Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00329

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

T7-


Morbidity and Mortality


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


Prepared by the


I COMMUN I(A L DI


MElrose 4-5131


For release January 27, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia Vol. 10, No. 3

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States and on
Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended January 21, 1961


Hepatitis The sharp rise in reported cases noted
throughout the nation one week ago briskly continues
with a total of 1,829 cases reported for the week ending
January 21, 1961. Reported cases for the past 4 weeks
and similar periods I and 2 years ago are shown in the
table below:


Week Number
Year 52nd 1st 2nd


1960-61 873 1,012 1,457 1,829


1959-60 441
1958-59 373


594 797 735
385 475 519


Cumulative four
3rd week total


5,171
2,567
1,752


The current cumulative 4 week total is 101 percent
above the comparable period one year ago and 194 percent
above 1959.

Diphtheria Twenty-five cases are reported this
week. Texas with 17 and neighboring Louisiana with 3,
account for the majority. Other States reporting cases are
Georgia 1, Montana 1, New York 1, and South
Dakota- 2.

Influenza The following additional information on
influenza in American Samoa (Vol. 10, No. 2) was re-


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases, United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports th

Disease 3rd Week 1tive
(Seventh Revision of International Approxi-
Liets, 1955) First a Since a ib veek mate
Ended Ended seasonal
Jan. Jan. Median II Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 21, 23, 1956-f Median 6 1955-56 point
-Data not available 1961 196 1961 1 195 1to
Quantity zero 199- 3
Anthrax----------------------- 062 -*
Botulism--------------------069.1 *
Brucellosie undulantt fever)----.-0l 8 26 11 23 44
Diphtheria-----------. ----------055 25 16 24 72 67 5 597 819 July I
Encephalitie, infectious---------08 2 17 25 19 63 75 56 63 75 56 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
serum-----------.--.. 092,N998.5 pt. 1,829 735 519 4,298 2,126 1,379 19,473 10,122 6,241 Sept. 1
Malaria------------.. --. -110-117 1 5 *
Measles ---------.. --------.--.085 7,489 8,095 8,150 22,209 22,737 22,102 58,256 60,289 60,289 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic ------ 340 pt. 24 22 --- 64 96 -- 64 96 -- Jan. 1
Meningoooccal infections--------057 61 67 53 159 163 175 813 818 991 Sept. 1
Poallyelitis-------------------080 9 27 27 39 72 72 3,103 8,346 8,346 Apr. 1
Paralytic---------- --080.0,080.1 5 20 20 22 55 55 2,131 5,556 5,556 Apr. 1
conparalytic------------080.2 3 4 4 6 7 7 627 2,124 2,126 Apr. 1
Unspecified---------..------080.3 1 3 3 11 10 10 345 666 666 Apr. 1
Paittacosia---- ---- ----096.2 1 2 3 *
Rabies ina------------------094 1 2 *
Btreptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever---050,051 8,653 8,508 --- 24,706 23,413 --- 122,358 --- --- Aug. 1
T phoid fever---------------- 0410 11 8 15 19 22 37 705 748 1,049 Apr. 1
Tyrphus fever, endemic ----------101 1 1 2 2 *
Rabies in animal--------------- 57 76 85 141 221 257 711 1,201 1,201 Oct. 1
Rabies in man California


U


1


3







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ceived on January 18 through Dr. Arthur Osborne, Chief,
International Organizations Relations Branch, D.I.H.,
USPHS.
". Acting Governor Mac Quarrie of American
Samoa reports 221 influenza-like disease cases
with three deaths in Pago Pago area alone. A
sharp upswing with 65 cases seen at emergency
room Pago Pago Hospital on January 17. The
deaths were in a cerebral palsy child and two in
infants under two years of age."
No report on virus isolation studies are yet available.
The British Ministry of Health reports that the out-
break of influenza continues in the Midlands. There were
246 influenza deaths in England and Wales in the 2nd
week 1961. This represents a moderate increase over the
average of 130 deaths reported for the same week during
the past 8 years. Preliminary laboratory reports indicate
that the viruses isolated during the current outbreak are
related to the Asian strain.

Rabies California reports a rabies death, the 2nd
reported in the nation during 1961.






EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS



Rabies California

A 76-year-old man died in a Yuma, Arizona hospital
on January 20, 1961, of what was believed to'have been
rabies. Forty-four days earlier he had been bitten by a
rabid dog near the Imperial Dam, Bard, Imperi County,
California. Onset of illness was 31 days after the bite
and death occurred on the 13th day after onst/The victim
incurred a 5 inch bite wound on the right w.rst when the
dog jumped from a bank a'blve and arracked him on Decem-
ber 7, 1960. The bite wound was washed with Phisohex
and Zipherin Chloride on the day of the attack and ad-
ministration of a 14 dose course of duck embryo rabies
vaccine was begun 6 days after the bite. Microscopic
examination of the dog's brain revealed typical Negri-
bodies and 6 out of 8 inoculated mice were dead by the
16th post-inoculation day. The dog brain and brain of the
inoculated mice were fluorescent antibody positive. Diag-
nosis in the human case was confirmed on January 24,
1061 by the finding of typical Negri-bodies on micro-
scopic examination of human brain material by the State
Department of Public Health.
(From a telegram received January 24, 10'l from
Dr. Malcolm II. Merrill, Director, California State Depart-
ment of Public Health)


Staphylococcal Food Poisoning Allen County, Kentucky

A food poisoning epidemic occurred December 15 in
a consolidated school in Alien County, Kentucky and
involved more than 200 grade and high school students.
Coagulase positive Staph>locorcus aureus was isolated
from portions of cooked turkey being served in the school
cafeteria. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea not associated
with fever which followed a 2-6 hour incubation period
were the principal symptoms noted. These symptoms were
severe enough to require the hospitalization of 40 chil-
dren. On December 17, investigation was made of this
epidemic with the following findings: the turkeys were
baked, sliced, and left in unrefrigerated open pans for
approximately 20 hours before serving. The meat was
then served without being reheated. Two cafeteria workers
were found to have carbuncle-type hand lesions. Infection
involving the fingernail of one of these workers was
purulent at the time of inspection and by history at the
time the meat was sliced. Cultures from the served turkey
and the hand lesions were found to contain coagulase
positive staphylococcus; the organisms from both sites
were not phage trpable. All other foods served were free
of coagulase positive staphylococci or other pathogenic
organisms.
(Submitted by J. Clifford Todd, State Epidemiologist,
Kentucky State Department of Health)

Hepatitis Vermont

There has been a sharp increase in hepatitis mor-
bidity in Vermont. Outbreaks have occurred in scattered
areas since September, when an outbreak began in several
Windlam County towns. At present, there is a large out-
break in Barton, another in several towns of Western
Rutland County, and a small outbreak in Hartford. Addi-
tional isolated cases have occurred. The peak hepatitis
year in Vermont occurred in 1955 with 257 reported cases.
There were 35 in 1958, 27 in 1959, 20 in 1960. Already,
33 cases have been reported during the first 17 days of
1061, indicating that the expected increase in hepatitis
morbidity in Vermont is occurring somewhat later than
that in the nation as a whole.
(Reported by Dr. Linus I. Leavens, Director, Com-
municableDisease Control, Vermont Department of Health)

Meningococcal Meningitis Florida

Through lanuarv 18, 1961, fourteen cases of meningo-
coccal meningitis have been reported to the State Board
of Health this year. This is coiisideied to be a rather
unusual occurrence inasmuch as practically no cases
were reported during this pciod lor the two previous
years. So far, no I nrtrentrition )t canf s have been ob-
served. The repois have O:'I. trom nine different coun-
(Continued on page 8)













Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JANUARY 23, 1960 AND JANUARY 21, 1961

(y place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
SMenin- losis
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
3rd Week first 3 weeks 3rd Week first 3 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044


1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UN TED STATES--------- 9 27 39 72 5 20 22 55 3 4 24 8

