9.0 6,240 6,599 -5.4
West South Central--------------------------(13 cities) 996 997 1,082 -7.9 11,675 13,082 -10.8
Mountain----------------------------------(8 cities) 385 424 367 +4.9 4,279 4,432 -3.5
Pacific------------------------------------(13 cities) 1,455 1,567 1,534 -4.1 16,680 18,190 -8.3

*Includes estimate for missing reports.


JUL AUG










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(EB place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


llth 1th Cumulative, llth 10th Cumulative,
week ee first 11 weeks week week first 11 weeks
ended ended Area ended ended
Area March March March March
18, 11, 18, 11,
1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.-----------
Bridgeport, Conn.-------
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-------
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.--------------
New Bedford, Mass.-----
New Haven, Conn.--------
Providence, R.I.--------
Somervni le, Mass.- ------
Springfield, Mass.-------
Watertur,, Conn.--------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.------------
Allentown, Pa.----------
Buffalo, N.Y.-----------
Camden, N.J.------------
Elizabetn, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.------------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.---------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgn, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.-------
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N.Y.----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.-------------
Yonkers, N.Y.----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-------------
Canton, Ohio------------.
Chicago, Ill.------------
Cincinnati, Ohio---------
Cleveland, hio----------
Columbus, Ohio----------.
Dayton, Ohio-------------
Detroit, Mich.-----------
Evansville, Ind.---------
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.--------
Gary, Ind.--------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.------
Indianapolis, Ind.----..
Madison, Wis.-----------
Milwaukee, Wis.---------
Peoria, Ill.------------
Rockford, Ill.-----------
South Bend, Ind.--------
Toledo, Ohio-------------
Youngstown, Ohio--------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Duluth, Minn.-----------
Kansas City, Kans.---...
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.----------
Minneapolis, Minn.-------
Omaha, Nebr.------------


217
43
30
27
50
31
26
28
36
69
13
65
28
53*


41
31
141
51
27
37
75
111
1,778
38
621
227
17
90
32
31
68
58
29
35


56
24
757
147
213
87
88
329
30
62
36
31
58
153
36
138
28
29
24
105
50


52
18
43
94
(30)
126
57


255
43
33
27
33
23
17
31
33
55
21
37
41
54


44
44
149
33
33
42
62
122
1,727
33
566
123
19
97
27
28
66
52
20
20


46
26
724
141
227
112
94
341
39
33
40
37
48
151
25
107
32
25
30
106
57


52
26
28
154
(22
126
60


2,840
455
332
302
527
285
255
317
518
700
149
569
328
662


541
397
1,636
467
332
443
823
1,204
19,547
448
6,066
2,242
254
1,164
284
426
693
537
340
385


643
355
8,506
1,767
2,409
1,265
966
3,833
405
483
450
358
515
1,672
351
1,399
327
317
325
1,125
632


588
299
441
1,485
(333)
1,428
785


3,223
512
395
372
605
296
321
310
563
815
190
608
343
708


528
410
1,788
546
353
439
846
1,192
19,416
500
6,245
2,436
274
1,270
293
480
780
479
362
376


689
440
9,569
2,049
2,767
1,501
876
4,253
436
460
461
369
492
1,780
357
1,549
361
341
367
1,284
709


682
330
430
1,608
(311)
1,493
935


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.-------
St. Paul, Minn----------
Wichita, Kans.----------

SOUTH ATIANTIC:
Atlahta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N.C.------
Jacksonville, Fla.------
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.-------------
Richmond, Va.------------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D.C.--------
Wilmington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.------
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.------
Mobile, Ala.-------------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.- ----

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-------------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.-------------
El Paso, Tex.------------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.------------
Little Rock, Ark.--------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.--------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah-----------
Phoenix, Ariz.-----------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah-----
Tucson, Ariz.---------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.--------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.--------
Honolulu, Hawaii--------
Long Beach, Calif.------
Los Angeles, Calif.-----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.---
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------

San Juan, P. R.-------------


201
63
56


116
252
32
40
82
44
74
41
(79)
76
171
36


90
41
27
137
96
47
21
69


37
44
16
143
43
72
145
56
166
69
92
67
47


34
23
133
19
111
16
39
49


18
(48)
(35)
39
67
584
92
42
92
52
110
217
(37)
158
64
32

(38)


2,718
768
521


1,382
2,866
418
702
876
559
957
414
(899)
807
2,195
454


1,035
596
341
1,306
1,398
480
392
692


395
332
275
1,436
427
785
2,042
645
1,996
907
1,194
611
630


361
189
1,357
172
989
181
563
467


189
(505)
(372)
451
687
6,082
1,112
369
1,138
728
1,032
2,407
(390)
1,508
519
458

(375)


3,248
906
561


1,482
3,329
559
833
936
572
1,006
466
(934)
827
2,401
499


1,046
614
391
1,427
1,396
531
433
761


489
389
333
1,531
511
844
2,179
778
2,379
936
1,329
639
745


370
217
1,496
208
930
176
596
439


208
(626)
(507)
491
663
6,834
1,160
442
1,257
751
1,138
2,478
(335)
1,684
549
535

(406)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3ll 122 08llIl8lill4
3 1262 08864 0155


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Staphylococcal Food Poisoning on a Trans-Pacific
Airline Hawaii

A violent gastroenteritis was reported among 13 of
28 passengers arriving by air in Honolulu on January 16,
1961. The flight originated at Vancouver, B. C.; a stop
was made at San Francisco but no food was taken aboard.
About one and one-half hours out, 13 passengers became
violently ill with nausea and vomiting. All who were ill
reported eating breast of chicken Jeanette. Those who had
not partaken of the chicken did not become ill. Items from
lunch and dinner served prior to the outbreak were re-
ceived for bacteriological examination. No organisms
commonly associated with food poisoning were found
in any of the specimens of foods submitted, except three
portions of breast of chicken, which showed a coagulase-
positive Staphylococcus aureus 187 in counts up to
11,000,000 per gram. .
The pilots and other crew members who do not eat
the food that is prepared for the passengers, did not be-
come ill. It is worth noting that this precaution is de-
signed to prevent a disastrous Staphylococcal food
poisoning episode among crew members. As an additional
precaution, the hours of eating for the pilot and co-pilot
are staggered on trans-oceanic flights.
(Submitted by James R. Enright, Chief, Bureau of Epi-
demiology, Hawaii Department of Health.)


QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel-1960
Edition

Public Health Service Publication No. 383
The following corrections and deletions should be
made in Section 5:
Pagc 53, France Smallpox Add the following:
Valid smallpox vaccination certificate required for per-
sons arriving from Spain. All other information remains
the same.
Page 56, Spain Smallpox Delete information and
insert: Smallpox vaccination required for arrival by air
except children under 6 months of age and travelers who
have been resident for more than 14 days in a European
Country immediately before arrival in Spain. All other
information remains the same.


FOR SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA SEE
LAST WEEK'S MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY
REPORT


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