Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00318

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





Morb:


dllP


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


Prepared by the


I DI *


MElrose 4-5131


For release December 8, 1961 Atlanta 22. Georgia vol. 10, No. 48

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended December 2, 1961

Respiratory Disease A number of outbreaks of nurse and one patient at a local hospital. Clinical infor-
respiratory disease, primarily in school populations, have mation on the cases and numbers of individuals involved
been noted in the last several weeks. Outbreaks have in the outbreak are not yet available.
occurred in Jamaica, Florida, California, Oregon, Arizona, r Miami, Flq During the week of November 20,
and in the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada. Type B approxi y h o o50 school children riding the
influenza has been isolated from the Jamaica, Florida, scho s ber e Key iscayne, Florida, and South
and Saskatchewan outbreaks. Mi i HVih School came dow, with a flu-like disease.
Jamaica Between August and October of 1961, a T i .ease was characterized by sore throat, headache
small respiratory outbreak occurred in workers at a mining f e pnd 'ecd-orbr pain. M lgia was not a prominent
company in Jamaica. Type B influenza virus was isolated pa *\f he clinical picture. T Bt washings were obtained
from one of the workers at the company. In addition, three fro -6een of the sick indivi uals. One of the isolates
sera rises against Type B influenza were identified in obtrale, ws similar to te great Lakes strain of B in-
three other workers at the mining company, and in one fluenza e izad y identical to the isolate ob-

Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases. United States
(Cumulative totals Include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 48th Week Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of International Approxl-
Lists, 1955) First 48 veeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
Dec. Dec. Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 2, 3, l'.-60 Median 1,-5-56 point
-- Data not available 1l l', 19j1 1 1966- 19i691 19-0, to
Quantity zero 1959-60
Anthrax--------- ------ 062 7 1 *
Botulism-----------------.. -----049.1 -* 5 10 *
Brucellosis undulantt fever)-----044 10 7 13 545 701 736 *
Diphtheria-----------------------055 14 35 32 529 755 806 220 .10 453 July 1
Encephalitle, infectious---------082 29 28 32 1,538 1,755 1,972 1,538 1,755 1,972 Jan. I
Hepatitis, infectious, and
serum---------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,293 1,110 318 67,560 36,786 17,807 14,857 11,076 3,770 Sept. I
Malaria-------------------110-117 1 2 57 68 *
Measles -------------------------085 3,592 3,582 3,582 405,590 419,264 464,171 19,962 19,174 20,544 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aeeptic----------340 pt. 28 43 -- 2,970 2,843 2,970 2,843 -- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infection----------057 35 48 45 1,970 2,030 2,379 455 492 543 Sept. 1
Polion~elitis-------------------080 15 56 109 1,263 3,121 5,796 1,160 2,909 5,483 Apr. 1
Paralytic-------------- 080.,080.1 11 45 85 817 2,182 2,084 757 2,016 2,754 Apr. 1
nlonparalytic-------- ---- -080.2 3 6 18 301 622 2,777 276 596 1,897 Apr. 1
Unspecified------------------080.3 1 5 6 145 317 935 127 297 832 Apr. 1
Psittacosis------- -------096.2 1 3 62 94 *
Rabies in man------------------094 3 2 *
Streptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever---- 050,051 6,398 6,586 --- 290,855 282,200 -- 71,644 --- --- Aug. 1
TYphold fever .------------.------ 0 21 11 15 775 769 992 661 638 812 Apr. 1
phus fever, endemic------------101 1 2 40 62 ,
I abies in animals----------------- 61 46 54 3,178 3,148 3,930 544 377 555 Oct. I


and Mortal!