NEW ENGLAND------------------ 2 5 2 5 -
Maine--------------------- 1 1 1 1 -
lew Hampshire-------------- -
Vermont-------------------- -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 4 1 4 -
Rhode Island--------------- -
Connecticut----------------- -
MIDDLE ATLAIC--------- 7 4 14 6 4 9 1 2 -
New York------------------- 6 13 5 8 1 1 -
New Jersey----------------- 1 1 1 -
Pennsylvania--------------- .- 4 4 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 3 5 7 9 2 1 5 2 1 3 2
Ohio--------------------- 1 4 3 8 1 1 2 2 -
Indiana------------------- .- 1
Illinois----------------- 2 2 1 2
Michigan----------------- 1
Wisconsin------------------ 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4
Minnesota------------------ 1 1 1 1 1 1 -
Iowa----------------------- 1
Missouri------------------ 1
North Dakota--------------- -
South Dakota--------------- -
Nebraska------------------- I
Kansas--------------------- 2
SOUTH ATLANIIC--------------- 6 3 15 6 2 15 1 -
Delaware------------------- 1 -
Maryland------------------- -
District of Columbia------- 1
Virginia------------------- -
West Virginia-------------- 2 2 2 2 -
North Carolina------------- 2 1 10 2 1 10 -
South Carolina------------- 1 1 -
Georgia-------------------- -
Florida----------- ----- 2 1 2 2 2 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL------ 1 5 1 1 1 -
Kentucky---------------- 1 5 1 1 1 -
Tennessee------------------ -
Alabama------------------ -
Mississippi--------------- -
WEST SOT CENTRAL----------- 2 5 1I 2 1 2 3
Arkansas------------------- 2 2 2 -
Louisiana------------------ 3 1 2 1 -
Oklahoma------------------ -
Texas---------------------- 3
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 2 7 4 1 3 3 1 4 1
Montana-------------------- 2 1 4 1 1 3 -
Idaho---------------------- 1 -
Wyoming-----------...------ -
Colorado------------------- 4
New Mexico----------------- -
Arizona------------------ -
Utah--------------------- 4 2 1
Nevada--------------------. -
PACIFIC--------------------- 3 4 6 22 2 3 5 18 1 1 10 1
Washington---------------- 1 1 1 -
Oregon------------------.-- 1 6 3 -
California---------------- 3 3 6 14 2 3 5 13 1 9 1
Alaska--------------------- -
Hawaii------------- ------ 1 -

Puerto Rico----------------- 2 -











4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JANUARY 23, 1960 AND JANUARY 21. 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,1998.5 pt. Measles
infectious
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
3rd Week first 3 weeks 082 3rd Week first 3 weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


UNITED STATES---------- 25 16 72 67 17 25 1,829 735 4,298 2,126 7,489 8,095

EW ENGLAN ----------------- 1 2 49 26 145 73 518 471
Maine------- ------ 7 11 3 8 91
New Hampshire----------- 2 4 7 6
Vermont----------------- 13 2 45 3 42
Massachusetts------------- 1 15 19 38 42 309 308
Rhode Island------------ 1 2 10 14 114 2
Connecticut---------------- 1 12 3 37 11 38 64
MIDDIE ATLANTIC----------- 1 2 1 3 4 1 269 79 525 185 891 790
New York------------ -----1 1 1 1 4 92 35 214 84 42 651
New Jersey---- 48 5 75 13 220 69
Pennsylvania-------------- 1 2 1 129 39 236 88 629 70
EAST NORTH CNTRAL--------- 1 4 1 325 111 821 350 2,751 2,134
hio -----.--.-------------- 2 1 143 37 372 84 689 429
Indiana----------------- 1 38 13 81 46 175 162
Illinois---------------- 52 25 117 79 330 533
Michigan-------------- 1 1 87 29 236 111 413 581
Wisconsin------------ --- 5 7 15 30 1,144 429
WEST NORTH CNTRAL-------- 2 4 5 3 205 58 418 173 409 199
Mfnnesota----------- ----. 2 2 35 3 77 16 12 116
Iowa-----------------------. 1 38 18 72 41 63 18
Missouri------------------ 2 63 7 124 44 189 6
North Dakota--------------- 1 1 5 16 10 23 102 52
South Dakota ---------- 2 2 16 2 20 18 6
Nebraska---------------- 8 7 38 15 43 1
Kansas--------------- 1 40 5 77 16 NN NN
SOUTH ATLANTIC------- --- 1 6 8 21 3 5 216 87 494 236 1,185 426
Delaware----------------- 3 18 9 94 4
Maryland----------------- 35 10 66 28 47 55
District of Columbia------ 2 1 4 5 42
Virginia---------. ------...- 2 4 1 23 42 57 66 232 210
West Virginia------------- 1 1 45 26 114 63 104 28
North Carolina------------- 1 2 1 33 3 84 10 115 29
South Carolina-------- 1 10 41 1 79 4 320 -
Georgia------------------- 1 2 1 12 5 25 15 1 5
Florida----------------- 5 3 5 1 23 47 41 267 53
EAST SOUTH (TAL------ 1 2 8 1 328 171 793 424 529 690
Kentucky ...------------.. 1 144 59 301 200 246 429
Tennessee -------- ------ 1 1 133 65 330 139 246 241
Alabama..---------------.. 1 6 44 43 132 68 26 14
Mississippi----...----- -- I 1 7 4 30 17 11 6
WEST SOUTH CEITRA----- 20 3 56 12 3 3 112 62 247 167 261 1,608
Arkansas----------------- .- -- 27 1 47 8 I
Louisiana------------- 3 4 1 2 1 9 7 1 11
Oklahoma------------. ----- 2 2 2 3 1 15 14 27 25 1 5
Texas---------------- 17 1 50 9 2 68 46 164 127 259 1,591
MOUIR AINT-------------------- 1 3 1 13 2 102 56 285 246 267 534
Montana-------------------- 1 1 1 9 1 48 8 30 67
Idaho---------------------- 9 12 6 27 27 30 134
Wyoming-------------------- 3 3 2 2 5 2 5 27
Colorado------------------- 46 13 115 69 69 27
New Mexico--------------- 7 13 15 58 -
Arizona------------------- 1 14 13 31 52 127 74
Utah----------------------- 1 8 8 32 25 6 205
Nevada--------------------- 4 12 5 -
PACIFIC---------------------- 7 7 223 85 570 272 678 1,243
Washington----------------- 36 14 58 24 133 381
Oregon--------------------- 26 13 98 53 82 177
California----------------- 5 7 157 56 395 178 452 243
Alaska-------------------- 2 1 9 12 1 33
Havall----------------- -- 3 2 10 5 10 409

