Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00297

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

Pfpsy td by th MElrose *l.

For release May 19, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia vol .9


Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in th itedIAt nJ61nn

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended May 13,

Hepatitis The current weekly toral of 1,562 cases Typhoid Fever Nin n c s wer rted this
he first significant decrease noted this year. If this week distributed throughout te cumulative
d continues, it will represent the expected seasonal 1961 total for the 19th week stands at 196 cases repre-
line arriving somewhat later than normal. This decline sending a small increase over the 188 reported during the
urred despite major increases in reported cases from comparable period one year ago. There does not appear
ana, Illinois, Maryland, North and South Carolina, to be any significant regional localization of the current
isiana, Colorado, and Utah. cases.


A tabulation of hepatitis cases reported by age
appears on page 8. States and areas with an adult concen-
tration include Connecticut and New Jersey (71 percent),
New York City (64 percent), Upstate New York (55 per-
cent), Missouri (54 percent), and Indiana (50 percent).
Twenty-three States had a childhood preponderance of
cases.


Poliomyelitis A total of 10 cases of poliomyelitis,
8 paralytic, was reported to the Communicable Disease
Center during the 19th week ending May 13, continuing
the low seasonal incidence depicted in the graph on
page 2. California reported 2 paralytic cases in Los
Angeles County, one a 17 year old white male, and the


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseasess United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 19th Week Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of International Approxi-
Lists, 1955) First 19 veeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
Hay Hay Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 13 14, 1,6-&: 1961 Median -6 point
-- Data not available 1961 6 1 6- to
Quantity zero 195-Il .
Anthrax------------ ----- 062 2 1 ,
Botulim------------------------019.1 3 *
Brucellosis undulantt fever)-----044 10 25 22 200 313 308 *
Diphtheria---------------------- -055 11 9 9 264 291) 330 844 826 1,030 July 1
Encephalitis, infectious------082 43 28 33 522 530 499 522 530 C99 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
sernu------.----------092,N998.5 pt. 1,562 778 383 33,792 14,843 9,321 48,999 22,653 1 ,653 Sept. 1
Mala --------------------- 110-117 1 1 20 *
Measles---------------------------085 19,858 20,763 21,153 258,003 267,199 310,729 294,213 302,158 347,398 Sept. 1
Meningitis, aseptic---------340 pt. 31 30 --- 464 531 --- 464 531 --- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infections--------057 6 36 52 952 986 1,06. 1,608 1,696 1,869 Sept. 1
Poliomyelitis-------------------.080 10 9 36 148 281 441 45 65 148 Apr. 1
Psralytic ----------080.0,080.1 8 5 18 93 201 305 33 47 97 Apr. 1
Naoparalytic-------- ------080.2 1 4 14 30 50 82 5 14 34 Apr. 1
Unspecified-----------------080.3 1 4 25 30 54 7 4 17 Apr. 1
Psittacoeis-------------096.2 1 20 35 *
Fabies in man----------.----- -094 *
8treptococcal sore throat,
Including scarlet fever----050,051 7,380 6,299 --- 173,592 158,793 --. 271,24 --- --- Aug. 1
Typhoid fever---------------.---.-00 19 7 16 196 188 268 82 61 88 Apr. 1
Typhus fever, endemic ------------101 2 10 14 *
Babies in animals------------.---- 67 96 96 1,363 1,591 1,893 1,939 2,572 2,675 Oct. 1


is t
tren
decl
occ
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Lou


I/* A b W /7 / 'w / 7







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CURRENT U.S. POLIO IN(
compared with years 1956 th


CIDENCE
rough 196


DATA PROVIDED BY NATIONAL OFFICE OF VITAL STATISTICS
-*----
S**ND COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER



,A,
\ -
/ *,./ 'v
N/ J
'4i


I
/
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1956
/


1957 /
Ai


The graph shows reported 1961
poliomyelitis (paralytic and non-
paralytic) cases in the United States
by week of onset and compares cur-
rent incidence with the years 1956
through 1960. A cumulative total of
148 cases has been reported through
May 13 which compares with 281
cases during the comparable period
one year ago.