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


trained in the Jamaica case. Two other isolates obtained
from these seven individuals have not been typed as yet.
No other cases of influenza or respiratory illness are
known to have occurred at South Miami High School.
California Since the middle of November, a signifi-
cant increase in school absenteeism has been noted in a
number of areas throughout California. Absenteeism as
high as 30% has been observed in a number of schools
around Los Angeles and San Francisco. Two different
clinical entities account for the school absenteeism:
A mild respiratory disease with fever, cough, and myal-
gia, and a gastrointestinal disease with nausea, vomiting,
and diarrhea. The increased absenteeism at any one
school reportedly lasts for less than a week. A survey
of a number of industrial concerns in the San Francisco
area has not revealed an increase in industrial absen-
teeism. Laboratory and epidemiological studies are in
progress.
Oregon In the past month, school absenteeism as
high as 20 to 25% has been reported in a number of coun-
ties near Portland. Two types of illnesses account for
the school absenteeism: 1) An upper respiratory disease
with fever 99 to 1010, sore inflamed throat, and some
vomiting. The condition persists from three to four days.
2) A gastrointestinal condition with fever 99 to 1010,
abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. This condition also per-
sists for about three to four days. Industrial concerns
show a normal or only slightly elevated absenteeism.
Absenteeism in any one plant on any one day through
December 1 has not been higher than 4%. In the past week,
some severe respiratory illnesses among adults with
myalgia and prolonged weakness have been recognized.
Laboratory studies are under way in the State Laboratory.
Arizona In the middle of November, an outbreak of
influenza-like illness was reported from the Hopi and
Navajo Indian Reservation in northeastern Arizona. Re-
ports suggests that the Navajo have had a considerable
amount of upper respiratory illnesses. School absenteeism
among the Hopi peaked at four Hopi schools with the
week beginning November 13, reaching a maximum of 32%
absenteeism. This is unusual for the Hopi School system
since attendance at their schools usually ranges from 95
to 98%. Preliminary results from a 20% morbidity survey
of the 3500 Hopi Indians gave the following attack rates
for upper respiratory infections over the past several
weeks:


Age Group
0 14
15- 24
25 44
45- 64
65 and over


Attack Rate
48%
32
20
20
33


The illness has been characterized by fevers over
1000, severe sore throats (sometimes inflamed), hacking
cough, minimal conjunctivitis, absence of pulmonary in-
volvement by auscultation and X-ray, myalgia in some
cases limited to the upper arms and chest, and frontal
headache. The acute symptoms last for two to three days;
it is usually at least a week before the patient is fully
recovered. Laboratory studies are under way at the Com-
municable Disease Center, Atlanta, Georgia.
Canada An outbreak of severe respiratory disease
in November caused school absenteeism as high as 90%
in some areas of Saskatchewan, Canada. Illness has been
characterized by conjunctivitis, headache, fever, weak-
ness, and gastrointestinal complaints. The acute phase
of the illness lasted from three to four days. Many pa-
tients suffered a persistent cough and continued weakness
for as long as an additional ten days. Complications were
rare but influenza deaths-associated with staphylococcal
pneumonia occurred in two women aged 25 and 35. Influ-
enza B has been isolated from a number of cases by the
Provincial Laboratory in Saskatchewan, and confirmed
by the Laboratory of Hygiene at Ottawa. The strain re-
sembles the Great Lakes variant of Influenza B.
(Information for this summary was obtained from: Dr. Ros-
lyn Robinson, Chief, International Influenza Center for
the Americas, CDC; Dr. Mike Segal, Dr. Ann Beasley and
Dr. Jim Conner from Variety Children's Research Founda-
tion, Miami, Florida; Dr. Henry Renteln, Division of Pre-
ventive Medical Services, California State Department of
Public Health; Dr. Grant Skinner, State Epidemiologist,
Oregon State Board of Health; Dr. E. W. R. Best, Chief,
Epidemiology Division, Department of National Health
and Welfare, Ottawa, Canada; Dr. James O. Bond, Di-
rector, Bureau Preventable Diseases, Florida State Board
of Health.)

Polio Fifteen cases of poliomyelitis, 11 paralytic
were reported for the 48th week ending December 2. This
compares with the 19 cases, 9 paralytic, reported the pre-
ceding week. The last community outbreak this polio
season occurred in Newberry County, South Carolina in
late summer and early fall. Since October, there have been
only sporadic cases of poliomyelitis reported throughout
the country.

