Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00271

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 15, No. 32


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS ((ON i 'N I

POLIOMYELITIS OUTBREAK Texas :pid."mlhil NXot- :>nd I i.p r


To date in 1966 a total of 52 cases of paralytic
poliomyelitis have been reported in the United States.
Of these, 43 are from the State of Texas: 10 in this total
have been reported since the week ending July 30(MMWR,
Vol. 15, No. 30). One patient who was diagnosed in
Michigan had lived in Texas until 3 days before onset.
Two other cases, one from Illinois and one from iashing-
ton, had travelled in Texas shortly before onset of illness.
Thirty-seven of the 43 Texas cases have occurred
since the first of May. There were 11 cases with onset in
May, 11 in June, 12 in July and 3 to date in August. All


Polhomv iehti Outtre.ak IT .
En( eph lil T s .. .. .
Current Trinls-
1M onine <. oC <'i Intfe 'n :in I -t H iH . .
Summary of Reported C('a.,-i o( nl-tioau' M


were in infants or preschool children except for a 7-year-
old child. There ha\e been two death-.
Cases have been reported from 17 counties in south
Texas (Figure 1) which haxe a combined population of 1.6
million people. In recent weeks there has been a tendency
for northward extension of the disease to -outh central
(('oitinued on paye 27i4)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
32nd WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 32 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE AUGUST 13, AUGUST 14. 1961-1965 I MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961- 1965
Aseptic meningitis ........... ..... .. 81 51 60 1,181 1.019 1.026
Brucellosis. ............... 7 8 10 132 148 257
Diphtheria. .... ........ ..... 9 108 89 160
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .. .. 37 30 862 982 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious ...... .. 8 16 -540 499
Hepatitis, serum .. 29 520 842 i ?1.310 i 27,608
Hepatitis, infectious ............. 5 520 734 20079 2110 2
Measles rubeolaa) ....... ... .. 782 921 1.568 186.936 237,409 382.274
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 4 13 57 35 159
Paralytic ............ ... ...... .. 4 11 52 30 132
Nonparalytic .......... ..... 5 -
Meningococcal infections. Total ......... 44 25 29 2,569 2,192 1.640
Civilian ..... 44 25 2.305 2,013
Military ..... ......... 264 179
Rubella (German measles) ...... ... 302 -- 40,618 --
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever 4.249 4.190 3,439 290.387 269,548 236.160
Tetanus ............ ...... .. 2 14 -99 164 -
Tularemia ... ... ..... 8 7 97 155
Typhoid fever ...... .. 10 13 15 216 242 268
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 12 8 160 176 -

Rabies in Animals....................... .. 77 69 60 2,672 2,917 2.602

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum Cum.
Anthrax: ........ ...... 4 Botulism: ... .. 4
Leptospirosis: ......... ................ ... 42 Trichinosis: N.Y.C.-l, N.Y.UpS.-I. Pa.- .. 61
Malaria: Pa.-9. S.C.-1. Ga.-1 ... 198 Rabies in Man:.. ... 1
Psittacosis: ?6 P ubhlla C~rinnital Svndrome: 18
TOphus murine .. I P Ilau. 4








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


AUtUST 13, 1966


POLIOMYELITIS OUTBREAK Texas
(Continued from front page)


Texas. All cases in Ector, Concho, Pecos and Bexar
Counties had onsets after the first of July.
Information on vaccination status is known for 42
cases; none had received a complete series of polio-
myelitis immunization. A total of 31 had never received
any poliomyelitis vaccine, 3 had received one or two
doses of inactivated vaccine, 4 a single dose of trivalent
live (oral) vaccine, and 4 a single dose of monovalent
live vaccine.
Type I poliovirus has been implicated by viral studies
of stool or serum specimens from 14 patients. No other
types of poliovirus have been found to date.
Programs of poliomyelitis immunization are being
planned by local health departments and local medical
societies with support from the State Department of Health.
So far this year more than 83,000 doses of trivalent live
poliovirus vaccine have been distributed by the State
Department of Health for use in the 17 counties which
have reported cases of poliomyelitis.
(Reported by Dr. Van C. Tipton, State Epidemiologist,
Texas State Department of Health.)