Puerto Rico--------------- 4 6 6 21 6 40 44 18

NN-NOL Nortllable












Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JANUARY 23, 1960 AND JANUARY 21, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
coccal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
alaria Meningoccocal Psitta- sore fever,
a infections cosis sorefe bies in
throat, endemic animals
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 3rd Week first 3 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNITED SATES------- 61 67 8,653 11 8 19 22 1 57 76

N ENGIAND-- ---------- 3 6 407 -
Maine------------------- 3 8 -
New Hampshire-------------. 8
Vermont----------------- 3 1 -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 215 -
Rhode Island--------------- 1 11 -
Connecticut-------------- 165
MIDDLE ATLANTIC------------- 11 11 503 1 2 2 2 5
New York------------------- 6 7 263 1 2 5
New Jersey---------------- 2 109 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 3 4 131 1 1 2 -
EAST NORTH CEITRAL --------- 8 13 1,027 1 2 3 2 6 5
Ohio-----------..-------- 3 4 255 1 2 1 -
Indana-------------------- 1 134 1 1 3 3
Illinois------------------. 1 4 176 1 -
Michigan------------------ 4 2 220 1 1 1 2
Wisconsin------------------. 2 242 1 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL ---. 5 2 291 2 1 2 2 18 10
Minnesota------------------ 1 15 5 4
Iowa-------------------- 61 6 2
Missouri------------------- 3 1 31 2 1 2 2 3 2
North Dakota------------- 1 128 2 1
South Dakota------------ 3 2 -
Nebraska------------------ 1 1
Kansas--------------------- 1 52 -
SOUTH ATLANTIC-.-----------. 9 9 603 2 3 2 5 16
Delaware------------------ 3 -
Maryland---------------- 25 -
District of Columbia------ 1 -
Virginia------------------- 1 2 103 3 7
West Virginia------------- 182 2 3
North Carolina------------- 4 2 41 1 1 2 1
South Carolina------------- 1 50 3
Georgia----------- ------ 1 1 2
Florida-------------------- 4 3 198 1 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL---------- 7 3 1,682 2 2 2 6 9 8
Kentucky------------------ 1 178 1 1 1 1 1 4
Tennessee------------------ 3 1 1,250 1 4 7 2
Alabama-------------------- 3 1 35 1 1 1 1 2
Mississippi---------------- 219 -
WEST SOUTH C AL---------- 9 14 1,144 1 1 2 3 1 13 25
Arkansas------------------I 1 3 1 1 3 10
Louisiana--------------- 3 2 6 1 2
Oklahoma------------------- 1 2 32 1 1 -
Texas---------------------- 4 10 1,103 1 2 1 9 13
MOUNTAIN ------------------- -- 2 1 1,886 3 1 4 3 2
Montana------------------- 114 1 1 3 -
Idaho------------------- 227 -
Wyoming------------------- 109 -
Colorado----------------- 608 3 3 2
New Mexico----------------- 1 509 -
Arizona-------------------- 2 183 -
Utah----------------------- 130 -
Nevada--------------------- -
PACIFIC-------------------- -- 7 8 1,110 1 2 4 5
Washington----------------- I 538 -
Oregon------------------ 91 -
California---------------- 7 7 437 1 2 4 5
Alaska--------------- 38 38- -
Hawaii----------- 6 -

