Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00301

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

S co/Pio/a3


Morbidit


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


Pfeppred by the


COMMUNKABLL DISIASE EN


MElrose 4-5131


For release June 16, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia Vol. 10, No. 23

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended June 10, 1961


Poliomyelitis Reported cases of poliomyelitis continue
at a remarkably low level. Notification of 10 cases, 5
paralytic, was received this week from 7 different States.
This week's cases bring the total in 1961 through June
10 to 194 cases, 126 paralytic. The number of paralytic
cases reported thus far is just over half the number re-
ported during this same period in 1958, the lowest pre-
vious year in over a decade.
Polio (Cumulated Weekly) Through the 23rd Week for the Past 5 Years
1961 1960 1959 1958 1957
Paralytic 126 253 458 234 497
Total 194 350 652 454 1,048


The occurrence of four cases of paralytic polio-
myelitis and two cases of aseptic meningitis in Atlanta
represent the only significant concentration of cases yet
noted. Five of the six patients are Negro children under
five years of age from a localized area in south central
Atlanta. From one of the paralytic cases a type III polio-
virus has been isolated. Surveys of young children in the
immediate neighborhood done in early May as part of a
vaccine study revealed carrier rates of type Il1 poliovirus
approximating 15 percent. (See Epidemiological Reports)
Thus far in the United States in 1961, specific polio-
virus isolates have been identified and reported to the
Poliomyelitis Surveillance Unit from 16 cases. Eight of


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseasesi United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 23rd Week Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of Interatontnal Approxl-
Lists, 1955) First 23veeke Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
June June Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 10, 11, 1%6-6C Median 1955-56 point
Data not available 19 19 1961 1 960 1956-'60 196r61 1 -u to
Quantity zero 1 99- -60
Anthrax----------- ----062 3 10 *
Botulism-------------------04.9.1 4 3 *
Brucellosle undulantt fever)-----O04 10 22 22 245 384 379 *
Diphtheria----------------------055 4 3 9 291 313 373 871 848 1,068 July 1
Encephalitis, infectious------082 41 41 36 659 692 642 659 692 642 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
erum--------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,246 683 370 39,477 17,862 10,739 54,684 25,546 15,991 Sept. 1
Malaria------------------- 110-117 2 2 22 23 *
Measles--------------------------085 17,030 17,448 17,138 325,431 337,901 383,595 361,641 371,505 420,264 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic--- -----340 pt. 47 33 --- 607 637 --- 607 637 --- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infecton---------057 38 40 46 1,102 1,139 1,260 1,758 1,871 2,032 Sept. 1
Polio~yelitis-------------------080 10 19 71 194 350 6-8 91 134 355 Apr. 1
Paralytic------------080.0,080.1 5 16 53 126 253 454 66 99 246 Apr. 1
Noparalytic------------080.2 4 2 17 38 62 124 13 26 76 Apr. 1
Unspecified-----------------080.3 1 1 1 30 35 70 12 9 33 Apr. 1
Psittacosl---------------096.2 2 2 31 42 *
Rabies in man------------------- 94 2 *
Btreptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever--- -050,051 4,750 5,398 --- 196,107 182,439 --- 293,79 --- --- Aug. 1
Typhoid fever------------------ 00 11 19 19 239 244 328 125 116 148 Apr. 1
Tphus fever, endemic----------1 -01 2 6 14 29 *
babies in animals--------------. --- 58 80 81 1,624 1,858 2,212 2,200 2,836 2,994 Oct. 1
Figures for current week exclude missing reports from Hawaii


r;;









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


these have been Type I; eight have been Type III. The
frequency of Type III isolations is somewhat higher than
might be expected although the numbers are yet quite
small. A preliminary analysis of the data on poliovirus
isolates for 1960 is included under Epidemiological
Reports.