Wk. ending- J F M A
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN


other unspecified. Texas accounted for 2 paralytic cases,
both in pre-school age children in different counties. The
remaining cases were reported by 6 States each account-
ing for one case.
A current summary of enterovirus isolations reported
in 1961 to the Communicable Disease Center is included
below.
ENTEROVIRUS SURVEILLANCE
REPORTS RECEIVED TO DATE FROM STATE LABORATORIES
ON 1961 SPECIMENS

Other
State Poliovirus Cox- and Total
I II III ECHO sackie Unsp.
Florida 1 3 4
Hawaii 3 2 5
Idaho 4* 1 5
Illinois 1 1
Maryland 2 4 2 8
Massachusetts 1 3 4
Minnesota 2 2
New Jersey 1 1
Ohio 1 1
Texas 2 2
Washington 1 I
Wisconsin I 1 2
Total 12 0 7 5 5 7 36
Only one case with symptoms.


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Streptococcal Infection and Rheumatic Fever -
North Dakota

In a preliminary report,Dr. Kenneth Mosser, Director,
Division of Preventable Diseases, North Dakota State


Department of Health, described an outbreak of strep-
tococcal infection and rheumatic fever which occurred in
a North Dakota city of 10,000 population. The appearance
of the rheumatic fever cases began around March 1 and
since that date a total of 13 acute cases and 3 recur-
rences have been reported. It is felt that these cases are
the result of group A, type 5 beta hemolytic infections.
The State Department of Health in cooperation with
local physicians has conducted throat swab surveys in
the public schools. Results indicate a Group A beta
hemolytic streptococcal prevalence rate of 46 percent.
Thirty-four percent of the typable organisms have been
type 5. Additional studies are continuing.


Outbreak of Erythema Infectiosum Minnesota
Early in March, physicians of the Minneapolis -
St. Paul Metropolitan area called attention to a rash
unassociated with constitutional symptoms among
children. Cases showed a characteristic malar flush, and
an evanescent, recurrent rash which sometimes showed
on the arms a lacy appearance outlining the vascular
pattern. Exertion, heat, and sunlight caused recurrence
of the rash which persisted for as long as two to three
weeks. Physical findings were otherwise normal except
for occasional low grade fever. Several hundred cases
have been reported among the younger school population
with occasional cases occurring among adult contacts
of children. Diagnoses initially included atypical rash,
atypical measles, virus rash, ECHO rash, etc., but on
the basis of clinical and epidemiologic findings, the
diagnosis of erythema infectiosum has been made. Speci-
mens, including stools, throat washings, and blood, are
(Continued on page 8)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED MAY 14, 1960 AND MAY 13, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- loss
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
19th Week first 19 weeks 19th Week first 19 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044


1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNED STAES---------- 10 9 148 281 8 5 93 201 1 4 31 10