Hepatitis The 1,293 cases of hepatitis reported for
the 48th week are 164 more than reported for the 47th
week. This represents 183 more cases than were reported
for the 48th week of 1960. There has been a definite
increase in the number of cases reported from the East
South Central, West South Central, and Pacific States.
More cases were reported this week than for any other
week since last June.
(Continued on page 8.)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES. EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED DECEMBER 3, 1960 AND DECEMBER 2, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


PoUiomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
48th Week first 48 weeks 48th Week first 48 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 196C 1961 1961

UNIIS STAES -------- 15 56 1,263 3,121 11 45 817 2,182 3 6 28 10

NEW ENGLAND----------------- 3 4 40 231 1 4 27 183 2 2 1
Maine--------- ----- 1 5 49 1 5 48 --
ew Hampshire----------- 2 ---
Vermont-------------------- 9 11 8 6 -
Massachusetts-------------- 3 3 18 34 1 3 10 23 2 2
Rhode Island--------------- 1 102 1 78 -
Connecticut------------ 5 35 3 28 1
MIDDE ATLANTIC------------ 1 12 329 471 1 8 218 335 3 2
New York------------------- 1 6 244 254 1 4 156 165 -
New Jersey--------------- 1 35 83 28 60 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 5 50 134 4 34 110 1 2
EAST NRTH ETRAL------- 5 12 177 535 4 9 110 332 1 10 1
hio--- ---------------- 1 5 48 126 1 2 22 65 1 -
Indiana------------------- 2 21 133 2 12 101 -
Illinois------------------- 1 4 36 147 1 4 19 100 8 1
Michigan------------------ 1 38 93 30 54 1 -
Wisconsin------------------ 2 1 34 36 2 1 27 12 1 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 2 75 174 1 34 101 6
Minnesota----------------- 6 54 6 44 -
Iowa----------------------. 19 22 10 4 5
Missouri------------------- 2 26 44 1 8 32 -
North Daketa--------------- 4 14 1 5 -
South Dakota--------------- 3 5 1 1 -
Nebraska------------------- 8 16 4 9
Kansas--------------------- 9 19 4 6 1
SOUTH ATIANTIC------------- 1 11 214 583 1 10 157 463 1 2 1
Delaware------------------- 2 -
Maryland------------------- 1 41 151 1 31 136 -
District of Columbia------- 3 3 5 3 5 -1
Virginia------------------- 5 12 52 4 12 47 1 1 1
West Virginia-------------- 1 3 33 62 1 3 23 51 -
North Carolina------------- 1 21 92 1 11 69 -
South Carolina----------- 1 34 130 1 26 88 -
Georgia------------------- 30 24 23 22 -
Florida------------------- 38 67 27 45 -
EAST SOU CETRAL---------- 3 85 250 3 49 108 1 1
Kentucky------------------- 27 130 5 5 -
Tennessee------------------ 2 22 54 2 10 37 -
Alabama------------------- 11 23 11 23 -1 1
Mississippi---------------- 1 25 43 1 23 43 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 4 151 283 4 84 181 2 -
Arkansas------------------ 21 31 10 23 -
Louisiana--------------- 1 54 50 1 43 31 -
Oklahoma---------------- 4 17 12 -
Texas---------------------- 3 72 185 3 31 115 2 -
MOUNTAIN ------------------ 2 6 47 98 2 4 28 51 11 -
Montana------------------- 2 4 23 2 2 17 --
Idaho--------------------- 14 10 6 1 -
Wyoming------------------- 1 21 1 -
Colorado------------------- 2 2 10 21 2 1 10 19 1 -
New Mexico---------------- 3 7 4 -
Arizona-------------------- 1 8 9 1 6 7 -
Itah5------------------------ 7 4 2 -
.. 8 7 4 2 --
Nevada.-------------------.
PACIFIC---------------------- 1 4 145 496 1 3 110 428 1 8
Wasnington---------------- 1 1 30 37 1 1 20 37 1
Oregon------------------- 17 36 8 19 -
California--------------- 3 93 413 2 77 362 1 7
Alaska------------------- 2 2 -
Haai-------------------- 5 8 5 8 -

