Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00285

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


:


c"nd


Vol. 15, No. 29






Week Ending
= July 23, 1966


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


CURRENT TRENDS
EXCESS MORTALITY RELATED TO HEAT WAVE
Excess mortality coincident with unusually high
temperatures has been observed in the Middle Atlantic
and West North Central Divisions. A similar occurrence
was noted in the Middle Atlantic States in 1964 (MMlIWR.
Vol. 12, No. 28).
Figure 1 shows the recent increase in total mortality
above the expected level among 122 reporting cities. This
began in the 27th week and has extended through the cur-
rent (29th) week. The excess has been largely in persons
65 years of age and older; the under one-year age group has
not been affected. In addition to the increase in total
deaths there was also an increase in deaths attributed to
pneumonia and influenza.


CONTENTS


The ks total .i,..ri f 'ir -l appeared in the
Middle A vision i e h week and one week
later in the : C division. In the current
(29th) week m d to the expected level in
the Middle Atlantic area but continued high in the West
North Central States.
(Continued on page 246)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
29th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 29 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JULY 23, JULY 24, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis ..................... 58 36 65 920 843 828
Brucellosis.......... .... .......... 3 6 10 117 129 219
Diphtheria........... .......... ....... 6 1 90 87 154
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-bore & unspecified ........... 37 39 755 865
Encephalitis, post-infectious ............. 15 13 500 454 -
Hepatitis, serum ........................ ..24 557 632 728 19,728 25,424
Hepatitis, infectious ................... 590 18,453
Measles rubeolaa) ................... ... 1,418 1,911 3,522 183.992 234,172 374,955
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 10 2 11 41 28 125
Paralytic ............... ............. 8 2 6 37 24 103
Nonparalytic ................... ...... -. 4 -
Meningococcal infections, Total .......... 56 40 39 2.452 2.081 1.550
Civilian .............................. 54 37 --- 2,188 1,908 -
Military.................... ............ 2 3 264 173 -
Rubella (German measles) ................ 334 ---- 39796 ---
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 4,353 4,144 3,763 277.275 257,392 225,980
Tetanus.................... ........... 5 8 87 132 -
Tularemia.... ............ ............. 5 5 85 137 -
Typhoid fever .......................... 6 11 12 170 208 228
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever). 16 19 --- 116 133 -
Rabies in Animals ................... .. 75 68 69 2.434 2.697 2.395

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ............................ .............. 4 Botulism : .......... .. .... 4
Leptospirosis: Fla.-4 ............................... 40 Trichinosis: ... ..... .. .. ..... .. 56
Malaria: Pa.-12, Fla.-l, Ky.-2, Calif.- ............ 177 Rabies in Man: ....... .... .. ......... 1
Psittacosis: ........ ........... .. .... ... ..... ... 24 Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: .. .18
Typhus, marine: Ark.- ..................... .. ........ 14 Plague: .. ..... .. .. .. ......... 2


.5 :./t : .M-y J/ I/.








246 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




CURRENT TRENDS
EXCESS MORTALITY RELATED TO HEAT WAVE
(Continued from front page)
Figure 1
MORTALITY IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES


16,000-
ALL CAUSES
ALL AGES
15,000-



14,000-



13,000-



1200-


I I000


9,000-

ALL CAUSES
AGE 65 AND OVER

8,000-




F- 7,000-




r 6,000-
EJ
S ipoo-
z PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA


JULY 23, 1966


WEEK NO 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52
WKENDEO 2522 21 8 13 11 8 5 3 31 28 2 30 27 24 22 19 17 14 II 9 6 4 29 26 26 23 2118 16 13 10 8 5 3 31
MONTH J F M A M AS J S O N J F AM A M A M JJ A S 0 N D
1964 1965 1966


(Continued on page 52)







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ADVISORY
COMMITTEE ON IMMUNIZATION PRACTICES

The Public Health Service Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
meeting on May 16, 1966, issued the following recommendations on typhoid
and paratyphoid A and B vaccines.



TYPHOID VACCINE


The incidence of typhoid fever in the United States has
declined steadily for many years. At the present time,
less than 500 cases are reported annually, and a continuing
downward trend can be expected. Cases are sporadic and
are primarily related to contact with carriers rather than
to common source exposure. Recognizing this epidemiologic
pattern of typhoid fever, re-definition of the role and use
of typhoid vaccine is indicated.


Current Status of Typhoid Vaccine

Although typhoid vaccines have been employed for many
decades, definitive evidence of their effectiveness has
been accumulated only recently from well controlled field
investigations. Several different preparations of typhoid
vaccine have been shown to afford protection in approxi-
mately 70 to 90 percent of individuals immunized,
depending in part on the degree of their subsequent
exposure()

Recommendations for Vaccine Use

Routine typhoid immunization is not recommended in the
United States. Selective immunization is, however, indi-
cated in the following situations:
1) Intimate exposure to a known typhoid carrier as
would occur with continued household contact.
2) Community or institutional outbreaks of typhoid
fever.
3) Foreign travel to areas where typhoid fever is
endemic.

Although typhoid vaccine has been suggested for individ-
uals attending summer camps and those in areas where
flooding has occurred, there are no data to support the
continuation of these practices.

Reference:
(1)Cvjetanovic, B. and Uemura, K., The present status of field
and laboratory studies of typhoid and paratyphoid vaccine.
Bull WHO 32:29-36, 1965.


Dosage and Schedule

On the basis of the field trials referred to above, the
following dosages are recommended, employing the
vaccines available in the USA:

Primary Immunization
Adults and children over 10 years
0.5 ml. subcutaneously on two occasions, sep-
arated by four or more weeks
Children 6 months to 10 years*
0.25 ml. subcutaneously on two occasions, sep-
arated by four or more weeks

In instances where there is insufficient time for the
two doses to be administered at the time intervals
specified, three doses of the same volume listed
above may be given at weekly intervals.


Booster Immunization

Under conditions of continued or repeated exposure
a booster dose should be given at least every there,
years. Even if an interval greater than three years ha
elapsed since the prior immunization, a single
booster injection should be sufficient.

The following alternative routes and dosages of
booster immunization can be expected to give com-
parable antibody responses; generally less reaction
follows the intradermal route.
Adults and Children over 10 years
0.5 ml. subcutaneously or 0.1 ml. intradermally
Children 6 months to 10 years*
0.25 ml. subcutaneously or 0.1 ml. intradermally




*Since febrile reaction in this age group are common following
typhoid vaccination, an antipyretic may be indicated.


PARATYPHOID A AND B VACCINES


The effectiveness of paratyphoid A vaccine has never
been established, and recent field trials have shown that
available paratyphoid B vaccines were ineffective. In
view of these data and recognizing that the paratyphoid


A and B antigens when combined with typhoid vaccine
may increase the occurrence of vaccine reactions, use of
paratyphoid A and B vaccines is not recommended.


JULY 23, 1966


247










248 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 23, 1966 AND JULY 24, 1965 (29th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 I 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 58 36 3 37 39 15 6 24 590 557

NEW ENGLAND.......... 3 1 2 1 1 1 22 30
Maine.............. 3 6
New Hampshire...... 1 5
Vermont............ 3
Massachusetts...... 3 1 2 1 9 10
Rhode Island...... 1 3 1
Connecticut........ 1 6 5

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 10 2 6 11 2 17 67 97
New York City..... 2 4 7 15 34
New York, Up-State. 3 1 I 1 22 27
New Jersey......... 3 1 2 5 9 16 18
Pennsylvania....... 4 2 2 1 14 18

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 4 6 8 4 83 96
Ohio............... 4 3 -- 26 18
Indiana............ 9 13
Illinois........... 1 2 1 3 11 20
Michigan........... 1 2 1 1 4 34 36
Wisconsin......... 1 3 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 1 4 44 21
Minnesota.......... 3 5 4
Iowa............... 1 7 10
Missouri............ 29 4
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska........... 1 1
Kansas.............. 1 2 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 8 4 1 7 2 4 1 69 51
Delaware........... 1 I
Maryland........... 1 22 6
Dist. of Columbia.. I
Virginia........... 1 2 9
West Virginia...... 2 1 4 8
North Carolina..... 1 1 2 1 4 17
South Carolina..... 2 3 3
Georgia............. 2 7 2
Florida............ 5 2 2 1 27 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 7 1 1 2 1 1 45 40
Kentucky........... 4 7 18
Tennessee.......... 1 1 2 26 10
Alabama............ 1 2 5
Mississippi........ 3 I 10 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 12 1 2 4 1 52 69
Arkansas........... 7 6
Louisiana.......... 1 1 1 13 8
Oklahoma........... 3 1 1
Texas............... 8 11 1 1 1 1 31 54

MOUNTAIN............. 1 4 12 23
Montana............ 3
Idaho............... 2 1
Wyoming............ 1 1
Colorado........... 1 1 12
New Mexico......... 3 2
Arizona............ 1 5 3
Utah................ 2 i -
Nevada............... 1

PACIFIC.............. 19 10 11 5 5 1 4 196 130
Washington.......... 1 1 3 18 2
Oregon............. 1 1 1 13 11
California.......... 18 9 10 4 2 4 164 113
Alaska............. 1
Hawaii............. 1 3

Puerto Rico........... 15 28









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED)

JULY 23, 1966 AND JULY 24, 1965 (29th WEEK) CONTINUED


MENINGOC
MEASLES (Rubeola)
AREA .
Cumulative
1966 1966 1965 1966

UNITED STATES... 1,418 183,992 234,172 56

NEW ENGLAND........... 13 2,171 36,546
Maine................ 192 2,764
New Hampshire...... 2 67 381
Vermont............ 2 221 1,244
Massachusetts...... 1 749 19,163
Rhode Island....... 72 3,885
Connecticut........ 8 870 9,109 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 58 17,724 14,054 8
New York City...... 15 8,193 2,107
New York, Up-State. 29 2,377 3,963 2
New Jersey......... 7 1,840 2,389 4
Pennsylvania....... 7 5,314 5,595 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 452 66,990 53,553 6
Ohio................ 11 6,237 8,741 1
Indiana............ 36 5,585 1,715
Illinois........... 23 11,212 2,472
Michigan........... 236 13,599 25,804 3
Wisconsin.......... 146 30,357 14,821 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 39 8,561 16,260 2
Minnesota.......... 10 1,631 619
Iowa............... 21 5,250 8,938
Missouri........... 523 2,552 2
North Dakota...... 8 1,042 3,593 -
South Dakota....... 40 109
Nebraska.............. 75 449
Kansas............. NN NN NN -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 182 14,520 24,236 14
Delaware........... 250 498 -
Maryland............ 9 2,079 1,094 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 379 71
Virginia ........... 62 2,001 3,974
West Virginia...... 63 5,031 13,286 5
North Carolina..... 7 396 372 3
South Carolina..... 641 1,004 1
Georgia............ 231 612
Florida............. 39 3,512 3,325 3

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 143 19,295 13,436 2
Kentucky............ 6 4,659 2,395 1
Tennessee.......... 104 12,008 7,686 1
Alabama............. 27 1,649 2,276
Mississippi........ 6 979 1,079

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 238 23,490 30,138 4
Arkansas........... 966 1,080
Louisiana........... 2 93 94 3
Oklahoma........... 3 470 201
Texas............... 233 21,961 28,763 1

MOUNTAIN............ 112 11,534 19,204 1
Montana............ 10 1,799 3,647
Idaho............... 42 1,496 2,690
Wyoming............. 1 144 839
Colorado............ 21 1,193 5,524 1
New Mexico......... 3 1,096 663
Arizona............. 20 5,202 1,199
Utah............... 15 561 4,440
Nevada............. 43 202

PACIFIC............. 181 19,707 26,745 19
Washington......... 5 3,417 7,195 2
Oregon............ 37 1,601 3,133 2
California.......... 131 14,250 12,613 15
Alaska.............. 8 318 142
Hawaii............. 121 3.662
Puerto Rico........... 37 2,413 2,180


OCCAL INFECTIONS,
TOTAL


Cumulative
1966 1965


2,452

110
9
9
4
43
12
33

283
39
81
81
82

379
101
64
73
102
39

134
31
21
54
7
4
8
9

412
4
41
10
49
21
102
46
57
82

212
80
69
44
19

354
32
135
18
169

78
4
5
6
41
10
8

4

490
37
32
402
15
4


9 5


T


1966


POLIOMYELITIS
. .. .T I RUBELLA

SCuiu ati ive i
1965 1966 1966
I L 96 1- -- -- --------


8 37 334

41
6


10

25

34
12
S 21

1

S115
S5
19
8
31
52

1 8
1 8

8


1 -
1 -


2,081

106
14
5
6
34
14
33

277
49
75
74
79

281
73
38
74
62
34

107
21
7
49
7
2
10
11

406
5
38
8
47
24
78
56
53
97

164
67
48
30
19

292
14
163
18
97

62
2
8
4
13
10
16
7
2

386
31
28
307
13
7


1



1

7



7


" I


T.,t,


3



2

31


1
30
-
31









I






I
1









250 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 23, 1966 AND JULY 24, 1965 (29th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)
1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 4,353 5 87 5 85 6 170 16 116 75 2,434

NEW ENGLAND.......... 557 2 1 4 1 3 50
Maine................ 49 2 19
New Hampshire...... 6 1 14
Vermont ...........- 15
Massachusetts...... 82 2 1 1 1 2
Rhode Island....... 38 -
Connecticut........ 382 3 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 175 11 1 34 4 26 4 166
New York City...... 6 4 15 -
New York, Up-State. 163 2 1 7 10 4 155
New Jersey......... NN 1 6 8
Pennsylvania....... 6 4 6 4 8 11

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 300 7 12 2 26 4 10 8 340
Ohio................ 10 3 3 2 12 3 6 2 170
Indiana............ 66 1 3 1 2 75
Illinois........... 95 1 5 3 1 4 3 36
Michigan........... 81 2 4 28
Wisconsin.......... 48 1 6 1 31

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 129 6 1 7 1 14 2 22 551
Minnesota.......... 1 1 7 127
Iowa................ 36 1 4 2 114
Missouri........... 4 4 1 3 1 6 1 4 175
North Dakota....... 54 I 4 17
South Dakota....... 8 1 2 53
Nebraska ........... 2 1 16
Kansas............... 24 2 2 1 3 49

SOUTH ATLANTIC ...... 526 4 22 8 31 5 54 8 311
Delaware........... 14 -
Maryland........... 42 1 1 1 7 15
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 1
Virginia ........... 117 1 4 2 8 15 3 185
West Virginia...... 184 1 1 39
North Carolina..... 1 1 2 3 3 14 2
South Carolina..... 12 1 1 5 4 -
Georgia............ 4 6 1 1 2 6 2 50
Florida............. 150 2 9 5 3 35

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 786 1 8 17 1 20 3 14 9 306
Ientucky........... 16 1 2 3 2 3 53
Tennessee.......... 651 1 9 1 8 3 11 6 238
Alabama............ 70 3 4 5 1 12
Mississippi........ 49 1 3 2 4 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 450 18 4 32 1 16 6 8 500
Arkansas........... 1 2 3 24 1 2 53
Louisiana.......... 4 3 5 1 23
Oklahoma .......... 51 1 1 4 4 4 2 133
Texas............... 398 11 1 1 6 5 291

MOUNTAIN............. 613 1 5 8 3 1 45
Montana............ 21 2 7
Idaho ......... 30 -
Wyoming ............ 15 -
Colorado........... 247 1 3 2 7
New Mexico......... 166 1 1 6
Arizona............. 42 1 1 1 23
Utah............ ... I 92 1 3 -
Nevada............. .- 1 2

PACIFIC............... 817 12 3 17 12 165
Washington......... 55 2 4 5
Oregon.............. 6 1 1 2 2
California......... 724 11 3 12 6 158
Alaska............. 10 -
Hawaii ...... ......- -
Puerto Rico......... 3 31 6 8









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JULY 23, 1966


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and 1 year
Ages and over Influenza All Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.*---
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.*--
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


693
248
35
35
30
47
15
15
18
42
71
12
38
33
54

3,415
39
27
119
43
22
34
82
100
1,652
40
681
201
47
98
26
34
54
50
29
37

2,696
53
34
778
177
242
118
84
327
58
41
34
48
51
184
40
141
46
27
46
102
65

1,344
76
28
54
196
35
96
146
589
69
55


426
145
18
29
18
24
13
8
5
24
47
9
31
22
33

1,998
25
18
63
25
11
21
46
53
936
23
404
122
30
69
17
26
33
32
19
25

1,518
36
23
410
115
127
61
48
174
42
19
16
20
35
109
18
97
27
13
27
63
38

868
47
18
30
118
28
55
90
398
49
35


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC: 1,265 648 56 89
Atlanta, Ga.----------- 169 82 6 10
Baltimore, Md.---------- 278 141 10 24
Charlotte, N. C.------- 56 22 1 4
Jacksonville, Fla.----- 73 29 2 5
Miami, Fla.------------- 81 46 1 6
Norfolk, Va.----------- 49 26 4 2
Richmond, Va.----------- 98 50 2 9
Savannah, Ga.---------- 39 16 1
St. Petersburg, Fla.--- 66 54 4 -
Tampa, Fla.------------ 79 45 7 5
Washington, D. C.------ 223 107 17 21
Wilmington, Del.------- 54 30 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL: 656 388 30 38
Birmingham, Ala.------- 96 58 1 6
Chattanooga, Tenn.----- 57 31 5 2
Knoxville, Tenn.------- 31 18 2
Louisville, Ky.-------- 138 85 9 4
Memphis, Tenn.---------- 156 92 6 10
Mobile, Ala.----------- 38 16 6
Montgomery, Ala.------- 30 18 3 2
Nashville, Tenn.------- 110 70 6 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL: 1,173 586 44 78
Austin, Tex.----------- 35 15 1 2
Baton Rouge, La.------- 40 23 1 2
Corpus Christi, Tex.--- 19 10 2 6
Dallas, Tex.----------- 149 75 6 7
El Paso, Tex.----------- 20 11 1 1
Fort Worth, Tex.------- 78 36 1 11
Houston, Tex.----------- 201 88 5 20
Little Rock, Ark.------ 63 31 1 3
New Orleans, La.------- 209 103 9 6
Oklahoma City, Okla.--- 87 45 3 2
San Antonio, Tex.------ 149 89 4 7
Shreveport, La.-------- 69 30 9 8
Tulsa, Okla.----------- 54 30 1 3

MOUNTAIN: 444 261 9 28
Albuquerque, N. Mex.--- 45 24 2 2
Colorado Springs, Colo. 27 15 4
Denver, Colo.---------- 127 76 5 9
Ogden, Utah----------- 18 13 1 -
Phoenix, Ariz.--------- 95 64 1 9
Pueblo, Colo.---------- 31 19 -
Salt Lake City, Utah--- 51 25 1
Tucson, Ariz.---------- 50 25 3

PACIFIC: 1,459 871 21 84
Berkeley, Calif.------- 22 19 1
Fresno, Calif.--------- 45 21 4 5
Glendale, Calif.------- 32 24 1
Honolulu, Hawaii------- 30 12 4
Long Beach, Calif.----- 66 39 1 2
Los Angeles, Calif.---- 478 287 7 37
Oakland, Calif.-------- 78 40 1 3
Pasadena, Calif.------- 34 25 1
Portland, Oreg.-------- 108 71 1 3
Sacramento, Calif.----- 62 30 2 5
San Diego, Calif.------ 95 52 2
San Francisco, Calif.- 150 77 1 8
San Jose, Calif .------ 32 20 1 2
Seattle, Wash.--------- 135 86 2 6
Spokane, Wash.--------- 53 40 3
Tacoma, Wash.----------- 39 28 1 1

Total 13,145 7,564 480 724

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 375,404
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 217,109
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 16,818
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 19,434


Week No.
29










252 Morbidity and Mo





CURRENT TRENDS
EXCESS MORTALITY RELATED TO HEAT WAVE
(Continued from page 246)

Tables 1 and 2 show the extent of excess total mor-
tality by age group in the Middle Atlantic and West North
Central Divisions, respectively. They also show percent
increases in pneumonia and influenza deaths in these
areas. There was a moderate increase over the expected
number of total deaths among those 1-64 years of age, and
a larger increase (35 and 47 percent for the respective
divisions) in those 65 and older.

Table 1
Summary of Reported Deaths in Middle Atlantic Division
for Two-Week Period Ending July 16, 1966


Deaths Due to All Causes

S 65 u& All
<1 1-64 65Ov Age
Over Ages


Pneumonia
and Influenza
Deaths


Observed 391 2,604 5,001 7,926 424
Expected 342 2,331 3.701 6,375 227
Excess -21 273 1,:100 1,551 197

Excess as Percent
of Expected 6 12 35 24 87



Table 2
Summary of Reported Deaths in West North Central
Division for Two-Week Period Ending July 23, 1966

Deaths Due to All Causes Pneumonia

65 & All and influenza
'1 1-64
Over Ages Deaths

Observed 83 734 1,491 2,308 82
Expected 86 541 1,012 1,639 55
Excess 3 193 479 669 27

Excess as Percent
of Expected 3 36 47 41 49





New York City in the Middle Atlantic States and St.
Louis, Missouri, in the West North Central States contri-
buted the substantial proportion of excess deaths in their
divisions.


reality Weekly Report


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15.600 IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA. GEORGIA
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J, SENCER, M.D
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D LANGMUIR. M D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L SHERMAN. M.S


IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF COM-
MUNICABLE DISEASES SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.





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