NEW ENGLAND------------------ 1 3 9 1 3 9 1
Maine---------------------- 1 5 1 5 -
New Hampshire------------ -
Veront---------------- -
Massachusetts ----------- 2 4 2 4 1
Rhode Island----------- -
Connecticut---------------- 1 -
MIDDLE ATLATIC--------- 2 1 14 40 2 11 28 1 6 -
New York------------------- 1 5 32 4 21 1 4 -
New Jersey----------------- I 5 6 1 4 6 1 -
Pennsylvania--------------- 1 4 2 1 3 1 1 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 1 5 21 39 3 13 13 1 2 7
Ohio----------------------- 2 8 18 2 4 5 1 -
Indiana-------------------- 1 3 2 -
Illinois------------------- 6 6 5 4 1 -
Michigan------------------- 2 1 12 1 3 2 4
Wisconsin------------------ 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL--------- 4 14 3 8 7
Minnesota------------------ 1 8 1 6 -
Iowa----------------------- -- 1 3 1 6
Missouri------------------- 2 1- -
North Dakota------------ .
South Dakota-------------- 1
Nebraska------------------- 2 2 -
Kansas--------------------- -
SOUTH ATLANTIC------------ 1 13 45 9 36 1 2 2
Delaware------------------- 2 1 -
Maryland------------------ 1 -
District of Columbia------ -
Virginia------------------ 2 1
West Virginia-------------- 2 3 1 3 -
North Carolina------------- 3 14 2 14 -
South Carolina------------- 1 2 1 2 -
Georgia-------------------- 2 3 2 2 -
Florida-------------------- 1 3 22 2 15 1 1
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL-------- 1I 15 9 3 8 -
Kentucky----------------- 14 6 2 5 -
Tennessee----------------- -
Alabama-------------------- 1 1 -
Mississippi--------------- 1 2 1 2 --
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 3 20 27 3 11 20 2 -
Arkansas----------------- -
Louisiana---------------- 1 6 6 1 4 5 -
Oklahoma------------------- 3 3 -
Texas---------------------- 2 13 18 2 7 12 2 -
MOUNTAIN ------------------- 17 14 10 8 3 1
Montana-------------------- 1 4 1 3 -
Idaho---------------------- 3 4 1 1 -
Wyoming------------------- -
Colorado------------------ 3 1 3 1 3 1
New Mexico----------------- 1 -
Arizona-------------------. 3 2 1 2 -
Utah----------------------- 6 1 4 1 -
Nevada--------------------- -
PACIFIC---------------------- 3 1 41 84 3 1 30 71 10
Washington----------------- 3 6 6 3
Oregon------------------ -- 3 12 1 8 1
California---- ------------ 2 1 33 64 2 1 27 55 6 -
Alaska--------------------- -
Hawaii--------------------- I 2 2 1 2 2 -

Puerto Rico---------------- 14 3 107 14 3 104 -








4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED MAY 14, 1960 AND MAY 13, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,N998.5 pt. esles
infectiousMeae
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
19th Week first 19 weeks 082 19th Week first 19 weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


UNITED STATES---------- 11 9 264 290 43 28 1,562 778 33,792 14,843 19,858 20,763

MEW ENGIAND ------------ 1 3 8 2 34 29 895 464 2,099 2,517
Maine---------------- 2 1 49 34 55 176
New Hampshire------------ 1 62 15 116 165
Vemont------------------ -- 1 115 8 47 213
Massachusetts-------------- 1 3 5 13 17 299 241 924 1,071
