Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00270

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





FsCOM, ICABLE DISEASE CENTE
/ COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
GASTROENTERITIS AND VIRAL HEPATITIS
ASSOCIATED WITH RAW CLAMS New Jersey

An outbreak of 33 cases of a gastroenteric illness
and 4 cases of viral hepatitis occurred among 128 persons
who had attended a picnic in East Brunswick Township,
New Jersey, on August 21, 1966. Following the investi-
gation of the four cases of viral hepatitis during October
1966, the common picnic experience was detected. Sub-
sequent investigation of the persons who had attended
that picnic revealed the occurrence of the gastroenteric
illnesses.
The gastroenteric illnesses, which developed 12 to
60 hours following the afternoon of the picnic, lasted


CONTINTIS
Epidemioloic Notes and Reports
(astroenteritis and \'irtl Ierpatutii Associated i.th
Raw Clams New Jersey ................. 3
Current Trends
Measles 1 6 ......... . :



for one to 3 days and were characterized by nausea, vomit-
ing, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Only 5 of the 33
persons experienced fever. None of the ill persons were
hospitalized.
Of the 128 persons who attended the picnic, 122
persons were questioned regarding possible illnesses and
foods eaten. Twenty-two food items, including raw and
(Continued on page 394)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
46th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE. FIRST 46 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE NOVEMBER 19, NOVEMBER 20. 1961- 1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis .. ......... .. 55 44 45 2.675 1,904 1.914
Brucellosis....... ........ ............ 3 4 6 211 217 353
Diphtheria. ............................. 1 4 8 170 144 244
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 44 39 1.937 1,728 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious ............ 5 7 -- 655 600
Hepatitis, serum ................... 40 1,279 (
Hepatitis, infectious .. 717 665 793 28.376 29849 38292
Measles rubeolaa) ....................... 1,159 1.702 1,885 195,405 249.331 399,815
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 3 11 91 54 389
Paralytic ............................. 3 10 83 42 332
Nonparalytic ....................... .. -- 1 9 --
Meningococcal infections. Total .......... 50 60 44 3,071 2.692 2.097
Civilian .............................. 45 57 2.779 2,499 -
Military .. ...... .... .. ............... 5 3 --- 292 193 -
Rubella (German measles) ................ 263 43827 ---
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 8,248 7.374 6,356 368.315 343,589 297.496
Tetanus................................. 3 11 --- 171 245 -
Tularemia ................................ 6 4 159 228 -
Typhoid fever ....................... 7 11 11 347 394 483
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 4 4 239 256 -

Rabies in Animals ................... 85 79 72 3.606 3.851 3,372

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ............................ 6 Botulism : .. .... ..... ... .. ........ 8
Leptospirosis: .............. ........ .............. 60 Trichinosis: NJ-1. NYC-2 ......... ......... 90
Malaria: Ala-1, Calif-2. La-5, Mass-. NYUpS-1, Ore-1. P.R.-.. 421 Rabies in Man: ........... .. ...... ........ ...
Psittacosis' Minn-1 41 Rubella Coneenital Svndrom- 21
Typnus munne AlW. I 26 Plaga[ 5






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NOVEMBER 19, 1966


GASTROENTERITIS AND VIRAL HEPATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH RAW CLAMS New Jersey


Table 1
Attack Rates of Gastroenteric Illnesses Among Persons Who Ate

Eaters


-- -7~~-r r- 1 ~- --- ---it-


Not Ill


Total


Attack Rate

36
24
32
51
25
25
29
26
34
27
28


Beer 16 28 44
Birch beer 20 62 82
Chicken 25 54 79
Clams 31 30 61
Corn on cob 23 68 91
Hamburgers 25 74 99
Hot dogs- grilled 18 44 62
Ice cream 16 45 61
Potato salad 16 31 47
Raw onions 12 32 44
Sausage with sauce 19 50 69

steamed clams, were served. Those food items eaten by
more than half of the ill persons are listed in Table 1,
with the attack rates shown among persons who ate and
did not eat each food. With the exception of clams, there
are no differences in attack rates among eaters and non-
eaters for each food item. Among 61 persons who had
eaten clams, 31 (51 percent) became ill, whereas only 2
(3 percent) of the 61 persons who did not eat clams be-
came ill. These data suggested clams as the responsible
food item.
Table 2 shows the attack rates among persons who
ate clams in different forms. Among persons who ate only
raw clams or both raw and steamed clams, the attack rates
were 52 and 53 percent, respectively. Although the attack
rate among persons who ate steamed clams alone was 33
percent, there were only six persons in that category, an
insufficient number to conclude that steamed clams were
involved. Thus, the illnesses seem to have been related
to ingestion of the raw clams.

