Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00316

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
f- C .&(1 & 7 U O/ '"


Morbidity and Mortality *


I


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

Prepared by the a I MElrose 4-5131

For release November 17, 1961 Atlanta 22. Georgia Vol. 10, No. 45

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended November 11, 1961


Poliomyelitis The declining trend of poliomyelitis
since the peak in mid-September continued during the
current week ending November 11 with reports of 29 cases,
22 paralytic. This is compared to 36 cases, 21 paralytic,
reported during the previous week.
The table below compares reports during the past
six weeks with those during corresponding weeks in pre-
vious years. The figures indicate the decidedly lower
level of late seasonal reporting evident this year.
Six Week Totals (40th thru 45th Week) for Past Five Years
1961 1960 1959 1958 1957
Paralytic 184 480 1134 821 410
Total 279 672 1521 1540 757


The cumulative totals for poliomyelitis through the
45th week for the past five years are shown below:
Polio (Cumulated Weekly) Through 45th Week
For Past Five Years
If11 1960 9.259 1958 1957


Paralytic 772
Total 1195


1993
5646


Only three rtes reported more than two cases:
New York with se ses, four paralyric; Michigan with
three cases, all pattc; JWisconisin with three cases,
two paralytic.
The New York dff.es included two nonparalytic re-
ports from Onondaga county, delayed for laboratory con-


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases, United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 45th Wcek Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of International Approxi-
Lists, 1955) First 45 weeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
Nov. Nov. Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic II, 12, -, 'i Median 19 .- point
Data not available it.1 19, 1.1 *. 9.-6 r -. to
Quantity zero i1-.4,-
Anthrax--------------------062 2 6 17 *
Botulism-----------------------049.1 5 10 *
Brucellosis undulantt fever)--0--44 13 11 14 511 678 707 *
Diphtheria----------------------055 13 22 23 498 648 725 189 303 346 July I
Encephalitis, infectious-------082 27 54 34 1,460 1,682 1,872 1,-60 1,682 1,872 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
serum----------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,042 701 280 64,032 33,748 16,942 11,215 8,05Q 2'905 Sept. 1
Malaria------------------110-117 4 2 55 63 *
Measles------------------------- 085 2,283 1,739 1,739 397,136 410,828 457,885 11,508 10,780 11,936 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic----------340 pt. 73 47 2,861 2,693 2,861 2,693 -- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infectione---------057 29 36 53 1,858 1,911 2,163 3.3 373 ,16 Sept. 1
Polio'yelitis -------------------080 29 76 158 1,195 2,962 5,63. 1,092 2,752 5,106 Apr. 1
Paralytic--------------080.0,080.1 22 56 96 772 2,053 1,983 712 1,889 1,708 Apr. 1
Nonparalytic---------------080.2 5 14 34 287 603 2,7-0 262 577 2,579 Apr. 1
Unspecified-----------------080.3 2 6 28 136 306 911 118 286 819 Apr. 1
Psittacosis--------------096.2 2 56 88 *
Rabies in man-------------------094 3 2 *
Streptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever ----050,051 5,525 4,618 --- 274,007 26.,282 --- 5.,796 --- --- Aug. 1
Typhoid fever-------------------040 10 12 20 716 73. 927 62 6 0603 747 Apr. I
Typhus fever, endemic------------101 I 37 58 -k
Babies in animals--------------- 58 46 65 2,989 3,031 3,766 355 260 366 Oct. I








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


firmation; one unspecified case from Orsego County; and
four paralytic cases, one each from Albany, Franklin,
Jefferson, and Otsego Counties. The Michigan cases are
scattered throughout the State. Two Milwaukee County
cases are included in the Wisconsin reports.

