Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00280

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


.113


..d .,
,SMCC ,


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


CURRENT TRENDS
PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS Texas

Through the week ending July 30, 1966, Texas has
reported 33 cases of paralytic poliomyelitis to the CDC.
Reports of 15 cases, several of which are delayed, have
been received since July 2 (MMWR, Vol. 15. No. 26). The
onset of illness occurred after May 1 in 28 of the 33 cases.
Type 1 polio virus has been isolated from 10 of the patients.
The illness has occurred entirely in preschool chil-
dren of Caucasian, Spanish-speaking families. Eight cases
were in children between 6 and 12 months of age. Of the
remaining cases, 21 occurred in children from one to 3
years of age and 4 in children from 4 to 5 years of age.
Twenty of the patients were males and 13 were females.


CONTENTS
C urrnt Trends
I'aralytic Poli tinv litii. -- Iexas
Salmonellu.sts May 1966 . .
1Epidenmiologic Note. and Reports
Gastroenteritis Associated with Ra" <(llnm.
Co ne ticut . .
International Notes and R reports
Variola Minor United Kingdom ..


.251


There were two fatalities, an H-trrnth-old male and a
3-year-old female.
The cases reported occurred in 14 different counties,
All,.i..~u'h most of the cases were reported from counties
in the lower Rio Grande Valley. several have been reported
from other counties in south and southwest Texas (Figure 1).
(Continued on page 254)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
30th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 30 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JULY 30, JULY 31, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis .... ........ .. ... 87 61 60 1,007 904 888
Brucellosis. ............ .. .. ..... 5 6 10 122 135 235
Diphtheria...................... ..... 8 1 5 98 88 159
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 35 46 788 911 --
Encephalitis, post-infectious ......... 16 16 518 470
Hepatitis, serum ............... .... 40 3 694769 20,271 26,118
Hepatitis, infectious .. ................. 541 18,993
Measles rubeolaa). .................. 1,318 1,171 2.601 185,310 235,343 378,007
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 3 1 12 44 29 137
Paralytic ................. ........ 3 1 10 40 25 113
Nonparalytic ............... ........ --- 4 -
Meningococcal infections. Total .......... 34 46 41 2,487 2.127 1,585
Civilian .............................. 34 44 2,223 1,952 -
Military ...... ... ............... 2 --- 264 175 -
Rubella (German measles) ................ 239 40,035 ...
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 4.355 3.885 3.408 281.630 261.277 229,388
Tetanus.......... ...................... 4 6 91 138 -
Tularemia ..... .. ...................... 2 8 87 145 -
Typhoid fever .......................... 19 6 16 190 214 237
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever). 16 20 132 153 -
Rabies in Animals .............91 77 80 2,525 2,774 I 2.476

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: .......................... ... ........ 4 Botulism: ....... ........ 4
Leptospirosis: .... ........ ...... 40 Trichinosis: Ohio- ................. 57
Malaria: Mich.-I, Kans.-l, Nev.-l, Calif.-3, Wash.-l .... 184 Rabies in Man: ....... ..... ......... .
Psittacosis: Tenn.-l ............ ............ 25 Rubella. Congenital Syndrome: ................. 18
Typhus marine ......... 14 Plague: Ariz.-l', N.Mex.- ...... .. ........... 4
*Delayed Report








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


JULY 30, 1966


CURRENT TRENDS
PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS Texas
(Continued from front page)


Seven of the 33 patients had received either inacti-
vated or oral vaccine. A 10-month-old child had received
2 or 3 doses of inactivated vaccine and one 3-year-old
child had received one dose of type 1 oral vaccine. The
remaining 5 had received only one dose of inactivated
vaccine or one dose of trivalent vaccine.

Information on travel and contact with travellers was
available for 25 of the 33 ill persons. Among these 25,
16 denied any travel or contact with travellers, It is possi-
ble that the remaining 9 persons acquired their infection
as a result of travel or contact with travellers outside of
State of residence.