Table 2
Attack Rates Among Persons Who Ate or Who Did Not
Eat Clams

Eaters

Ill Total Attack Rate

Raw plus steamed clams 16 30 53
Raw only 13 25 52
Steamed only 2 6 33
None 2 61 3

Total 33 122 27


or Did Not Eat Picnic Foods

Non-Eaters


Not Ill


Total


_____ + -4- -4


Attack Rate


Four persons who attended the picnic developed viral
hepatitis. Each had eaten both raw and steamed clams,
and three of them also experienced an acute gastroenteric
illness. The intervals between the time of the picnic and
onsets of hepatitis in the four patients were 22, 26, 37,
and 40 days, respectively. None of these four had a his-
tory of personal contact with a jaundiced person during
the 2 months prior to onset, and none had received paren-
teral inoculations or blood transfusions within the 6 months
preceding their illnesses.
An attempt was made to uncover other patients with
hepatitis who had eaten clams obtained from the same
sources as the "picnic" clams. A telephone survey among
95 physicians in the county where the clam retailer is
located revealed four unreported hepatitis cases. Noneof
these four had eaten raw or steamed clams. In addition,
from the entire state there were eight other persons with
hepatitis and history of clam ingestion reported to the
New Jersey State Health Department during August, Sep-
tember, and October, but none of these could be linked with
the sources of the "picnic" clams.
One bushel of raw clams (Mercenaria mercenaria)
and one bushel of steamer clams (Mya arenaria) which
were served at the picnic were obtained from different
sources. Investigation of the source of the raw clams is
currently underway.


(Reported by Dr. William J. Dougherty, ;D.r--ror. Preven-
table Disease Control, New Jersey State Department of
Health; Dr. Sidney Katz, Director, Health and Welfare,
East Township; and a team of EIS Officers.)


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES 1966


For the 46th week (ending November 19, 1966),1,159
measles cases were reported from 40 states. This repre-
sents an increase of 443 cases over the preceding week


and a decrease of 543 cases from the total of 1,702 cases
for the 46th week in 1965. The states recording the
highest numbers of measles cases for the 46th week are


394









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Texas, with 199 cases, and ;u,-hirqi ir, with 190.
The 14 counties reporting 10 or more cases for the
45th week are listed in Table 3; the geographic distribution
of counties and health districts reporting measles for that
week is shown in Figure 1.
(Reported by the Childhood Viral Diseases Unit, Epidemi-
ology Branch, CDC.)

Table 3
Counties Reporting Highest Number of Measles Cases
Week Ending November 12, 1966


County


Washington
Richardson
Sioux
Maury
Waushara
Jefferson
Los Angeles
Milwaukee
Red River
Glacier
McHenry
Penobscot
Tulsa


State
Michigan
Oregon
Nebraska
N. Dakota
Tennessee
Wisconsin
Texas
California
Wisconsin
Texas
Montana
N. Dakota
Maine
Oklahoma


Number of Cases
71
69
41
28
25
22
16
14
14
14
11
10
10
10


Park County, Wyoming
Investigation of the recent outbreak of measles in
Park County, Wyoming (MM\I\R. Vol. 15, No. 45) has
revealed the localization of 99 known cases among school
children in the city of Cody (population 4,838). The


395


distribution of cases to date in the Cody schools is as
follows: Eastside School- 58 cases; Sunset School-38
cases: Westside School 2 cases: Junior High School -1
case. A telephone survey of families of known school
cases has uncovered more than 2( cases among preschool
siblings of school-age cases.
The index case entered the Eastside School during
the first week of September: a playmate of the index case
had had measles during the late summer. Peak numbers
of cases occurred during the first week in October and
again in the first and second weeks in November. Compli-
cations requiring hospitalization occurred in an 18-month-
old male with a febrile convulsion and in an 8-year-old
male with post-infectious encephalitis.
A survey was conducted in the three elementary
schools with 97 percent return of the questionnaire forms.
In the first three grades of the schools, 37.5 percent of
the children at Westside were noted to be susceptible,
compared to 22.9 and 17.3 percent, respectively, of the
students at Eastside and Sunset Schools where almost all
of the measles cases occurred.
Local newspaper articles and radio programs have
emphasized the importance of measles immunization. A
letter from the superintendent of the school system was
sent to the parents of susceptible children in the ele-
mentary grades urging measles immunization.
In the nearby community of Powell, .rnmin- (popula-
tion 4,740), seven cases of measles have been reported
since October 16, 1966. five of which occurred in one