Puerto Rico--------------- 2 2 3 -







Morbidty and Mortality Weekly Report



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS
(By place of occurrence and veek of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shownin parentheses In table 4)

3rd 2nd Perent Cmulative, first 3 veeks
week week Adjusted change,
ended ended average adjusted
Area Jan. Jan. 3rd average
21 14, week to 1961 1960 Percent
1961 1961 1956-60 current change
Seek

TOTAL, 117 POMM CITIE---------------------- 11,995 12,970 12,655 -5.2 37,615 39,473 -4.7

e nglan------------------------------ (14 cltes) 721* 782 752 -4.1 2,281 2,415 -5.5
Middle Atlantic---------------------------(20 cities) 3,409* 3,551 3,462 -1.5 10,631 10,634 -0.03
EaNt North Central-----------------------(21 cities) 2,543* 2,685 2,706 -6.0 7,942 8,790 -9.6
West North Central------ ------------- (9 cities) 755 886 889 -15.1 2,483 2,620 -5.2
South Atlantic---------------------------- (11 cities) 1,044* 1,173 1,090 -4.2 3,403 3,272 +4.0
East South Central------------------------ -(8 cities) 480 700 589 -18.5 1,739 1,869 -7.0
West South Central------------------------(13 cities) 1,039 1,123 1,164 -10.7 3,213 3,459 -7.1
Nountain-------------------------------- (8 cities) 423 364 392 +7.9 1,142 1,191 -4.1
Pacific---------------------------------- (13 cities) 1,581 1,706 1,611 -1.9 4,781 5,223 -8.5

*Includes estimate for missing reports.


r I i T I I I I TI I I lI I lT I I I I 1Tl T I l I I T l I I T1 IT I ITI I -1
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
1960 11961












Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7

Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

3rd 2nd 3rd 2nd
3rd 2nd Cumulative, 3rd 2wk Cumulative,
week week first 3 weeks ee first 3 weeks
ended ended Aea Jan. Jan. en
Area Jan. Jan. Area Jan Jan
21, "14, 21, 14,
1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.-------
Bridgeport, Conn.-------
Cambridge, Mass.-------
Fall River, Mass.-------.
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.--------------
Ilew Bedford, Mass.------
New Haven, Conn.--------
Providence, R.I.--------
Somerville, Mass.---------
Springfield, Mass.------
Waterbury, Conn.---------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.------------
Allentown, Pa.----------
Buffalo, N.Y.------------
Camden, N.J.-------------
Elizabeth, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.-------------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.-----------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgh, Pa.---------
Reading, Pa.------------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.-------
Scranton, Pa.-----------
Syracuse, N.Y.----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.-------------
Yonkers, N.Y.-----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-------------
Canton, Chio ------------
Chicago, Ill.------------
Cincinnati, Ohio---------
Cleveland, hio----------
Columbus, Ohio----------
Dayton, Chio------------
Detroit, Mich.-----------
Evansville, Ind.---------
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.--------
Gary, Ind.--------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.-----
Indianapolis, Ind.---- ..
Madlson, Ws.-----------
Milwaukee, Wis.---------
Peoria, Ill.-------------
Rockford, Ill.----------
South Bend, Ind.--------
Toledo, Ohio------------
Youngstown, Ohio---------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Duluth, Minn.-----------
Kansas City, Kans.-------
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.-----
Omaha, Nebr.------------


256
41*
23
28*
55
24*
24*
24*
44
54
9
59
30
50


38
38*
144
44*
31*
32
80
92
1,666
36
595
222
25*
116
25
52
56
36
33
48

61
40
776
155
214
101
85
347
32
44
42
35
33*
140
39
114
25
33
37
117
73


54
30
37
134
(21)
130
59


267
38
36
25
46
17
22
39
53
71
14
64
30
60


72
44
154
38
24
44
64
87
1,822
35
548
239
23
ill
111
27
36
59
65
31
28


67
27
838
202
205
131
97
370
34
48
41
22
44
170
21
145
33
22
19
93
56


54
27
49
148
(27)
133
67


793
130
91
81
142
75
81
93
136
197
36
165
88
173


172
116
464
127
86
126
256
327
5,278
123
1,658
693
67
353
81
128
194
153
112
117

182
97
2,399
538
679
366
283
1,083
92
141
132
92
122
469
99
408
95
78
93
312
182


143
92
129
447
(109;
381
192


788
135
112
88
139
66
80
117
156
207
52
188
92
195


129
110
514
168
77
130
265
356
5,167
144
1,580
777
87
386
79
132
215
114
102
102

168
138
2,823
571
713
452
244
1,210
107
129
142
96
147
476
100
440
86
100
106
368
174