Plans are underway for intensification of vaccination
in the affected areas.



(Reported by Dr. Van C. Tipton, Director, Communicable
Disease Division, Texas State Health Department, and a
team from CDC.)


Figure 1
CASES OF PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS BY COUNTY
TEXAS 1966


1


i

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--- -------'-'i ~`-`---i
i
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r- -i
il\
1---
;, :J~

- i iii:--i--;lI



...


7 V
1\..:.


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
GASTROENTERITIS ASSOCIATED WITH
RAW CLAMS Connecticut


Three outbreaks of gastroenteritis occurred in Con-
necticut among separate groups of persons attending
picnic outings on June 12, 1966. Hard-shell clams, con-
sumed raw, were incriminated epidemiologically as the
cause of each outbreak.
At one picnic there were 31 known gastrointestinal
illnesses among the 140 persons present. After an interval
of 24 to 48 hours, the 31 persons developed diarrhea,
anorexia and abdominal pain, frequently accompanied by
nausea and vomiting. Fever was virtually absent. None
reported mucus or blood in stools. Food histories obtained
from 52 persons showed that 23 of 24 ill persons had
eaten raw clams while only 3 of 28 persons remaining
well had eaten raw clams.
On the same day, another group held an outing at a
different site. After a similar incubation period, 67 of the
430 persons present developed an illness similar to that
described above. Food histories from 104 persons showed
that 54 of 67 ill persons had eaten raw clams. Among those
13 ill persons who did not eat raw clams, 5 ate some of
these same cherrystone clams which had been either
steamed or boiled for an uncertain length of time. Some
of the remaining eight persons consumed clam broth from
the steamed clams. Of the 37 persons interviewed who
were not ill, only 4 gave a history of eating raw clams.
Also on the same day, a third group held a picnic for
approximately 160 persons at another separate site.


\lrhough less information is available about this out-
break, it is known that several identical illnesses occurred
after a similar incubation period in persons known to have
eaten raw clams. A number of persons known not to have
eaten raw clams remained well.
Stool specimens were collected one week after the
onset of illness from 8 persons attending the first picnic
and 2 weeks after the onset of illness from 43 persons
attending the second picnic. All of the specimens obtained
have been negative for enteric pathogenic bacteria.
The clams consumed at all three outings were pur-
chased from a single seafood market. At the first 2 picnics
they were opened by 2 different employees of this market.
At the third, however, the clams were opened by persons
attending the picnic who reported discarding a large
number because they were malodorous. The clams were
supplied to the market by a single wholesaler in another
state. Bacteriological studies undertaken on other clams
from the same market, though not from the same shipment,
and from the wet storage facility of the wholesaler, have
been negative for salmonella. The area from which the
suspected clams were harvested has not yet been iden-
tified.
(Reported by Dr. James C. Hart, Director, Division of
Preventable !'. r.i-. and Dr. Barbara Christine, Chief,
Epidemiology Section, Division of Preventable Diseases,
Connecticut State Department of Health.)


254


r-------
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JULY 30, 1lf6


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CURRENT TRENDS
SALMONELLOSIS MAY 1966


Durnr May 1966 there were 1,431 recoveries of
salmonella from human sources and 513 isolations from
nonhuman sources; the comparable figures for April were
1,266 and 436 respectively. The cumulative number of
isolations reported for the first 5 months of 1966 is 6,751,
6.3 percent less than the same period in 1965 when there
were 7,206. As illustrated in Figure 2, the numbers
generally correspond to the expected seasonal pattern.
Among the human salmonellae isolations there were
60 different serotypes, seven of which accounted for 66.1
percent of the 1,431 isolations reported (Table 1). The
age-sex distribution of individuals reported as harboring
salmonellae during May was compatible with past expe-
rience.
Salmonella enteritidis, which usually accounts for
5 percent of isolations from human sources, increased
to 10 percent during May. Fil'.n in.- of the 142 isolations
reported were from Georgia, and most of these were
associated with a continuing outbreak in a chain of
restaurants primarily in the Atlanta area. Although no
vehicle of infection has been identified as yet, studies
by the State Health Department staff are presently under-
way.
Fi, ft -,rn serotypes were represented among the
513 isolations from nonhuman sources reported from 33
states during May; the seven most frequently reported
serotypes accounted for 48.5 percent of the total (Table 2).


