Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00313

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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Morbidity and Mortality



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELfR V orTo

PrpOred b y thIeD MEIrose

For release October 27, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia Ii. 7

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the Unite t s and

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended October 21, 1961


Poliomyelitis There has been an increase in the
number of poliomyelitis cases reported during the current
week ending October 21. A total of 59 cases, 39 paralytic,
was reported. This is in contrast to the low report of 35
cases, including 20 paralytic, for the previous week:
The 196r incidence through the current week is com-
pared below with the corresponding time period in the
past four years.
POLIO CUMULATEDD WEEKLY) THROUGH THE 42ND WEEK
FOR PAST FIVE YEARS
1961 1960 1959 1958 1957
Paralytic 693 1,850 4.709 2,300 1,838
Total 1,080 2,680 7,204 4,744 5,385


The increase in reported cases during the current week is
scattered throughout the nation with no evidence of locali-
zation. The paralytic case reported this week from South
Carolina was the 21st case (17 paralytic) to occur in
Newberry County. This case, a 32 year old white male,
had onset on October 16 and died on October 20. On
Thursday, October 19, 22,600 doses of Type III oral polio
vaccine were administered throughout the county in a mass
immunization program.
Only six States reported as many as three paralytic
cases. Of the six, the cases were scattered geographically
in New York, Missouri, West Virginia, Louisiana, and


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases: United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 42nd Week Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of International Approxl-
Lists, 1955) First 42 veeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
Oct. Oct. Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 21, 22, 1i6-6 Median 1955-6 point
Data not available 196, 19 .'. 1961 196C X6-& 1960-6 1 9-60 to
Quantity zero 1959-60
Anthrax----------------.----062 6 15 *
Botulism------------ --------049.1 5 10 *
Brucellosi undulantt fever)----044 3 20 15 484 648 653 ** *
Diphtheria-------------. ---------055 12 26 36 451 551 627 142 206 235 July I
Encephalitis, infectious------082 47 23 52 1,346 1,557 1,725 1,346 1,557 1,725 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
serum---------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,191 944 309 60,761 31,259 15,980 7,943 5,641 1,960 Sept. 1
Malaria---------------------10-117 I 1 46 59 *
Measles-------------------------085 1,336 1,331 1,331 391,530 406,153 453,826 5,902 6,229 6,755 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic----------340 pt. 97 98 --- 2,639 2,474 --- 2,639 2,474 --- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infections---------057 43 51 43 1,734 1,781 1,961 219 244 259 Sept. L
Polio ielltis-------------------080 59 140 248 1,080 2,680 5,373 977 2,471 4,845 Apr. l
Paralytic--------------080.0,080.1 39 98 194 693 1,850 1,828 633 1,691 1,553 Apr. 1
Nonparalytic----- ------080.2 14 21 42 256 560 2,676 231 535 2,515 Apr. 1
Unspecified-----------------080.3 6 21 12 131 270 869 113 245 777 Apr. 1
Psittacosis----------------096.2 2 5 82 *
Rabies In man------------------ 09 3 2 *
Btreptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever----050,051 4,752 4,016 --- 258,816 250,141 --- 39,605 --- --- Aug. 1
Typhoid fever-------.----------040 19 28 28 657 678 861 543 548 681 Apr. 1
Typhus fever, endemic ----------101 1 36 55 *
Babies in animals--------------- 57 43 67 2,833 2,888 3,590 199 117 190 Oct. 1







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


California. In Wisconsin, 3 of the 4 paralytic cases re-
ported were from Milwaukee County. Investigations are
underway.
Hepatitis There were 1,191 cases of hepatitis
reported for the current week ending October 21. This is
42 cases more than was reported the preceding week. The
level of hepatitis cases has remained approximately the
same since July.


