Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00323

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


SFS C.


S/ /


Morbidity a


nd Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


MElrose 4-5131


For re.lea May 1962 f


lNTA 22, GEORGIA


PROVISIONAL INF( TI o. 1l((C OlI IFIABLE DISEASES IN THE LiNI ED
DEATTI-I SELECTED (ITI IS R WEEK ENDED APRIL 28, 1962


POLIOMYELITIS Three N'es b'atic omye-
litis were reported for the w d A 8. The 3
cases were from Virginia, Missouri, an aliforia. Th-
90 paralytic cases reported thus far in 1962 are 25 per-
cent less than the number of paralytic cases reported
thru this period last year. The comparable figures for para-
lytic and total cases during the current and past four
years are as follows:


Polio (Cumulative Total) Through 17th Week
1962 1961 1960 1959 1958

Paralytic Cases 64 85 188 272 153
Total Cases 90 131 260 383 278


Vol. 11, No. 17

STATE AND ON


INFLUENZA No new reports of outbreaks of Type B
influenza have been received. An outbreak of A2 (Asian)
Influenza in March in the state of Washington is reported
in an Epidemiologic Report. This represents the only
institutional or community outbreak of Type A Influenza
reported during the current 1961-1962 influenza season.

HEPATITIS A total of 1,326 cases of viral hepatitis
has been reported for the week ending April 28. This
represents an increase of 162 cases (or 14%) over the
1,164 cases reported for the previous week. This is
largely due to a relative increase in incidence of cases
in the over 20 age group reported in East South Central,
West South Central, Mountain, and Pacific Coast regions.


Tahlc I ( A'SE OF SPrCIFIED NO1IFIABLt DISIASIS I NITFD STATES
(CUIrulati'.c tor al.- include revised and dielaycd reports through pre. iou- % iee'.)


Aseptic m enlit gitll ..... .........
Brucellosis ....... .....
Diphtheria .. ............
Encephalitis. infectiou ... ...
Hepatitis, Infectiou-. 31an.d -L u I
Mleasle.; .......... ...... .
Neningococcal infct ions .......
Poliom yelitis, total ...... ... .
Paralytic ......... ........
Noinparal ytic ...... .... .
Un.-pecified............ .. .
Streptococcal -ore throat
and Scarlet fever ...........
Tetanu .......... ...........
Tularem ia .. ..................
Typhoid le? cr ...... ..... ....
Tvphus fe\ktr. tick-borne,
(Rocky Mouinain spotted). ... .


Rabies in Animal .... ... ........ Ii.


Endedl
April 28,
0962

20
7
5
26
1,326
23.323

3
3


6,749
3
6
8


17th Wec.
Ended
April 29,
1361

21
10i
5
32
1,;91
18,177
36

3
1


ied -an
1957 1961


16
11
35

1'4,729
48
141
7i
-4
3



9


1962

311
lib
165
22,-.L-
26.,661
832
91:i
6,
11
iS

145, 20
42
86
124

5

1 ,4Lu


Fir-: 17 e k
Hed an


23-
1 2
30,328
21 ,0',QS
83-.
131
85

19

15 3,029


162


1 ,21'9


1957 1961


230
269
6,880
-30,979
956
275
150
79

-. 6



1 1


1,420


Table 2 NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW' FREQUEN(.Y


Anthrax:
Botulism-
Malaria. Mass. 1, I11. i, N.Y. 1, Mit -
Plague


P-.itrjuCsil. 14L. 1
Rabils in Nlan
Sma I lpo-X
T'phus. marine


~--~--


t









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


.A *Current U. S. Hepatitis Incidence
\, Compared With Years 1961, 1960, and 1957
i SOUICi DAIA NOVS CDC