The most. prominent nonhuman sources of salmonella
reported during May were chickens, 101 (20.7 percent);
turkeys, 94 (17.9 percent); animal feed. 88 (16.7 percent);
and dry milk, 40 (7.6 percent).
(Reported by the Salmonella Surveillance Unit, Epide-
mioloyy Branch, C(C.)(


Table 1
Seven Most Frequently Reported Serotypes
Sources May 1966


Rank

1


2
3
4
5
6
7


Serotype

S. typhi-murium and
S. typhi-murium iar.
copenihayen
S. enteritidis
S. heidelbery
S. infants
S. nel-port
S. saint-paui
S. blockley
Total
Total
(all serotypes)


Number


142
136
106
78
51
43
945

1,431


from Human


Percent


27.2

9.9
9.5
7.4
5.5
3.6
3.0
66.1


Rank
Last
Month


(Table S on page 260)


Figure 2
REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA IN THE UNITED STATES


6001


U MS


JFMAMJ JASOND6JFMAM J JASO N D
1964 1965


255


J F M A M J J A S 0 N D
1966


If"JA


VVA


url"I


J F M A MJ JASOND
1963









256 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 30, 1966 AND JULY 31,1965 (30th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 87 61 5 35 46 16 8 1 40 541 543

NEW ENcLAND.......... 21 2 1 1 19 17
Maine.... .......... 1 -2 2
New Hampshire...... 3 4 1
Vermont............. 1 2
Massachusetts...... 16 1 5 7
Rhode Island....... 1 2 1 1 1
Connecticut........ 6 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 4 5 10 8 3 21 86 96
New York City...... 3 5 4 16 29 21
New York, Up-State. 1 1 21 23
New Jersey......... 2 5 3 5 8 26
Pennsylvania ....... 2 1 1 2 28 26

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 7 1 4 7 3 1 79 92
Ohio................ 2 3 5 1 16 23
Indiana............ 1 2 9
Illinois........... 4 1 6 30
Michigan........... 4 2 3 45 28
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 1 10 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 30 29
Minnesota........... 2 3 1 3 1 9 5
Iowa............... 1 1 1 6 4
Missouri........... 1 10 10
North Dakota.......
South Dakota ....... 1 1
Nebraska .......... -
Kansas............. 1 4 9

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 23 5 1 14 5 5 6 35 49
Delaware............ 2 1 -
Maryland............. 7 8
Dist. of Columbia.. 1
Virginia........... 1 1 1 1 6 5
West Virginia...... 6 2 8
North Carolina..... 2 1 3 1 3 8 15
South Carolina..... 4 2
Georgia ............ 5 2
Florida............. 13 3 10 4 2 5 10

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 7 3 2 -1 1 34 34
Kentucky.......... 8 16
Tennessee.......... 1 3 1 15 10
Alabama............. 6 1 1 2 7
Mississippi........ 1 9 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 8 9 1 4 4 43 63
Arkansas........... 4 4
Louisiana............. 1 2 1 2 6 9
Oklahoma.......... 2 2
Texas.............. 7 7 2 4 31 48

MOUNTAIN............. 3 2 4 2 1 42 41
Montana............ 2 2 1
Idaho............... 6 2
Wyoming............. 1 i
Colorado............. 1 2 22 14
New Mexico........ 3 11
Arizona............ 2 1 1 9 11
Utah ................ 1 I 1
Nevada.............