(Continued on page 400)


Figure 1
COUNTIES OR HEALTH DISTRICTS REPORTING MEASLES
WEEK ENDING NOVEMBER 12, 1966





L,
1 i;. -:- *
---^ ~ ~ t- ) Z-"'
1 ----- 1 r ."^"


I or More Coses Reported
5] Number Cases Reported by State or Health DiOtrclt


NOVEMBER 19. 1966


~


7 L~
i


A.^--









396 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

NOVEMBER 19, 1966 AND NOVEMBER 20, 1965 (46th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 55 44 3 44 39 5 1 4 40 717 665

NEW ENGLAND.......... 3 1 1 4 44 40
Maine.............. 9 6
New Hampshire...... 3
Vermont.............. 2 1
Massachusetts...... 1 11 24
Rhode Island ...... 1 1 2 2 2
Connecticut......... 1 -1 2 20 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 6 6 6 11 1 16 135 125
New York City...... 1 2 4 12 32 33
New York, Up-State. 1 2 1 41 38
New Jersey.......... 4 3 3 4 1 24 25
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 3 1 2 38 29

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 11 16 5 1 1 121 150
Ohio................ 1 1 8 3 25 30
Indiana............. 1 2 16 15
Illinois........... 3 3 2 1 1 32 30
Michigan........... 2 7 1 1 1 39 68
Wisconsin.......... 3 9 7

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 1 9 2 1 29 38
Minnesota.......... 1 6 1 7 4
Iowa............. 2 2 14 14
Missouri............ 6 9
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... 1
Nebraska........... 1 1 1
Kansas............. 2 10

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 11 5 2 3 2 2 71 76
Delaware........... 2 1 -
Maryland............ 1 17 16
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 3 2
Virginia........... 1 1 1 20 15
West Virginia...... 13 6
North Carolina..... 7 2 6 10
South Carolina..... 2 1 3
Georgia.............. 2 4 4
Florida............. 2 1 2 6 20

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 3 1 1 59 32
Kentucky........... 1 16 11
Tennessee.......... 1 21 12
Alabama............ 1 1 1 12 6
Mississippi........ 2 2 10 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 3 3 4 1 1 74 56
Arkansas............. 2 1 5 9
Louisiana.......... 1 12 16
Oklahoma........... 1 1 2 8 1
Texas.............. 2 3 2 49 30

MOUNTAIN............. 2 7 30 38
Montana............. 2 4 4
Idaho............ .... 3 2
Wyoming............ 1 3
Colorado........... 3 7 10
New Mexico......... 1 2 9
Arizona............. 1 I 11 6
Utah................ 3 4
Nevada.......... -

PACIFIC.............. 19 15 3 11 3 15 154 110
Washington......... 1 2 1 15 7
Oregon............... 22 14
California.......... 19 14 3 8 2 15 113 87
Alaska............. -2 -
Hawaii............. 1 2 2

Puerto Rico.......... 1 16 16










%1nrbidil~ and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED)

NOVEMBER 19. 1966 AND NOVEMBER 20, 1965 (46th WEEK) CONTINUED


AREA


UNITED STATES... 1


NEW ENGLAND...........
Maine ..............
New Hampshire......
Vermont............
Massachusetts......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut ........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania .......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio ..............
Indiana............
Illinois ..........
Michigan...........
Wisconsin..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota..........
Iowa ..............
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska ..........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware ..........
Maryland ..........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia ..........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia............
Florida.............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky............
Tennessee .........
Alabama............
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas...........
Louisiana..........
Oklahoma...........
Texas..............

MOUNTAIN.............
Montana ............
Idaho...............
Wyoming.............
Colorado...........
New Mexico.........
Arizona............
Utah. ..............
Nevada.............

PACIFIC..............
Washington.........
Oregon..............
California.........
Alaska.............
Hawaii.............


Puerto Rico..........