/ ',/-.. ,- ,
1961









i ,
/'.'" '\ \I

/ I960 ,^ ,,, -./ -
\ ,/
1 /


2.000

1,00

1,600

1,400

S1,200
Soo

1,000

; 800

600

400

200

Week Endinq


V -


Jan Feb Mar Apr May June
6 20 3 17 3 17 31 '14 28 1 2"6 9 23


- S I


July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec
S21 4 e "1 15 9 13 27 10 4 8 22


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Typhoid Fever California, 1961

During the year 1961, 79 cases of typhoid fever
were reported in California, with one death. The pattern
of occurrence of typhoid in California was generally the
same in 1961 as had been observed in the previous six
years. Of the 79 cases, 35 were contracted in California,
6 in other States, and 38 out of the country (primarily in
Mexico). Of the 41 cases contracted in the United States,
carrier sources were discovered in 22. The investigation
of the carrier sources showed that grandparents played an
important role in transmission of the disease.
TYPHOID CASES BY CARRIER SOURCE CALIFORNIA, 1961


Relation to Case
Grandmothers
Great-Grandmothers
Grandfathers
Other Members of Family
Patient in Hospital
Employer
Friend


Total
11
2
2


2
TOTAL 22


(Reported in California Morbidity by Philip K. Condit,
M.D., Chief, Bureau of Communicable Diseases, Cali-
fornia State Department of Public Health.)

A2-(Asian) Influenza Washington
Between March 14 and 19, 23 of 52 patients and 17
of 29 staff members at a Washington State Nursing Home
developed a severe respiratory disease. Since the nursing
home patients were primarily over the age of 70, it was
difficult to get good clinical information on symptom-
atology. However, fever, headache, and myalgia were the


most prominent symptoms in the patient group. Eleven of
the 23 ill nursing home patients at one time or other had
fevers over 1020, while a number had temperatures as
high as 1040. The duration of illness in the patients was
less than five days. One death occurred in a 95-year-old
cardiac patient on the fourth day of illness. Among the
1'7 staff members who became sick, the prominent signs
and symptoms included cough, chills, fever, headache,
and malaise. One to five day absences were observed in
the staff members. Sera and throat swabs were obtained
from 3 sick individuals. Sera rises against Influenza A2
were demonstrated in two cases by hemagglutination-
inhibition tests.
Four additional tier rises against Type A Influenza
have been identified in the Stare of Washington during
1962. These are shown below:


Case

10 yr. old male
6 yr. old male
(Brother of 1.)
50 yr. old male
Naval Officer


Date of
Illness

Mid-March
Mid-March

March 8
March 9


Titer to Type A
Acute Cony.

Neg. 1:256
Neg. 1:64


>1:256
>1:256


The Naval case occurred in an officer who had just
traveled from Japan to Seattle aboard a U. S. Naval ship.
Japann had had an A, (Asian) Influenza epidemic in
February and March of 1962.)
(Reported by Dr. Ernest Ager and Dr. Byron J. Francis,
Washington State Health Department.)
(Continued on page 136)


130


/ 1957 '- ,.,.


r


-


r










131


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




1961 POLIOMYELITIS FATALITIES


During 1961, there were 77 fatalities due to polio-
myelitis reported to the Poliomyelitis Surveillance Unit
of the Communicable Disease Center. Of the 71 deaths
in which localization of paralysis was known, 93 percent
has some degree of bulbar involvement.
The fatalities are presented in the following table
by age group and vaccination history. The number of polio
cases with residual paralysis and the paralytic case-
fatality ratio (per 100) are also given for each age group-
The age distribution of fatal cases is quite different


from that of paralytic cases. While 39 percent of the
paralytic cases were 0-4 years of age, only 14 percent
of the fatalities were in this age group. Conversely, over
58 percent of the fatalities, but only one-fourth of the
paralytic cases, were 20 years of age or over. The para-
lytic case-fatality ratio increases with age indicating
a more severe involvement in the older age groups. The
overall case-fatality ratio of 9.3 per 100 compares with
9.5 in 1960, 8.3 in 1959, and 7.4 in 1958.