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Poliovirus Isolations 1960, 1961 (Preliminary)

Reports of attempted virus isolations on specimens
from 1,530 poliomyelitis cases with onset during the year
1960 were received by the Poliomyelitis Surveillance Unit
through March 1, 1961. This represents 46 percent of the
total cases submitted to Polio Surveillance Unit.
Poliovirus was isolated from 1,054 cases (69 percent)
of the 1,530 specimens studied. Specimens from cases
with residual paralysis revealed 76.5 percent polio iso-
lates compared to 60.8 percent in paralytic cases without
residual paralysis and to 49.2 percent of cases recorded
as nonparalytic poliomyelitis-aseptic meningitis.
Poliomyeliris in 1960 was again predominantly due to
type I virus. Of those with virus type specified, 772
(73.7%) were type I and 274 (26.1 %) were type III (10% of
cases were due to type III in 1959). Type II was isolated
in only two cases. The geographic breakdown of polio-
virus isolations is shown in the following table by State.
A type III outbreak was experienced in Baltimore, Mary-
land with other concentrations noted in western Maryland,
Pennsylvania and New York State.
Thus far in 1961, 11 States have recorded poliovirus
isolations from cases of poliomyelitis reported on polio
surveillance forms. Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, New Jersey,
Ohio, and Hawaii (2) have noted type I isolates. Type III
has been reported from Georgia, Pennsylvania, Utah and
three different locations in Washington. Minnesota and
Oregon have reported both type I and type III poliovirus
from current cases.


Poliomyelitis Atlanta, Georgia

Four cases of paralytic poliomyelitis and two cases
of aseptic meningitis, etiology undetermined, have been
reported from Atlanta.


Age Sex

26 M
3 F
3 F
3 M
1mo. F
2 F


Race Onset


W
N
N
N
N
N


3-23
5-6
5-27
5-28
6-9
6-12


Paralytic Status Vaccine doses

Bulbar 0
Spinal 2
Spinal 0
Aseptic men. 0
Aseptic men. 0
Spinal 0


POLIOMYELITIS BY STATE 1960
LABORATORY STUDIES AND POLIOVIRUS ISOLATIONS
REPORTED ON PSU FORMS

S o Total Poliovirus Isolations
State and Region I Studied
ses in Lab. I II III Unsp.


UNITED STATES

N. ENGLAND
Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
M. ATLANTIC
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
E. N. CENTRAL
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
W. N. CENTRAL
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
S. CENTRAL
Delaware
Maryland
D. C.
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
E. S. CENTRAL
Kentucky
Tennessee
Alabama
Mississippi
W. S. CENTRAL
Arkansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
Texas
MOUNTAIN
Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada
PACIFIC
Washington
Oregon
California
Alaska
Hawaii


3,304


1,530


0
0
0
1
0
4

31
9
66
18
0
2
0
2

5
0
2
0
0
0
2

77
1
10
1
13
1
2
0
2
4
1

0
5
0
4

2
0
1
0
0


* Cases reported to the Polio Surveillance Unit on preliminary forms.


Five of the cases are among Negro children who live
within a two mile radius of each other in South Central
(Continued on page 8)










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JUNE 11, 1960 AND JUNE 10, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not spectrled by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
23rd Week first23 weeks 23rd Week first 23 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNID STAIES---------- 10 19 194 350 5 16 126 253 4 2 47 10

NEW ENGLAND------------------ 5 3 15 5 3 15 1 -
Maine---------------------- 5 5 -
New Hampshire-------------- -
Vermont--------------------- -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 2 6 1 2 6 1
Rhode Island--------------- 4 4 4 -
Connecticut--------------- 1 1 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 15 41 12 29 2 1
New York------------------- 6 33 5 22 1 1
New Jersey----------------- 5 6 4 6 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 4 2 3 1 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 23 40 15 13 1
ho---------------------- 8 19 4 5 -
Indiana------------------- 3 2 -
Illinois------------------ 7 6 6 4 1
Michigan-- --------------- 2 12 2 3 -
Wisconsin------------------ 3 3 -1 1 -
WEST NORTH NTRAL----------- 2 2 10 18 1 5 10 1 1 3 8
Minnesota------------------ 3 8 3 6 3 1
Iowa----------------------- 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 7
Missouri------------------- 1 1 3 4 1 3 -
North Dakota--------------- -
South Dakota--------------- -
Nebraska------------------- 2 2 -
Kansas--------------------- -
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 3 1 19 51 3 1 15 41 2
Delaware------------------- 2 1 -
Maryland------------------- 1 -
District of Columbia------- -
Virginia------------------- 2
West Virginaa-------------- 1 3 4 1 2 4 -
North Carolina------------- 1 4 16 1 3 16 -
South Carolina------------ 1 2 3 1 2 2 -
Georgia-------------------- 1 5 3 1 5 2 -
Florida-------------------- 3 24 2 17 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRJAL----------- 18 13 6 11 13
Kentucky------------------- 14 7 2 5 12
Tennessee------------------ 1 1 1 1 -
Alabama-------------------- 1 1 -
Mississippi---------------- 3 4 3 4 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----- 3 5 33 46 4 18 31 3 1 2
Arkansas------------------- -
Louisiana---------------- 1 7 15 1 5 11 -
Oklahoma---------------- --- 3 3 -
Texas---------------------- 3 4 25 28 3 13 17 3 1 2 -
MOUNTAIN--------------..----- 3 20 20 2 12 11 2 1
Montana-------------------- 3 1 9 2 1 5 -
Idaho---------------------- 4 4 1 1 -
Wyoming-------------------- 1 1
Colorado------------------ 3 1 3 1 1
New Mexico----------------- 1 1 1 -
Arizona-------------------- 5 3 3 3 -
Utah---------------------- 6 1 4 1 -
Nevada--------------------- -
PACIFIC---------------------- 2 3 53 106 2 3 40 92 21
Washington----------------- 8 7 4 7 1 -
Oregon--------------------- 4 12 1 8 -
Callfornia----------------- 2 2 39 81 2 2 33 71 20
Alaska-------------------- I 2 1 2 -
Hawali--------------------- --- 2 4 --- 2 4 -

Puerto Rico----------------- 24 4 178 24 4 175 -










4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JUNE 11, 1960 AND JUNE 10, 1961 Continued

k(y place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepattis, infectious, an&
Encephalitis seerum 092,N998.5 pt. M
infectiouseale
Area Cumulative, Cuulative,
23rd Week first 23 weeks 082 23rd Week first 23 weeks 085

19lt 19.c. i9i 1 it ii 9 196.. 1906 1'6 i.1: 166 19161 1960


UNIED STAES-- ----- 4 3 291 313 41 41 1,246 683 39,477 17,862 17,030 17,448

NEW ENGLAND------------------ 4 8 2 3 39 21 1,074 545 1,723 2,133
Maine--------------------- 2 1 1 61 36 115
New Hampshire-------------- 69 18 14 15
Vermont------------------ 2 121 9 81 193
Massachusetts-------------- a 5 1 2 15 8 368 274 967 1,065
Rhode Island--------------- 1 1 1 5 8 147 104 216 115
Connecticut---------------- 16 4 308 104 445 630
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 1 14 8 16 3 209 88 5,700 1,861 4,536 2,586
New York------------------ 7 1 15 2 87 57 2,326 931 1,485 1,827
New Jersey----------------- 62 5 1,415 154 1,936 503
Pennsylvania--- ----------- 7 6 1 1 60 26 1,959 776 1,115 256
EAST NORTH CENTRAL--------- 13 25 5 6 319 112 8,026 3,409 3,887 6,242
hlo--------------------- 1 14 1 73 27 2,848 1,105 405 436
Indiana------------------ 1 4 4 50 7 1,342 441 268 331
Illinois----------------- 10 3 2 1 55 38 1,341 709 575 862
Michigan------------------- 1 3 2 1 136 37 2,296 998 1,363 2,121
Wisconsin------------------ I 5 3 199 156 1,276 2,492
WEST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 2 24 17 4 103 23 4,001 1,424 744 180
Mfnnesota------------------ 2 13 5 16 895 143 40 80
Iowa---------------------- 2 23 2 1,153 244 513 11
Missouri ------------------ 2 18 11 900 524 94 26
North Dakota--------------- 2 1 1 2 4 81 112 73 63
South Dakota--------------- 6 5 3 122 114 15 -
Nebraska------------------- 2 1 23 6 401 138 9
Kansas--------------------- 1 3 18 449 149 NN NN
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- I 57 70 5 3 154 71 4,804 2,117 1,504 725
Delaware------------------ 4 7 124 118 18 13
Maryland------------------- 1 1 2 13 17 427 214 190 154
District of Columbia------- 2 1 5 1 52 15 7 20
Virginia------------------- 12 8 18 16 679 430 410 301
West Virginia-------------- 1 2 13 7 1,010 411 564 129
North Carolina------------- 1 7 2 1 28 5 1,059 156 60 4
South Carolina------------- 1 18 1 272 39 45 33
Georgia------------------- 12 15 35 5 473 156 42 12
Florida------------------ 21 24 3 1 37 13 708 578 168 59
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL-------- 1 12 38 2 3 140 100 6,209 2,744 744 1,274
Kentucky ---------------- 3 I 2 34 32 1,823 1,112 129 354
Tennessee------------------ 2 5 49 33 2,553 889 543 809
Alabama-------------------- 1 5 20 3 40 25 1,013 556 27 38
Mississippi---------------- 2 12 17 10 820 187 45 73
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 1 157 116 1 3 74 37 2,863 1,459 501 1,267
Arkansas------------------- 3 2 1 9 2 568 67 6 74
Louisiana------------------ 14 26 6 284 56 6
Oklahoma------------------- 3 6 2 1 1 217 205 5 16
Texas------------------ 1 137 82 1 58 34 1,794 1,131 490 1,171
MOUNTADI-------------------- 1 7 30 5 49 79 2,523 1,507 742 1,138
Montana-------------------- 2 2 2 2 239 60 40 63
Idaho--------------------- 11 4 5 151 187 76 71
Wyoming-------------------- 5 4 92 12 25 -
Colorado------------------- 4 3 4 19 22 880 515 241 580
New Mexico--------------- 3 7 7 292 224 NN -
Arizona------------------- 1 3 1 9 39 357 351 276 235
Utah----------------------- 3 4 3 433 138 25 128
Nevada--------------------- 1 79 20 59 61
PACIFIC---------------------- 3 1 10 11 159 152 4,277 2,796 2,649 1,903
Washington----------------- 1 16 25 552 337 213 433
Oregon--------------------- 1 31 12 731 501 294 398
California----------------- 8 11 112 106 2,822 1,785 2,132 1,025
Alaska--------------------- 3 1 3 140 121 10 1
Havall--------------------- ---- --- -. 6 32 52 --- 46

Puerto Rico--------------- 3 36 88 27 8 429 404 59 20

NN-NOI NotLrlable










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JUNE 11, 1960 AND JUNE 10, 1961 Continued

(Ey place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
n coc coccal Typhoid fever 040 ,Typhus
aai Meningoccocal Psitta- f r
Malaria infections cosis sore fever, Rabies in
throat, endemic animals
Area etc Cumiulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 23rd Week first 23 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UNIED STATES--------- 2 38 40 2 4,750 11 19 239 244 2 58 80

EW ENGIAND------------------ -- 3 1 341 6 4 -
Maine---------------------- 2 9 1 1 -
New Hampshire-------------- 8 -
Vermont------------------- 7 -
Massachusetts-------------- 98 1 2 -
Rhode Island--------------- 15 1 -
Connecticut---------------- 1 1 204 3 1 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 6 589 1 3 26 14 1 13
New York------------------- 4 1 358 2 11 11 1 13
New Jersey---------------- 1 3 161 1 5 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 1 1 70 1 10 3 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 10 6 582 1 2 32 29 6 14
Ohio----------------------- 2 120 1 1 9 4 2 8
Indiana--------------- ----- 1 98 6 9 2
Illinois------------------- 1 2 111 1 15 7 1 -
Michigan------------------ 7 2 129 1 5 2 4
Wisconsin------------------ 1 124 1 4 1 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 2 3 1 108 1 17 14 15 20
Minnesota------------------ 1 2 1 10 5 1 5 5
Iowa---------------------- 1 30 7 2
Missouri--------------- -- 1 4 1 8 11 1
North Dakota-------------- 53 3
South Dakota-------------- 1 1 3 9
Nebraska------------------- 1 -
Kansas--------------------- 11 2 -
SOUTH ATLANTIC-------------- 3 7 242 3 2 39 31 3 11
Delaware------------------- 4 .
Maryland------------------ 2 5 -
District of Columbia------- 1 5 1 6 1 -
Virginia------------------- 96 1 4 2
West Virginia-------------- 61 4 1 2 3
North Carolina------------- 2 27 6 7 1 1
South Carolina----------- 15 2 6 -
Georgia-------------------- 1 2 2 15 6 4
Florida------------------- 1 4 28 5 6 1
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL------- 3 11 755 27 40 1 7 7
Kentucky--------------- 3 7 87 6 11 3 2
Tennessee------------------ 1 643 19 20 4 3
Alabama------------------- 2 3 2 6 1 2
Mississippi---------------- I 22 3 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL--------- 3 4 665 3 10 44 76 1 22 13
Arkansas------------------ 1 4 18 6 4
Louisiana------------------ 1 3 1 5 5 19 2 2
Oklahoma------------------- 2 4 1 5 5 1 -
Texas---------------------- 2 1 658 1 5 30 34 1 13 7
MOUNTN--------------------- 1 2 1,000 1 1 21 17 1
Montana-------------------- 20 3 5 -
Idaho--------------------- 88 -
Wyoming--------------- --- 1 1 1 2 -
Colorado------------------- 368 -
New Mexico----------------- 1 233 1 5 4 1
Arizona-------------------- 1 252 4 6 -
Utah-------- ----------- 36 2 -
Revada-------------------- 1 2 1 -
PACIFIC---------------------- 1 6 3 1 468 2 27 19 4 1
Washington----------------- 1 116 3 1 -
Oregon-------------------- 21 -
California----------------- 1 4 3 289 2 24 18 4 1
Alaska--------------------- 1 42 -
Hawaiic--- --------- 5- 8 1 2 -

Puerto Rico- ------------------ 1 5- 8 16 2 -







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospitalcenters serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIB BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS


fBy place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shown in parentheses in table 4)

23rd 22d Percent Cumulative, first 23 weeks
week week Adjusted change,
ended ended average, adjusted
Area June June 23rd arage
June June
10, 3 week to 1961 196C Percent
1961 1961 1956-60 current Ctange
6 week
TOTAL, 117 REPORINW CITIES.--------------------. 11,476 10,879 10,944 +4.9 271,736 280,464 -3.1

New England---------------------------(14 cities) 712 678 651 +9.4 16,795 17,626 -4.7
Middle Atlantic----------------------------(20 cities) 3,175 3,330 3,016 +5.3 78,010 77,508 +0.6
East North Central--------------------------(21 cities) 2,596 2,318 2,330 +11.4 57,980 60,205 -3.7
West North Central--------------------------(9 cities) 777 712 779 -0.3 18,315 19,555 -6.3
South Atlantic-----------------------...................---( cities) 975 909 922 +5.7 23,350 24,475 -4.6
East South Central---------------------------(8 cities) 517 485 489 +5.7 12,386 12,851 -3.6
West South Central--------------------------(13 cities) 956 861 1,008 -5.2 23,158 24,658 -6.1
Mountain-------------------------------------( cities) 353 326 352 +0.3 8,577 8,715 -1.6
Pacific------------------------------------(13 cities) 1,415* 1,260 1,397 +1.3 33,165 34,871 -4.9

*Includes estimate for missing reports.


NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


\,000


13,000


12,000


11,000


10,000


IL i Ti i i I I I I I I 9000

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
1960 1961


115,000










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

IBy place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.-----------
Bridgeport, Conn.--------
Cambridge, Mass.--------
Fall River, Mass.--------
Hartfora, Conn.---------
Lowell, Mass.-----------
Lynn, Mass.-------------
New Bedford, Mas;.-------
New Haven, Con.--------
Providence, R.I.--------
Somerville, Mass.--------
Springfield, Mass.------
Waterbury, Con .---------
Worcester, Mass.--------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.------------
Allentown, Pa.-----------
Buffalo, N.Y.-----------
Camden, N.J.------------
Elizabeth, N.J.---------
Erie, Pa.---------------
Jersey City, N.J.--------
Newark, N.J.------------
New York City, N.Y.------
Paterson, N.J.----------
Philadelphia, Pa.--------
Pittsburgh, Pa.---------
Reading, Pa.------------
Rochester, N.Y.---------
Schenectady, N.Y.--------
Scranton, Pa.-----------
Syracuse, N.Y.-----------
Trenton, N.J.-----------
Utica, N.Y.---------------
Yonkers, N.Y.-----------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.
Akron, Ohio-------------
Canton, Ohio-------------
Chicago, Ill.-----------
Cincirunati, Ohio--------
Cleveland, Ohio---------
Columbus, Ohio----------
Dayton, Ohio------------
Detroit, Mich.----------
Evansville, Ind.--------
Flint, Mich.-------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.---------
Gary, Ind.---------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.------
Indianapolis, Ind.-------
Madison, Wis.-----------
Milwaukee, Wis.---------
Peoria, Ill.-------------
Rockford, 11i.----------
South Bend, Ind.--------
Toledo, Ohio------------
Youngstown, Ohio--------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iuwa---------
Duluth, Minn.------------
Kansas City, KanE.-------
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.----------
Minneapolis, Minr .-------
Omana, Nebr.------------


23rd
week
ended
June
10,
1961



245
36
23
32
41
30
25
25
41
71
15
44
32
52


39
34
170
56
40
39
54
99
1,621
56
458
159
27
88
22
31
74
47
39
22


77
48
760
164
201
118
68
375
37
40
32
31
53
150
44
132
33
35
26
106
66


58
26
42
131
(21
118
70


22nd
weeK
ended
June


Cumulative,
first 23 weeks


3
1961 I il61 19 C:


237
39
30
23
51
18
27
29
39
65
11
28
21
60


37
37
150
43
26
44
72
103
1,668
36
510
270
27
99
27
30
441
53
25
29


53
35
738
151
181
106
80
310
34
42
42
27
36
159
23
99
25
13
32
83
49


37
31
36
132
(26
123
55


5,751
888
710
643
1,127
575
545
628
1,108
1,455
312
1,077
654
1,322


1,089
823
3,478
1,024
697
920
1,666
2,447
39,956
930
12,212
4,505
521
2,356
573
841
1,447
1,075
690
760


1,330
750
17,571
3,696
4,828
2,674
1,909
7,915
869
1,020
921
714
1,056
3,4.0
753
2,893
685
671
668
2,291
1,326


1,229
594
890
2,991
(646)
2,872
1,594


6,148
1,016
763
705
1,125
581
599
601
1,069
1,560
356
1,117
667
1,319


1,046
867
3,3-3
1,049
693
917
1,707
2,336
39,286
942
12,021
4,699
587
2,399
568
920
1,512
1,008
669
739


1,352
844
18,472
3,816
5,189
2,883
1,700
8,280
896
949
885
743
1,008
3,564
777
3,009
706
681
680
2,422
1,349


1,349
620
837
3,138
(609)
2,965
1,801


Area


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.---------
Wichita, Kans.----------

SOUTH ATIANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-------------
Baltimore, Md.-----------
Charlotte, N.C.---------
Jacksonville, Fla.-------
Miami, Fla.--------------
Norfolk, Va.-------------
Richmond, Va.------------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-----------
Waensington, D.C.--------
Wilmington, Del.--------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
irmingham, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-------
Knoxville, Tenn.---------
Louisville, K-y.-------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.--------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-------------
Baton Rouge, La.---------
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.---------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.-------.
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.-------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah-----------..
Phoenix, Ariz.-----------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii--------
Long Beach, Calif.------
Los Angeles, Calif.-----
Xakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.---------
Portland, Oreg.----------
Sacramento, Calif.------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.---------
Seattle, Wash.------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Taeoma, Wash.-----------

San Juan, P. R.-------------


23rd
week
ended
June
10,
1961


22nd
week
ended
June
3,
1961


Cu.-ula-.ve,
first 23 weeks


1961


*1- t +


210
72
50


118
274
38
48
55
45
89
24
(---)
65
181
38


80
40
30
107
126
37
38
59


44
16
28
137
40
46
143
63
151
75
99
48
66


25
20
111
11
89
16
49
32


193
72
33


105
233
42
49
82
32
73
30
(59)
68
176
19


76
47
33
104
108
43
30
44


23
21
20
122
32
55
151
43
152
60
91
44
47


28
10
80
26
73
18
48
43


19 14
(52) (45)
(34) (31)
30 35
54 37
492 453
82 91
37 32
1094 104
66 55
79 69
228 165
(34) (37)
142 125
46 39
31 41

(321 (42)


5,523
1,566
1,056


2,724
5,866
831
1,354
1,753
1,167
1,880
779
(---)
1,567
4,526
903


2,045
1,138
657
2,680
2,772
975
751
1,368


812
679
548
2,909
850
1,549
3,856
1,304
3,919
1,800
2,420
1,213
1,299


715
384
2,661
368
1,967
392
1,159
931


395


(1,029)
(776)
929
1,345
11,795
2,219
786
2,474
1,428
2,076
4,641
(824)
3,079
1,062
936

(8431


1960


6,043
1,719
1,083


2,842
6,241
1,000
1,533
1,767
1,012
1,933
888
(1,812)
1,639
4,692
928


2,079
1,153
706
2,759
2,779
1,031
867
1,477


856
703
595
3,045
915
1,632
4,062
1,446
4,448
1,815
2,494
1,297
1,350


717
398
2,873
408
1,899
366
1,161
893


406


(1,106)
(919)
983
1,318
12,531
2,321
832
2,601
1,380
2,170
4,805
(800)
3,378
1,103
1,043

(807)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
cluded in Table 3.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

l111111111 llI111111IIIIt II Ilill II
3 1262 08864 0221


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Atlanta. The first case has been confirmed by serology as
due to Type III poliomyelitis. From the third case, a Type
III poliovirus has been isolated from a stool specimen.
Other laboratory studies are in process.
It is pertinent to note, that in March, scattered iso-
lates of Type III poliovirus were first isolated from stool
specimens taken from young children. In early May,
preliminary results show that 15 percent of stool speci-
mens taken from young children in a housing project in
the center of this area contained Type III poliovirus.
(Reported by Dr. W. J. Murphy, Georgia State Department
of Health. Studies jointly conducted by the Fulton County
Department of Health and the Enterovirus Unit, Communi-
cable Disease Center.)

Hepatitis Menominee Indian Reservation, Wisconsin

Beginning in October 1960, cases of hepatitis com-
menced to appear among Indian children in the Menominee
Reservation, a reservation served by municipal water and
sewerage and with a population of 3,200. In all, 28 cases
were reported, 22 of these being among children aged 5 to
14, one a 33-year-old adult and the remainder, preschool
children. The outbreak appeared to be largely school
centered. Because of a continual build-up in cases, a
mass gamma globulin prophylaxis program was carried
out between February 7 and 9 for children and adults in
the schools. Six hundred persons were given gamma globu-
lin using a dosage schedule of approximately .01 cc per
pound.
Two cases only occurred following this program. One
was in a seven year old girl who developed hepatitis on
February 27 and the second, a four year old boy who had
the onset of illness on March 6. Both cases represented
secondary cases occurring respectively two and one
months following primary cases in their households.
Neither child had received gamma globulin.
(Reported by Dr. Joseph Preizler, State of Wisconsin
Board of Health. Investigated by Dr. George Shinners,
District Medical Officer, Green Bay, and Mrs. Elaine W.
Nera, Public Health Nurse, Menominee Reservation.)




QUARANTINE MEASURES

New Iraqi Quarantine Regulations for Entrance
All travelers arriving in Iraq from India by sea or air
must possess an International Certificate of Cholera vac-
cination. There are two doses required six days apart,
the first dose no more than six months prior to arrival, the
second dose no less than six days prior to arrival. Trav-
elers not complying will be placed in Iraqi quarantine for
five days. All travelers should be cautioned to comply.


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA

These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public lHealrh Service from the health departments of
each State and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table 1 shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


NIV OF FL L .
DOCUMENT- DQPT.




U.S DEPOSITORY


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