Rhode Island------------- 1 1 5 122 77 494 104
Connecticut---------------- 1 14 11 248 89 463 788
MIDD ATLANTIC---------- 1 1 12 8 11 2 215 112 4,945 1,496 4,409 2,801
New York--------- --- -- 1 5 1 4 2 9A 73 1,989 750 1,573 2.092
New Jersey----------- 1 6 51 11 1,212 130 1,014 447
Pennsylvania--------------- 1 7 6 1 71 28 1,744 616 1,822 262
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 8 22 3 4 395 122 6,771 2,862 5,313 6,944
Chio---------------------- -- 1 14 1 1 115 47 2,493 903 933 1,434
Indiana----------------- 1 3 2 95 12 1,152 397 352 433
Illinois------------------- 5 2 1 75 16 1,069 594 446 1,172
Michigan----------------- 1 3 2 99 44 1,890 827 1,883 1,798
Wisconsin----------------- 11 3 167 141 1,699 2,107
NEST NORTH CENTRAL------- 1 19 16 2 130 49 3,490 1,264 950 553
Minnesota------------------ 1 8 5 26 10 780 124 46 191
Iowa---------------------- 1 2 45 6 1,009 219 641 252
Missouri----------------- 2 1 25 14 782 462 153 10
North Dakota------------ 2 1 3 5 73 97 94 83
South Dakota-------------- 6 5 1 1 118 113 1 -
Nebraska--------------- 2 11 4 338' 113 15 17
Kansas-------------------- 1 1 19 9 390 136 NN NN
SOUTH ATIANTIC--------------- 4 51 60 3 231 98 4,103 1,748 1,507 822
Delaware-------------- 4 9 110 98 32 7
Maryland----------------- 1 1 2 28 9 373 170 244 113
District of Columbia----- 2 2 42 11 6 26
Virginia----------------- 1 9 8 60 17 563 365 525 188
West Virginia------------- 1 2 24 8 915 314 297 142
North Carolina------------- I 6 2 55 2 925 124 153 24
South Carolina-------- 1 15 17 2 248 33 105 62
Georgia------------------ 10 11 11 1 404 143 11 1
Florida------------------ 2 21 21 1 30 50 523 490 134 259
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL------ 1 1 9 36 1 3 182 118 5,473 2,322 1,194 1,703
Kentucky ---------------- -- 1 3 1 73 37 1,590 951 361 377
Tennessee---------------- 2 5 67 37 2,273 734 603 1,160
Alabama ------------------- 1 2 18 2 18 32 883 471 145 55
Mississippi--------------- 2 12 1 1 24 12 727 166 85 111
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL-------- 4 5 152 111 6 3 120 71 2,346 1,205 1,005 1,921
Arkansas-----------------. 2 1 22 2 471 53 80 159
Louisiana--------------- 1 14 26 20 1 201 44 11
Oklahoma------------------ 1 2 6 10 9 176 183 78 29
exa----- ------ 4 3 134 78 6 3 68 59 1,498 925 847 1,722
MOUNTAIN ------------------ 7 28 1 103 74 2,195 1,244 652 1,141
Montana------------------- 2 2 2 2 218 50 35 74
Idaho-------------------- 11 4 12 119 165 33 133
Wyoming----------------- 5 1 87 9 11
Colorado-------------------. 4 2 52 30 752 426 253 385
New Mexico--------------- 3 8 4 270 200 NN -
Arizona------------------ 2 15 21 301 264 298 233
Utah---------------------- 3 21 5 375 111 25 214
Nevada--------------------- 1 1 73 19 8 91
PACIFIC-------------------- 1 3 1 21 9 152 105 3,574 2,238 2,729 2,361
Washington --------------- -- 21 10 472 261 290 463
Oregon------------------- 18 17 612 424 199 694
California----------- ---- 21 9 112 76 2,338 1,400 2,227 1,099
Alaska------------------ 1 3 1 1 2 125 115 8 27
Hawaii------------------- 27 38 5 78

Puerto Rico------------- 1 5 31 78 30 13 315 361 23 41

1tf-NOt NOUIrtable








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED MAY 14, 1960 AND MAY 13, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
Mengooal Psitta- coccal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
Malaria Meningoccocal Paitta- sore fever,
Malaria infections cosis sore fever, Rabies in
throat, endemic anil
Area etc. Cumulative,
110-117 057 096.2 050,051 19th Week first 19 weeks 101

1961 1961 1960 1961 1961 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961 1960

UIED ES------ 64 36 1 7,380 19 7 196 188 67 96

I ENGIAND------------------ 5 4 522 1 6 3 -
Maine--------------------- -- 17 1 -
New Hampshire-------------- 5 -
Vermont ------------------ 25 -
Massachusetts------------- -- 2 2 194 1 2 -
Rhode Island------------ 1 36 -
Connecticut--------------- 2 2 245 1 3 1 -
MIDD ATLATIC------------ 9 10 989 4 1 19 9 20
New York------------------- 8 5 613 1 1 8 7 19
New Jersey-------------- -1 3 201 2 3 -
Pennsylvania-----------.. 2 175 1 8 2 1
EAST NORTH CENTRAL---------- 12 9 1,029 2 2 26 25 13 4
Ohio----------------------- 3 3 225 1 7 3 2 -
Indiana-------------------- 1 1 143 2 8 4 2
Illinois------------------- 4 1 154 2 1 15 5 2 2
Michigan--------------- 4 4 337 1 5 1 -
Wisconsin----------------. 170 1 4 4 -
WEST NORTH CHTRAL --------- 4 1 179 3 1 20 11 16 28
Minnesota---------------- 1 8 5 1 4 2
Iowa-------------------- 1 71 1 7 10
Missouri------------------- 2 6 3 11 8 5 6
North Dakota---------- 52 -
South Dakota--------------- 1 1 1 10
Nebraska---------------- 1 1 1 -
Kansas--------------------- 41 2 -
S TH ATLANTIC -------------- -- 16 4 461 3 31 24 11 10
Delaware------------------- 3 -
Maryland----------------- 5 1 21 -
District of Columbia------- 4 1 2 1 -
Virginia------------------ 4 196 1 3 5 5
West Virginia------------- 134 4 1 5 5
North Carolina------------ 3 1 24 6 7 -
South Carolina------------ 2 24 2 6 -
Georgia------------------- 1 12 1 -
Florida------------------ 2 1 55 2 4 5 1
EAST SOUT CENTRAL-------- 6 2 1,178 3 1 27 35 12 17
Kentucky----- -------- 2 272 6 11 3 6
Tennessee----------------- 3 857 3 19 18 8 7
Alabama------------------- 2 22 2 4 1 4
Mississippi--------------- 1 27 1 2 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL----------- 5 3 898 2 1 29 53 13 14
Arkansas------------------ 5 3 16 3 1
Louisiana------------- 2 1 4 4 12 1 -
Oklahom ------------------ 1 20 3 5 -
Texaae-------------------- 3 1 869 2 1 19 20 9 13
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 1 1,255 16 12 3
Montna------------------ 43 2 5 -
Idaho-------------------- 84 -
Wyoming------------------- 86 1 1 -
Colorado ---------------- -- 507 5 2
New Mexico--------------- 255 3 4 -
Arizona------------------- 1 161 2 2 1
Utah ----------------- 115 2 -
Nevada ------------------ 4 1 -
PACIFIC----------------- 6 3 1 869 2 22 16 -2 -
Washington----------------- 2 1 386 2 1 -
Oregon---------------- 61 -
California----------- --- 3 2 1 374 2 20 15 2 -
aska ----------- 1 46 -
awaii- ----------- 2 -

Puerto Rico--------------- 1 5 1 1 8 16 1 2







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN ELECTED CITME BY GOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shownin parentheses In table 4)

19th 18th Percent Culativ, first 19 weeks
veek veek Adjumted change,
ended ended average, adjusted
Area 19th average
ay ay week to 1961 1960 Percent
13, 6, &1961 1960
1961 19el 1956-6C current change
19tI 19ti
week

TOTAL, 117 EPOIRTIO CITIES--------------------- 11,264 11,386 11,033 +2.1 226,873 236,532 -4.1

e England---------------------------------(14 cite) 730 724 668 +9.3 13,998 14,938 -6.3
Middle Atlantic---------------------------(20 cities) 3,111 3,323 3,087 +0.8 65,089 64,915 40.3
East North Central------------------------(21 citieeJ 2,565* 2,551 2,331 +10.0 48,152 50,778 -5.2
West North Central--------------------------(9 cities) 742 748 794 -6.5 15,278 16,445 -7.1
South Atlantic-----------------------------(11 cities) 1,015 1,000 927 +9.5 19,660 20,769 -5.3
East South Central-------------------------(8 cities) 496 479 491 +1.0 10,371 10,835 -4.3
West South Central-------------------------(13 cities) 927 949 975 -4.9 19,439 20,860 -6.8
Mountain-----------------------.--..---.----( cities) 330 360 348 -5.2 7,181 7,352 -2.3
Pacific-----------------------------------(13 cities) 1,348* 1,252 1,412 -4.5 27,705 29,640 -6.5

*Includes estimate for missing reports.


NUMBER OF DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES


JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
1960 1961








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7

Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(Py place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)
T T II I i


Area


19th 18th Cumulative,
e ek week first 19 weeks
ended ended


May
13,
1961


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.-- 235
Bridgeport, Conn.----- 36
Cambridge, Mass.----- 31
Fall River, Mass.----- 29
Hartford, Conn.---------- 57
Lowell, Mass.------------ 35
Lynn, Mass.-------------- 23
New Bedford, Mass.------ 19
ew Haven, Conn.--- 58
Providence, R.I.----- 70
Somerville, Mass.----- 25
Springfield, Mass.----- 46
Waterbury, Conn.----- 25
Worcester, Mass.--------- 41

MIDDLE ATIANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.---------- 62
Allentown, Pa.------- 32
Buffalo, N.Y.------- 154
Camden, N.J.--------- 41
Elizabeth, .J.------ 19
Erie, Pa.--------- 32
Jersey City, N.J.---- 54
Newark, N.J.-------- 92
New York City, N.Y.- --- 1,580
Paterson, NJ.---- 45
Philadelphia, Pa.------ 518
Pittsburgh, Pa.------- 109
Reading, Pa.--- ---- 25
Rochester, N.Y.--------- 108
Schenectady, N.Y.-------- 19
Scranton, Pa.------------ 33
Syracuse, N.Y.-------- 73
Trenton, N.J.----------- 61
Utica, N.Y.- ---------- 30
Yonkers, N.Y.---------- 24


EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio---------
Canton, Ohio------------
Chicago, Ill.-----------
Cincinnati, Ohio--------
Cleveland, Ohio------
Columbus, Ohio----------
Dayton, Chio------------
Detroit, Mich.-----------
Evansville, Ind.--------
Flint, Mich.------------
Fort Wayne, Ind.--------
Gary, Ind.-------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.------
Indianapolis, Ind.------
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wia.----
Peoria, Ill.------------
Rockford, Ill----------
South Bend, Ind.-----
Toledo, Ohio-------------
Youngstown, Chio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa---------
Duluth, Minn.-----------
Kansas City, Kans.------
Kansas City, Mo.---------
Lincoln, Nebr.- -----
Minneapolis, Minn.-------
Omaha, Nebr.-------------


59*
32
752
152
211
108
86
351
41
55
34
32
48
140
31
154
37
44
32
103
63


52
20
37
123
(24)
110
59


May
6,
1961


1961


1960


4.-4 I


246
29
33
31
48
27
25
29
54
69
11
36
33
53


28
30
139
55
40
36
86
121
1,630
41
528
273
26
86
18
29
71
30
23
33


53
24
757
180
211
113
80
361
49
45
36
31
41
155
44
140
17
28
38
93
55


55
19
32
115
(21)
131
63


4,793
747
595
530
928
477
449
519
918
1,226
261
920
545
1,090


924
670
2,858
853
564
761
1,392
2,051
33,452
751
10,212
3,727
425
1,960
469
705
1,219
882
565
649

1,092
601
14,574
3,082
4,065
2,229
1,585
6,519
725
846
767
599
875
2,862
610
2,422
570
560
556
1,909
1,104


1,023
487
749
2,461
(539)
2,402
1,352


5,217
855
638
600
941
488
527
527
903
1,317
304
960
556
1,105


883
721
2,951
876
588
772
1,452
1,959
32,955
787
10,000
3,924
475
2,036
480
763
1,261
842
568
622


1,129
731
15,606
3,248
4,338
2,467
1,435
6,988
762
797
732
608
833
2,986
635
2,546
595
568
583
2,047
1,144


1,110
520
710
2,645
(505)
2,475
1,522


Area


WEST NORIs CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.-----
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.---------

SOITH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, NM.---------
Charlotte, N.C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.------
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.------------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Ha.--------
Wasnington, D.C.------
Wilmington, Del.---------

EAST SOU CENTRAL:
3irmingnam, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.------ -
Memphis, Tenn.---- --
Mobile, Ala.-------
Montgomery, Ala.-----
Nashville, Tenn.-----

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.------------
Baton Rouge, La.-----
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.---------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.----
Houston, Tex.--------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.-------
Shreveport, La.----------
Tulsa, Okla.------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Nex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.------
Ogien, Utah---------
Phoenix, Ariz .---------
Pueblo, Colo.-------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.------
Glendale, Calif.------
Honolulu, Haaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.----
Los Angeles, Calif.-----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, reg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.-----
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.----------

San Juan, P. R.--------


19th
week
ended
May
13,
1961


18th
week
ended
May
6,
1961


4 4-+


232
62
47


132
259
32
52
77
45
92
36
(62)
50
193
47


94
33
24
140
101
42
19
43


26
32
22
114
33
68
131
56
183
62
90
53
57


35
14
111
21
71
16
37
25


20
(32)
(37)
40
56
476
93
31
88
54'
117
167
(40)
129
44
33

(46)


219
69
45


101
218
32
55
91
70
76
38
(63)
68
205
46


82
45
27
75
115
39
37
59


42
44
19
104
47
67
135
46
136
91
102
54
62


27
20
104
10
82
18
66
33


20
(38)
(60)
40
49
420
79
32
115
52
71
156
(38)
147
36
35

(38)


Cumulative,
first 19 weeks


1961 1 1960


4,646
1,290
868


2,269
4,940
688
1,140
1,477
987
1,570
670
(1,459)
1,330
3,815
774


1,746
956
540
2,233
2,305
810
620
1,161


675
591
458
2,405
717
1,319
3,254
1,082
3,298
1,510
2,015
1,037
1,078


610
320
2,248
302
1,654
322
949
776


327
(841)
(652)
778
1,144
9,918
1,859
635
2,018
1,191
1,741
3,889
(695)
2,564
867
774

(676)


5,136
1,406
921


2,399
5,294
867
1,289
1,518
877
1,664
761
(1,537)
1,365
3,945
790


1,748
971
581
2,312
2,369
886
720
1,248


733
606
510
2,558
766
1,362
3,433
1,235
3,737
1,563
2,123
1,058
1,176


608
345
2,420
338
1,632
297
970
742


345
(952)
(801)
838
1,108
10,755
1,946
701
2,223
1,177
1,878
4,019
(643)
2,834
936
880

(682)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures show in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
eluded in Table 3.


I




IlIllll lllII0 l 0
3 1262 08864 0247


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


being examined for virus with negative results to date.
(Submitted by D. S. Fleming, M.D., Director, Division of
Disease Prevention and Control, Minnesota Department
of Health.)

Staphylococcal Food Poisoning Idaho

A total of 43 students, one teacher and a cook be-
came ill 3-5 hours after eating lunch at a school in Idaho.
Symptoms were characterized by abrupt onset of nausea,
vomiting and abdominal discomfort. Potato salad prepared
the day preceding the outbreak by a cook with a lesion
on her finger was the responsible food. Potatoes were
cooked and peeled and then left overnight without refri-
geration. The next morning they were sliced, other in-
gredients were added and again it was allowed to stand
until lunch. Abundant hemolytic coagulase-positive
Staphylococcus aureus phage type 6/47/53/57/83 was
cultured from the salad as well as the cook's lesion.
(Submitted by Dr. John A. Mather, Chief, Preventive
Medicine Section, Idaho Department of Health.)


HEPATITIS CASES BY AGE*
WEEK ENDING MAY 13, 1961
Under 20 Years Age Un-
State or Area 20 Years and Over specified Total
Maine 1 1
New Hampshire 1 1
Massachusetts 7 6 13
Rhode Island 3 2 5
Connecticut 4 10 14
Upstate New York 20 25 3 48
New York City 16 29 45
New Jersey 15 36 51
Indiana 45 45 5 95
Illinois 31 16 28 75
Minnesota 18 6 2 26
Iowa 31 10 4 45
Missouri 11 13 1 25
North Dakota 1 2 3
South Dakota 1 1
Nebraska 2 4 5 11
Kansas 17 2 19
Maryland 24 4 28
District of Columbia 1 1 2
Virginia 38 15 7 60
West Virginia 20 2 2 24
North Carolina 44 11 55
South Carolina 7 1 9 17
Georgia 7 2 2 11
Florida 19 11 30
Kentucky 46 10 17 73
Tennessee 55 11 1 67
Alabama 14 4 18
Arkansas 16 6 22
Oklahoma 8 2 10
Texas 41 21 6 68
Montana 2 2
Colorado 3 3 46 52
New Mexico 6 2 8
Utah 17 4 21
Washington 10 4 7 21
Oregon 11 7 18
Alaska I 1

States not reporting age classification are not listed.


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA

These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each Stare and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table 1 shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


UNIV OF PL L1t
DOCL ;,MEENT 5 EPT





U S DEPOSITORY


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