POLIOMYELITIS FATALITIES BY AGE GROUP
AND VACCINATION HISTORY, UNITED STATES 1961*

Total** Paralytic
Age DOSES OF VACCINE Paralytic Case
9- Paralytic Case
Group 0 1-2 3 4+ Unk Total Cases Fatality Ratio/100

0-4 5 3 3 1 0 11 319 3.4
5-9 9 0 1 2 0 12 184 6.5
10-14 1 1 2 0 0 4 79 5.1
15-19 1 0 3 1 0 5 39 12.8
20-29 10 2 0 01 0 12 106 11.3
30-39 18 4 0 0 2 24 71 33.8
40+ 8 0 1 0 0 9 30 30.0
Unk 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Total 52 10 9 4 2 77 829 9.3
* Fatalities reported to Polio Surveillance Unit, CDC.
** Cases with residual paralysis reported to Polio Surveillance Unit, CDC.


MORTALITY TOTAL DEATHS REPORTED IN 108 CITIES


For the four-week period ending April 28, deaths
from all causes declined to an average of 11,706 per
week, but with marked variation during the individual
weeks of the period. The average number of deaths in
excess of the expected number per week was 177.


WEEK ENDING 4Week Weekly
4/7 4/14 4/21 4/28 Total Average
Observed 11,849 11,620 11,296 12,058 46,823 11,706
Expected 11,645 11,572 11,492 11,407 46,116 11,529
Excess 204 48 -196 651 707 177


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


NUMBER

OF

DEATHS


Pr Wod En. M -r
s8Y PLACE OF OCCURRENCE


0 I 1961 1962 | 1963 C
"CACULATE FROM 954-'60 EXPERIENCE


(See table, page 135)













132 Morbidity and MortalitY Weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 29, 1961 AND APRIL 28, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Asrpti,
Poliomyelitis, Total Cases Poliomyelitis, Paralytic Nonparalytic Meningi ri


Area




UNITED STATES......

NEW ENGLAND .............
Maine.................
New Hampshire..........
Vermont...............
Massachusetts.........
Rhode Island..........
Connecticut...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..........
New York...............
New Jersey............
Pennsylvania

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.......
Ohio..................
Indiana..............
Illinois..............
Michigan...............
Wisconsin............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.......
Minnesota.............
Iowa ..................
Missouri...............
North Dakota..........
South Dakota.........
Nebraska..............
Kansas................

SOUTH ATLANTIC..........
Delaware..............
Maryland..............
District of Columbia..
Virginia...............
West Virginia..........
North Carolina........
South Carolina........
Georgia................
Florida................

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.......
Kentucky..............
Tennessee.............
Alabama...............
Mi Z Zs lppL...........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.......
Arkansas..............
Louisiana.............
Oklahoma...............
Texas..................

MOUNTAIN................
Montana...............
Idaho..................
Wyoming................
Colorado...............
New Mexico............
Arizona................
Utah.................
Nevada................

PACIFIC ..................
Washington ..........
Oregon...............
California............
Alaska................
Hawaii................


Cumulative Cumulative
17th week First 17 weeks 17th week First 17 iekh 17th -EkL 17th week
1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961