Puerto Rico-------------- 7 506 -7 497 -








4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED DECEMBER 3, 1960 AND DECEMBER 2, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
n cephalitis, serum 092,1998.5 pt. eae
infectious ___
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
48th Week first 48 weeks 082 48th Week first 48 weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


UNIED SMSS-------- 14 35 529 755 29 28 1,293 1,110 67,560 36,786 3,592 3,582

EW ENGAND------------------ 8 12 2 1 47 29 2,216 1,067 526 473
Maine------------------- 8 4 166 74 175 7
New Hampshire------------- 2 4 199 34 14 263
Vermont------------------- 2 2 190 27 2 3
Massachusetts-------------- 7 9 2 27 10 955 511 281 150
Rhode Island -------------- 1 1 4 237 200 35
Connecticut---------------- 1 8 5 469 221 54 15
MIDD ATLANTIC-------------- 20 16 6 12 154 149 9,094 4,557 494 1,024
New York----------- 7 4 6 9 72 90 3,930 2,465 325 388
New Jersey----------------- 2 1 32 12 2,154 332 79 133
Pennsylvania--------------- 13 10 2 50 47 3,010 1,760 90 503
EAST NORTH CENTRAL------- 16 41 1 1 275 216 13,533 6,654 657 604
Ohio--------------------- 1 16 72 86 4,483 2,312 36 184
Indiana----------------- 2 7 56 22 1,997 758 72 86
Illinois---------------- 10 6 1 53 45 2,466 1,432 268 54
Michigan--------------- 3 10 1 86 59 4,240 1,927 204 92
Wisconsin----------------- 2 8 4 347 225 77 188
WEST NORTH CETRA-------- 2 7 48 63 3 126 78 6,498 2,565 56 85
Mfnnesota------------------ 2 4 33 36 52 35 1,571 461 6 3
Iowa--------------------- 2 8 21 11 1,859 407 15 13
Missouri----------------- 1 2 1 19 17 1,394 860 9
North Dakota--------------- 1 4 3 14 4 147 175 34 57
South Dakota------------- 1 6 10 1 194 146 1 3
Nebraska----------------- 1 2 2 2 6 5 625 259 -
Kansas-------------------- 2 14 5 708 257 NN NN
SOUTH ATANTIC----------- 5 8 130 217 2 1 156 95 8,631 4,210 229 500
Delaware----------------- 1 2 182 258 32
Maryland----------------- 1 1 10 13 743 431 21 20
District of Columbia------ 3 1 2 130 60 30 2
Virginia------------------- 2 17 39 I 28 21 1,425 745 70 298
West Virginia--------.---. 1 4 37 22 1,514 807 56 67
North Carolina------------- 11 14 37 17 2,025 398 9 32
South Carolina------- 13 50 14 2 489 151 6 34
Georgia------------------- 3 7 42 41 14 4 736 261 --
Florida------------------ 1 42 68 1 1 14 12 1,387 1,099 37 15
EAST SOUTH CETRAL------- 5 9 46 124 2 2 224 236 10,110 5,300 381 250
Kentucky------------- 5 9 45 2 ,68 73 2,948 1,845 22 170
Tennessee------------------ 3 9 1 71 95 3,956 1,798 214 71
Alabama-------------------- 5 4 27 37 56 47 1,747 1,147 68 9
Mississippi---------------- 7 33 1 29 21 1,459 510 77
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL---------- 2 10 241 244 2 1 86 64 4,844 2,794 293 180
Arkansas------------------- 4 16 13 17 947 218 4 -
Louisiana------------------ 1 7 30 70 8 7 533 173 1
Oklahoma------------------- 9 25 7 3 329 321 1 13
Texas------------------- 1 3 198 133 2 1 58 37 3,035 2,082 287 167
MOUNTAIN--------------------- 12 36 1 45 76 3,799 2,835 241 164
Montana-------------------- 2 3 4 7 333 163 47 40
Idaho---------------------- 11 3 4 300 312 27 20
Wyoming------------------- 5 2 156 36 1 1
Colorado------------------- 4 3 13 34 1,316 1,035 12 38
New Mexico--------------- 5 4 4 8 312 310 NN -
Arizona-------------------- 3 1 16 3 638 605 80 44
Utah---------------------- 7 5 15 608 272 66 20
Nevada--------------------- 1 3 136 102 8 1
PACIFIC--------------------- 1 8 2 14 6 180 167 8,835 6,804 715 302
Washington----------------- 2 1 26 27 1,017 902 334 84
Oregon-------------------- 33 21 1,399 1,062 94 115
California----------------- 1 2 1 13 6 111 108 5,936 4,524 220 103
Alaska--------------------- 4 1 8 10 413 235 65 -
Hawaii ------------------ 2 1 70 81 2 -