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
Nicotinic Acid Poisoning Pennsylvania
Two cases of nicotinic acid (niacin) poisoning in-
volving 5 persons were recently investigated in Phila-
delphia, Pennsylvania. In both instances ground meats
including beef and lamb were the foods implicated. Symp-
toms exhibited by all 5 persons were essentially the
same intense flushing of the skin, a feeling of warmth,
itching, and some abdominal discomfort. The ill effects
lasted from 45 minutes to an hour. Onset of symptoms
occurred within 15 minutes following the ingestion of the
meat. All affected individuals ate the ground meats twice
and on both occasions became ill with the same syndrome.
Samples of meat obtained at the home of the patients and
the market where meats were purchased revealed niacin
to be present in the following amounts.
Chopped lamb patties 87 mg/100 grams of meat
Ground beef patties 112 mg/100 grams of meat
Ground beef stuffed into
peppers 50 mg/100 grams of meat
Ground beef 145 mg/100 grams of meat
The niacin had been added to the meat to assure
retention of its color for longer periods of time, thereby
increasing its shelf life. It is felt by the Philadelphia
officials that the addition of niacin to ground meats is
more universal than is generally suspected.
(Reported by Milton Werrin, V.M.D., Chief, Veterinary
Public Health Section, Philadelphia Department of Public
Health)

Hepatitis from A Chimpanzee Connecticut
Another report has been received on human hepatitis
cases possibly transmitted from a chimpanzee.
On August 8, the Director of the Children's Zoo in
New London, Connecticut, purchased a chimpanzee from
an importer in New York City and brought it to New Lon-
don. The chimp was so young it was taken into the Di-
rector's home. He, his wife and their 16-year-old son
diapered, nursed and cared for the animal.
On September 6 the wife became ill with a fever,
anorexia and nausea. Five days later, she developed
jaundice. On September 11, the son developed similar


symptoms, and both cases were diagnosed as infectious
hepatitis. On September 15 the husband and an aunt living
in the home received gamma globulin. Neither he nor the
aunt developed symptoms.
Prior to the Director's purchase of the chimp, it had
been "farmed out" to a pet shop in New York City for a
two-week period since the animal required special care.
Reportedly, the chimp originated from Liberia and arrived
as a single chimpanzee in a shipment of animals. Speci-
mens from the chimpanzee, the human cases, and the
contacts are being tested.
Previous reports this year in MMWR on human hepa-
titis cases probably transmitted from chimpanzees have
involved 8 laboratory workers in Miami, Florida (MMWR
Vol. 10, No. 20) and 6 zoo workers in Miami, Florida
(MMWR Vol. 10, No. 35).
A summary of human hepatitis in the United States
probably transmitted from chimpanzees or monkeys ap-
peared in CDC Hepatitis Surveillance Report No. 4 (March
21, 1961).
(Epidemic reported by Dr. Mila Rindge, M.P.H., Chief,
Epidemiology Section, Connecticut State Department of
Health and Dr. Robert McCollum, Yale University).


Bat Rabies Massachusetts and South Dakota
Massachusetts recently discovered and reported its
first case of rabies in bats. The bat was found in Harvard,
Massachusetts, anid was brought to the State laboratory on
September 5, 1961, after having bitten a woman the pre-
vious evening. The bat apparently flew into the open bed-
room window of a child visiting his grandparents. After
discovering the bat in his bedroom the youngster drove the
minimal into a closet, slammed the door shut and injured
he bat while doing so. The boy's mother hearing the com-
motion arose from her sleep to investigate. Upon opening
the closet door she was bitten on the toe by the bat. The
bat was carried by the husband to the State Diagnostic
Laboratory the next morning.
Direct.impression smears of the bat's brain and sali-
vary glands stained for Negri bodies were negative. How-
ever, mouse inoculation studies were suspicious. Tissues
from both the bat and the mouse brain were sent to the
Communicable Disease Center in Atlanta and were found to
be positive by fluorescent antibody techniques on October
9, 1961.
The description of the bat coincided most closely
with that of the small brown Myotis lucifugus.
This represents the first case of animal rabies dis-
covered in Massachusetts since 1949.
(Continued on page 8)