3 4 90 131 3 3 64 85 1 20 21

1 3 1 3 -



2 -

1 1 1 -

31 11 18 10 1 3
31 5 18 4 2
4 4 1
2 2 1

2 8 19 2 6 13 3
4 8 4 4 1
3 2 2 2 -
2 1 5 2 5 1 2
1 1 1 1
3 -1 -

1 a 7 4 1 4 3 -
1 1 -
3 1 2 -
1 3 1 1 -


2 -


S 7 13 1 6 9 1 1
2 -


1 1 1 -
2 1 -

1 2 -
1 1 1 1 -
1 2 2 I
2 3 1 2 -

4 14 3 3 4
1 13 1 2 3 -


2 1 2 1 1 1

1 19 17 1 17 8 -
1 1 1 -
1 5 5 1 5 3 -
-




-13 11 11 5 -

1 5 17 1- 3 10 1 3 1
2 1 1 -
3 1 -

3 3 -2 1
S1 5 1
1 2 3 2 1 1- -
I 6 4 -


1 8 33 1 6 26 8 10
2 2 3 2
2 1 --
1 7 28 1 5 22 5 8

1 1 1 1 -


Puerto Rico.............. 1 5 3 1 5 3 -











Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report 133


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 29, 1961 AND APRIL 28, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
Infectious Infectious and serum
Area Cumu- Cumu- 17th week
lative lative Under 20 &
17th week 17 weeks 17th week 17 weeks 17th week 20 yr. over Total Total 17th week
1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1961
UNITED STATS...... 7 116 5 165 26 32 684 578 1,326 1,791 23,523 18,177

NW ENGLAND.............. 1 1 31 26 60 31 2,800 1,660
Maine.................. 1 12 7 19 7 476 58
New Hampshire......... 1 2 3 5 5 90
Vermont............... 137 17
Massachusetts......... 13 13 26 4 1,063 749
Rhode Island.......... 1 2 4 2 161 345
Connecticut ........... 5 2 8 13 958 401

MIDDLE ATIANTIC.......... 3 2 4 3 92 103 195 258 6,186 3,630
New York.............. 1 2 2 2 39 58 97 87 2,946 1,178
New Jersey ............ 12 18 30 68 2,893 1,106
Pennsylvania.......... 2 2 1 41 27 68 103 347 1,346

EAST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 29 1 6 3 5 183 130 327 448 3,187 5,121
Ohio.................. 1 1 36 23 64 122 871 909
Indiana............... 2 1 3 49 20 73 59 513 261
Illinois.............. 24 1 59 45 108 61 685 549
Michigan.............. 1 3 1 4 38 40 78 199 888 1,524
Wisconsin............. 2 1 2 4 7 230 1,878

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 51 2 30 2 24 42 73 226 828 752
Minnesota............. 4 11 1 6 13 21 47 53 96
Iowa.................. 1 27 1 1 6 8 56 391 255
Missouri.............. 2 1 1 3 2 6 70 188 198
North Dakota.......... 1 1 3 9 12 3 183 154
South Dakota.......... 1 2 1 5 1 1 4 13 1
Nebraska.............. 6 11 1 1 5 13 48
Kansas................ 9 1 10 10 20 33 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 9 32 7 2 86 45 138 177 1,203 1,908
Delaware............... 1 1 2 2 18 57
Maryland .............. 3 2 2 5 7 15 206 316
District of Columbia.. 1 1 19 5
Virginia............. 1 4 5 12 9 22 19 297 597
West Virginia ......... .- 1 12 4 21 52 393 414
North Carolina......... 2 4 1 37 9 46 39 29 142
South Carolina ........ 4 2 7 1 9 8 65 60
Georgia. ............... 2 4 8 6 14 1 26 45
Florida.............. 1 13 1 7 10 17 40 150 272

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ...... 4 11 1 105 42 148 208 1,767 1,050
entucky .............. 55 9 64 44 392 430
Tennessee ............ 2 4 33 15 49 98 1,216 468
Alabama ............... 1 3 6 12 18 22 111 66
Mississippi........... 1 4 1 11 6 17 44 48 86

WEST SOUTH CENTAL 1 8 2 67 3 4 58 43 102 128 4,072 1,082
Arkansas.............. 1 1 8 1 2 5 5 10 30 5 58
Louisiana ............. 1 7 15 9 24 7 5 3
Oklahoma............. 3 1 2 15 146 20
Texas................. 1 6 1 49 2 2 37 29 66 76 3,916 1,001

MOUNTAIN ................ 2 7 13 16 56 101 1,108 635
Montana ............. 11 6 4 4 10 10 276 35
Idaho ................. 8 13 28 46
Wyoming............... 2 2 7 22
Colorado.............. 1 2 4 13 42 353 78
New Mexico............ 1 3 6 10 6 NN NN
Arizona............... -. 7 16 323 409
Utah .................. 1 4 2 6 5 128 22
Nevada................. 2 23