175
78
124
372
(92)
393
231


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.----------
Wichita, Kans.-----------

SOUTH ATIANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-------------
Baltimore, M&.----------
Charlotte, N.C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.---..
Miami, Fla.-------------.
Norfolk, Va.------------.
Richmond, Va.------------
Savannah, Ga.-----------.
St. Petersburg, Fla.---..
Tampa, Fla.----------
Washington, D.C.-----
Wilmington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.--------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.----------
Memphis, Tenn.-------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.------

WEST SOUTH CENTAL:
Austin, Tex.-------------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---..
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.-------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.--------
Ogden, Utah--------
Phoenix, Ariz.-----------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah----
Tucson, Ariz.--------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.------
Fresno, Calif.------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii--------
Long Beach, Calif.-------
Los Angeles, Calif.-----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.-------
Spokane, Wash.-------
Tacma, Wash.--------

San Juan, P. R.-------


746
201
152


397
823
125
243
215
139
297
131
(266)
244
658
131


322
159
103
339
375
130
114
197


111
119
82
381
128
180
600
182
520
259
329
141
181


102
57
350
43
275
44
148
123


56
(123:
(113:
141
197
1,796
331
91
301
217
261
693
(112
413
146
138

(105


853
258
136


366
813
132
193
235
183
260
131
(263)
197
606
156


326
172
86
407
361
146
134
237


122
100
83
371
158
178
592
243
543
258
442
168
201


115
56
407
57
255
40
179
82


68
(167)
(168)
127
191
1,966
318
147
349
228
373
729
(104)
431
150
146

(--)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1 llllllllllll i 08864 11111
3 1262 08864 0585


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ties within the State. Of the 14 cases, 10 were children
under 14 years of age. Eleven were white and 3 non-white.
Nine cases occurred in males and 5 in females.
(Received from Dr. James O. Bond, Director, Bureau
of Preventable Diseases, Florida State Board of Health)


Tularemia Marlboro, Massachusetts

During November, a 43-year-old man apparently con-
tracted tularemia from a rabbit found dead during a hunting
trip. During the hunt the patient's dog returned from a
briar patch carrying the dead animal. The hunter field
dressed the rabbit atthat 'time without gloves, although
he had an abraded area on his right index finger. No
gunshot wound was noted in the rabbit; it had no foul
odor, and the meat and viscera appeared normal. Three
days later the patient noted erythema, edema, induration
of the right index finger, axillary lymphadenopathy, chills,
and fever. No specific diagnosis was.made initially and
he was treated intinitten.tly with- tetracycline, 1 gram
per day. No streptomnicin ~tapl'ieluded in the treatment.
On this regimen he followFd -a stormy course with symp-
toms becoming worse when the antibiotic was discon-
tinued. On the 16th day of illness a blood specimen was
drawn and the tularemia agglutination titer found to be
1:10,240 which established the diagnosis. Tularemia
occurs only rarely in Massachusetts; a total of 11 cases
were reported during the past 10 years.
(Submitted by Dr. Nicholas J. Fiumara, Director,
Division of Communicable Disease, Massachusetts De-
partment of Public Health)

Poliomyelitis Western Vermont
A poliomyelitis fatality in late September, followed
by a cluster of three cases in North Burlington and two
family cases in rural Essex prompted intensive vaccina-
tion clinics in Burlington and surrounding communities in
Chittenden County. To date, a total of eight cases have
occurred, seven in Chittenden County, and one in adjoin-
ing Washington County. Four of the cases in the six
children and both adult cases are paralytic. Of the six
paralytic cases, four are unvaccinated and two have re-
ceived three or more injections of Salk vaccine. Since no
known case has occurred since November 24, authorities
are hopeful that the small outbreak has run its course.
Over 15,000 injections were given in free clinics in the
Burlington area during a two-week period beginning
November 19, in addition to injections given by private
physicians.
This outbreak was reported by Dr. L. J. Leavens,
Director, Division of Communicable Disease Control,
Vermont Department of Health.


QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel

No Changes Reported


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA

These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each State and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table 1 shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


UNIV OF FI-.L
D 8DUME NTS DPT




U.S DEPOSITORY


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