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED OCTOBER 22, 1960 AND OCTOBER 21, 1961

(]y place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specrtled by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area mulative, Cumulative, fever)
42nd Week first 42 weeks 42nd Week first 42 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044


1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 196C 1961 1961

UNIED STAES---------- 59 140 1,080 2,680 39 98 693 1,850 14 21 97 3

NEW ENGIAND------------ 8 27 207 7 19 162 1 6 -
Maine------------------- 4 3 38 4 3 38 -
New Hampshire------------- 1 -
Vermont---------------- 5 7 4 2 -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 12 29 8 19 1 3
Rhode Island-------------- 1 99 1 76 3 -
Connecticut-------------- 3 5 34 3 3 27 -
MIDDE ATLANTIC-------------- 10 22 282 391 8 10 186 275 6 2
New York------------------ 9 12 204 218 7 4 131 142 3 1 -
New Jersey----------------- 1 4 34 75 1 3 27 55 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 6 44 98 3 28 78 3 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL------ 16 26 135 453 10 20 83 273 3 5 31
Ohio--------------------- 5 4 41 106 2 4 19 55 1 1 -
Indiana-------------------- 4 9 16 102 2 6 9 75 1 2 1
Illinois------------------ 5 25 131 3 12 88 2 12 -
Michigan------------------ 2 8 26 83 2 7 22 46 1 11
Wisconsin------------------ 5 27 31 4 21 9 1 6 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 4 2 63 154 3 1 28 87 1 8
Minnesota----------------- 1 6 49 1 6 41 6 -
Iowa---------------------- 18 21 9 4 -
Missouri------------------- 4 20 32 3 6 22 1
North Dakota-------------- 3 14 5 -
South Dakota--------------- 1 4 1 -
Nebraska------------------- 1 8 15 4 8 1 -
Kansas--------------------- 7 19 3 6 1
SOU ATLATIC------------ 14 41 185 484 7 34 135 380 7 5 10
Delaware------------------- 2 1 -
Maryland------------------ 1 18 28 126 1 14 27 115 4 -
District of Columbia------- 3 2 3 2 -
Virginia------------------- 7 10 31 7 8 28 8 -
West Virginia-------------- 5 6 29 46 3 6 19 38 2 -
North Carolina------------- 4 4 21 80 1 4 11 60 3 -
South Carolina------------- 1 32 123 1 1 24 81 -
Georgia-------------------- 28 18 21 16 -
Florida-------------------- 3 5 32 58 1 2 21 40 2 1 2
EAST SOTH CENTRAL-------- 17 74 210 7 42 85 2
Kentucky------------------- 10 27 117 5 5 -
Tennessee------------------ 1 17 40 1 8 27 -
Alabama-------------------- 6 9 21 6 9 21 2 -
Mississippi---------------- 21 32 20 32 -
WEST SOTH CENTRAL---------- 5 6 139 254 5 5 75 157 1 5 1
Arkansas------------------- 17 28 7 20 -
Louisiana---------------- 4 1 49 47 4 39 28 1-
Oklahoma------------------- 4 16 11 1
Texas---------------------- 1 5 69 163 1 5 29 98 4 1
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 2 5 44 73 1 3 25 38 1 -
Montana------------------- 1 2 4 18 2 2 14 1
Idaho--------------------- -- 2 14 7 6 1 -
Wyoming-------------------- 1 19 1 1 -
Colorado------------------- 1 7 15 1 7 14 -
New Mexico----------------- 3 5 2 -
Arizona------------------- 8 4 6 4 -
Utah----------------------- 8 5 4 2 -
Nevada----------------------
PACIFIC---------------------- 8 13 131 454 5 11 100 393 3 2 33 2
Washington----------------- 1 1 23 31 1 1 15 31 1
Oregon--------------------. 2 16 32 1 8 18 1 -
California----------------- 5 12 88 382 3 10 73 335 2 2 32 2
Alaska-------------------- 2 2 --
Hawaii------------------- 4 7 4 7 -