PACIFIC .................. 1 8 10 5 17 92 131 227 214 2,372 2,339
Washington ............ 1 1 37 21 61 21 693 337
Oregon............... 1 1 13 16 29 28 577 230
California ........... 1 6 5 4 15 33 72 106 156 1,015 1,759
Alaska................ 5 9 22 31 5 13 11
Hawaii ........... .. -. 4 74 2

Puerto Rico.............. 14 16 14 30 65 123 27











134 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 29, 1961 AND APRIL 28, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococal Streptococcal, Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
17th wk. 17 eeks 17th week 17th wk. 17th wk. 17th wk. 17th wk. 17 weeks 17th week 17 weeks
1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962

UNITED STATES.... 41 852 6,749 7,489 3 6 8 129 107 95 1,440

NEW ENGLAND......... 3 58 471 645 3 -
Maine..,........... 7 10 24 1 -
New Hampshire ..... 3 2 15 -
Vermont............ 2 4 4 -
Massachusetts...... 2 23 88 185 2 -
Rhode Island....... 1 5 31 41 -
Connecticut........ 18 336 376 -

MIDDLE ATIANTIC..... 7 125 571 926 2 1 16 2 1 37
New York........... 4 56 276 560 2 1 9 1 1 25
New Jersey......... 2 32 103 188 5 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 37 192 178 2 1 12

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 9 182 867 1,000 1 17 26 12 283
Ohio............... 2 54 64 267 8 18 3 145
Indiana............ 1 19 119 173 1 7 3 98
Illinois........... 2 29 226 208 1 3 3 21
Michigan........... 3 67 257 164 3 3 10
Wisconsin.......... 1 13 201 188 2 1 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 5 44 293 200 6 26 28 409
Minnesota........... 7 28 12 7 4 75
Iowa................ 2 9 66 69 11 12 176
Missouri........... 2 11 11 16 5 3 5 67
North Dakota....... 3 128 48 30
South Dakota....... 1 2 3 7 50
Nebraska..... ... 6 1 2 10
Kansas............. 1 6 58 55 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 6 137 433 532 1 2 2 19 6 13 114
Delaware ........... 2 18 6 10 -
Maryland........... 1 6 25 94 2 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 6 5 5 2 -
Virginia............ 1 26 95 138 4 3 7 56
West Virginia ..... 9 77 191 1 1 3 35
North Carolina..... 1 37 25 30 -
South Carolina..... 9 131 7 1 -
Georgia.......... 6 21 -- 2 1 5 2 4
Florida............ 1 20 48 57 1 1 4 3 18

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 54 1,213 1,297 10 11 15 188
Kentucky........... 12 117 285 2 5 3 55
Tennessee.......... 22 1,032 943 4 6 11 126
Alabama............ 11 5 4 4 1 7
Mississippi........ 9 59 65 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 5 83 752 865 3 4 43 17 20 293
Arkansas........... 9 1 8 1 1 6 1 5 39
Louisiana.......... 2 35 7 4 11 1 1 12
Oklahoma........... 5 50 35 3 1 8
Texas.............. 3 34 694 818 2 3 23 14 14 234

MOUNTAIN............ 1 24 1,206 1,047 1 7 3 2 15
Montana............ 3 70 38 -
Idaho......... ..... 3 103 82 -
Wyoming............ 2 17 69 2 -
Colorado........... 1 5 428 288 1 -
New Mexico......... 325 216 2 2 1 8
Arizona............ 8 190 206 1 1 1 7
Utah............... 73 129 -
Nevada............. 3 19 -