MEASLES (Rubeola)

Cumulative
966 1966 1965

,159 195,405 249,331

39 2,473 37,114
8 268 2,884
80 382
14 316 1,369
5 815 19,352
1 73 3,951
11 921 9,176

61 18,299 15,988
10 8,350 2,767
7 2,592 4,278
14 1,913 2,989
30 5,444 5,954

161 69,671 58,249
15 6,403 8,974
15 5,774 2,132
10 11,457 3,118
55 14,863 27,081
66 31,174 16,944

56 9,013 17,031
5 1,665 748
3 5,361 9,186
537 2,635
29 1,262 3,890
40 115
19 148 457
NN NN NN

102 15,696 26,039
262 508
S 2,121 1,203
S 388 88
3 2,208 4,179
45 5,457 14,383
40 559 405
660 1,119
2 238 626
12 3,803 3,528

117 20,097 14,752
19 4,773 2,983
21 12,488 8,280
13 1,738 2,347
64 1,098 1,142

203 25,549 31,482
S 979 1,088
S 99 114
4 538 219
199 23,933 30,061

57 12,330 20,370
11 1,882 3,828
7 1,664 2,918
3 217 857
28 1,376 5,883
3 1,153 685
2 5,335 1,390
S 648 4,595
3 55 214

363 22,277 28,306
190 4,439 7,382
112 2,117 3,395
45 14,975 13,333
11 592 197
5 154 3.999
63 3,230 2,727


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
TOTAL

Cumulative
1966 1966 1965

50 3,071 2,692


Total

1966


POLIOMYELITIS
---- UBELLA
Paralytic
Cululat ive
1965 1966 1966 1966
iybb


3 83


263

41
19


7
1
14

16
11
4



57
3
17
4
21
12

4
1


3




23
3
2


6

3

9

19
12
7


397


16 11 i 17










398 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

NOVEMBER 19, 1966 AND NOVEMBER 20, 1965 (46th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)
1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 8,248 3 171 6 159 7 347 4 239 85 3,606

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,162 4 1 2 13 3 83
Maine.............. 95 25
New Hampshire...... 8 28
Vermont............. 46 25
Massachusetts...... 162 2 1 2 9 1 4
Rhode Island....... 84 -
Connecticut........ 767 2 4 2 I

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 246 14 1 57 2 46 4 209
New York City...... 15 5 25 1
New York, Up-State. 191 2 12 13 3 195
New Jersey......... NN 2 1 8 2 15 -
Pennsylvania....... 40 5 12 18 1 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 767 20 1 20 41 19 6 468
Ohio................ 48 4 3 20 9 3 197
Indiana............ 128 4 1 10 4 1 107
Illinois........... 191 4 6 5 10 2 70
Michigan........... 312 6 6 41
Wisconsin.......... 88 2 1 6 53

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 278 1 15 19 2 33 4 14 820
Minnesota.......... 13 3 1 1 4 195
Iowa............... 109 2 5 1 155
Missouri........... 10 8 10 2 17 3 3 241
North Dakota....... 96 1 2 48
South Dakota....... 21 4 4 97
Nebraska........... 1 1 2 2 23
Kansas............. 29 1 2 7 1 61

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,004 32 12 1 66 109 7 458
Delaware........... 26 1 2 -
Maryland............ 140 3 2 11 26 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 220 6 2 1 16 31 2 234
West Virginia...... 219 1 1 1 54
North Carolina..... 25 4 3 6 27 4
South Carolina..... 19 2 1 13 5
Georgia............. 12 7 3 4 18 3 99
Florida............. 343 10 12 1 64

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,258 2 24 1 24 43 1 43 12 457
Kentucky........... 57 2 2 10 9 7 107
Tennessee.......... 1,001 1 6 1 14 22 1 25 5 309
Alabama............ 163 8 4 6 7 20
Mississippi........ 37 1 8 4 5 2 21

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 867 42 4 71 36 1 10 8 718
Arkansas........... 3 4 4 54 4 2 1 80
Louisiana.......... 3 10 4 10 1 49
Oklahoma............ 67 3 7 9 1 7 2 176
Texas............... 794 25 6 13 1 4 413

MOUNTAIN............. 1,330 2 9 17 4 1 95
Montana............. 64 2 7
Idaho............. 131 -
Wyoming............. 40 3 1 -
Colorado........... 757 2 4 2 18
New Mexico......... 216 1 2 1 16
Arizona............ 65 1 5 1 42
Utah............. .. 56 2 5 3
Nevada............... 1 1 9

PACIFIC.............. 1,336 18 3 1 41 1 33 298
Washington......... 265 11 15
Oregon............. 32 1 1 4
California......... 954 17 3 1 27 1 33 279
Alaska. ............ 47 -
Hawaii ............. 38 2
Puerto Rico.......... 6 53 1 17 18








Morbidity and Mortality 'eekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 19, 1966