PACIFIC.............. 16 27 1 7 5 1 10 173 122
Washington......... 15 8
Oregon............. 1 1 31 16
California......... 15 24 1 7 4 1 9 126 97
Alaska.............. 1 1
Hawaii............. 3 -

Puerto Rico.......... 16 16









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 257


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 30, 1966 AND JULY 31 1965 (30th WEEK) CONTINUED


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, POLIOMYELITIS
MEASLES (Rubeola) TOTAL RUBELLA
AL Total Paralytic
AREA --

S1966 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966
1966 1965 1966 1965 1966
I*. 1 ,.. I '" I -' '

NEW ENGLAND......... 13 2,184 36,586 2 112 109 27
Maine............... 192 2,764 9 16 5
New Hampshire .... 67 381 9 5
Vermont ........... 221 1,245 4 6 1
Massachusetts...... 4 753 19,184 43 35 8
Rhode Island....... 72 3,888 12 14
Connecticut ........ 9 879 9,124 2 35 33 13

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 58 17,782 14,203 3 286 280 19
New York City...... 17 8,210 2,156 39 49 -- 7
New York, Up-State. 36 2,413 3,990 81 76 12
New Jersey......... 2 1,842 2,437 1 82 75
Pennsylvania....... 3 5,317 5,620 2 84 80

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 522 67,512 54,025 2 382 287 103
Ohio ............... 72 6,309 8,770 1 102 75 8
Indiana.............. 13 5,598 1,734 1 65 39 9
Illinois........... 18 11,230 2,500 74 76 15
Michigan........... 268 13,867 25,928 102 62 25
Wisconsin.......... 151 30,508 15,093 39 35 46

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 42 8,603 16,278 4 138 109 1 1 3
Minnesota.......... 6 1,637 619 2 33 22 1 1
Iowa................ 22 5,272 8,940 21 7 1 -
Missouri............ 5 528 2,555 54 50 -
North Dakota....... 9 1,051 3,604 2 9 7 2
South Dakota....... 40 111 4 2
Nebraska........... 75 449 8 10
Kansas ............. NN NN N 9 11 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC ...... 186 14,706 24,353 6 418 417 1 13
Delaware........... 1 251 499 4 6 -
Maryland.......... 4 2,083 1,107 41 39 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 380 72 1 11 8
Virginia........... 68 2,069 3,993 49 48 5
West Virginia...... 38 5,069 13,365 2 23 24
North Carolina..... 14 410 375 102 82 -
South Carolina..... 1 642 1,005 46 56 2
Georgia............. 2 233 612 57 53 I
Florida............. 57 3,569 3,325 3 85 101 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 75 19,370 13,487 3 215 167 3 23
Kentucky.......... 2 4,661 2,401 80 68 11
Tennessee.......... 58 12,066 7,711 1 70 49 12
Alabama............ 11 1,660 2,281 2 46 30 1 -
Mississippi........ 4 983 1,094 19 20 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 178 23,668 30,252 4 358 296 3 3 34 3
Arkansas........... 966 1,081 1 33 14 -
Louisiana.......... 93 99 1 136 165 -
Oklahoma............ 470 201 18 18 1
Texas............... 178 22,139 28,871 2 171 99 3 3 33 3

MOUNTAIN............. 90 11,624 19,316 78 65 21
Montana............ 1 1,800 3,651 4 2 2
Idaho.............. 18 1,514 2,722 5 8
Wyoming............ 144 840 6 4 -
Colorado........... 25 1,218 5,562 41 13 4
New Mexico........ 5 1,101 670 10 10 -
Arizona............ 16 5,218 1,216 8 16 15
Utah............... 25 586 4,453 10 -
Nevada............. 43 202 4 2 -

PACIFIC ............. 154 19,861 26,843 10 500 397 1 27
Washington......... 36 3,453 7,205 37 32 1 11
Oregon............... 23 1,624 3,146 32 28 10
California........ 79 14,329 12,667 10 412 315 3
Alaska............. 14 332 149 15 15
Hawaii............. 2 123 3,676 4 7 3
Puerto Rico.......... 39 2,452 2,213 1 10 5 1 1 1 1










258 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 30, 1966 AND JULY 31, 1965 (30th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)

1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 4,355 4 91 2 87 19 190 16 132 91 2,525

NEW ENGLAND.......... 631 2 1 4 1 8 58
Maine.............. 64 2 21
New Hampshire...... -- 5 19
Vermont............ 30 1 16
Massachusetts...... 97 2 1 1 2
Rhode Island ....... 51 -
Connecticut ....... 389 3 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 150 11 1 35 2 28 7 173
New York City...... 5 4 15 -
New York, Up-State. 143 2 7 1 11 7 162
New Jersey......... NN 1 1 7 1 9
Pennsylvania....... 2 4 6 8 11

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 307 7 12 26 10 11 351
Ohio ............... 27 3 3 12 6 4 174
Indiana............. 58 1 3 1 4 79
Illinois........... 52 1 5 3 4 36
Michigan............ 113 2 4 1 29
Wisconsin.......... 57 1 6 2 33

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 148 6 1 8 2 16 2 19 570
Minnesota.......... 5 1 4 131
Iowa.............. 39 1 4 6 120
Missouri........... 3 4 3 2 8 1 3 178
North Dakota....... 73 1 2 19
South Dakota ....... 8 1 2 3 56
Nebraska........... 1 1 1 17
Kansas............. 20 2 2 1 49

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 453 1 23 1 9 2 33 7 61 10 321
Delaware........... 26 1 1
Maryland........... 7 1 1 7 1 16 1 1
Dist. of Columbia.. I 1 2 -
Virginia........... 135 4 2 8 2 17 2 187
West Virginia...... 102 1 1 39
North Carolina..... 13 1 2 2 3 1 15 1 3
South Carolina..... 18 1 1 1 6 1 5 -
Georgia............ 5 6 1 2 1 1 7 6 56
Florida............ 146 9 5 35

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 745 3 11 17 1 21 6 20 8 314
Kentucky........... 29 1 2 3 2 5 58
Tennessee .......... 691 1 9 8 3 14 3 241
Alabama ............ 3 6 4 1 6 3 4 12
Mississippi........ 25 3 2 4 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 629 18 32 4 21 6 20 520
Arkansas........... 3 2 24 1 -2 3 56
Louisiana.......... 1 4 3 5 1 24
Oklahoma......... 21 I 4 4 8 4 4 137
Texas .............. 604 11 1 7 12 303

MOUNTAIN............. 781 1 5 8 3 5 50
Montana............ 12 2 7
Idaho.............. 94 -
Wyoming............. 15 -
Colorado........... 431 1 3 2 1 8
New Mexico ........ 73 1 1 2 8
Arizona............. 51 1 2 25
Utah ............... 104 1 3 -
Nevada ............ 1 2

PACIFIC.............. 511 12 3 9 26 1 1 3 168
Washington......... 38 8 10 5
Oregon ............. 9 1 1 2
California......... 417 11 3 1 13 1 1 3 161
Alaska.............. 33 -
Hawaii............ 14 -
Puerto Rico.......... 10 31 6 8









Morbidity and Mortality W'eekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JII.Y ., 1966

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Week No.


Area


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass. ----.
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.--------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, I1l.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


A I I

All 65 years and 1 y1er
Ages and over Influenza All
I a All Ages Causes


Area


+ I 4 I---


667
211
45
31
23
46
26
11
28
37
70
15
50
28
46

3,009
52
46
145
33
26
37
53
87
1,428
28
514
188
49
85
33
37
56
54
24
34

2,501
62
26
732
165
187
110
72
369
48
47
51
40
44
161
22
128
35
23
28
98
53

920
69
28
30
143
23
130
80
266
71
80


409
126
26
22
18
20
17
7
17
22
35
11
31
21
36

1,753
30
32
85
20
14
20
30
48
821
20
294
105
28
53
26
23
34
30
17
23

1,376
38
15
363
103
109
63
43
186
36
22
31
21
33
86
11
72
18
15
15
65
31

553
47
15
13
87
16
86
46
157
41
45


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.- ----
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii*-----
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,155
115
281
41
81
92
52
92
25
79
59
192
46

637
96
50
32
143
129
43
47
97

1,054
41
29
31
142
52
66
176
48
171
68
107
54
69

417
48
24
105
16
87
21
67
49

1,527
14
64
26
44
67
529
85
35
108
62
106
140
44
124
40
39


65 years
and over


591
51
135
16
44
51
23
40
12
62
39
91
27

307
53
23
11
67
66
18
20
49

562
27
13
21
77
24
40
82
32
90
33
58
27
38

240
27
17
57
13
49
13
40
24

909
9
34
17
20
41
331
43
27
60
35
54
89
24
74
23
28


and
Inf luenza
All Ages

55
5
9
2
2

4
2
2
6
12
7
4

26
2
3
1
10
6

2
2

41
3
1
I
5
2

9
2
4
2
6


1 year
All
Causes

71
7
21

5
4

12
2
2
2
12
2

57
8
3
4
19
8
5
3
7

81

5

4


Total 11,887 6,700 459 658

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 387,304
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 223,820
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages---------- 17,279
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 20,094


259


|








260


CURRENT TRENDS
SALMONELLOSIS MAY 1966
(C(nti/nuied from page *

Table 2
Seven Most Frequently Reported Serotypes


from Nonhuman Sources


May 1966


Rank Last
Rank Serotype Number Percent Month

1 S. typhi-murium and 57 11.1 1
S. typhi-1urium rarT.
copenhagen

2 S. heidelberg 44 8.6 2

3 S. oranienburg 43 '4 Not Listed

4 S. anatum 33 0.4 4

5 S. monterideo 27 ,.3 3

6 S. tennessee 24 4.7 Not Listed

7 S. senftenberg 21 4.1 Not Listed

Total 249 48.5
Total (all serotypes) 513



INTERNATIONAL NOTES
VARIOLA MINOR United Kingdom


Subsequent to the outbreak in Staffordshire County,
England, in which a total of 44 cases of variola minor were
reported (MMWR, Vol. 15, No. 24), three new foci of infec-
tion were recognized in the United Kingdom during June
and early July. Of 16 new cases diagnosed. 12 have been
notified from the Pontypool Urban and Rural Districts in
Monmouthshire, Wales, 3 from Solihul County Borough in
Warwickshire and one from Salford County Borough in
Lancashire.
The twelve cases in Wales all involved children under
10 years of age. The earliest diagnosed case was in an
infant 4 months old who became ill on June 2 and was
hospitalized on June 9. Five siblings diagnosed during
the previous month as chickenpox were considered in retro-
spect to be cases of variola minor; two of these children
were reported to have been successfully vaccinated in
1962. Six additional cases within a single family occurred
in school contacts of the -ihi;nh of the initial case.
Three confirmed cases were reported on July 11 in
Solihul County Borough near the city of Birmingham. The
most recent case was notified on July 16 from Salford
County Borough, which is near the city of Manchester and
73 miles northwest of Birmingham.
To date, no epidemiological link has been found be-
tween the prior outbreak in Staffordshire and the present
c ases.
Previously infected areas in Staffordshire County are
now declared smallpox-free.


(Compiled from reports from the World Health Organization).


JULY 30, 1966


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15600 IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA, GEORGIA
CHIEF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER, M.D
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A D LANGMUIR, MD
ACTING CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION IDA L SHERMAN, M.S,


IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF COM-
MUNICABLE DISEASES SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333
NOTE" THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE COC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


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