PACIFIC............. 5 145 943 977 8 16 4 101
Washington.......... 1 15 260 509 -
Oregon............. 13 33 73 1 1
California......... 4 112 595 350 8 15 4 100
Alaskd............. 4 21 42 -
Hawaii ............. 1 34 3 -
Puerto Rico......... 5 3 2 1 1 1 7











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




Table 4 (A). TOTAL DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


135


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.0


Area For weeks ending Area For weeks ending
4Area 4 4/21 4/ 4 414 Area1
4/7 4/14 4/21 4/28 4/7 4/14 4/21 4/28


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. .............
Bridgeport, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass. ..........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, M ss. .............
Lynn, Maws ..............
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New Haven, Conn. ..........
ProvidencE, R.I. ...........
Somerville, Mass. .........
SpringrfLld, Mass. ........
Waterbury, Conn. ..........
Worcester, Mass. ..........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ..............
Allentown, Pa. ............
Buffalo, N.Y. .............
Camden, N.J. ..............
Elizabeth, N.J. ...........
Erie, Pa. .................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J. ..............
New York City, N.Y. .......
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. ........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...........
Reading, Pa. ..............
Rochester, N.Y. ...........
S Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa. ............
Syracuse, N.Y. ...........
Trenton, N.J. ........ ....
Utica, N.Y. ..............
Yonkers, N.Y. .............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio ...............
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, III. .............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio................
Detroit, Mich ............
Evansville, Ind .........
Flint, Mich. ..............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. ................
Grand Rapids, Mich. ........
Indianapolis, Ind. ........
Madison, Wis. ............
Milwaukee, Wis. ..........
Peoria, Ill. ..............
Rockford, Ill. ............
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio..:........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn. .............
Kansas City, Kans. ........
Kansas City, Mo. ..........
Lincoln, Nebr ............
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ............
St. Paul, Minn ...........
Wichita, Kans ............


252
40
29
35
46
15
27
21
57
72
10
61
15
63


50
37
131
36
17
31
74
126
1,728
35
597
271
22
101
28
38
67
38
33
42


74
37
700
162
205
132
80
371
39
32
29
35
51
179
46
133
30
29
54
112
58


56
24
39
142
40
97
73
268
43
59


281
49
31
24
52
18
33
25
33
68
16
43
25
55


52
31
153
38
34
28
79
84
1,753
25
579
123
27
143
23
42
64
54
34
36


39
32
769
163
224
106
88
375
39
50
57
26
34
139
33
107
24
30
43
115
63


63
17
43
134
14
138
62
222
65
45


236
31
27
22
40
24
24
24
39
79
14
43
25
39


36
30
133
45
20
37
78
86
1,741
42
537
187
30
129
25
43
67
45
23
26


47
44
674
143
213
113
74
353
35
51
36
45
40
138
36
110
32
27
34
97
58


62
18
44
107
26
102
74
254
52
48


275
49
43
40
60
27
20
31*
46
57
20
61
48
55


36
41
132
47
37
48
81
130
1,795
52
542
229
21
114
32
42
60
60
30
43


61
46
837
160
213
120
70
342
47
48
47
35*
44
136
42
144
24
28
42
112
63


56
25
39
148
27
113
80
240
93
69


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. ..............
Baltimore, Md. ............
Charlotte, N.C. ..........
Jacksonville, Fla. ........
Miami, Fla. ..............
Norfolk, Va. ..............
Richmond, Va. .............
Savannah, Ga. .............
St. Petersburg, Fla. ......
Tampa, Fla. ...............
Washington, D.C. ..........
Wilmington, Del. ..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........
Knoxville, Tenn. ..........
Louisville, Ky. ..........
Memphis, Tenn. ...........
Mobile, Ala. ..............
Montgomery, Ala. ..........
Nashville, Tenn. ..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. .............
Baton Rouge, La. ..........
Corpus Christi, Tex ......
Dallas, Tex. ..............
El Paso, Tex. ...........
Fort Worth, Tex. ..........
Houston, Tex. .............
Little Rock, Ark. .........
New Orleans, La. ..........
Oklahoma City, Okla. ......
San Antonio, Tex. .........
Shreveport, La. ..........
Tulsa, Okla. ..............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex ......
Colorado Springs, Colo. ...
Denver, Colo. .............
Ogden. Utah...............
Phoenix, Ariz. ............
Pueblo, Colo. .............
Salt Lake City, Utah.......
Tucson, Ariz. .............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. ..........
Fresno, Calif. ............
Glendale, Calif. ..........
Honolulu, Hawaii...........
Long Beach, Calif. ........
Los Angeles, Calif. .......
Oakland, Calif. ...........
Pasadena, Calif. ..........
Portland, Oreg. ...........
Sacramento, Calif. .......
San Diego, Calif. .........
San Francisco, Calif .....
San Jose, Calif. ..........
Seattle, Wash. ............
Spokane, Wash. ............
Tacoma, Wash. .............


21
41
43
39
58
470
105
31
117
53
88
208
35*
129
49
45


San Juan, P.R. .............. 21 34 32 26


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age.............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


12,058
488
740
6,743


*Estlmate based on average percent of divisional total
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

'fOTF All deaths by place of occurrence.








136 Morbidity and Mo




Staphylococcal Food Poisoning Aboard a Naval Vessel
Seventeen enlisted personnel aboard a Naval vessel
became sick on August 11, 1961, within eight hours of
the noonday meal. Approximately 700 men ate the meal.
The illness was characterized by nausea, vomiting, ab-
dominal cramps, and diarrhea. The mean incubation
period was approximately 35 hours.
Thirty-seven individuals were questioned regarding
history of food consumption. This represented all 17 ill
individuals and 20 asymptomatic individuals who had
eaten the noonday meal. No selectivity was demonstrated
for age, race, service, rate, or berthing area. The follow-
ing table gives the attack rates for specified foods ac-
cording to history of consumption:


Total
Food Total Not
Eating No. Ill % Ill Eating No. Ill % III
Corn Chowder 3 1 33 34 16 47
Hamberger 16 5 31 21 12 57
Spaghetti 30 15 50 7 2 28
Stewed Tomatoes 8 5 63 29 12 41
Macaroni Salad 27 16 60 10 1 10*
Sweet Potato Pie 26 11 42 11 6 55
* P < .01


The macaroni was cooked on August 10 for consump-
tion that evening. Some was left over and stored in the
refrigerator in the vegetable preparation room over night.
It was removed from the refrigerator at 10:00 A.M. on
August 11. The mess cook stated it was cold. Chopped
pimentos, lettuce, boiled eggs, mayonnaise, and mustard
were added shortly after 10:00 A.M. The ingredients were
mixed by hand by two mess cooks. The salad was placed
on the serving line at 10:30 A.M. for early chow at 11:00
A.M. One of the mess cooks who had helped prepare the
salad by hand had several minor cuts on two fingers and
a laceration of the nose. However, no gross infection
was noted.
Rectal swabs were obtained from 37 individuals who
had eaten the noonday meals, 17 of whom were ill and
20 who were asymptomatic. Stool cultures from four ill
individuals and from four asymptomatic individuals were
positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The macaroni salad
was also positive for Staph. aureus, as was a culture
from the finger lacerations of the mess cook who had
prepared the salad. The cutting board in the butcher
shop was bacteriologically negative. The staphylococci
were non-typable by phage typing techniques.
(Reported by Lt. Stephen J. Kendra, M.C., Epidemiology
Officer, U. S. Navy Preventive Medicine Unit No. 2,
Norfolk 11, Virginia.)


rtality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
Immunization Information for International Travel
1961 edition Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following name should be added to the list of Yellow
Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:

City
Midland, Michigan
Center
Midland City-County Health Department,
Courthouse Annex, 301 Main Street
Telephone: TEmple 5-7781
Clinic Hours
Thursday, 10 a.m., by appointment
Fee
Yes
_UNIV OF FL 1
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