Puerto Rico------------------ 3 6 472 3 6 465 -









4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED OCTOBER 22, 1960 AND OCTOBER 21, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,N998.5 pt. Meale
infectious ___
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
42nd Week first 42 weeks 082 42nd Week first 42 weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


NITD STAES--------- 12 26 451 551 47 23 1,191 944 60,761 31,259 1,336 1,331

NEW ENGAND--------------- 7 11 68 18 1,902 913 178 152
Maine ---------------1-- 2 11 3 129 56 84 1
New Hampshire------------- 13 170 27 2 3
Vermont------------------- 2 1 184 13 -
Massachusetts-------------- 6 8 31 7 773 453 64 130
Rhode Island ------------- 3 2 216 179 3
Connecticut--------------- 1 8 5 430 185 28 15
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 20 13 13 5 158 183 8,282 3,805 133 265
New York------------- 7 3 11 4 83 123 3,529 2,098 73 126
New Jersey----------- 2 1 39 7 1,962 259 13 56
Pennsylvania-------------- 13 8 2 36 53 2,791 1,448 47 83
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 15 38 5 226 147 12,073 5,588 304 322
Ohio------------------- 1 16 2 66 45 4,027 1,899 17 88
Indiana----------------- 1 5 22 14 1,812 631 37 38
Illinois ----------------- 10 6 2 56 52 2,171 1,205 153 29
Michigan------------------ 3 9 72 32 3,755 1,651 64 61
Wisconsin------------------ 2 1 10 4 308 202 33 106
WEST NORTH CENTRAL------ 4 40 36 1 4 81 68 5,812 2,217 43 22
Mfnnesota---------------- 3 24 17 25 24 1,281 320 3 2
Iowa----------------------- 2 7 2 21 2 1,708 358 17 5
Missouri----------------- 1 2 21 18 1,299 779 2 -
North Dakota--------------- 4 1 1 126 162 18 13
South Dakota-------------- 1 7 6 7 4 178 138 3 -
Nebraska------------------- 2 1 3 10 584 228 2
Kansas------------- 2 1 2 4 9 636 232 NN NN
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 4 11 105 178 5 5 174 93 7,661 3,641 69 85
Delaware---- -------- 1 10 175 218 9
Maryland ---------------- 1 1 2 13 10 681 363 31 9
District of Columbia----- 2 3 113 42 3 -
Virginia------------------- 2 15 29 3 2 30 3 1,231 674 5 13
West Virginia------------- -- 1 4 17 13 1,385 675 12 18
North Carolina------------- 2 2 9 10 1 60 13 1,711 332 5 1
South Carolina------------ 1 10 46 9 8 403 112 6 5
Georgia------------------- 5 31 33 9 4 684 239 -
Florida ------------ 1 2 36 55 1 1 32 32 1,278 986 7 30
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL------ 1 4 37 56 3 2 167 116 9,143 4,441 95 71
Kentucky--------------- 9 2 2 52 47 2,698 1,604 36 35
Tennessee----------------- 3 7 1 53 33 3,576 1,440 47 33
Alabama-------------------- 3 19 27 30 28 1,580 976 8 2
Mississippi-------------- 1 1 6 20 2 32 8 1,289 421 4 1
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL------- 7 7 209 183 9 1 83 56 4,418 2,460 150 77
Arkansas------------------ 4 14 1 15 21 859 157 2
Louisiana------------- 1 5 26 40 9 6 479 140 -
Oklahoma------------------- 1 1 9 18 5 295 291 1
Texas ------------- 5 1 170 111 8 1 54 29 2,785 1,872 150 74
MOUNT ---------------- 10 35 1 50 47 3,606 2,432 51 130
Montana-------------------- 2 3 4 9 311 121 11
Idaho-------------------- 11 4 2 .270 268 6 14
Wyoming------------------- 5 4 2 148 26 15 79
Colorado------------------- 4 3 21 15 1,220 894 8 8
New Mexico--------------- 3 4 1 11 5 398 281 NN -
Arizona------------------- 3 6 10 573 539 13 7
Utah--------------------- -- 6 4 563 223 9 11
Nevada-------------------- 1 123 80 -
PACIFIC---------------------- 8 1 10 6 184 216 7,864 5,762 313 207
Washington---------------- 2 1 23 35 898 679 118 57
Oregon--------------------- 35 38 1,221 941 44 49
California---------------- 2 9 6 120 128 5,320 3,877 135 92
Alaska---------------- 4 1 4 14 365 188 13 7
Hawaii-------------------- 2 1 60 77 3 2

Puerto Rico------------- 5 52 118 16 8 812 629 69 24

NN-NoL NOT.rlable









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED OCTOBER 22, 1960 AND OCTOBER 21, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
Mengoccoca tta- occal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
Malaria ea sore fever,
alaa infections cosis ore fever, Rabies in
throat, endemic animals
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 42nd Week first 42 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNITED STATES--------- 1 43 51 4,752 19 28 657 678 1 57 43

NEW ENGLAND----------------.. 2 1 171 1 18 9 -
Maine--------------------- 8 1 2 -
New Hampshire------------ 3 -
Vermont-------------------- 2 -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 1 41 1 12 4 -
Ihode Island ------------ 11 2 -
Connecticut--------------- 1 106 3 3- -
DLE ATLANTIC-------------- 8 10 148 4 2 81 47 2 6
New York------------------- 5 6 101 4 1 45 31 1 6
New Jersey----------------- 1 1 22 17 2 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 2 3 25 1 19 14 1 -
EAST NOR CENTRAL--------- 15 15 320 2 3 83 90 8 3
Ohio---------------------.. 4 48 2 28 26 2 2
Indiana-------------------. 81 1 1 20 23 1 -
Illinois------------------- 5 3 53 26 21 1 -
Michigan------------------- 8 6 63 1 6 13 2 1
Wisconsin------------------ 2 2 75 3 7 2 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 1 148 33 37 15 11
Minnesota------------------ 9 5 1 6 3
Iowa----------------------- 39 2 6 2 3
Missouri------------------- 1 20 22 3 1
North Dakota--------------- 48 1 -
South Dakota-------------- 3 3 4 4
Nebraska ----------------- 1 1 2 -
Kansas--------------------- 51 2 2 -
SOUTH ATLATIC------------- 6 10 404 4 4 108 103 1 6 6
Delaware------------------- 1 1 1 -
Maryland------------------- 1 2 8 2 5 -
District of Columbia------- 1 3 1 10 8 -
Virginia------------------- 2 2 110 1 1 18 23 2 3
West Virginia-------------- 4 132 1 9 10 1 2
North Carolina------------- 2 1 41 14 8 1 -
South Carolina------------- 22 8 12 -
Georgia-------------------- 13 2 1 34 24 1 -
Florida ------------------ 1 74 1 12 12 2 1
EAST SOH CENTRAL--------- 2 3 979 1 8 74 102 4 4
Kentucky------------- 50 4 18 23 3 -
Tennessee---------------- 1 1 883 1 2 44 55 1 4
Alabama------------------ 1 18 2 10 19 -
Mississippi---------------- 1 1 28 2 5 -
WEST SOUTH CNTRAL----------- 518 4 6 142 188 17 7
Arkansas------------------- 3 4 28 46 4 2
Louisiana--------------- 2 1 21 57 1 3
Oklahoma------------------- 5 12 12 -
Texas---------------------- 511 1 1 81 73 12 2
MOUNTAIN--------------------- 1 5 1,094 2 2 56 38 1 2
Montana------------------- 33 1 1 17 11 -
Idaho---------------------- 47 1 3 -
Wyoming------------------- 76 3 4 -
Colorado----------------- 1 265 6 1 -
New Mexico----------------- 1 2 363 1 1 16 9 1
Arizona-------------------- 1 161 7 9 1 1
Utah---------------------- 1 149 2 1 -
Nevada--------------------- 4 -
PACIFIC--------------------- 1 9 6 970 2 2 62 64 4 4
Washington----------------- 1 252 7 5 -
Oregon--------------------- 1 2 31 1 8 3
California------------------ 1 8 3 632 2 2 54 50 4 1
Alaska----------------- 14 -
awaii------- ------------ 41 -

Puerto Rico-----------------........ 1 7 1 18 19 -








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS

(By place of occurrence and veekof filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shown in parentheses in table 4)

42nd 41st Percent Cumulative, first 42 veeks
week week Adjusted change,
ended ended average adjusted
Area ended ended 42nd average
21 c1 week to 1961 1960 Percent
1961 14 1956-60 current change
1961. 1961 week
week

TOTAL, 117 PORNG CITIE---------------------- 11,820 10,613 11,222 +5.3 479,401 482,510 -0.6

Ne Egan-------------------------------(14 cities) 680 671 673 +1.0 29,393 30,286 -2.9
Middle Atlantic---------------------------(20 cities) 3,328* 2,922 3,105 +7.2 136,448 133,993 +1.8
East North Central------------------------(21 cities) 2,471 2,351 2,396 +3.1 102,459 104,326 -1.8
West North Central-------------------------(9 cities) 821* 709 807 +1.7 32,697 33,525 -2.5
South Atlantic---------------------------- (1 cities) 1,075 972 944 +13.9 41,466 41,357 +0.3
Baut South Central--------------------------(8 cities) 519 463 507 +2.4 21,661 21,861 -0.9
West South Central------------------------ (13 cities) 918 952 1,004 -8.6 41,020 42,084 -2.5
ountain---------------------------------(8 cities) 387 344 364 +6.3 15,320 15,107 +1.4
Pacific---------------------------------- (1 cities) 1,621 1,229 1,422 +14.0 58,937 59,971 -1.7

*Includes estimate for missing reports.


15,000 NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES 15,000


-- CURRENT WEEK
14,000 14,000
--..... 5-WEEK MOVING AVERAGE
ADJUSTED AVERAGE

13,000 13,000



12,000 / 12,000



11,000 I 11,000



10,000 --- ---- -t ---- -_ -- ---- -------- -~---- 10,00


,000 9,000
S T I I I T I I l T T I II T I I T i I T T I I I I T I I
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Area


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass-----------
Bridgepcrt, Conn.--------
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.--------
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.---------------
New Bedford, Mass.-------
New Haven, Conn.---------
Providence, R.I.--------
Somerville, Mass.--------
Springfield, Mass.-------
Waterbury, Conn.---------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.------------
Allentown, Pa.-----------
Buffalo, N.Y.-----------
Camden, N.J.------------
Elizabeth, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.-------------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.----------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgh, Pa.---------
Reading, Pa.------------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.--------
Scranton, Pa.-----------
Syracuse, N.Y.----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.-------------
Yonkers, N.Y.-----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-------------
Canton, Ohio-------------
Chicago, 111.-----------
Cincinnati, Ohio--------
Cleveland, Ohio---------
Columbus, Ohio----------
Dayton, Ohio------------
Detroit, Mich.----------
Evansville, Ind.---------
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.---------
Gary, Ind.---------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.-----
Indianapolis, Ind.-----
Madison, Wis.-----------
Milwaukee, Wis.-- ---
Peoria, Ill.------------
Rockford, I..-----------
South Bend, Ind.-------
Toledo, Ohio-----------.
Youngstown, Ohio--------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Duluth, Minn.-----------
Kansas City, Kans.------
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.----------
Minneapolis, Minn.-------
Omaha, Nebr.------------


41st
week
ended
Oct.
14,
1961


256
30
34
31
51
19
20
33
39
44
19
41
21
42


53
39
170
34
35
19
89
100*
1,606
35
484
286
23
108
39
41
64
45
28
30

57
34
726
141
219
129
82
318
35
41
30
34
52
172
23
132
16
25
32
113
60


57
28
35*
141
(30)
112
61


Cumulative,
first 42 weeks


1961 1960


208
38
32
33
57
25
24
20
37
54
17
40
33
53


40
24
98
34
29
35
58
82
1,688
40
364
112
27
81
26
33
63
31
30
27

61
35
704
161
210
95
75
309
33
34
38
37
50
136
20
117
35
30
26
97
48


53
18
42
131
(27)
79
88


L I


Area


10,110 10,579
1,597 1,714
1,225 1,305
1,139 1,181
2,014 2,047
1,015 1,000
913 1,023
1,089 1,020
1,901 1,876
2,590 2,664
552 554
1,846 1,896
1,116 1,149
2,286 2,278


1,920 1,791
1,444 1,462
6,111 6,072
1,775 1,763
1,233 1,224
1,620 1,619
2,898 2,989
4,232 4,091
69,665 68,288
1,628 1,608
21,256 20,529
8,035 8,040
978 993
4,223 4,201
1,023 989
1,485 1,569
2,560 2,614
1,891 1,733
1,180 1,136
1,291 1,282


2,398 2,384
1,301 1,461
31,001 32,204
6,533 6,605
8,504 8,821
4,796 4,931
3,355 3,127
13,903 14,203
1,516 1,535
1,778 1,684
1,588 1,535
1,283 1,299
1,902 1,730
5,955 6,091
1,357 1,320
5,145 5,249
1,186 1,272
1,192 1,184
1,204 1,223
4,142 4,171
2,420 2,297


2,268 2,286
1,077 1,070
1,570 1,464
5,376 5,24"
(1,171) (1,090)
4,947 5,237
2,905 3,073


42nd
week
ended
Oct.
21,
1961


WEST NORTH CBETRAL--Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.---------
St. Paul, Minn.---------
Wichita, Kans.-----------

SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.-----------
Charlotte, N.C.------
Jacksonville, Fla.------
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------.
St. Petersburg, Fla.----
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D.C.--------
Wilmington, Del.---------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
jirmingham, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-------
Knoxville, Tenn.---------
Louisville, .---------
Memphis, Tenn.-------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.--------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.------------
Baton Rouge, La.-----
Corpus Chrlsti, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.---------
Fort Worth, Tex.-----
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.--------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.-----
San Antonio, Tex.--------
Shreveport, La.----------
Tulsa, Okla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah-------------
Phoenix, Ariz.----------
Pueblo, Colo.--------
Salt Lake City, Utah----
Tucson, Ari---z.--------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.------
Fresno, Calif.-------
Glalndale, Calif.-----
Honolulu, Haaii--------
Long Beach, Calif.------
Los Angeles, Calif.------
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.-----
Seattle, Wash.----- -
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.---------

San Juan, P. R.---------


41st
week
ended
Oct.
14,
1961


256
77
54


122
295
36
59
73
49
73
32
(57)
76
208
52


93
43
11
118
109
41
26
78


38
44
13
96
20
67
155
43
177
63
88
63
51


39
12
125
12
98
19
37
45


27
(45)
(42)
42
67
560
116
47
92
55
118
232
(31)
167
55
43

(43)


Cumulative,


Cumulative,
first 42 weeks


1961 1960


207
57
34


120
189
49
76
83
47
87
28
(63)
72
197
24


76
31
16
93
114
36
30
67


28
37
21
134
37
60
170
51
155
63
104
37
55


34
16
110
12
87
15
37
33


12
(35)
(18)
41
48
441
100
25
95
57
88
149
(29)
97
42
34

(23)


9,838
2,763
1,953


4,756
10,286
1,512
2,420
3,167
2,081
3,240
1,370
(2,821)
2,778
8,195
1,661


3,571
1,953
1,145
4,757
4,738
1,703
1,338
2,456

1,428
1,169
910
5,221
1,467
2,716
6,920
2,355
7,062
3,091
4,264
2,115
2,302


1,320
686
4,841
689
3,460
710
2,008
1,606


728
(1,809)
(1,387)
1,690
2,329
20,814
4,054
1,397
4,457
2,587
3,735
8,128
(1,461)
5,439
1,975
1,604

(1,410)


42nd
week
ended
Oct.
21,
1961


10,301
2,907
1,943


4,911
10,556
1,628
2,481
3,038
1,676
3,264
1,398
(2,946)
2,756
8,059
1,590


3,542
1,982
1,178
4,813
4,671
1,730
1,450
2,495

1,434
1,216
987
5,189
1,596
2,783
7,076
2,386
7,474
3,153
4,224
2,273
2,293


1,293
702
5,005
700
3,195
689
2,038
1,485


712
(1,821)
(1,588)
1,728
2,272
21,087
4,040
1,444
4,624
2,439
3,823
8,301
(1,450)
5,798
1,995
1,708

(1,476)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.








3 IIIIII 62 0886III 3 9876I
3 1262 08863 9876


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


South Dakota has also reported its first case of bat
rabies. On September 10, 1961, a man and his wife were
trimming trees on their grounds. The wife was wearing a
pullover-type sweater. In removing the sweater, she was
bitten on the tip of the finger and her first impression was
that she was stung by a wasp. The bat fluttered to the
ground from the sweater and apparently made no attempt to
escape when picked up and placed in a jar. A science
teacher was asked if he would care to use the bat in any
of his classroom studies, and since he was aware of the
possibility of rabies in bats, suggested that it be sub-
mitted for diagnosis. The bat was presented dead to a
veterinarian at Miller, South Dakota, on September 11th and
was forwarded at once to South Dakota State College. It
was identified as a hoary bat. A positive diagnosis of
rabies was made on September 12. The woman was in-
formed and was started on immunizations that day.

To date, bat rabies cases have been confirmed in
35 States.
(Reported by A. L. Frechette, M.D. Commissioner, Common-
wealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Health; and
Dr. G. S. Harshfield, South Dakota State College and
B. Diamond, South Dakota State Department of Health.)



INTERNATIONAL NOTES- QUARANTINE MEASURES
Smallpox Belgium
The World Health Organization reported a case of
smallpox in Brussels, Belgium. The report indicated that
a 17-month-old child had entered Brussels on October 12
on a commercial airlines from Leopoldville, The Congo.
The child was hospitalized on October 14; the diagnosis
of smallpox was made on October 16; and the child died
on October 18. One traveler who accompanied the child
from Leopoldville to Rome flew on to Idlewild Airport,
New York City. This traveler had a valid vaccination
certificate and his family has been vaccinated and will
be kept under surveillance.
All travelers from Brussels are required to have valid
smallpox certificates.
Cholera For East
The World Health Organization declared Hong Kong
and Macao free of cholera on October 12. Sarawak was
declared free of cholera on October 19. Valid cholera
vaccination certificates and surveillance of unvaccinated
persons are no longer required for travelers from these
areas to the United States.
Unofficial information received indicates that vac-
cination against cholera is still being required for all
arrivals into Formosa.


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA
These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each State and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table 1 shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of-rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.



UNIV OF FL LIB
DOCUMENTS DEPT.
Li. '.-



U.S DEPOSITORY


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