Puerto Rico--------------- 2 58 132 14 20 918 721 47 24

Nm-Hot NoLiriable








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED DECEMBER 3, 1960 AND DECEMBER 2, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
enngoccocl Psitt cocal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
Malaria sore fever,
infections cosis throat, endemic aes in
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 48th Week first 48 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNITED STATES-------- 1 35 48 1 6,398 21 11 775 769 1 61 46

HW ENIAND.----.------------. 1 3 295 20 11 -
Maine---------------------. 1 16 1 2 -
New Hampshire-------------- 2 -
Vermont------------------- 3 -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 94 14 5 -
Mode Island-------------- 1 19 2 -
Connecticut---------------- I 161 3 4 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 1 18 1 267 4 4 96 58 6
New York------------------- 13 1 148 2 1 53 34 6
New Jersey----------------- 1 48 17 7 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 1 4 71 2 3 26 17 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-----------' 9 7 435 5 105 98 7 1
Ohio----------------------- 2 65 2 43 29 1 -
Indiana-------------------- 78 3 24 24 2 -
Illinois------------------- 1 3 128 29 21 1 1
Michigan- ---------------- 8 2 93 6 16 1 -
Wisconsin------------------ 71 3 8 2 -
WEST NORM CE~TRAL---------- -- 2 1 221 2 35 48 19 8
Minnesota------------------ 1 27 5 1 1 1
Iowa----------------------- 1 55 2 11 6 3
Missouri------------------- 1 6 2 21 26 7 2
North Dakota--------------- 98 1 -
South Dakota-------------- 3 4 2 1
Nebraska----------------- 1 3 2 1
Kansas-------------------- 35 3 2 1 -
SOTH A LANTIC -------------- 4 7 495 5 *2 132 117 3 9
Delaware------------------ 6 1 1 -
Maryland------------------- 1 1 16 4 6 -
District of Columbia------- 1 13 10 -
Vi rgnia------------------- -- 3 137 20 24 2 4
West Virginia-------------- 154 10 14 1 5
North Carolina------------- -- 1 3 46 16 9 -
South Carolina------------ -- 1 8 8 12 -
Georgia-------------------- 1 4 3 39 27 -
Florida------------------- 124 2 1 21 14 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL---------- 1 1 1,179 4 2 84 119 4 3
Kentucky------------ -- 1 109 1 1 19 32 2 -
Tennessee------------- --- 1 1,025 1 50 56 2 2
Alabama----------------- 16 1 11 23 -
Mississippi-------------- 29 2 4 8 1
WEST SOIUTH ETRAL---------- 4 4 820 1 156 203 1 18 16
Arkansas---------------- 1 30 52 1 1
Louisiana----------------- 2 1 4 27 59 2
Oklahoma------------------- 2 2 12 12 2 -
exas---------------------- 2 814 1 87 80 1 15 13
MOIJTAIN--------------------- 4 1,180 64 45 1 1
Montana-------------------- 1 88 20 13 -
Idaho--------------------- 1 77 1 3 -
Wyoming-------------------- 4 3 4 -
Colorado------------------ 2 363 7 1 -
New Mexico----------------- 328 17 12 1
Arizona------------------- 242 10 10 1 -
Utah--------------------- 77 2 2 -
Nevada-------------------- 1 4
PACIFIC------------------- 1 13 3 1,506 3 83 70 9 2
Washington----------------- 1 1 477 7 5 -
Oregon------------------ 42 1 8 1
California----------------- 1 10 2 904 2 72 56 9 1
Alaska------------ 71 1 -
--------------- 2 12 1 3 --

Puerto Rico------- ---- 1 4 22 20 -







Morbidity and Mortliy Weekly Report


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospitalcenters serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to,year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVIIONS

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shown n parentheses in table 4)

48th 47th Perent Culive first 48 weeks
week week Adjusted rsne
ended ended avege adjusted
Area 48th average
Dec. No'. week to 1961 1960 Percent
3, 25, 195-60 current 1ha1ng
1961 1961 191we
week

TOTAL, 117 REPORTING CITIES---------------------- 13,138 10,487 11,926 +10.2 549,049 550,920 -0.3

ev ngland--------------------------------(14 cities) 838 606 703 +19.2 33,819 34,670 -2.5
Middle Atlantic----------------------------(20 cities) 3,601 2,922 3,221 +11.8 155,786 153,172 +1.7
East North Central-------------------------(21 cities) 2,762* 2,338 2,524 +9.4 117,497 119,316 -1.5
West North Central--------------------------(9 cities) 954 736 861 +10.8 37,535 38,279 -1.9
South Atlantic-----------------------------(11 cities) 1,151 846 1,010 +14.0 47,401 47,224 +0.4
East South Central---------------------------(S cities) 613 525 554 +10.6 24,882 24,926 -0.2
West South Central--------------------------(13 cities) 1,216 809 1,108 +9.7 46,897 47,817 -1.9
Mountain----------------------------------- (8 cities) 403 325 379 +6.3 17,513 17,344 +1.0
Pacific---------------------------------- (13 cities) 1,600* 1,380 1,566 +2.2 67,719 68,172 -0.7

*Includes estimate for missing reports.








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(Py place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


48th 47th Cumlative, 48th 47th Cumulatve,
week week week week
ended ended first 48 weeks ended ended first 48 weeks
a Dec. Nov. Dec. Nov.
2, 25 2, 25,
1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960
2, 25 2a 25,i =


NEW ENGLAD:
Boston, Mass.------------
Bridgeport, Conn.-------.
Cambridge, Mass.--------
Fall River, Mass.-------.
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.-------------.
New Bedford, Mass....-----
New Haven, Conn.--------
Providence, R.I.------
Somerville, Mass.------
Springfield, Mass.------
Waterbury, Conn.--------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.-----
Buffalo, N.Y.---------
Camden, N.J.------------
Elizabeth, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.----------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.----------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgh, Pa.----------
Reading, Pa.------------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.--------
Scranton, Pa.-----------
Syracuse, N.Y.----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.--------------
Yonkers, N.Y.-----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, hio-------------
Canton, Ohio-------------
Chicago, 111.-----------
Cincinnati, Ohio---------
Cleveland, Ohio---------
Columbus, Chio----------.
Dayton, Ohio-------------
Detroit, Mich.-----------
Evansville, Ind.--------
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.---------
Gary, Ind.---------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.------
Indianapolis, Ind.-------
Madison, Ws.-----------
Milwaukee, Wis.---------
Peoria, Ill.-------------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio-------------
Youngstown, Ohio---------

VWST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa-------....
Duluth, Minn.------------
Kansas City, Kans.-------
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.----------
Minneapolis, Minn.-------
Omaha, Nebr.-------------