Figure 1
CASES OF PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS BY COUNTY
TEXAS 1966


S------l



I-


_---. -- .fTY


K


N.,


ENCEPHALITIS Dallas, Texas


During the last week in July and first 2 weeks in
August, 33 clinical cases of encephalitis have been re-
ported from Dallas. Two deaths have occurred. In addi-
tion there have been 25 cases of aseptic meningitis.
Serologic studies at the Texas State Department of
Health laboratories indicate that at least some of the
cases of encephalitis are caused by the St. Louis enceph-
alitis virus. Hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer
determinations have revealed a 4-fold increase in the
sera of two patients and initial titers of 1:10 or greater
in sera from seven others.
None of the 25 patients with aseptic meningitis have
been evaluated serologically to date. Viral studies of
earlier patients with this syndrome have confirmed the
presence of enteroxiruses in the Dallas area.


Encephalitis has occurred in all age groups from 5
to 87 years but has been more frequent in older age groups.
There is no distinct geographical clustering of cases.
Clinical specimens and mosquitoes have been obtained
for viral isolation, but results are not yet available.
Culex quinquefasciatus has been the predominent mosquito
species collected. Intensive control measures, directed
at both larval and adult mosquitoes, have been initiated
in selected areas throughout the city and aerospraying is
being considered. Intensive surveillance and investiga-
tion are continuing.
(Reported by Dr. Van C. Tipton, State Epidemiologist,
Texas State Department of Health; Dr. Hal J. Dr. **
Director, Dallas City Health Department; and a team from
CDC.)


CURRENT TRENDS
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION 1966


Through the 32nd week of 1966 a total of 2,569 cases
of meningococcal infection has been reported to the
Communicable Disease C'enter, an increase of 17.2 per-
cent over the 2,192 cases notified during the comparable
period in 1965. \ii,- i.'ich the numbers of moningcoccal
infections reported weekly in July and August 1966 have
closely followed the expected seasonal low level, the
weekly totals during the months March through June 1966)


were substantially above the 1965 level FIL'ir. 2).
Table 1 indicates that all regions of the country except
the New Fngland. Middle Atlantic and South Atlantic Divi-
sions contributed to this spring increase. Of the total
number of cases reported thus far in 1966, 10.3 percent
have occurred among military personnel compared to
8.2 percent during the similar period in 1965.
(Table and Text continued on page 280)


274


--- -1-


*











AUGUST 13, 1966


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report







Figure 2

MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS BY WEEK OF REPORT

1965, 1966 AND MEDIAN 1961-65 UNITED STATES


1961-65 MEDIAN


i I i I I T I r I I i i i l i I I ii I I 1 I I I T I r I 1 I'
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

MONTH




SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS, JULY 1966 and JULY 1965


CASES OF PRIMARY AN' SECONDARY SYPHILIS: Reporting Areas July 1966 and July 1965 Provisional Data


Cumulative
Reporting Area July Jan-July Reporting Area


NEW ENGLAND ........
Mailne. ................
New Hampshire............
Vermont.................
Massachusetts............
Rhode Island...........
Connectic .... ........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..........
Upstate New York.........
Nev York City............
Pa. (Exc1. Phila.).......
Philadelphia..........
NeC Jersey. ............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........
hiaa. ................
Indlana.........
Downstate Illinois......
Chicago....... ........
SM chigan...............
Wi.sconsl...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........
Minnesota...........
Iowa....................
Mtssouri .................
North Da.k ta.............
South Dak ta............
Nebraska...............
Kansas..................

SOUTH ATLANTIC...........
Delaware.................
Maryland.................
District of Columbia.....
Virginia...............
West Virginia ...........
North Carolin............
South Carlina.........


21




273
22
153
8
2
67

232
51
9
12
75
74
11
II

25
3
5
8


2
5


6
46
40
35
13
72
80
95
[ 191


- .4 ----4--+--- --- ---- ______
SKentucky................
S7 22 Tennesse................
1 1 2 Alabama.............
16 188 152 MississippT.........
I 18 10
6 53 7- WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........
Arkansas...............
428 2155 2,724 Louisiana..........
61 21 29 Oklahoma................
239 465 1620 Texas...... .........
9 107 91
22 151 154 MOUNTAIN... ....
97 419 5AO Montana.............
Idaho....................
230 1,818 1,737 Wy6ning.................
50 345 369 Colorado................
1 54 33 New Mexico...............
16 113 128 Arizona..................
88 588 708 Utah..................
69 651 48 Nevada.................
6 67 51
PACIFIC ................
42 246 293 Washington .. ...........
8 19 59 Oregon...................
4 38 14 California...........
12 100 138 Alaska.............
5 1 Hawaii..............