Hepatitis There were 1,042 cases of hepatitis re-
ported for the week ending November 11. This represents
70 fewer cases than had been reported in the preceding
week.
EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
Encephalitis Among Pheasants-Florida and Connecticut
There has been a striking absence this summer and
fall of reports of epidemics of human arthropod-borne en-
cephalitis. The only epidemics of arthropod-borne enceph-
alitis to have occurred within the last several months have
been among pheasants in Florida and Connecticut.
A report of an outbreak of what appeared to be arbo-
virus in pheasants in Brevard County, Florida was re-
cently received from the State authorities. The farm in-
volved kept many penned gamed birds including quail,
wild turkeys, pheasants and chickens. All mortality,
however, occurred in the pheasants. In the original 500
pheasants, a 35% mortality occurred from October 9 to
October 19, 1961. A local veterinarian submitted several
of the original sick and dead birds to the Department of
Agriculture Diagnostic Laboratory at Kissimmee, Florida.
A tentative diagnosis from pathological examinations
indicated encephalitis. Serum neutralization tests indi-
cated Eastern Equine Encephalitis. No indication of
human illness was found and nohorse cases were reported.
Bloods from sick and normal pheasants, wild turkeys,
wild birds, and small mammals have been collected; mos-
quitoes have been collected by a variety of traps they
are being processed for virus isolation and classification.


The report from Connecticut indicated that encepha-
litis cases there was confined to one pheasant breeding estab-
lishment. This is a farm in central Connecticut where
about 3700 birds are being raised. The birds are confined
to five different pens. Late in September 1961, illness
became apparent in one pen containing about 700 phea-
sants. There were no sick birds in the other pens. Several
birds were submitted to the University of Connecticut
where they were found to be positive for Eastern Equine
Encephalitis. Isolations were confirmed by Yale Univer-
sity. Attempts were made to collect mosquitoes in the
areas of this pheasant farm but mosquitoes had become
scarce by the time the outbreak was reported. As far as
was known there has been no illness resembling Eastern
Equine Encephalitis among horses or humans in the State.
(Reported by James E. Scatterday, D.V.M., M.P.H., Di-


rector, Division of Veterinary Public Health, Florida
State Board of Health, and James C. Hart, M.D., Director,
Division of Preventable Diseases, Connecticut State
Department of Health).



T. cruzi Isolated From Opossums and Kissing Bugs -
Alabama
Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas'
disease, have been isolated from native opossums col-
lected in Lee and Barbour Counties in Alabama. Infected
kissing bugs, Triatoma sanguisuga, have also been re-
covered from animal dens in the Barbour County area. It
is believed that this isolation represents the first recovery
of the organism from Alabama mammals and the first col-
lection of infected bugs from East of the Mississippi
River. Studies are now proceeding at Auburn University
concerning the virulence of these strains for laboratory
and native mammals.

Editor's note: Animals infected with Trypanosoma
cruzi have been found in Arizona, California, New Mexico,
Texas, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida, and Maryland. The
heaviest infections have been found in wood rats, opos-
sums, skunks, and armadillos. Infected Triatoma have
been found in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.
Only two incidents of indigenous human infection have
been etiologically diagnosed. Both of these cases oc-
curred in South Texas. More recently antibody studies
carried out on a group of 500 indigents in the vicinity of
Corpus Christi, Texas have revealed that 9 our of the 500
individuals tested had significant elevations of comple-
ment fixing antibody to T. cruz:.
Children, especially infants under two years of age,
are particularly susceptible to the disease. The disease
is transmitted from infected mammals to kissing bugs and
then to man. The acute stage lasting several weeks may
be characterized by any of the following: fever, malaise,
irritability, edema of face, eyelids or legs, enlargement of
spleen and liver, myocardial damage, or encephalitis.
Other early signs are inflammation and swelling of the
lachrymal glands, conjunctivitis, local reaction at the
site of a bite, and regional lymphadenopathy. Many in-
fected persons, especially adults, have few or no clinical
manifestations.
It is not unlikely that in rural areas of the South and
and Southwest, some of the non-specific illnesses, con-
junctivitis, idiopathic myocarditis and encephalitis may
be caused by T. cruzi infection.
(Reported by W. H. Y. Smith, M.D., Director, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, Alabama Department of Public
Health, and Kirby L. Hays, Associate Professor of
Zoology, Auburn University School of Agriculture).
(Continued on page 8)










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE. AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED NOVEMBER 12, 1960 AND NOVEMBER 11, 1961

(ly place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Tc ci Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not speckled Dy type) Nc.npFaralyJi.- aseptic lant
Area fever)
Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
45th Week first 45 weeks 45th Week first 45 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNITED STAES--- --- 29 76 1,195 2,962 22 56 772 2,053 5 14 73 13

NEW ENGAND------------------ 2 7 33 225 2 6 23 177 1 2
Maine---------------------- 3 4 46 3 4 45 -
New Hampshire----------- 2 -
Vermont-------------------- 2 2 8 11 2 2 7 6 -
Massachusetts-------------- 2 13 31 1 8 20 1 1
Rhode Island--------------- 1 102 1 78 1 -
Connecticut-------------- 5 35 3 28 -
MIDDE ATLANTIC---------- 7 12 318 441 4 9 213 311 2 2 1 -
New York------------------- 7 5 232 241 4 3 150 156 2 1 1 -
New Jersey--------------- 2 35 82 1 28 60 1 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 5 51 118 5 35 95 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 10 12 158 503 8 9 98 305 1 2 28 3
Ohio----------------------- 2 4 45 116 2 3 21 60 1 2
Indiana--------------------- 1 7 18 125 5 10 93 1 1
Illinois------------------- 1 1 33 138 1 1 16 91 20 3
Michigan------------------- 3 30 89 3 26 50 3
Wisconsin------------------ 3 32 35 2 25 11 3
WEST NORTH CENTRAL------- 3 4 72 171 2 3 32 101 1 1 10 7
Minnesota----------------- 6 53 6 44 6 1
Iowa--------------------- 18 21 9 4 2
Missouri------------------- 1 2 24 43 1 2 7 32 -
North Dakota--------------- 4 14 1 5 -
South Dakota--------------- 2 1 3 5 1 1 1 1 1 -
Nebraska------------------- 1 8 16 1 4 9 2
Yansas-------------------- 9 9 1 4 6 4 2
SOUTH ATLATIC--------------- 2 23 204 553 2 19 147 438 4 4
Delaware------------------ 2 1 -
Maryland------------------- 3 39 144 3 29 130 -
District of Columbia------ 3 5 3 5 -
Virginia------------------- 5 10 42 5 10 39 2
West Virginia-------------- 2 31 57 1 21 46 1
North Carolina------------- 7 21 89 5 11 67 2
South Carolina------------- 1 33 127 1 25 85 -
Georgia-------------------- 3 30 23 3 23 21 -
Florida-------------------- 2 2 35 66 2 1 24 45 1 2
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL---------- 1 4 80 235 1 1 47 94 6
Kentucky--------------- 2 27 130 5 5 -
Tennessee------------------ 1 19 45 9 29 -
Alabama-------------------- 1 11 21 1 11 21 6
Mississippi-------------.- 1 23 39 1 22 39 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 2 8 145 271 2 6 79 170 2 5 2
Arkansas------------ --- 1 1 20 31 1 1 9 23 2
Louisiana----------------- 51 48 1 40 29 -
Oklahoma------------------- 4 17 12 -
Texas---------------------- 7 70 175 5 30 106 2 3 2
MOUNTAIN--------------------- 1 3 45 87 1 2 26 46 2 -
Montana-------------------- 4 21 2 15 -
Idaho--------------------- 14 9 6 1 -
Wyoming------------------- 19 1 -
Colorado------------------- 1 8 19 1 8 18 -
SNew Mexico----------------- 2 3 7 2 4 2
Arizona-------------------- 8 5 6 5 -
Utah---------------------- -- 1 8 7 4 2 -
Nevada--------------------- -
PACIFIC---------------------- 1 3 140 476 1 107 411 1 2 15 1
Washington---------------- 1 25 34 1 17 34 2 -
Oregon--------------------- 2 17 36 8 19 2 -
California----------------- 93 397 77 349 1 13 1
Alaska----------------- 2 2 -
Hawaii-------------------- 5 7 5 7 .

Puerto Rico----------------- 5 7 491 5 7 482










4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED NOVEMBER 12, 1960 AND NOVEMBER 11, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,N998.5 pt. Meles
infectious
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
45th Week first 45 weeks 082 45th Week first 45 weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


UNITED STATES--------- 13 22 498 648 27 54 1,042 701 64,032 33,748 2,283 1,739

NEW ENGLAND----------------- 8 12 51 15 2,072 974 421 178
Maine ----------------- -2 2 8 2 147 63 66 4
New Hampshire------------- 8 187 27 2
Vermont------------------ 2 187 15 7 4
Massachusetts-------------- 7 9 29 7 872 481 317 155
Rhode Island ------------ 1 4 1 232 187 1 3
Connecticut---------------- 1 2 3 447 201 30 10
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 20 15 6 9 124 78 8,679 4,147 209 290
New York------------- --- 7 4 6 5 69 29 3,744 2,261 110 153
New Jersey----------------- 2 3 23 6 2,046 290 30 47
Pennsylvania--------------- 13 9 1 32 43 2,889 1,596 69 90
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 1 16 41 3 5 206 123 12,752 6,042 374 513
Ohio-----------------------. 1 16 3 1 54 51 4,230 2,073 29 149
Indiana------------------ 1 2 7 30 24 1,891 688 38 61
Illinois-------------------. 10 6 2 61 21 2,342 1,310 182 35
Michigan---------------- 3 10 1 58 20 3,971 1,753 58 104
Wisconsin------------------ 2 1 3 7 318 218 67 164
WEST NORTH CENTRAL--------- 2 2 46 47 5 75 57 6,096 2,352 94 102
Minnesota------------------ 2 2 30 23 38 26 1,400 372 35
Iowa----------------------- 2 8 21 8 1,797 380 49 24
Missouri------------------- 1 2 2 12 1,319 807 2 10
North Dakota--------------- 4 2 3 1 2 130 165 68
South Dakota--------------- 7 9 1 189 141 3 -
Nebraska----------------- 2 1 7 3 604 240 5
Kansas--------------------- 2 2 5 6 657 247 NN NN
SOUTH ATLANTIC-------------- 1 5 120 202 6 183 78 8,114 3,905 131 125
Delaware----------------- 15 176 243 7
Maryland------------------ 1 1 1 12 7 707 385 21 7
District of Columbia------- 3 4 121 53 3 -
Virginia------------------ 1 15 36 41 14 1,336 703 32 55
West Virginia-------------. 1 4 19 13 1,428 730 53 39
North Carolina------------- 1 12 14 2 51 7 1,861 357 11 2
South Carolina------------ 1 10 47 16 9 437 143 3 1
Georgia-------------------- 36 34 17 2 711 253 2
Florida----------------- 1 2 42 66 3 27 7 1,337 1,038 8 12
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL------- 7 38 80 1 25 156 99 9,603 4,785 216 116
Kentucky------------------- 3 9 16 1 25 30 37 2,801 1,698 15 68
Tennessee------------------ 3 7 69 30 3,756 1,590 157 39
Alabama-------------------- 4 19 32 23 15 1,650 1,042 27 9
Mississippi------------- 7 25 34 17 1,396 455 17 -
WEST SOUTH CENTAL---------- 10 7 230 214 3 54 41 4,635 2,613 158 156
Arkansas------------------- 4 16 1 14 13 905 183 3 41
Louisiana--------------- 2 1 28 56 7 1 504 153 -
Oklahoma------------------- 5 9 24 1 2 313 309 -
Teas------------ 8 1 189 118 2 32 25 2,913 1,968 155 115
MOUNTAIN ------------------ 12 36 2 43 57 3,744 2,630 167 109
Montana----------------- 2 3 4 4 320 134 115 13
Idaho-------------------- 11 2 277 287 10 19
Wyoming----------------- 5 4 154 29 -
Colorado------------------- 4 3 11 17 1,256 961 12 29
New Mexico-------------- 5 4 1 9 5 417 294 MN -
Arizona------------------- 3 8 8 603 578 26 40
Utah--------------------- -- 7 1 4 16 587 251 2 2
Nevada-------------------- 1 3 5 130 96 2 6
PACIFIC---------------------- 8 1 12 4 150 153 8,337 6,300 513 150
Washington----------------- 2 2 1 18 29 956 810 228 44
Oregon-------------------- 32 18 1,315 1,001 45 56
California---------------- 2 9 3 92 106 5,613 4,194 159 50
Alaska-------------------- 4 1 1 8 391 217 74 -
Hawaii-------------------- 62 78 7 -

Puerto Rico----------------- 4 57 122 14 2 878 661 17 16

NN-NOt NOtlriable










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED NOVEMBER 12, 1960 AND NOVEMBER 11, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
enigoccoca sitta- cocal yphoid fever 040 Typhus
Malaria Meningoccocal Psitta- sore fever,
Malaria infections cosis sore fever, Rabies in
throat, endemic animals
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 45th Week first 45 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNITED STPAES--------- 4 29 36 2 5,525 10 12 716 734 58 46

EW ENGLAND----------------- 3 2 184 20 11 -
Maine--------------------- 3 1 2 -
New Hampshire------------ -
Vermont ------------------ 1 6 -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 59 14 5 -
Rhode Island--------------- 30 2 -
Connecticut--------------- 2 1 86 3 4 -
MIDDIE ATLANTIC-------------- 9 9 1 203 1 88 52 4 8
New York------------------ 4 1 125 1 47 32 4 8
New Jersey----------------- 2 5 31 17 6 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 3 3 1 47 24 14 -
EAST NORT CENTRAL----------- 5 7 401 2 91 93 5 3
hio----------------------- 1 4 74 1 33 26 1 -
Indiana-------------------- 77 20 24 3 2
Illinois------------------ 2 1 89 1 29 21 1 1
Michigan------------- ----- -- 1 73 6 15 -
Wisconsin------------------ 2 1 88 3 7 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 3 1 161 1 34 45 18 10
Minnesota------------------ 1 13 5 1 3 1
Iowa- --------------------. 1 41 2 11 9 5
Missouri------------------- 1 4 1 20 24 3 3
North Dakota--------------- 26 1 1
South Dakota--------------- 3 3 2 -
Nebraska------------------ 2 1 3 1 -
Kansas--------------------- 1 75 3 2 -
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 3 3 5 429 4 3 116 111 6 5
Delaware------------------- 2 1 1 -
Maryland------------------- 3 1 1 4 3 5 -
District of Columbia------- 1 12 8 -
Virginia------------------ 1 68 1 19 24 2 3
West Virginia------------ -- 104 1 10 12 1 2
North Carolina------------- 1 1 23 14 9 -
South Carolina------------- 1 24 8 12 -
Georgia------------------- 1 2 1 34 27 -
Florida------------------- 1 202 3 15 13 3 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL-------- 2 4 1,041 5 77 111 4 7
Kentucky----------------- 1 41 4 18 28 2 3
Tennessee------------------ 1 2 957 47 55 2 1
Alabama-------------------- 1 1 15 1 10 22 3
Mississippi---------------- 28 2 6 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 2 4 763 2 150 199 16 11
Arkansas------------------- 1 2 3 29 50 6 4
Louisiana---------------- 1 3 1 25 59 1 -
Oklahoma----------------- 2 12 12 -
Texas---------------------- 1 1 755 1 84 78 9 7
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 1,001 2 1 62 45 1 -
Montana-------------------- 63 18 13 -
Idaho---------------------- 65 1 3 -
Wyoming ----------------- -- 102 3 4 -
Colorado----------------- -- 326 7 1 -
SNew Mexico----------------- 285 1 17 12 1 -
Arizona----------- ------- 140 1 1 10 10 -
Utah----------------------- 17 2 2 -
Nevada--------------------- 3 4 -
PACIFIC-------------------- 1 2 4 1 1,342 1 78 67 4 2
Washington----------------- 1 455 7 5 -
Oregon------------------- 29 1 8 -
California----------------- 1 2 3 713 1 68 53 4 2
Alaska--------------------- 78 1 -
Hawaii---------------- 1 67 2 -

Puerto Rico ----- -------- 1 20 19








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


APR. MAY ... SEP.OCT.NOV.DEC


JAN FEB MAR


JUN JUL AUG


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shown in parenthesee in table 4)

SA44th d rcent Cumulative, first 45 weeks
week week Adjusted change,
ended ended aerage, adJusted
Area end e d 45th average
N. week to 1961 1960 Percent
11, 4, 1961 1960
1961 1961 1956-60 current change
week

TOTAL, 117 REPORTING CITIES--------------------- 11,158 11,418 11,281 -1.1 513,540 515,165 -0.3

New England-------------------------.----(14 cities) 768 728 673 +14.1 31,634 32,421 -2.4
Middle Atlantic--------------------------(20 cities) 2,O72, 3,201 3,056 -2.7 145,856 1-3,236 +1.8
East North Central--------------------------(21 cities) 2,-53 2,-35 2,417 +1.5 109,781 111,512 -1.6
West North Central---------------------------(9 cities) 789 839 833 -5.3 35,076 35,815 -2.1
South Atlantic----------------.----------(Ul cities) 956- 962 953 +0.3 44,412 44,207 +0.5
East South Central--------------------------(8 cities) 512 490 512 0.0 23,184 23,257 -0.3
West South Central--------------------------(13 cities) 874 1,001 1,038 -15.8 43,885 44,854 -2.2
Mountain----------------------------------.(8 cities) 341 379 348 -2.0 16,417 16,153 +1.6
Pacific-----------------. --------------.(13 cities) 1,493 1,383 1,451 +2.9 63,295 63,710 -0.7

*Includes estimate for missing reports.


rI iIT I I i


TI II


APR MAY


SEP OCT


NOV DEC










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


NEW ENGIAID.
Boston, Mass.-----------
Bridgeport, Conn.-------
Cambridge, Mass.--------
Fall River, Mass.-------
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.--------------
New Bedford, Mass.------
New Haven, Conn.--------
Providence, R.I.--------
So-merville, Mass.------
Springfield, Mass.-----
Waterbury, Conn.--------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N.Y.-----------
Camden, N.J.------------
Elizabeth, N.J.--------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.-------
Newark, N.J.------------
New York City, N.Y.----
Paterson, N.J.--------
Pniladelpbia, Pa.-------
Pittsburgh, Pa.---------
Reading, P.------------
Rochester, N.Y.----------
Schenectady, N.Y.--------
Scranton, Pa.-----------
Syracuse, N.Y.-----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.----------
Yonkers, N.Y.----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Chio-------------
Cantor, hio-------------
Chicago, Ill.-----------
Cincinnati, Ohio---------
Cleveland, Ohio---------
Columbus, Ohio-----------
Dayton, Ohio-------------
Detroit, Mich.-----------
Evansville, Ind.---------
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.---------
Gary, Ind--------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.----
Indlahapolis, Ind.------
Madison, Wis.-----------
Milwaukee, Wis.------
Peoria, Ill.------------
Pockford, Ill.--------..
South Bend, Ind.--------
Toledo, Ohio------------
Youngstown, Ohio---------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Dulurn, Minn.------------
Kansas City, Kans.------
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.-----------
Minneapolis, Mann.-------
Omaha, Nebr.-------------


45th
week
ended
Nov.
11,
1961


44th
week
ended
Nov.
4,
1961


lil4


264
60
25
32
69
46
23
27
29
65
7
38
25
58


57
32
141
43
26
32
49
86
1,586
36
406
90
20
110
22
36*
74
43
50
33


56
38
751
153
198
109
66
352
28
41
38
27
51
149
51
119
21
27
23
100
55

43
36
40
132
(33)
135
62


242
42
35
36
46
22
20
24
42
69
18
51
22
59


53
30
132
35
35
52
51
100
1,614
40
502
228
28
113
27
28
44
36
18
35


62
33
742
147
181
105
86
327
30
47
45
35
40
138
42
128
35
28
23
94
67

55
23
41
136
(31)
118
78


Cumulative,
first 45 weeks


1961 1960


10,860
1,738
1,314
1,238
2,189
1,112
976
1,163
2,034
2,791
587
1,982
1,189
2,461


2,076
1,537
6,517
1,894
1,334
1,749
3,080
4,547
74,505
1,744
22,664
8,518
1,050
4,552
1,087
1,584
2,745
2,013
1,277
1,383


2,571
1,411
33,228
6,997
9,093
5,115
3,580
14,887
1,619
1,910
1,708
1,379
2,028
6,414
1,484
5,523
1,267
1,272
1,276
4, -20
2,599

2,413
1,162
1,695
5,743
(1,251)
5,318
3,109


11,320
1,834
1,385
1,269
2,191
1,071
1,086
1,092
1,993
2,885
587
2,044
1,235
2,429


1,935
1,557
6,450
1,897
1,314
1,729
3,189
4,341
73,235
1,705
21,835
8,557
1,069
4,492
1,049
1,680
2,790
1,835
1,207
1,370


2,534
1,556
34,322
7,029
9,478
5,288
3,377
15,215
1,651
1,806
1,639
1,382
1,825
6,506
1,432
5,575
1,364
1,291
1,317
4,464
2,461

2,464
1,129
1,576
5,637
(1, 162)
5,601
3,300


Area


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.----------
St. Paul, Minn.----------
Wichita, Kans.------------

SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-------------
Baltimore, Md.-----------
:nariotte, N.C.---------
Jacksonville, Fla.-------
Miami, Fla.--------------
Norfolk, Va.-------------
Richmond, Va.-------------
Savannah, Ga.------------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D.C.---------
Wilimngton, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Sir rdnaham, Ala.---------
Chattanocga, Tenn.-------
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-------------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.--------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-------------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort aorth, Tex.------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.--------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.--------
Shreveport, La.----------
Tulsa, Okla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.-
Denver, Colo.-- -------
Ogden, Utah--------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii--------
Long Beach, Calif.------
Los Angeles, Calif.-----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.........------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


San Juan, P. R.--------------


45th
week
ended
Nov.
11,
1961


44th
week
ended
Nov.
4,
1961


II 4


223
61
57


118
249
48
50
60
64
74
33
(67)
38


287
69
32


100
240
36
56
81
40
69
39
(61)
55


186 208
36* 38


75
54
23
101
104
37
43
53


27
30
19
146
36
71
191
58
168
72
98
34
51


36
22
115
25
66
17
62
36


16
(50)
(38)
33
59
495
97
31
85
63
90
193
(32)
143
45
33

(23)


Cumulative,
first 45 weeks


1961 1960


10,604
2,946
2,086


5,106
11,022
1,638
2,591
3,379
2,235
3,471
1,467
(3,018)
2,923
8,802
1,778


3,829
2,104
1,241
5,078
5,044
1,806
1,448
2,634


1,519
1,267
987
5,586
1,566
2,898
7,400
2,537
7,528
3,308
4,547
2,272
2,470


1,418
742
5,183
756
3,680
757
2,161
1,720


764
(1,944)
(1,499)
1,808
2,486
22,398
4,374
1,497
4,791
2,786
3,979
8,727
(1, 574)
5,844
2,125
1,716
(1,49Z


10,934
3,101
2,073


5,267
11,273
1,748
2,642
3,218
1,794
3,483
1,507
(3,147)
2,932
8,649
1,694


3,787
2,114
1,259
5,106
4,941
1,839
1,541
2,670


1,510
1,276
1,051
5,589
1,699
2,980
7,515
2,554
7,960
3,364
4,470
2,418
2,468


1,417
740
5,361
740
3,403
737
2,176
1,579


752
(1,977)
(1,654)
1,830
2,427
22,447
4,266
1,544
.,867
2,592
4,067
8,828
(1,550)
6,123
2,150
1,817
(1,593)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.




wI rrOi T Uii -LORIDA


3 1262 08863 9751


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

The 1961 edition of the booklet "Immunization Infor-
mation for International Travel" is available at the Super-
intendent of Documents, Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D.C. It has 84 pages and is priced at 254
a copy with a 25 percent discount on one hundred copies
or more delivered to the same address.
The principal additions and changes since the last
edition include: 1) The addition of poliomyelitis as one
of the immunizations recommended for all international
travel; 2) The most recent information on immunization
requirements for entrance into countries; 3) Additional
yellow fever vaccination centers in the U. S.; 4) The
deletion of Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, North
Carolina, and part of West Texas from the yellow fever
receptive areas of the United States.
Three changes should be made in the 1961 booklet
"Immunization Information for International Travel,"
PHS Publication No. 384:
1. Africa
Congo (Brazzaville), page 23
Smallpox vaccination 6 months of age and over.
Cholera vaccination arrivals from infected areas,
1 year of age and over.
All other information remains the same.

2. Oceania
Ryukyu Islands, page 60
(Okinawa)
Cholera vaccination arrivals from infected areas,
6 months of age
Yellow fever vaccination arrivals from infected
areas, 6 months of age and over.
All other information remains the same.

3. Designated Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers
The following name should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6, p. 69:


City
Texas
Amarillo


Center
Amarillo Bi-City-County
Health Unit
417 Austin Street
Tel: DR 2-6562


Clinic Hours
2d and 4th
Wednedsay,
1 3 p.m.


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA
These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each Stare and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table I shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


UNIV OF FL LIB
D CUMENTS DEPT.

POSITO, R


U S DEPOSITORY


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