318
42
44
18
51
23
22
30
62
62
15
54
39
58


44
43
150
42
30
56
99
169
1,799
44
447
274
28
106
22
33
68
68
49
30

64
32
788
177
252
143
100
373
46
44*
33
54
33
174
50
117
34
26
33
126
63


81
36
37
137
(42)
144
82


194
38
27
22
53
10
29
19
27
68
13
39
22
45


43
32
123
47
18
34
61
57
1,548
37
461
151
19
97
25
32
60
29
23
25

47
35
698
148
152
117
72
332
39
43
33
32
45
149
27
122
30
27
27
102
61

56
16
36
158
(26
105
48


11,628
1,873
1,409
1,313
2,339
1,183
1,052
1,239
2,156
2,985
628
2,123
1,270
2,621


2,217
1,642
6,939
2,020
1,419
1,873
3,335
4,904
79,526
1,868
24,084
9,176
1,118
4,862
1,157
1,683
2,959
2,153
1,381
1,470

2,739
1,516
35,531
7,511
9,722
5,514
3,827
15,942
1,742
2,037
1,810
1,492
2,156
6,863
1,604
5,865
1,371
1,360
1,370
4,744
2,781

2,605
1,235
1,801
6,150
(1,347
5,683
3,312


12,039
1,956
1,465
1,357
2,363
1,134
1,172
1,198
2,142
3,078
643
2,160
1,336
2,627


2,106
1,679
6,914
2,021
1,400
1,856
3,382
4,661
78,223
1,847
23,227
9,199
1,136
4,831
1,120
1,824
2,998
1,964
1,294
1,490

2,709
1,659
36,800
7,532
10,128
5,679
3,631
16,073
1,787
1,929
1,756
1,484
1,979
6,942
1,554
6,002
1,445
1,381
1,408
4,789
2,649

2,635
1,219
1,689
6,001
(1,244)
5,997
3,523


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.-- -----
St. Paul, Minn.----------
Wichita, Kans.-----------

SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, M.-----------
Charlotte, N.C.--------
Jacksonville, Fla.-------
Miami, Fla.--------------
Norfolk, Va.-------------
Richmond, Va.------------
Savannah, Ga.------------
St. Petersburg, Fla.-----
Tampa, Fla.--------------
Washington, D.C.-------
Wilnington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-------
Knoxville, Tenn.--------.
Louisville, Ky.-------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-------
Montgomery, Ala.---------
Nashvlle, Tenn.------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.------------.
Baton Rouge, La.--------.
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.------------.
El Paso, Tex.------------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.------------
Little Rock, Ark.-------.
New Orleans, La.---------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.--------
Shreveport, La.----------
Tulsa, Okla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.----
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah---------
Phoenix, Ariz.-----------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah-----
Tucson, Ariz.--------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.--------
Freano, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.--------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-------
Los Angeles, Calif.------
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-------
San Diego, Calif.--------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.-----....
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.------------

San Juan, P. R.---------


302
87
48


114
294
54
70
104
50
88
50
(76)
63
210
54


102
58
26
131
140
47
38
71

47
64
28
109
55
88
257
72
157
106
122
44
67


45
20
115
18
109
18
52
26


19
(48)
(34)
42
65
567
116
35
96
55
118
221*
(33)
160
60
46

(26)


198
60
59


85
218
26
49
56
38
83
23
(67)
57
188
23


94
27
26
96
155
37
18
72

16
0
17
117
34
51
108
51
149
57
104
60
45


20
17
106
22
68
14
43
35


14
(42)
(22)
44
40
488
1j1
30
116
59
94
174
(27)
135
44
31

(36)


11,326
3,175
2,248


5,425
11,759
1,738
2,776
3,633
2,367
3,731
1,566
(3,212)
3,098
9,406
1,902


4,114
2,229
1,333
5,426
5,458
1,928
1,543
2,851

1,615
1,354
1,059
5,937
1,692
3,109
7,933
2,699
8,032
3,560
4,868
2,425
2,614


1,530
788
5,504
816
3,937
806
2,307
1,825


809
(2,071)
(1,591)
1,936
2,660
23,967
4,692
1,599
5,118
2,961
4,294
9,291
(1,670)
6,273
2,290
1,829
(1,586)