399


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and I year
Ages and over Influenza Ca s Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.-----
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-----
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.-------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


815
275
45
37
31
57
22
37
37
67
67
20
41
23
56

3,635
53
29
152
53
40
47
91
109
1,850
41
495
252
43
102
32
36
68
67
32
43

2,798
74
43
771
199
261
145
86
357
52
55
60
54
55
116
31
143
43
25
38
118
72

939
59
34
52
116
43
122
84
293
84
52


487
147
29
25
21
27
14
25
21
39
40
14
29
17
39

2,068
26
20
83
28
22
28
53
51
1,054
27
275
139
27
62
23
24
41
32
23
30

1,560
47
28
400
123
141
76
50
194
32
37
28
25
31
59
16
96
26
17
20
63
51

554
31
21
31
70
32
70
41
178
53
27


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ca.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D. C.-------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.-------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.*------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,248
123
276
47
94
99
40
71
35
101
79
235
48

693
102
65
36
141
152
56
41
100

1,193
54
50
30
155
26
79
223
62
190
106
91
53
74

468
44
21
121
22
104
22
69
65

1,599
15
57
21
59
93
395
23
37
173
77
93
219
50
180
63
44


Total 13,388 7,472 504 737


Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for


previous weeks


All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 575,864
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 329,931
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 23,717
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 30,761


Week No.
46


*Estimate based on average percent


of divisional total.









400


MEASLES 1966
(Continued from page 395)

school. A survey of susceptibles is now being conducted
throughout the elementary schools in Powell.
(Reported by Dr. E.C. /. .;;:. Health Officer of Park
County, Wyoming; r. Lester F. Allison, Assistant Health
Officer of Park County, Wyoming; Dr. Robert Alberts,
Director of Public Health, Wyoming State Department of
Public Health: and an EIS Officer.)

Washington County, Oregon
For the past 4 weeks (ending November 12, 1966),
Washington County, Oregon, which is suburban Portland.
reported a total of 147 cases of measles (MMWR, Vol. 15,
Nos. 42-45). Of approximately 12,000 kindergarten through
fourth grade students, 6,000 have been estimated to be
susceptible. A school measles vaccination program is
scheduled on November23 to eliminate these susceptibles.
A school surveillance system will be set up to report to
the County Health Officer any absences due to measles.
(Reported by Dr. Edward Goldblatt, State Epidemiologist,
Oregon State Board of Health.)
Waushara County, Wisconsin
Within the past 2 weeks, an outbreak of 22 cases of
measles has occurred in two grade schools in the rural
county of Waushara. Wisconsin. This outbreak was un-
covered as a result of the accelerated reporting of measles
cases to the State Board of Health. Of the approximately
750 students in grades one through three, an estimated
400 children are susceptible to measles. Consequently,
a grade school immunization program has been scheduled
for November 23, 1966: in addition, a routine program is
planned for early December to immunize preschoolers in the
county. Jet injector guns are to be used in the programs.
(Reported by Dr. Josef Preizler. State Epidemiologist,
Wisconsin State Board of Health.)
Browning, Montana
The Indian Health Service in Browning, Montana.
reported an increase in the number of measles cases seen
at their clinic during October and early November. Inves-
tigation disclosed that during October an estimated 120
cases occurred in the City among all age groups. On
November 7. 650 children in grades one ihr...jch six were
immunized with measles vaccine.
A sample survey of 60 homes, which included 298
people, was conducted 2 days later. Results indicated that
28 susceptible children remain: 20 in the 0 to 4 year age
group, 7 in the 5 to 9 year age group, and one child over
9 years of age. Of the total population, an estimated
10 percent remain susceptible to measles at this time.
A measles surveillance reporting system has been set
up in the two grammar schools to report any further cases
in the students. The Indian Health Service Clinic will also
maintain surveillance for measles in their clinic pop-
ulation.
(Reported by Dr. Mary E. Soules, Director of Disease Con-
trol, Montana State Board of Health: and an EIS Officer.)


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15.600. IS PUBLISHED. AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA, GEORGIA
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF COM-
MUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS, THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


UNV OF FL IBT
DOCMENTS T.






U.S. DEPOSITORY


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NOVEMBER 19, 1966 _
O 0T


I-.--.

Pd


m
r
-4-

a C
C
o co
a n "


-- -
>
Z -

uZZ

" ^-'I
M n
r




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EP9N36PHW_VQLQS5 INGEST_TIME 2012-10-15T13:22:14Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00270
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES