Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00306

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





Morbidi


and Mortality *


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

Prepared by OMe _,, Ci E MEIrose 4-


For release July 21, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United at and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended July 15, 19( *


Poliomyelitis A sharp increase in the incidence Polio (Cumulated Weekly) Through the 28th Week
of poliomyelitis is apparent from the current week's re- for the Past Five Years
ported total of cases. For the week ending July 15, a 1961 1960 1959 1958 1957
total of 28 cases, 18 paralytic, was reported compared to -- -
10 cases, 7 paralytic, during the preceding week. How- Paralytic 175 454 974 416 734
ever, the number of cases remains well below that re- Total 279 612 1458 818 1753
ported during comparable weeks in recent years. For the
same week in 1960, there were 95 cases, 69 paralytic; The three paralytic cases reported by Alabama
and for 1958, 255 cases, 169 paralytic. represent a concentration of cases in Mobile, all with
Cumulative totals for the first 28 weeks of the year onsets during June. Specimens from a previous paralytic
over the past five years are shown above, case, also from Mobile, with onset on June 1, has yielded



Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases, United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 28th Week Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of International Approxi-
Liste, 1955) First 28 weeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
July July Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 15, 16, 1 Median i9i,-tj point
-- Data not available i961 1960 135- it' 9-6] to
Quantity zero 1,.c_ t
Anthrax---------- --- --- -062 1 4 *
Botulism----------------------049.1 4 6 *
Brucellosis undulantt fever)---0- 6 32 29 22 321 460 454 *
Diphtheria----------------------0 55 9 9 10 323 346 .19 14 17 22 July 1
naeephalitis, infectious-------082 27 47 41 792 880 824 792 880 824 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
Nseru m-----. --.------092,N998.5 pt. 1,156 563 270 45,225 20,786 12,157 60,432 28,353 17,587 Sept. 1
Malaria----------------- -110-117 1 25 29 *
MOale-----------------------... 085 5,132 5,824 6,281 370,892 383,528 431,3-8 407,102 416,240 468,017 Sept. 1
IMeningtia, aseptic---------30 pt. 165 77 --- 898 896 --- 898 896 --- Jan. 1
Neningococcal infections--------057 39 49 40 1,267 1,352 1,447 1,923 2,082 2,226 Sept. 1
Pollorelitl -------------------080 28 94 186 279 612 1,454 176 396 1,161 Apr. 1
Paralytic-------------080.0,080.1 18 69 56 175 454 970 115 300 762 Apr. 1
loNparalytic-----------------080.2 7 20 103 63 115 338 38 79 290 Apr. 1
Unspeciiedl----------------080.3 3 5 27 41 43 146 23 17 109 Apr. 1
Psittacosis------------96.2 1 3 41 58 *
Rabies in man--------------.-.094 *
Streptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever---050,051 3,010 3,329 --- 213,671 201,394 --- 11,323 --- --- Aug. I
Typhoid fever------------------040 23 20 25 334 376 435 220 246 255 Apr. 1
phus fever, endeic-----------101 2 20 44 *
Robles in animals-------.-- ----- 81 84 83 1,983 2,194 2,675 2,559 3,167 3,457 Oct. 1
Figures for current week exclude missing reports from Alaska
Anthrax 1 Pennsylvania


V1
LaI







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


type III poliovirus. All of these cases are among unvac-
cinated children.
In Maryland, the paralytic case reported last week
and the two cases reported this week all reside in Fred-
erick County. Onsets for these cases were in late June
and early July; none were vaccinated; type III poliovirus
has been isolated from two.
The four cases reported from Kansas this week are
from four separate counties with no geographical locali-
zation evident.
From Texas this week, 120 cases of aseptic men-
ingitis are reported. The cases, described as being
clinically mild with only slight nuchal rigidity but ac-
companied by rash, have occurred principally among
children in the Big Spring-Howard County area in the
Southern Panhandle.

Anthrax A fatal case of suspect inhalation anthrax
is reported this week from Pennsylvania. An account of
this case is detailed in Epidemiological Reports.



EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS


Food Borne Outbreaks of Unknown Etiology Summary

Summarized on page 8 are 22 apparent food-borne
disease outbreaks, the etiology of which could not be
determined. With the three summarized in MMWR, Vol. 10,
No. 12, it brings to 25 the number of such outbreaks re-
ported this year. All are reported from five States, the
majority from California.
Common to most of these outbreaks is the incrimina-
tion of a meat product and an incubation period falling in
the range of 6 to 24 hours. The majority of the outbreaks
were associated with establishments preparing food on a
mass basis; in most instances, the food had been kept in
warming devices for varying extended periods of time.
The epidemiologic characteristics described for
many of these outbreaks are those most commonly associ-
ated with outbreaks caused by Clostridium perfringens,
an organism annually implicated in a number of outbreaks
in England but infrequently incriminated in this country.



Inhalation Anthrax Delaware County, Pennsylvania

On June 27, a 52 year old woman, a secretary in a
goat hair and wool processing plant near Philadelphia,
died after a short illness of suspected inhalation anthrax.
Employees in the mill where she was employed had ex-


perienced cases of cutaneous anthrax in the past. The
plant is participating in an anthrax vaccine evaluation
program but, because the office staff was not included in
the program, the patient had received no vaccine.
She complained first of chest and back pain on
Friday, June 23, followed by extreme fatigue and intense
sweating but was able to complete her work day. Because
of the increasing severity of symptoms, she was hospital-
ized on Saturday, June 24. Examination at that time
revealed a normal temperature, remarkably negative physi-
cal findings but some prominent lymph nodes in the left
hilus by X-ray. Pending definitive diagnosis, she was
given supportive therapy only.
On Tuesday, June 27 at 2:00 a.m., her condition
abruptly deteriorated and despite heroic efforts, she
died four hours later. At autopsy, a hemorrhagic mediasti-
nitis was the most notable finding. Organisms resembling
Bacillus antbracis were noted from smears of exudate
and later from cultures. This organism has been confirmed
as B. anthracis by phage studies.
Intensive environmental and epidemiological studies
have been instituted by Dr. Herman Gold, plant physician,
a team from the Pennsylvania Department of Health and
the Communicable Disease Center.
(Reported by Dr. Ernest J. Witte, Chief, Veterinary Public
Health Section, Pennsylvania Department of Health.)



Staphylococcal Gastroenteritis Stapleton, Alabama

On April 28, beginning about 11:00 a.m. and extend-
ing over the next three hours, 46 of 106 children attending
the Stapleton, Alabama elementary school became abruptly
ill with symptoms of abdominal cramps, headache, nausea
and some vomiting. The children had been given chocolate
popsicles and ice cream at 10:30 a.m. and had eaten
lunch in groups at 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Many had
become ill before lunch. Of those who had eaten pop-
sicles, 49% .(36 of 73) became ill; of those who had not
eaten popsicles, 30% (10 of 23) developed symptoms.
Only four reported eating the ice cream. (It should be
noted that histories from many of these young children
were considered to be of doubtful reliability thus par-
tially accounting for the ten cases among those who had
supposedly not eaten popsicles.)
The popsicles had been derived from two commercial
sources. Samples of one brand, when cultured, grew co-
agulase positive Staphylococcus aureus.
(Reported by Dr. W. H. Y. Smith, Director, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, Alabama Department of Public
Health; investigated by Dr. W. Bruce Nelson, Health
Officer, Baldwin County.)









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JULY 16, 1960 AND JULY 15, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) onaralytic aseptic plant
Area Cumulative, Cuulative, fever)
28th Week first 28 ween; 28th Week first 28 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNIBSD S ES-------- 28 94 279 612 18 69 175 454 7 20 165 32

NEW ENGLAND----------------- 25 3 70 19 3 60 5 1 1
Maine---------------------- 6 6 6
New Hampshire-------------- -
Vermont-------------------- -
Massachusetts------------- 2 6 2 6 -
Rhode Island--------------- 24 57 18 47 5 1
Connecticut---------------- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 1 10 19 58 1 7 15 42 3 2 1
New York------------------- 1 3 9 40 1 3 7 29 1 1
New Jersey----------------- 2 5 8 1 4 7 1 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 5 5 10 3 4 6 2 1 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 3 10 30 64 1 6 19 29 1 3 5 1
Ohio----------------------- 1 12 21 6 7 1 -
Indiana-------------------- 1 1 4 2 1 1 3 1 -
Illinois------------------- 1 7 8 21 5 6 15 1 2 4 -
Michigan------------------- 2 3 17 3 5 1 1
Wisconsin------------------ 3 3 1 1 --
WEST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 5 3 19 31 2 2 9 17 1 1 23
Minnesota------------------ 3 14 3 11 1
Io'wa---------------------- 2 7 1 10
Missouri--------------- 1 2 8 6 1 2 4 1 -
North Dakota------------ --- .-
South Dakota---------------- 1 .- 1
Nebraska----------------- 1 2 1 1 2 1 3
Kansas--------------------- 4 4 2 2 2 1 8
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 7 15 46 83 6 9 32 65 1 4 5 2
Delaware------------------ 2 1 -
Maryland------------------- 2 3 1 2 3 -
District of Columbia----- -- -
Virginia------------------- 1 2 1
West Virginia-------------- 2 1 7 8 1 4 7 1 1 -
North Carolina------------- 4 18 3 17 1
South Carolina------------- 12 4 21 7 4 14 3 2 -
Georgia------------------- 2 16 4 2 10 3 -
Florida-------------------- 1 2 9 31 1 2 6 24 1 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 3 6 29 24 3 6 12 21 1 -
Kentucky------------------ 16 8 2 5 -
Tennessee------------------ 1 5 3 1 2 3 -
Alabama-------------------- 3 4 4 6 3 4 4 6 1 -
Mississippi---------------- 1 4 7 1 4 7 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 6 12 47 79 2 7 26 48 4 5 122 3
Arkansas------------------ 3 2 5 2 3 1 2 1
Louisiana----------------- 2 3 13 25 2 2 10 18 1 2
Oklahoma------------------- 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 -
Texas---------------------- 3 5 31 45 2 16 23 3 3 120 -
MOUNTAIN -------------------- 22 23 13 13 9 -
Montana-------------------- 2 10 2 6 -
Idaho------------------- 4 4 1 1 -
Wyoming-------------------- 1 -
Colorado------------------- 3 2 3 2 8 -
New Mexico---------------- 1 2 1 -
Arizona-------------------- 5 3 3 3 -
Utah---------------------- 7 1 4 1 -
Nevada--------------------.. -
PACIFIC---------------------- 3 13 64 180 3 13 46 159 19 1
Washington----------------- 1 10 7 1 6 7 2 1
Oregon--------------------- 7 16 1 11 -
California----------------- 2 12 45 150 2 12 37 134 17
Alaska--------------------- --- 2 --- 2 -- -- --
Hawaii--------------------- 1 2 5 1 2 5 -

Puerto Rico------------------ 1 19 5 312 1 19 5 305 -










4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JULY 16, 1960 AND JULY 15, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,11998.5 pt. eagles
infectiousMeas
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
28th Week first 28 weeks 082 28th Week first 28 weeks 085


1961 Ia, 1"i1 se6 19e61 19: i9 96e. 1J96i 1960 1961 1960


UNITED STATES--------- 9 9 323 346 27 47 1,156 563 45,225 20,786 5,132 5,824

NEW ENGLAND----------------- 5 10 2 32 16 1,240 626 635 438
Maine--------------------- 4 73 44 56 34
New Hampshire-------------- 4 78 20 3
Vermont -- ------------ 1 1 142 10 3 63
Massachusetts------------- 4 7 1 13 9 -43 313 439 215
Rhode Island--------------- 1 1 3 5 171 123 31 48
Connecticut--------------- -- 1 7 1 333 116 106 75
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 1 17 10 9 8 L21 59 6,448 2,199 1,428 1,110
New York------------------- 7 2 7 1 60 33 2,661 1,114 703 829
New Jersey----------------- 1 5 32 6 1,585 170 380 205
Pennsylvania--------------- 1 10 7 2 2 29 20 2,202 915 345 76
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 2 13 30 2 10 249 82 9,159 3,920 1,143 2,350
Ohio----------------------- 1 14 1 76 26 3,142 1,287 148 215
Indiana------------------- 1 4 2 26 6 1,477 467 38 50
Illincis------------------- 10 3 1 3 52 20 1,551 813 218 115
Michigan------------------- 2 1 8 1 3 88 28 2,767 1,190 409 963
Wisconsin------------------ 1 1 7 2 222 163 330 1,007
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 26 18 1 107 32 4,604 1,572 69 47
Mfnneolta------------------ 15 5 22 2 1,028 163 6 13
Iowa----------------------- I 2 28 1 1,330 270 9 16
Missouri------------------- 2 29 17 1,027 588 16 7
Nortn Dakota--------------- 2 1 1 7 2 113 122 36 11
South Dakota--------------- 6 5 2 126 117 1 -
Nebraska------------------- 2 1 8 6 474 151 1 -
Kansas--------------------- 2 11 4 506 161 UN NN
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 4 61 83 2 4 157 70 5,617 2,503 571 273
Delaware------------------- 7 139 156 16 16
Maryland----------------- 1 1 1 1 30 8 557 244 106 46
District of Columbia------ 2 1 3 63 23 6 21
Virginia------------------- 1 12 10 24 8 894 503 258 55
West Virginia-------------- 1 4 13 9 1,089 479 112 60
North Carolina------------ 7 2 1 45 10 1,192 209 20 9
South Carolina------------- 2 20 1 4 300 43 7 2
Georgla ------------------- 2 13 19 14 2 532 171 23
Florida------------------ 1 23 27 2 26 23 851 675 46 41
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 1 16 39 2 140 65 6,962 3,099 313 325
Kentucky------------------- 3 1 41 18 2,072 1,204 46 76
Tennessee------------------ 1 3 6 48 17 2,794 1,004 248 242
Alabama-------------------- 5 20 36 20 1,197 662 5 7
Mississippi---------------- 5 12 2 15 10 899 229 14 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 2 3 168 123 7 4 73 65 3,254 1,737 172 339
Arkansas------------------- 3 2 1 13 2 631 75 1 6
Louisiana------------------ 1 19 28 '-9 3 329 81 2 -
lahoma------------------- 1 4 6 6 1 4 230 242 6 10
Texas--------------------- 3 142 87 1 3 50 56 2,064 1,339 163 323
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 5 12 32 3 74 46 2,856 1,709 265 323
Montana------------------- 2 2 5 1 268 66 20 22
Idaho---------------------- 11 1 21 12 198 220 42 33
Wyoming-------------------- 5 2 108 17 1
Colorado------------------- 4 3 1 26 16 982 605 103 117
New Mexico--------------- 4 4 1 317 235 N -
Arizona-------------------- 5 5 3 6 13 427 398 85 82
Utah----------------------- 4 1 5 468 147 13 28
Nevada--------------------- 1 7 1 88 21 2 40
PACIFIC---------------------- 5 1 2 18 203 128 5,085 3,421 536 619
Washington----------------- 10 13 618 405 39 44
Oregon--------------------- 31 17 850 583 109 212
California----------------- 1 17 161 93 3,436 2,239 388 307
Alaska------------------- --- 4 1 --- 1 --- 5 144 140 --- 45
Hawaii-------------------- 1 37 54 11

Puerto Rico------------------ 1 3 41 94 29 6 574 446 32 14

MN-NOL NOtiLable









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JULY 16, 1960 AND JULY 15, 1961 Continued

(Hy place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
coccal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
Malaria Meningococal Psitta- sore fever,
infections cosis tsore fever, Rabies in
throat, endemic animals
Areanaee
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 28th Week first 28 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNITEf STATES--------- 39 49 1 3,010 23 20 334 376 81 84

NE ENGLAND------------------ 5 1 88 1 7 6 -
Maine---------------------- 1 2 1 2 -
New Hampshire-------------- 1 -
Vermont-------------------- 1 -
Massachusetts-------------- 2 1 35 2 2 -
Rhode Island--------------- 10 -
Connecticut---------------- 2 39 1 3 2 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC------------- 7 13 1 215 4 2 40 23 2 22
New York------------------- 6 5 186 3 1 22 19 1 21
New Jersey---------------- 1 1 17 1 8 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 7 1 12 1 10 4 1 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL--------- 6 11 214 2 5 42 42 17 13
hio---------------------- 1 2 30 1 4 14 10 4 4
Indiana-------------------- 26 6 11 6 3
Illinois------------------- 1 5 22 1 1 20 11 6 1
Michigan------------------ 4 4 113 1 6 1 2
Wisconsin----------------- 23 1 4 3
WEST NORTH CENTRAL -------- 3 4 77 1 2 24 23 26 11
Minnesota------------------ 1 1 5 1 7 1
Iowa---------------------. 23 1 3 13 -
Missouri------------------- -- 1 2 2 1 12 15 4 9
North Dakota----------- I 35 1 -
South Dakota--------------- 1 1 3 1 1
Nebraska ---------------- 1 1 1 1
Kansas--------------------- 1 16 1 2 1 -
SOUTH ATLANTIC ----------- 4 5 145 2 5 49 58 2 4
Delaware--.---------------- 1 1 -
Maryland .-------... ------ 1 5 1 1 1 -
District of Columbia------- 1 6 5 -
Virginia------------------ 1 1 64 2 1 14 2 2
West Virginia-------------- 1 41 4 2 2
North Carolina------------- 4 6 7 8 -
South Carolina------------- 6 1 3 8 -
Georgia-------------------- 1 1 19 11 -
Florida------------------- 1 23 7 8 -
EAST SOUTH CBNTRAL------ .. 2 7 752 3 1 36 53 9 7
Kentucky----------------- 6 28 1 7 13 3 2
Tennessee----------------- I 677 1 24 25 5 5
Alabama----------------... 1 1 2 1 1 4 10 -
Mississippi--------------. 45 1 5 1 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 3 3 483 7 4 74 123 25 22
Arkansas------------------- 5 9 22 8
Louisiana---------------- 1 1 -- 1 6 48 1 -
Oklahoma------------------- 7 8 5 1 -
Texas---------------------- 2 2 471 6 4 51 48 23 14
MOUNTAI--------------------- 3 812 26 18 3
Montana-------------------- 18 3 5 -
Idaho------------------- 66 -
Wyoming------------------ 1 2 -
Colorado------------------- 332 5 3
New Mexico----------------- 193 7 5 -
Arizona-------------------- 130 5 6 -
Utah---------------------- 73 2 -
Nevada-------------------- 3 3 -
PACIFIC--------------------. 6 5 224 4 36 30 2
Washington---------------- 1 67 5 1 -
Oregon--------------------- 2 1 15 6 -
California---------------. 3 4 140 4 31 23 2
Alaska ------------- --- --- --- -
eai---------------- 2 -

Puerto Rio------------------- 7 1 11 16 1








6 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION

(By place of occurrence and weekof filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shown in parentheses in table 4)

28eh 27th Percent Cumulative, first 28 weeks
week week Adjuted change;
ended ended average, adjusted
Area Jul July 28th average
15, 8, week to 1961 196 percent
1961 1961 1
1961 1ie61 1956-6u current change

TOTAL, 117 REPORTIM CITIES---------------------- 11,012 10,723 10,620 +3.7 326,713 334.010 -2.2

New England-------------------------------(1 cities) 668 650 623 +7.2 20,172 20,989 -3.9
Middle Atlantic---------------------------(20 cities) 3,004 3,094 2,883 +4.2 93,266 92,576 +0.7
last North Central------------------------ (21 cities) 2,277 2,486 2,276 +0.04 69,922 71,745 -2.5
West North Central---------------------------(9 cities) 830 776 757 +9.6 22,163 23,217 -4.5
South Atlantic-----------------------------(11 cities) 997 863 908 +9.8 28,133 29,047 -3.1
last South Central--------------------------(8 cities) 477 413 484 -1.4 14,754 15,187 -2.9
West South Central--------------------------(1 cities) 986 814 996 -1.0 27,747 29,422 -5.7
Mountain----------------------------------- ( cities) 373 369 348 +7.2 10,398 10,412 -0.1
Pacific----------------------------------- (13 cities) 1,400 1,258 1,345 44.1 40,158 41,415 -3.0


NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY


DEC









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(Ey place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)
1~ r I


Area


27th
week
ended
July
8,
1961


28th
week
ended
July
15,
1961


4 $


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-------:
Cambridge, Mass.--------
Fall River, Mass.--------
Hartford, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.------------
Lynn, Mass.-------------
New Bedford, Mass.-------
New Haven, Conn.--------
Providence, R.I.--------
Somerville, Mass.--------
Springfield, Mass.-------
Waterbury, Conn.---------
Worcester, Mass.---------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.------------
Allentown, Pa.---------
Buffalo, N.Y.-----------
Camden, N.J.-------------
Elizabeth, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.----------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.------------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.----------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgh, Pa.---------
Reading, Pa.-------------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.--------
Scranton, Pa.------------
Syracuse, N.Y.----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.--------------
Yonkers, N.Y.------------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio--------------
Canton, Ohio-------------
Chicago, Ll.------------
Cincinnati, Ohio---------
Cleveland, Ohio----------
Columbus, Ohio-----------
Dayton, Ohio-------------
Detroit, Mich.-----------
Evansville, Ind.---------
Flint, Mich.--------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.---------
Gary, Ind.---------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.------
Indianapolis, Ind.-------
Madison, Wis.------------
Milwaukee, Wis.----------
Peoria, Ill.-------------
Rockford, ll.-----------
South Bend, Ind.---------
Toledo, Ohio------------
Youngstown, Ohio--------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Duluth, Minn.------------
Kansas City, Kans.-------
Kansas City, Mo.--------
Lincoln, Nebr.----------
Minneapolis, Minn.-------
Omaha, Nebr.------------


222
42
21
25
57
30
13
29
36
64
13
38
37
41


48
35
127
46
28
43
59
90
1,482
34
499
193
20
113
23
29
53
33
23
26


62
24
627
173
216
99
86
273
30
36
32
40
43
137
31
124
18
29
35
110
52


67
38
38
131
(32)
122
91


206
36
30
31
48
14
16
26
47
75
8
38
21
54


44
40
151
34
19
45
62
126
1,615
39
485
143
13
88
23
28
65
19
26
29


68
16
818
148
195
113
79
316
40
39
34
27
61
122
34
127
19
26
24
109
71


37
17
46
144
(33)
125
59


Cumulative,
first 28 weeks


1 6_0


6,851
1,096
839
776
1,358
712
627
760
1,324
1,784
378
1,307
786
1,574


1,322
991
4,198
1,211
810
1,129
1,980
2,912
47,627
1,114
14,627
5,472
641
2,824
693
996
1,737
1,260
815
907


1,618
884
21,187
4,486
5,824
3,222
2,313
9,519
1,024
1,223
1,086
873
1,300
4,074
926
3,496
811
809
822
2,799
1,626


1,487
727
1,085
3,652
(794:
3,400
1,939


7,292
1,205
926
846
1,364
694
700
701
1,297
1,851
405
1,336
813
1,559


1,290
1,023
4,265
1,254
837
1,120
2,042
2,786
47,041
1,119
14,181
5,596
689
2,855
681
1,090
1,796
1,207
796
908


1,61w
995
22,079
4,485
6,143
3,399
2,069
9,865
1,052
1,141
1,081
915
1,198
4,212
930
3,582
853
832
817
2,876
1,607


1,618
728
987
3,667
(749)
3,547
2,119


() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.


Area


27th
week
ended
July
8,
1961


28th
week
ended
July
15,
1961


Cumulative,
first 28 weeks


1961


4 I I I


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con. .
St. Louis, Mo.------
St. Paul, Minn.---------
Wichita, K ns.---------

SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N.C.--------
Jacksonville, Fla.----
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D.C.--------
Wilmington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
,Birm nibam, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Lounsvllle, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.----- --
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.---------
Nashville, Tenn.-----

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-------------
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.-----.----
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.-------
New Orleans, La.---------
Oklahoma City., Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.-------
Shreveport, La.----------
Tulsa, kla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo-......------------
Ogden, Utah----------
Phoenix, Ariz.-----------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah-----
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.------
Glendale, Calif.--------
Honolulu, awaii--- ----
Long Beach, Calif.------
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.---
San Jose, Calif.-----
Seattle, Wash.--------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------

San Juan, P. R,--------------


6,688
1,886
1,299


3,219
7,037
998
1,623
2,152
1,422
2,245
929
(2,041)
1,915
5,469
1,124


2,444
1,350
789
3,229
3,265
1,139
887
1,651


962
801
648
3,501
1,010
1,844
4,636
1,582
4,713
2,139
2,898
1,468
1,545


899
467
3,238
451
2,348
471
1,392
1,132


476
(1,270)
(963)
1,121
1,576
14,240
2,788
949
3,050
1,790
2,513
5,577
(999)
3,696
1,290
1,092

(980)


I. L .4 .4


1960


7,190
2,044
1,317


3,389
7,376
1,164
1,783
2,138
1,194
2,286
1,045
(2,133)
1,949
5,615
1,108


2,481
1,370
844
3,313
3,268
1,169
1,012
1,730


1,008
835
699
3,633
1,113
1,941
4,876
1,685
5,309
2,174
2,954
1,574
1,621


888
486
3,405
482
2,234
450
1,410
1,057


487
(1,299)
(1,090)
1,188
1,597
14, 760
2,773
977
3,170
1,662
2,559
5,687
(982)
3,994
1,346
1,215

(999)






3 1262 08864 0205

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA


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These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each State and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are nor
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table I shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


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