Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00283

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 15,







7', eek, ing
May 7, 1966



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLA ORANIENBURG Arizona

Between March 15 and April 4, 1966, six patients in
a community hospital developed gastroenteritis due to
Salmonella oranienburg. One of the patients was admitted
on March 16 with diarrhea; the other five patients devel-
oped a febrile diarrheal illness subsequent to hospital
admission.
Since these six isolations of Salmonella oranienburg
were obtained from six individuals in the hospital within
a period of 3 weeks, a review of the patients' records
was undertaken. There was no area of the hospital com-
mon to all patients: they were cared for by different
doctors and nurses and received different diets. There


CO.vTENTS
Epidemiulonic Notls and Reports
Salmonella oranienbh irg .\rizona . ..153
Surveillance Summary
Salmonellos s January. February. March 1966 151
International Notes
Variola Minor Britain ... . 160

was no evidence of increased incidence of diarrheal ill-
ness in the surrounding community or in other hospitals
in the area.
Food for all patients and personnel in the hospital
is prepared in a central kitchen from where it is distri-
buted in appropriate containers to individual diet kitchens
in patient-care units. It is then served by the employees
(Continued on page 154)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)

18th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 18 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE MAY 7. MAY 8, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis ................... 25 26 23 488 516 433
Brucellosis ....... ............ 5 7 65 69 129
Diphtheria ......... ..... .. 1 1 6 50 73 107
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-bore & unspecified ....... 23 24 433 534
Encephalitis, post-infectious ......... 9 18 294 278 -
Hepatitis. serum ................ 29 675 04 443 I 13,709 17,962
Hepatitis, infectious ...... ............. 609 12,206
Measles rubeolaa) ........... ..... ... 8,117 11,272 19,088 134,084 173.301 238,186
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 1 1 7 7 48
Paralytic ......... .. .. ....... 1 1 6 5 43
Nonparalytic .... .. .- 2
Meningococcal infections. Total ....... 102 80 58 1.799 1,534 1,081
Civilian ... .... ..... 94 77 1,577 1,400
Military .. ..... ...... ...... 8 3 222 134
Rubella (German measles) .... ....... 1.780 -- 26.409 -
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 8,814 8.769 8,183 206,343 194.351 169,872
Tetanus ........... .... ......... .. 2 4 37 68 -
Tularemia ............... ... 1 2 48 63
Typhoid fever ............... ...... 5 7 8 98 110 124
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 1 1 10 9

Rabies in Animals .............. .. 84 70 95 1.602 1.851 1,538

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum Cum.
Anthrax: .. ......... .. .... 2 Botulism: 1
Leptospirosis: Hawaii-1, Texas- .... ... 12 Trichinosis: ...... ...... 37
Malaria: Md-5. Pa.-2. Colo.-1, Calif.- ..... 100 Rabies in Man: ....... ..
Psittarcsis 16 Rubplla Coneenital Svndromp In
Typhus mnurin .








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLA ORANIENBURG Arizona
(Continued from front page)


permanently assigned to the relevant unit. However, the
scale of accommodation and equipment in the central
kitchen has not maintained progress with demands. Ade-
quate and efficient working space in the kitchen is at a
premium until the new central kitchen unit, now under con-
struction, has been completed. Water supplies are obtained
from wells in the hospital grounds which are adequately
and regularly checked bacteriologically. Milk from the
local contractor is likewise checked and has always been
within acceptable bacteriological limits.
During the investigation five employees concerned
with the preparation and distribution of food were also
found to have stool cultures positive for Salmonella C1,
later confirmed as S. oranienbury. Three of them worked
permanently in the individual diet kitchens of three sepa-
rate areas of the hospital; two others worked in the serv-
ing line of the employees' cafeteria. Although none worked
in the central kitchen where food common to all patients
was prepared, they frequently ate food from this kitchen.
Two could recall a well defined recent diarrheal illness


compatible with salmonella infection.
Epidemiologic evidence indicated that this was a
salmonella outbreak related to a source of infection pres-
ent over a period of time and not a single common source
of infection such as one meal. Attention was then focused
on the central kitchen. Cultures obtained from stool speci-
mens of personnel working in the central kitchen were
negative for salmonella. Dietary histories then narrowed
down the range of foodstuffs that were most commonly
eaten until it was found that frozen unpasteurized egg
products were being used in the preparation of puddings,
custards and pie frequently consumed by all those affected.
It was also noted that in March, about the time of the
start of the ...ilbr.,-k. the dietary department had used up
the stocks of commercially prepared pudding and custard
mixes, and had begun to prepare its own mixes in the
hospital central kitchen using basic ingredients which
included frozen, unpasteurized egg products.

(Continued on page 160)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SALMONELLOSIS January, February and March, 1966


During the months of January, February and March,
1966, the reported numbers of human isolations of sal-
monellae were 1,531, 1,149 and 1,374 respectively. The
numbers generally correspond to the expected seasonal
pattern, although the February total was the lowest


recorded for any one month since the same period during
1963 (See Figure 1).
The seven most frequently reported human serotypes
for the 3 months are listed in Table 1. The seven most
common ones accounted for 68.1 percent, 62.4 percent and


Figure 1
REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA
IN THE UNITED STATES


1964 1965


154


MAY 7, 1966


-- including S derby
---Excluding S derby


) M1963
1963


1966








MAY 7, 1966


Table 1
The Seven Most Commonly Reported Serotypes From Human Sources January-March, 1966


Serotype


S. typhi-murium & S. typhi-murium
var. copenhagen .
S. heidlebery .
S. newport ..
S. enteritidis .
S. infantitis . .
S. thompson .........
S. saint-pau .
S. ty hi .. .
S. oraninburg . .
Total of above serotypes .

Total of all serotypes .


January

Rank Number


Percent Rank


32.1 1


February March

Number Percent Rank Number


7 46 4.0
7 57 3.7 6 47 4.1


1,043


68.1


1,531


717 62.4


6 58
7 48
912


1,374


1,149


66.4 percent respectively of all isolations in each month.
The age and sex distribution of persons with salmonellae
for the 3 months is compatible with past experience. The
percentage of persons reported as harboring salmonellae
who had other members in their families simultaneously
infected was consistent: 21.3 percent in January; 19.2
percent in February: 23.1 percent in March.
The seven most commonly reported serotypes from


nonhuman sources for this period are listed in Table 2.
It is evident that the frequent nonhuman sources of sal-
monellae have been turkeys, chickens, and bovines. In
March, however, a variation in this pattern was intro-
duced with the high number of isolations from various
types of animal feed. A large portion of the latter isolates
were from surveys of animal feed conducted in one State.
(Reported by the Salmonella Surveillance Unit, CDC.)


The Seven Most Commonly


Table 2
Reported Serotypes From Nonhuman Sources January-March, 1966


January

Rank Number Percent R


S. typhi-murium & S. typhi-murium
var. copenhagen . ......
S. heidleber . .........
S. infantitis . ..........
S. saint-paul ..........
S. oranienbur .........
S. montevideo ..........
S. anatum ........ .........
S. derby .............. ...
S. blockley . .........
S. thompson ................
S. senftenberg. ...............
Total of above serotypes ..


309 58.9


February

:ank Number Percent Rank


1 115 22.0 1
2 46 8.8 2
7
4 26 5.0 6


3 33
5 25
7 '22


7 22 4.2
6 24 4.6
291 55.7


March

Number Percent


3 50 6.6
4 39 5.2

5 35 4.6


388 51.5


Total of all serotypes ..... 525 522


Most Common Sources of
Nonhuman Isolations
Turkey . ...........
Chicken ............
Pork Meat Product . ....
Bovine . ..... ......
Frozen Egg . ..
Animal Feed . ..


29.5
19.4
7,6
7.4


1 135 25.9 2 185 24.5
2 120 23.0 3 168 22.3


4 28 5.4
3 37 7.1


4 45 6.0

1 200 26.5


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SALMONELLOSIS January, February and March, 1966
(Continued from paye 154)


155


Percent


30.6
7.1
5.6
4.9
10.5


4.2
3.5
66.4


Serotype


754


I


I










156 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 7, 1966 AND MAY 8, 1965 (18th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 25 26 23 24 9 1 1 29 609 675

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 2 1 31 46
Maine.............. 4 5
New Hampshire...... 6
Vermont ...........- -
Massachusetts...... 1 1 2 1 20 19
Rhode Island....... 3 8
Connecticut........ 4 8

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 5 4 9 2 1 12 121 101
New York City...... 1 1 1 4 9 22 13
New York, Up-State. 2 1 23 36
New Jersey......... 1 2 3 2 38 24
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 1 2 1 1 38 28

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 2 5 3 2 80 152
Ohio................ 1 1 3 1 1 19 36
Indiana............ 2 1 2 20
Illinois............ 4 1 1 26 22
Michigan........... 1 27 68
Wisconsin........... 1 6 6

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 2 49 53
Minnesota.......... 1 1 5 6
Iowa................ 16 24
Missouri............. 17 8
North Dakota....... 1 -
South Dakota...... 1
Nebraska........... 5 -
Kansas.............. 5 15

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 6 1 2 3 73 68
Delaware............ 1 4
Maryland............ 13 9
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1
Virginia........... 2 7 15
West Virginia...... 4 7
North Carolina..... 1 1 2 10 4
South Carolina..... 1 4
Georgia............ 11
Florida............. 2 1 26 28

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 2 2 59 46
Kentucky........... 1 11 17
Tennessee.......... 1 24 15
Alabama............ 1 1 17 8
Mississippi........ 1 7 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 -2 1 57 38
Arkansas........... 1 7 10
Louisiana.......... 15 7
Oklahoma ........... -
Texas.............. 1 1 1 1 35 21

MOUNTAIN.............. 2 3 3 1 19 31
Montana............ 1 2
Idaho............... 4 -
Wyoming........... -.. 1 2
Colorado........... 1 3 9
New Mexico......... 1 8 7
Arizona............. 1 2 5 10
Utah ............... 1 1
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC............... 12 12 1 4 2 11 120 140
Washington.......... I 1 2 1 5 10
Oregon............. 1 18 10
California......... 9 12 2 1 11 96 115
Alaska............. -- 3
Hawaii.............. 1 1 2

Puerto Rico.......... 1 24 33









Mlirlidily and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 7, 1966 AND MAY 8, 1965 (18th WEEK) CONTINUED


MEAS
AREA

1966

I'nI TFD I-iE 6 111

NEW ENGLAND........... 100
Maine ....... ...... 4
New Hampshire...... 7
Vermont ............ -
Massachusetts...... 22
Rhode Island....... 17
Connecticut........ 50

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 566
New York City...... 205


New York, Up-State. 57
New Jersey.......... 48
Pennsylvania........ 256

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2,465
Ohio............... 511
Indiana............. 243
Illinois........... 313
Michigan........... 455
Wisconsin.......... 943

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 392
Minnesota.......... 64
Iowa............... 264
Missouri........... 5
North Dakota....... 35
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska............ 24
Kansas............. NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 601
Delaware............ 18
Maryland............ 65
Dist. of Columbia.. 12
Virginia............ 58
West Virginia...... 156
North Carolina..... 18
South Carolina..... 20
Georgia............. 7
Florida............. 247

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 851
Kentucky........... 106
Tennessee........... 673
Alabama............. 12
Mississippi........ 60

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,157
Arkansas........... 5
Louisiana .......... 2
Oklahoma............ 42
Texas................ 1,108

MOUNTAIN............. 711
Montana............. 82
Idaho............... 35
Wyoming............. 7
Colorado............ 46
New Mexico.......... 156
Arizona............. 319
Utah............... 66
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.............. 1,274
Washington ......... 202
Oregon.............. 71
California......... 997
Alaska.............. 3
Hawaii............. 1
Puerto Rico........... 120


-I


LES (Rubeola)

Cumulative
1966 1965



1,559 31,159
166 2,204
33 345
204 639
586 17,176
79 3,412
491 7,383

14,884 7,678
7,407 860
1,579 2,323
1,578 1,331
4,320 3,164

49,336 33,530
4,573 6,670
3,411 1,169
9,462 1,412
8,127 17,589
23,763 6,690

6,343 13,208
1,449 424
3,610 7,362
381 2,070
831 2,967
4 68
68 317
NN NN

10,248 19,185
152 413
1,522 762
338 31
1,080 3,077
3,771 10,981
185 213
471 795
192 538
2,537 2,375

14,983 10,719
4,085 2,000
8,850 6,004
1,279 1,863
769 852

16,231 24,546
528 883
74 60
365 136
15,264 23,467

7,775 13,509
1,155 2,936
747 1,862
100 660
783 3,410
686 506
3,998 621
282 3,371
24 143

12,725 19,767
2,162 5,768
914 2,515
9,511 9,048
61 107
77 1,329
1,673 1,270


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS
TTOTALtal Para
Cumulative
1966 1966 1965 1966 1965 1966



4 79 77
7 9
7 5 -
3 2
1 31 28 -
7 11
3 24 22 -

16 198 214 -
4 30 31 -
4 55 56 -
4 56 64 -
4 57 63 -

11 267 182 -
3 73 53 -
4 45 25 -
2 51 48 -
1 72 32 -
1 26 24 -

3 96 83 -
S 24 17
13 3 -
3 38 39 -
4 4 -
3 2
7 9
7 9

20 290 302 -
3 3
4 29 31 -
1 7 4 -
4 42 31
1 10 23 -
8 62 51
S 39 45 -
1 42 41 -
1 56 73 -

15 159 110 -
3 69 47 -
6 47 33 -
4 32 22 -
2 11 8

11 271 234 1
1 15 12 -
3 108 134 -
1 11 16 -
6 137 72 1 -

7 67 53 -
4 1 -
1 4 7
2 3 2
3 36 12 -
9 8
1 9 15 -
S 6 -
2 2

15 372 279 -
2 24 21 -
S 24 21 -
13 307 226 -
S 14 6 -
3 5 -
1 4 3 -


-


i


164
7
3

104
6
43

95
28
63

4

453
23
89
77
82
182

238

234
1
3




176
2
4
1
43
16

6

104

230
52
172
6


4
1


3

193
10


34

147
2


227
83
49
80
10

3
3











158 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAY 7, 1966 AND MAY 8, 1965 (18th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)
1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 3,814 2 37 1 48 5 98 1 10 84 1,602

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,150 2 1 4 22
Maine.............. 44 -- 2
New Hampshire...... 13 8
Vermont.............. 19 12
Massachusetts ..... 227 2 1 -
Rhode Island....... 46
Connecticut........ 801 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 415 1 6 24 1 3 113
New York City...... 30 3 12 -
New York, Up-State. 260 3 3 107
New Jersey ......... NN 6 -
Pennsylvania....... 125 1 3 3 1 6

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,191 3 12 15 12 228
Ohio............... 159 3 7 7 124
Indiana............. 231 1 3 1 2 49
Illinois............ 276 I 5 2 1 18
Michigan........... 284 1 2 2 19
Wisconsin........... 241 1 3 18

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 658 2 3 1 11 1 23 349
Minnesota.......... 17 7 69
Iowa............... 258 3 6 77
Missouri........... 4 2 1 5 7 130
North Dakota....... 221 6
South Dakota....... 12 1 34
Nebraska.......... 3 1 7
Kansas............. 143 2 1 2 1 2 26

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 949 8 6 1 19 1 7 10 212
Delaware........... 25 -
Maryland............. 160 1 6 1 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 4
Virginia........... 282 2 6 2 5 134
West Virginia...... 180 1 1 30
North Carolina..... 20 2 2 3 -
South Carolina..... 12 1 1 2 -
Georgia............. 7 3 1 4 31
Florida............. 259 4 2 17

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,484 2 1 13 1 8 9 227
Kentucky........... 73 2 1 1 34
Tennessee.......... 1,225 1 7 4 7 184
Alabama............ 92 2 4 2 1 9
Mississippi........ 94 I- 1 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 750 8 11 1 5 1 15 328
Arkansas........... 2 9 1 1 1 1 39
Louisiana.......... 3 1 1 2 19
Oklahoma........... 34 1 6 94
Texas............... 716 3 1 2 6 176

MOUNTAIN.............. 1,197 1 1 6 2 31
Montana............. 44 7
Idaho.............. 64
Wyoming............. 50 -
Colorado............ 450 1 I 2 1
New Mexico......... 228 -- 5
Arizona............. 147 1 2 17
Utah............. .. 214 1 3
Nevada............. 1

PACIFIC.............. 1,020 1 5 1 1 6 10 92
Washington......... 268 -
Oregon............. 47 -
California......... 642 1 5 1 3 10 92
Alaska............. 33 -
Hawaii............. 30 -
Puerto Rico.......... 4 4 19 4 1 4








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MAY 7, 1966


18 (By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and year Area All 65 years and I a
v Influenza All Influenza All
Ages and erAll Ages Causes Age and over All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.----.---
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.-------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.-------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, 11l.-*--------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.-------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.----------
Kansas City, Kans.*---
Kansas City, Mo.-----
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


775
264
58
31
18
64
35
29
34
52
61
14
32
33
50

3,213
56
34
154
33
38
44
69
92
1,711
39
421
155
50
102
25
40
51
34
22
43

2,633
70
30
812
173
203
106
80
334
36
65
43
42
50
138
35
126
37
38
46
112
57

890
53
26
42
138
37
109
88
241
108
48


491
150
37
21
9
40
27
20
27
32
41
12
24
20
31

1,884
25
19
92
14
24
19
41
36
1,052
18
225
82
37.
69
15
26
33
16
14
27

1,539
34
19
452
106
116
63
45
202
22
37
31
29
33
78
19
75
22
22
28
63
43

538
34
17
21
88
24
66
56
140
67
25


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Clendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,185
123
288
46
57
72
53
85
35
72
83
218
53

720
101
63
52
142
158
45
46
113

1,103
31
39
24
174
52
63
190
68
162
91
98
56
55

373
47
21
92
15
62
21
63
52

1,538
17
55
20
46
66
480
85
42
110
62
108
177
38
143
40
49


Total 12,430 7,165 533 642

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 238,210
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 138,568
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 11,654
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 12,150


Week No.


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


"








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
SALMONELLA ORANIENBURG Arizona
(Continued from page 154)


Cultures were then made from both opened and un-
opened cans of frozen, unpasteurized egg products which
were all processed by and obtained from the same com-
pany. S. oranienbury as well as two other serotypes were
isolated as a result (Table 3). The isolation of multiple
serotypes of salmonella from unpasteurized egg products
was not unexpected, but no cases of illness could be
traced which were related to the S. thompson and S. ken-
tucky serotypes.

Table 3
Results of Bacteriologic Cultures from Foods

Item Result*

Whole Eggs Thawed (opened can) S. thompson
Egg Whites Thawed (opened can) Negative
Egg Yolks Thawed (opened can) Negative
Whole Eggs Frozen (unopened can) Negative
Egg Whites Frozen (unopened can) S. kentucky
Egg Yolks Frozen (unopened can) S. oranienburg
Cooked Custard (4 samples) Negative

*Cultured only for salmonellat,.

A bacteriological survey was made of work areas in
the central kitchen and included tables, meat slicers,
serving trays, chopping boards and cooking utensils. All
specimens were negative for salmonella.
The outbreak of S. oranienburg infection in both
patients and employees coincided with a change in the
method of preparation of a food consumed by all involved.
Used as an ingredient in pudding and custard mixes, the
unpasteurized frozen eggs contaminated with S. oranien-
burg would suggest, this food item as the likely source
of infection.
(Reported by Dr. Frederick J. Brady, Director, Pima County
Health Department, Arizona; Or. Philip llotchkiss, Chief.
Section of Acute Communicable Diseases, Arizona State
Department of Health; Dr. George Spendloe, Director.
Preventire Medical Seriices, Arizona State Department
of Health; and an EIS Officer.)



INTERNATIONAL NOTES
VARIOLA MINOR Britain

Following on the report published in the MMR1W, Vol.
15, No. 17, the United Kingdom on May 5 has declared
infected with smallpox the Stoke-on-Trent C(ounty Borough,
the Wallsall County Borough and the Harley Nvew Admin-
istrative District, all in Staffordshire, nor th of Birmingham,
England. The total of cases of variola minor reported from
Britain, as of May 9, is eight.
(Compiled from reports by the World Health Oryanization,
Geneva.)


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15.600, IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F.R. C P.E.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES.
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO;
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONALBASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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MAY 7, 1966


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