11,674
3,313
2,228


5,630
12,032
1,854
2,825
3,419
1,916
3,728
1,613
(3,373)
3,112
9,250
1,845


4,061
2,262
1,342
5,452
5,332
1,979
1,645
2,853

1,606
1,377
1,103
5,949
1,807
3,167
8,002
2,720
8,559
3,594
4,771
2,576
2,586


1,545
800
5,727
791
3,660
779
2,326
1,716


809
(2,106)
(1,772)
1,977
2,631
23,916
4,574
1,664
5,253
2,801
4,347
9,443
(1,671)
6,509
2,298
1,950
(1,680)


*Etimate baaed on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.




UNIVNbIll l Y UI 1-LONIDA


3 1262 08863 9918


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORT

Bacillary Dysentery Report of an Outbreak in Omaha,
Nebraska
Sixty cases of shigellosis, of a total of 69 cases re-
ported to the Omaha-Douglas County Health Department
since January 1961, occurred between September 1 and
November 15. Person to person and household to house-
hold spread is believed to be the mechanism responsible
for this outbreak.
The nine cases reported during the first 8 months of
1961 occurred in five households and included Shigella
Groups A, B, C, and D. The 60 cases of shigellosis re-
ported from September 1 through November 15, occurred in
26 households and one nursing home. Thirty-four of these
60 cases were Shigella Group B, 25 Group D and one
Group A. There was one death, in a 2-year old white male.
The pre-school age group accounted for over 30% of
the household members and for the largest percentage of
those ill. Asymptomatic carriers, (11 in all) were found in
all age groups.
The following is a list of signs and symptoms and
their frequency of occurrence among the cases where this
information was obtained:

Signs and Symptom Culture Positive Culture Negative
(19 Cases) (12 Cases)

Fever 18 7
Nausea 18 6
Vomiting 18 7
Diarrhea 19 12
Blood in stool 8 2
Abdominal cramps 15 10

Twenty-two of the 26 households involved since
September 1 are located within a 15 by 27 block area,
consisting of a low socioeconomic and predominantly non-
white population. Dwelling units are primarily individual
structures but are crowded and frequently occupied by
more than one family. The average household size was 7.2
members with a range of 4 to 17 members.
Investigation of water supply, food supplies and
attack rates by schools disclosed no evidence that any of
these were involved as a common source of infection.
There was no evidence of disruption of city water or
sewer systems.
The probability of household to household spread was
demonstrated in three instances by history of contact and
isolation of the same serological group in the households.
In each case there was adequate close contact among pre-
school children and by baby sitting arrangements between
the homes. In one instance spread to three additional
families from a single household was traced.
Control measures instituted, including investigation
and culture of all contacts of reported cases, have been
continued. Household contacts of positive cases receive


a course of tetracycline. Food handlers are released only
with negative cultures and all other cases are released on
clinical recovery, and/or initiation of therapy.

Editor's Note: Reported outbreaks of shigellosis in urban
communities have generally been either institutional out-
breaks or have been common source outbreaks due to
water or food borne transmission. The outbreak reported
from Omaha with continuous propogation by contact spread
is an unusual one for a Northern urban community.
(Reported by Dr. Edwin Lyman, Director of Omaha-Douglas
County Health Department; Miss Bea Adams, Chief
Preventable Disease Control, Omaha-Douglas County
Health Department; and a team from the Kansas City Field
Station, Communicable Disease Center.)


SLINIV OF FL LI -
SDOCUMENTS DEP

I S -- EO/


IIS DEPOSITORY


0, Z

S 3- 0



ZI


-'
m


- c
C C

td




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EQ4ZUPQ7B_GFYOHY INGEST_TIME 2012-12-04T22:20:08Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00318
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES