Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00281

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


COMUNI E DISEASE CENTER
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


< Vol. 15, No. 1

-USA' -- "




Week Ending
January 8, 1966



EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


INSTITUTIONAL SHIGELLOSIS WISCONSIN CONTENTS


For over 10 years shigellosis has been a recurring
problem in a Colony and Training School for the mentally
retarded in Wisconsin. Despite carefully planned pre-
ventive and therapeutic measures initiated in 1960,
there have been 2 years of high incidence in 1963 and
1965. The numbers of cases reported in this Colony
since 1954 are:

1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
117 81 32 57 188 290
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965*
204 56 34 265 48 125

*Through 10/1/65


Institutional Shigellosis Wisconsin . ..... .
Measles Current Trends . .. ... 2
Reported Cases of Encephalitis. . . 3
International Notes -
Quarantine Measures . ... ... 8
Plague Viet Nam . .. ... 8

In some years there has appeared to be a seasonal trend
with a small peak of incidence in the late summer and
early fall; in years of low incidence this seasonal trend
is not evident. In July and August of 1965, however,
there was a sharp outbreak of shigellosis with 76 cultur-
ally proved cases; many more patients had diarrhea with
negative findings on stool culture.
(Continued on page 2)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
1st WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST WEEK
MEDIAN
DISEASE JANUARY 8, JANUARY 9, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961- 1965
Aseptic meningitis ................... ... 30 42 19 30 42 19
Brucellosis................ ... ..... 8 4 8 4
Diphtheria .......... .... .. ... 1 3 8 1 3 8
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 19 33 19 33 --
Encephalitis, post-infectious ....... 9 5 -- 9 5 -
Hepatitis, serum ............... ... 10 10
Hepatitis, infectious ................. ... 666 6891 666 88
Measles rubeolaa) ........... ... 3,861 5,203 5,203 3,861 5.203 5,203
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 1 1 1 1
Paralytic ...... ... .. ...... .... 1 1
Nonparalytic ........................ -
Meningococcal infections, Total .. ...... 63 52 46 63 52 46
Civilian .............. ......... .... 58 52 58 52 -
Military .............................. 5 5 -
Rubella (German measles) ................ 396 396 -
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever 7,361 8,680 6,810 7,361 8,680 6,810
Tetanus. ............ 3 3 3 3
Tularemia ....... ....... ........... ... 4 6 -- 4 6 -
Typhoid fever .......................... 3 2 2 3 2 2
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever). 5 -5 -

Rabies in Animals. ................ 72 92 49 72 92 49

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ............ ..... ...... ..... .. ... Botulism: .. .. ........ .................
Leptospirosis: .......... ............... .. .. Trichinosis: N.C. 1, Ky. 3 ............ .. .. 4
Malaria: Mass. 1, S.C. -1, Calif. 2, N.Y. Up-State- 1 ... 5 Rabies in Man: .... ....................... ...
Psittacosis: Wise. 1. Ore. 1 ............. ......... 2 Rubella. Congenital Syndrome: .. ..... ....
Typhus, murine:................. ... ...

















The affected Colony cares for 1,560 patients in 15
cottages which accommodate an average of 100 patients
in each; the amount of accommodation available in the
cottages varies from 41 to 124 persons whose ages range
from 3 years to 76 years. The cottages are scattered
through the grounds of the Colony in groups of two and
four, and there is little or no contact between the patients
from different cottages. The food service is from a
central kitchen, and the Colony has its own laundry and
sewage disposal plant. Water is from deep wells and,
since 1960, has been chlorinated before distribution.
The milk supply, from a commercial source, is pasteurized.
Investigations of the outbreak in July and August
showed that 78 percent of the cases of shigellosis
occurred in only two of the 15 cottages. These two
cottages, respectively numbered 8 and 12, accommodate
patients with moderate to severe degrees of retardation;
the median age is 10 years in cottage 8 and 9 years in
cottage 12. The outbreak began in cottage 8 in July
where the eventual attack rate was 25 percent; it affected
cottage 12 in August with an eventual attack rate of 39
percent. The highest attack rate in any other cottage was
4.3 percent; five cottages had no cases.
Laboratory studies showed that in cottage 8 all
isolates were of the Shigella flexneri group while in
cottage 12 all were Shigella sonnei. In the other 8 cottages
which had only a few cases each, the serotype was the
same for all cases in any one cottage; in two of the
cottages the index case was linked with cottage 12.
Environmental hygiene is generally satisfactory,
with good standards of cleanliness in the cottages and
laundry arrangements are adequate. Washing facilities in
the cottages for the personal hygiene of patients with
diarrhea is adequate in some instances but less adequate
in others.


JANUARY 8, 1966


Investigations included a review of the patients'
records and it was noted that 21 percent of the patients
who had shigellosis in ..-*.i. 8 during this year had
had laboratory confirmed shigellosis in the past; the
comparable percentage in cottage 12 was 39 percent.
No shigella isolates were obtained from any of the
hospital staff caring for patients in cottage 8. Questioning
of other hospital staff did not reveal any episodes of
diarrhea prior to the outbreak and there was no increased
incidence among the general public living in the vicinity
of the Colony.
During the period October 5 to 7, 1965, three
successive rectal swab cultures were obtained from
every patient in cottage 8 and 12; at least one rectal
swab culture was obtained from each employee at the
two cottages. From a total of 337 individuals so examined
there were only 8 isolates of shigellae, none of which
were from employees. One rectal swab from a girl in
cottage 12 yielded S. sonnei: the other 7 isolates were
from boys in cottage 8 and all yielded S. flexneri. Four
of these 8 children had mild diarrhea at the time of the
survey. Shigella prevalence rates were 1.1 percent in
cottage 12 and 6.3 percent in cottage 8. Antibiotic
sensitivity tests showed resistance to neomycin but
sensitivity to chloramphenicol.
The rate of shigellosis in the institution is now low
and it is anticipated that continuing active clinical and
laboratory surveillance, plus the rapid and effective
isolation of children excreting shigella, will prevent
outbreaks in the future.

(Reported by Dr. Ellison i .. Medical Director,
Southern Wisconsin Colony and Training School; and Dr.
Josef Preizler, Deputy ',. *.'.*'. Preventable Disease
1,. .' Wisconsin State Board of Health.)


MEASLES CURRENT TRENDS


The provisional total of cases of measles during
1965 is 266,222, which is the lowest total recorded
since 1925. The 106 cases of measles encephalitis
notified in 1965 is 76 cases fewer than those reported
in 1964.
During the last 4-week period of 1965 there were
12,849 cases of measles reported (Figure 1). This is
an increase of 836 cases over the total for the comparable
period in 1964; however, this relatively small increase
does not reflect the occurrence of measles in epidemic
proportions in many communities. While most States


reported a decrease during the weeks 49-52 of 1965, in
12 States there was a definite increase in incidence
compared to the same period in 1964 (Table 1). The
greatest part of this increase is due to epidemics of
measles occurring in small rural communities and in
segments of metropolitan areas where measles has not
occurred in epidemic proportions for 2 to 3 years. It is
in just such communities that the practicality of .borrirn
epidemics by immunization of the young school age
children is being studied (M\IllR, Vol. 14, No. 48, pp.
409-410).


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



INSTITUTIONAL SHIGELLOSIS WISCONSIN
(Continued from front page)









JANUARY 8, 1966


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ITa bh, 1
TWELVE IST \TES WITH INCEl \SE IN REPORtTED MEASLES
Wiek, 19-52, 196;5


REPORTED MEASLES BY FOUR-WEEK PERIODS
UNITED STATES, 1956-1965


Middle A\tlUnl1



East North Central

West North central l
South Atlantic

East South Ci-ntral

West South Central
Mountain


Since the licensure of live attenuated measles
vaccine in the United States in March 1963, approximately
13 million doses of vaccine have been distributed through-
out the country by the manufacturers. Based on the
proportion by age of children immune to measles and by
the annual number of births, this is enough vaccine to
immunize 65 percent of susceptible children within the
relevant age groups. The occurrence of the sharp seasonal


iith,



Nei ,Jersey
Pennslvaniia
New York ('it,
Illnois,
Wi ionsin
Minno-ta
Maryland
South Carolina
Kentuckv
Tennessee
Arkansas
\rizona


REiporledMeasles, Weeks 49-52


Increase
1964 to 19i65


increase of measles in certain geographical areas late in
1965 suggests that the utilization of vaccine has not
been uniformly spread through the susceptible pre-school
population as a whole. Until this uniform distribution of
vaccination of the susceptible children is achieved,
localized but severe epidemics may be expected to
continue.
(Reported by the Childhood Virus Disease Unit, CDC.)


fable 2
REPOil IE) CASES OF' POST-INFECTIOUS AND POST-IIMMNIZATION ENCEPIIHALI'I \ I
EIG;IIIT-hEEK PERIOD ENDING DECEMBER .4 1965.

( hi ken- HIerpes Mono- Resprator, Post-Immunization
State Mumps io Me'.sles Hbdi Sia impler Pertussis Influenza nucleosis synciti AE. colt Pneumonia Rab es Vaccinia
California ... I .. .
Florida .... 5 ..... ...
Illinois, ..... .. .. .. .
Michigan .......
Minnesota .. .
New York Upslate. ... ......... .... .. ....
Pennsyl ania . . . . .
RhodeI sland .. I .
T ennessee . .. . . 1 .
Texas ...... 1 . .
Washington ..... .....

U.S. Total ..... 36 5 3 I -

U.S. Cumulative
Totals (weeks 1-4i)
1965" .. 9. 76 101 12 1 5 2 1 2 5
1964"* ... ... 452 (1i 178 34 10 1 10 1 3


States not reporting a case not listed)


'Includes revised and delayed report
**Corresponding perii in 19it4.










4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 8, 1966 AND JANUARY 2, 1965 (1st WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Tyes
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 30 42 19 33 9 1 3 10 666 688

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 3 1 2 34 46
Maine.............. 6 15
New Hampshire...... 3 5
Vermont ............ -
Massachusetts ...... 3 1 10 11
Rhode Island....... 1 1 6 3
Connecticut........- 1 9 9

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 6 5 13 1 2 72 114
New York City...... 3 1 28
New York, Up-State. 1 1 25 31
New Jersey.......... 2 3 10 1 21 21
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 2 1 1 26 34

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 4 1 1 1 147 137
Ohio............... 1 40 55
Indiana............ 2 5
Illinois........... 4 1 6 23
Michigan........... 4 1 1 84 41
Wisconsin.......... 15 13

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 3 1 1 2 27 46
Minnesota .......... 3 2
Iowa................ 12 30
Missouri............ 2 1 5 3
North Dakota........ 1
South Dakota........ 1 -
Nebraska............. -
Kansas............. 1 1 1 6 10

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 2 6 1 1 2 47 68
Delaware........... 1 3
Maryland........... 1 1 9 13
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia........... 11 12
West Virginia...... 1 6
North Carolina..... 8 7
South Carolina..... 1 4 3
Georgia .... ...... 4 9
Florida............ 1 1 5 1 1 1 7 18

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 8 2 2 125 31
Kentucky............ 1 8 1 1 26 10
Tennessee.......... 1 1 93 9
Alabama............ 5 10
Mississippi........- 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 4 1 1 74 89
Arkansas........... 11 14
Louisiana............ 1 10
Oklahoma .......... 2 1 3
Texas.............. 3 2 1 62 62

MOUNTAIN ............. 2 2 29 42
Montana............ 2 4
Idaho.............. 2 9
Wyoming............ 1 2
Colorado........... 1 1 1 1
New Mexico......... 13 6
Arizona............ 1 I 6 17
Utah............... 1 3
Nevada.............. 3

PACIFIC .............. 17 15 8 4 3 4 111 115
Washington......... 5 3
Oregon..... ...... 14 17
California......... 17 14 7 4 3 4 89 79
Alaska......... .... 16
Hawaii ............ I
Puro Ric o .... ......-










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIC) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 8, 1966 AND JANUARY 2, 1965 (1st WEEK) Continued


AREA



UNITED STATES...

NEW ENGLAND...........
Maine..............
New Hampshire......
Vermont ............
Massachusetts.......
Rhode Island .......
Connecticut.........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey........
Pennsylvania .......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio. ..............
Indiana............
Illinois .o ........
Michigan.. ........
Wisconsin ..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota ..........
Iowa...............
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware ...........
Maryland ..........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia..........
West Virginia......
North Carolina....
South Carolina....
Georgia ...........
Florida ............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky.. .........
Tennessee.........
Alabama............
Mississippi ........


MEASLES (Rubcol

Cumulati
166 -1966-

3,861 3,861

46 46
7 7
1 1
17 17
6 6


17 17


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 239 239
Arkansas............ 2 2
Louisiana.......... 1 1
Oklahoma ............ -
Texas ............... 236 236

MOUNTAIN............. 159 159
Montana............ 32 32
Idaho.............. 8 8
Wyoming.............. 6 6
Colorado............ 5 5
New Mexico.......... 2 2
Arizona............ 98 98
Utah ............... 4 4
Nevada............. 4 4

PACIFIC .............. 214 214
Washington ........ 76 76
Oregon.............. 34 34
California.......... 102 102
Alaska ............ -
.Puerto Ri ..-
Puerto Rico..........
49 4


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
TOTAL


5

1


965

i,203

,876
257
58
5
896
84
576

115
28
32

55

502
69
32
25
248
128

350
3
158
49
124
12
4
NN

783
12
10

40
653
27
13
5
23

233
6
165
26
36

491

1
5
485

521
232
76
15
76
14
22
86


332
5
132
152
2
.I

40


.ve


POLIOMYELITIS
RUBELLA
Total Paralytic

Cumulative
'6 1965 1966 1966 1966

S 396

42
4
9
9
2
10
6
6
S 11

13

12

1

103
1 103
S 21
21
17
25
-- 40

S16
2
6
2
6

1
7





36
36

6

-
S 23

4









411
44
14
23
7









42






S29



100
70
- 22
7



2


15 11
1 I

12 10
1










6 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 8, 1966 AND JANUARY 2, 1965 (1st WEEK) Continued



STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)

1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 C 1966 m. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 7,361 3 3 4 4 3 3 5 5 72 72

NEW ENGLAND .......... 1,018
Maine.............. 134
New Hampshire...... 22
Vermont............ 20
Massachusetts...... 178
Rhode Island....... 77
Connecticut........ 587

MIDDLE ATIANTIC ..... 182 1 1 1 1 9 9
New York City...... 23 -
New York, Up-State. 133 8 8
New Jersey......... 6
Pennsylvania....... 20 1 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 633 1 1 11 11
Ohio................. 55 1 1 7 7
Indiana............. 97 3 3
Illinois........... 47 1 1
Michigan. .......... 324 -
Wisconsin .......... 110

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 268 2 2 1 1 14 14
Minnesota......... 7 5 5
Iowa................ 50 4 4
Missouri........... 4 2 2
North Dakota....... 134 1 1
South Dakota....... 11 2 2
Nebraska........... 4
Kansas............. 58 2 2 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 771 2 2 2 2 3 3 6 6
Delaware ........... 9
Maryland .......... 5
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 219 2 2 3 3
West Virginia...... 261 2 2
North Carolina..... 18 -3 3
South Carolina..... 39
Georgia............ 7 2 2 1 1
Florida ............ 213

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,244 17 17
Kentucky............ 64 1 1
Tennessee............. 950 16 16
Alabama ... ........ 82
Mississippi........ 148

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,035 14 14
Arkansas ...........
Louisiana.......... 2 2
Oklahoma ........... 5 1
Texas............... 1,030 11 11

MOUNTAIN............. 1,268 1 1 -1 1
Montana............ 91
Idaho ............... .. 78
Wyoming ............ 25
Colorado........... 441
New Mexico ......... 375 -
Arizona ............ 84 -
Utah................ 171
Nevada ............. 3

PACIFIC ............. 942 1 1
Washington ......... 289 -
Oregon ............. 24
California........ 603 1 1
Alaska ............ 6
Hawa ii ............. 220 -
Puerto Rico..........









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JANUARY 8, 1966


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and yer Area Al 65 years a year
Ages and over Influ a Age and over
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn -----
Cambridge, Mass.- ----
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Con. ------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.*-
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio ------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio-----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.----------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


827
265
57
35
27
62
26
26
31
41
70
13
62
36
76

3,606
70
39
160
51
41
40
81
110
1,821
42
472
291
48
131
21
39
52
28
35
34

2,783
68
44
779
212
231
132
90
348
41
48
47
35
62
140
35
164
32
39
48
106
82

931
66
29
23
114
27
155
91
310
82
34


516
158
31
29
21
33
17
17
18
20
38
8
43
25
58

2,206
40
28
104
30
25
26
42
51
1,112
27
281
179
27
91
15
20
30
22
32
24

1,547
41
32
400
122
116
76
54
193
22
17
29
20
41
82
18
106
19
21
21
66
51

556
50
20
14
71
18
90
49
177
50
17


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.---------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.-------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.*----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.----------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif .------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif. .------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


750
73
172
19
55
48
33
59
19
86
50
109
27

370
41
34
25
67
70
27
37
69

697
18
16
16
97
20
61
83
46
109
65
86
40
40

277
20
10
95
15
62
7
29
39

1,095
14
33
34
22
39
342
72
30
105
36
73
95
25
102
40
33


Total 13,857 f 8,014 691 690

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks


All Causes, All Ages -------------------------
All Causes, Age 65 and over-------------------
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages-------------
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age---------------


13,857
8,014
691
690


Week No.















INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Information for International Travel
1966-66 edition-Public Health Service Publication No. 384


The following change should be made in the list of Yellow
Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:
Delete
City Chicago, Illinois
Center United Air Lines Medical Department
O'Hare Field Station
O'Hare International Airport
Clinic Hours Friday, 9-11 a.m.
Fee Yes


Add
City Chicago, Illinois
Center United Air Lines Medical Department
O'Hare Field Station
O'Hare International Airport
Clinic Hours Friday, 9-11 a.m.
By Appointment
Fee Yes



PLAGUE Viet Nam


Bubonic plague continues to be a problem in Viet Nam.
The areas on the 'infected local area' list as of January 7,
1966, include the ports of Dalat, Danang, \- ,r.rn:, Sai-
gon, and Binh-Dinh, Pleiku, and (.J, 'r:-\. :, Provinces.
Over 300 cases of bubonic plague were reported to the
World Health Organization from Viet Nam during 1965.
Although it is not a requirement, travelers proceeding
to any of these areas in Viet Nam are strongly advised to
be immunized against plague. The standard course, using
the vaccine licensed in the United -i1.,,.- is three injec-
tions, the first two 30 days apart and the third 4 to 12
weeks following the second dose. A booster dose at
3-month intervals is advised when remaining in a known
plague area. Once the complete standard course has been
given, it need not be repeated and a single booster dose
is adequate at any time thereafter.

(Department of Foreign Quarantine, United States Public
Health Service.)





REVISION, Vol. 14, No. 52, p. 441: The total number
of cases of human rabies in the U.S. during 1965, as
shown in"Notifiable Disease of Low Frequency," should
read 1 and not 2. The human case of rabies reported from
California on the same page was an imported case brought
into hospital for treatment from outside of the U.S.


JANUARY 8, 1966


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15. 00, IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA. GEORGIA.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GCOOGA iD. M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. A NUI iA, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF. SURVEILLANCE SECTION D.A. HENDERSON, M.D.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE, M.B.,
F.R.C.P.E.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
VESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 3033S
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS fO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.





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