Cuuiltrive
Juiy an i
!4i


3 64
I:n 187



,048 1,22<
I3 A7
-. 21


U. S. TOTAL.......... il71 l,66 1.7 .8 13..71

TERRITORIES.............. 47 6 560
Puerto Ric............ 4 6 44 N50
Virgin Islands........... 3 1 I




Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed rep rts
through previous onths.


275










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 13, 1966 AND AUGUST 14, 1965 (32nd WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965


UNITED STATES...

NEW ENGLAND...........
Maine...............
New Hampshire......
Vermont............
Massachusetts ......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut ........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania .......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio...............
Indiana ...........
Illinois ..........
Michigan ..........
Wisconsin .........


81

10



9
1


6
1
1

4

6
3

1
2


WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2
Minnesota......... 2
Iowa ..............
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 12
Delaware...........
Maryland. ......... I
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia............
West Virginia....... 4
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
,eorgia ............ -
Florida............. 7

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3
Kentucky.... ...... 1
Tennessee .......... 1
Alabama............ I1
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 10
Arkansas ...........
Louisiana..........
Oklahoma...........
Texas....... ...... 10

MOUNTAIN.............
M,i tn


M an..............
Idah ...............
Wyoming............
Co rad .............
NSw Mexico ......
Arizona............
lUl h .............
Nevada. i.... .


3 1


7



7

2





2


PACIFIC .............. 32 16
Washing on n.........
Orgn ........ ..
C$l iforni,........ 32 14
i tC ii..............
w i i ............ -

Pi i' T


1
- 4-
4

4 5

2

1


526

16
7

1
2
2
4

95
20
31
18
26

74
29
8
7
27
3

41
1
16
19
1


4

57

14

9

8
1
15
10

29
7
8
6
8

42
3
6
1
32

17


- 7 155
- 9
24
7 120



22


7
10
3

IIi

7
14
88
2


276


5




-









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 13, 1966 AND AUGUST 14, 1965 (32nd WEEK) CONTINUED


AREA


MEASLES (Rubeo

Cumula
1966 1966


UNITED STATES... 782

NEW ENGLAND.......... 17
Maine.............. -
New Hampshire...... 3
Vermont............ 4
Massachusetts...... 4
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut....... 6

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 35
New York City...... 13
New York, Up-State. 19
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania....... 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 218
Ohio................ 9
Indiana............. 6
Illinois............ 13
Michigan............ 134
Wisconsin.......... 56

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 10
Minnesota .......... 1
Iowa................. 4
Missouri............
North Dakota....... 5
South Dakota.......
Nebraska ...........
Kansas............. NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 87
Delaware ........... 5
Maryland........... 5
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia ...........
West Virginia...... 35
North Carolina..... 22
South Carolina..... 1
Georgia ...........
Florida............. 19

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 84
Kentucky............ 28
Tennessee .......... 41
Alabama............ 3
Mississippi........ 12

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 123
Arkansas ...........
Louisiana..........
Oklahoma........... 4
Texas............... 119

MOUNTAIN ............ 95
Montana ............
Idaho............... 11
Wyoming............ 1
Colorado........... 38
New Mexico.......... 7
Arizona............. 27
Utah................ 11
Nevada............ -

PACIFIC.............. 113
Washington.......... 4
Oregon.............. 27
California......... 31
Alaska.............. 51
Hawaii............. -
Puerto Rico........... 53


186,936

2,220
194
78
225
765
72
886

17,871
8,236
2,466
1,844
5,325

67,965
6,324
5,621
11,257
14,117
30,646

8,657
1,639
5,302
529
1,072
40
75
NN

14,938
256
2,095
380
2,090
5,133
453
653
233
3,645

19,517
4,693
12,165
1,663
996

23,943
966
98
474
22,405

11,759
1,801
1,531
145
1,269
1,115
5,254
601
43

20,066
3,462
1,682
14,406
391
125


2,557


MENINGOCOCCAL INFE
la) TOTAL

tive Cumula
1966
1965 1966 1966
237,409 44 2,569

36,681 113
2,781 9
381 9
1,246 4
19,238 44
3,896 12
9,139 35

14,439 6 303
2,248 1 42
4,044 3 87
2,503 1 88
5,644 1 86

54,850 7 398
8,822 107
1,791 3 69
2,589 1 76
26,190 1 105
15,458 2 41

16,383 140
625 33
8,969 22
2,578 54
3,650 9
112 4
449 8
NN 10

24,519 12 433
501 4
1,134 2 45
73 11
4,008 1 48
13,473 1 24
378 2 106
1,007 46
612 6 63
3,333 86

13,573 6 223
2,408 2 82
7,771 1 73
2,293 3 49
1,101 19

30,432 4 363
1,081 33
103 136
202 18
29,046 4 176

19,481 80
3,690 4
2,739 5
841 6
5,588 41
674 10
1,259 10
4,487 -
203 4

27,051 9 516
7,207 37
3,166 33
12,787 9 427
170 15
3,721 4
2,269 10


CT


ati


IONS,


ve
1965
2,192

111
16
7
6
35
14
33

289
51
80
76
82

299
79
39
81
65
35

110
22
7
50
8
2
10
11

423
6
40
8
48
24
82
57
53
105

170
68
51
31
20

301
14
168
18
101

68
2
8
5
13
10
16
12
2

421
33
30
335
16

5


POLIOMYELITIS
Total Paralytic
Cumulative
1966 1965 1966 1966

4 4 52


_________ L________ t _______ t


3



2

45
1
1
I j



















43







1
2
45

1
1
43



















1


277


J3U

37
14


3
4
16

24
10
14



150
2
12
8
44
84

7

2
1
4




18

4

2
8

3

1

28
4
24


I


]


I










Morbidiit and Mortality Weeklh Report


(ASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: I UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 13, 1966 AND AUGUST 14, 1965 (32nd WEEK) CONTINUED


AREA


i ; ,


STREPTOCOCCAL
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA
SCARLET FEVER
1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cu
11966 I 19
1966 19


NEW ENGLAND.......... 488
Maine.............. I 4
New Hdamp hre ......
V rrmr ............ i 61
Ma ia-huett ,. 59
Rhode sland. ...... 32
Connecti ut .... 332

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 62
New York City...... 2
New York, Up-State. 59
New Jersey......... NN
Pennsylvania...... 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 293
Ohio ............... 22
Indiana............ i 57
Illinois........... 76
Michigan ........... 99
Wisconsin.......... 39

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 203
Minnesota......... I
Iowa................ 35
Missouri ........... 2
North Dakota....... 105
South Dakota....... 12
Nebraska............
Kansas............. 4 47

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 710
Delaware........... 6
Maryland ........... 37
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia. ...... .... 232
West Virginia...... 160
North Carolina..... 7
South Carolina..... 23
Georgia............ 2
Florida ............ 243

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 855
Kentucky ........... 38
Tennessee.......... 636
Alabama............. 105
Mississippi........ 76

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 494
Arkansas ...........
Louisiana ..........
Oklahoma ........... 23
Texas .............. 471

MOUNTAIN............. 666
Montana............ 29
Idaho .............. 27
Wyoming............. 13
Colorado............ 291
New Mexico ......... 147
Arizona ............ 53
Utah............... 104
Nevada ..... .. ..... 2

PACIFIC............... 478
Washington......... 15
Oregon............ 12
California......... 359
Alaska ............. 33
Hawaii............... 59
Puerto Rico.......... 4


2






11
4

1
2 -

4

8
3
1
2
2 -


.
6


- 31 -


4
- -


1

3

3 38
1 16
1 8
7
1 7

1 29
1 14
2
3
4
6

16

4
8
1
- I
1
2

2 40
1
7
2
8
1
3
1 7
1 2
9

- 25
- 3
11
6
5

1 24
1
- 7I
7
8
1 8

3 12



3
2 2
1 3
3
1

28
11

14



6


2 62
22
21
17
-1 2



3 35 2 175

12 2 164
10
3 13 11

3 14 10 365
2 8 4 180
1 80
1 6 1 38
1 30
3 37

2 13 604
3 139
1 125
1 5 188
2 23
2 63
17
1 49

4 72 15 348
1 -
2 22 I

1 21 6 195
S 2 42
1 16 3
5
7 5 66
2 41

2 25 15 344
1 5 1 67
15 9 257
1 5 12
5 8

6 17 545
2 57
2 27
4 2 140
S 13 321

3 1 55
7


2 8
1 11
26

1 3

1 4 174
3 8
1 1 164
1 1 164


278










lorbidity and liortality N e\\ 'ikl( Relorl


DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED Al'GIST 13. 1966

(By place oi occurrence and 'eek cf ailing certift dte. Ex1 luds fetal deaths)


Area


NEW ENCLAND:
Boston, Mass..--------
Bridgeport, C.in.-----.
Cambridge, lMass.------
Fall River. Mass.----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.----------
New Bedford, Mass.---
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I. ----
Somerville, Mass.----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass *-----

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.---------
Buffalo, N. Y.---------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.---------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.--------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio-----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.-------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------.
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.----------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.---------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


S5 years
Irand over


and
Influenza
All .Ages


1 year
All
Causes


Area


65 years
-IW -,ver


and
luenza
Ages


+ 4 41 1-1+ p-


400
128
24
17
16
19
20
16
13
26
34
8
32
14
33

1,723
28
22
72
23
18
21
34
39
829
25
271
95
34
67
25
31
33
15
16
25

1,326
31
27
361
76
89
62
40
179
23
20
19
12
33
81
21
75
27
23
24
58
45

461
34
20
15
77
11
69
46
112
44
33


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, C,.- ---------
Baltimore, iHd.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fli.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ca.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Taipa, Fla.------------
Washingcon, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Ti x.--------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Wrth, Tex.-------
Houston, TeI.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo*----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif*-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif*----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,178
128
238
33
76
81
49
72
28
66
78
191
38

(698
120
48
39
135
159
39
46
112

1,065
51
25
32
127
39
59
166
63
163
86
132
57
65

403
32
19
126
20
80
18
57
51

1,510

48
36
38
61
494
82
34
105
58
94
186
38
i28
72
36


1 year
All
Can ies


90
12
13

7
9


2
2
3
30
1

32
6
1


Total 11,654 6,416 386 679

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 410,358
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 236,548
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 18,029
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 21,441


Week N-.
32


279









280


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION 1966
(Continued from page e74)

Table 1

Meningococcal Infections United States
Total Cases Reported to CDC
1st through 32nd week, 1965 and 1966


Percent
1966 1965
Increase

United States 2,569 2,192 17.2
New England 113 111 1.8
Middle Atlantic 303 289 4.8
East North Central 398 299 33.1
West North Central 140 110 27.3
South Atlantic 433 423 2.4
East South Central 223 170 31.2
West South Central 363 301 20.6
Mountain 80 68 17.6
Pacific 516 421 22.6


Figure 3 shows the susceptibility to sulfadiazine
of meningococci submitted to the Communicable Disease
Center in 1964, 1965 and the first half of 1966. The trend
toward increasing sulfonamide resistance is clearly
evident. In 1964, 64 percent of strains were inhibited by
0.1 mg. percentof sulfadiazine; only 27 percent of strains
were inhibited at that level during the first 6 months of
1966. Similarly, in 1964 only 8 percent of strains required
10.0 mg. percent or more of sulfadiazine for inhibition,
while during the first half of 1966 about 35 percent of
strains were resistant to this high degree.

Figure 3
SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MENINGOCOCCI
TO SULFADIAZINE*


05 ,1 05 10 5.0 10.0 >10.0
MINIMUM INHIBITORY CONCENTRATION
MILLIGRAMS PERCENT

*ISOLATED FROM BLOOD OR CEREBROSPINAL FLUID SUBMITTED TO THE CDC

(Ieiported by the Horcterial [slotea sl i' Section, Epidem-
ioloyy Branch, and, the Bartcrioloyy Section, Laboratory
Branch, (CC).)


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15,600, IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
CHIEF, C r:MMju CLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, E '-C.E )'L :-L BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF i' lE-'-TiNC CUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF :u. R N INT AFI TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF COM-
MUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
TO:

THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.



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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


AUGUST 13, 1966 a-s



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