Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00265

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

ps- 4 o/9:VdI S" No 17

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 15, No. 17


SApril 30, 1966
SWeek Ending




EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


-'EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING Illinois


On April 1, 1966, the Ogle County Coroner in Illinois
requested that the State Health Department Toxicology
Laboratory in Chicago assist in an investigation of the
mysterious death of a 48-year-old man and the illness of
his wife and a guest. On Thursday, March 31, 1966, the
man had been found dead in his home near Rochelle,
Illinois; his wife and the guest were found alive but
unconscious. As chemical or bacterial poisoning was
suspected initially, an autopsy was carried out and mate-
rial submitted for analysis along with specimens of food
from the house. Analysis of the blood of the dead man,


CONTENTS
Epidemioloigic Note, and Repotrts
(arbon Monoxide Poisoning Illinois . ... 145
Surveillance Summary
Shigella Fourth Quarter 1965f ..... . 1.
Current Trends Metasles .................... 117
International Notes
Variola Minor in Britain .. . 152

however, showed a high concentration of carbon monoxide
in his blood.
Investigation by the staff of the State Health Depart-
ment revealed that following the death a wake had been
held on the night of April 2 in the home of the dead man.
Fifteen persons stayed overnight and next morning 14 of
them were treated in hospital for headache, nausea and
(Continued on page 146)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
17th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 17 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE APRIL 30, MAY 1, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis ....... . 18 36 20 461 490 410
Brucellosis. .. ...... ..... ........... 6 1 5 65 64 117
Diphtheria. ... ... 3 4 50 72 104
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ........... 17 32 410 510 -- -
Encephalitis, post-infectious ........... 14 22 285 260
Hepatitis, serum ............... 15 629 833 414 13,034 17,158
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 531 11,598
Measles rubeolaa) .. .... ........... 8,163 10,603 18,177 125,966 162,029 219,098
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 3 7 6 47
Paral.ti: ............................. 3 6 4 42
Nonparalytic ......................... --- 2 -
Meningococcal infections, Total .......... 65 72 62 1,696 1.454 1,006
Civilian ......... ............. 56 64 1,482 1,323 -
Military............................ .. .. 9 8 214 131 -
Rubella (German measles) ................ 2,003 --- 24.629
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 10,482 8.079 7,921 197,197 185,582 162.304
Tetanus ..................... ........ 1 4 35 64 -
Tularemia ..................... 3 47 61 -
Typhoid fever ............... ........ 11 1 4 93 103 116
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 2 -- 9 8 -

Rabies in Animals........ ......... .... 116 92 107 1,518 1.781 1,443

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY


Anthrax: ......... ....... ............
Leptospirosis: ........ ............
.... Malaria: D.C.-l, N.Y.C.-I, Pa.-1, Calif.-1. Va.-1 ...
Psittacosis: ....... ........... ...................
"Typhus, marine: ................................ ..


Cum.
2
9
91
16
6


Botulism: ........ .
Trichinosis: Ohio-1, W.Va.- .
Rabies in Man: .
Rubella, Congenital Syndrome:


Cum.
1
37
1
10








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


APRIL 30, 1966


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING Illinois
(Continued from front page)


dizziness; four of them were detained in hospital for
several days. The one person attending the wake who
did not become ill had slept in a room next to an open
open window.
An inspection of the premises was conducted by
State Health Department engineers. The one-story house
has a partial basement containing a furnace fired with
bottled gas: a fan in the basement circulates warm air
through the underside of the house to prevent pipes from
freezing. When the furnace is lighted, air is drawn down
through the windows, doors and chimney of the house.
This year was the first time that all the fireplaces were
sealed to prevent drafts and all windows were closed at
night for sleeping. Accordingly, the air supply to the
furnace was deficient and carbon monoxide accumulated
in the basement. State engineers investigating the heating
system found that a valve in the flue was stuck in the
open position so that carbon monoxide freely circulated
throughout the house.
The house had been closed for several days prior to
the night of March 30; the deceased man was found dead
on March 31 near the door to the furnace room; the wife
and the guest were unconscious, but recovered.
On the night of April 2 when all were gathered for
the wake, the house which had been well aired during the


day was closed up because of the cold and the thermostat
on the furnace turned up high to warm the house. The
furnace apparently functioned until the oxygen supply was
so depleted that it went out. Thereafter, carbon monoxide
gradually seeped into the house by convection and affected
all except the one visitor who slept by an open window.
By 6:00 a.m. next morning all but this one man were
overcome.
Laboratory studies indicated that the deceased man
had a 60 percent concentration of carbon monoxide in his
blood. Of the four persons who were hospitalized, carbon
monoxide saturation levels were determined in the blood
of three patients: 40 percent in a 13-year-old boy; 30.4
percent in a 72-year-old woman; and 29.3 percent in a
79-year-old man. All four have recovered.
In order to prevent a recurrence it has been recom-
mended that a duct be placed in the basement which would
draw air direct to the furnace, and that an alarm system
should be installed for the detection of carbon monoxide
in the basement.
(Reported by Dr. Franklin D. Yoder, Director of Public
Health, Dr. Norman J. Rose, Chief, Epidemiology Bureau,
Dr. Frank F. Fiorese, Chief, Bureau of Toricology, and
Mr. Merlin J. Rohlinger, Chief Chemist, all of the Illinois
Department of Public Health.)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SHIGELLA FOURTH QUARTER, 1965


During the fourth quarter of 1965, 2,429 shigella
isolations from human sources were reported from 52
centers. This represents an increase of 8.1 percent over
the 2,24h isolations reported during the third quarter of
1965 (MMVWR. Vol. 14, No. 50). Starting in January 1964,
17 States have been reporting shigella isolations con-
sistently; the data from these 17 States for the whole of
1964 suggested a seasonal pattern of increased activity
in July, with peak incidence occurring in September. The
comparable data for 1965 from these same States has
indicated a similar seasonal pattern, but with a peak of
activity occurring one month later, in October. The total
number of isolations reported in 1965 is less than that
reported in 1964 (Figure 1).
The age and sex distribution during the fourth quarter
is consistent with the pattern in previous quarters. Two-
thirds of shigella isolations were reported from children
under 10 years of age. No sex predilection for shigella
was apparent.
During the fourth quarter of 1965, 27.4 percent of the
isolations were from families in which shigella was


isolated from more than one member, as compared to 22.5
percent isolated from families during the third quarter of
1965.
There were 18 different serotypes reported during the
fourth quarter, compared to 13 during the previous quarter.
The six most frequently reported serotypes have been the
same since shigella reporting was begun in January 1964;
Table 1 shows the order of frequency of the serotypes
during the past two quarters. Only the major numbered
subgroups of S. flexneri have been listed since all States
do not perform final serotyping.

Table 1

Fourth Quarter 1965 Previous Quarter
Rank Serotype Number Percent Rank Percent

1 S.sonnei 912 37.4 1 32.4
2 S.flexneri 2 596 24.4 2 26.9
3 S.flexneri3 247 10.1 3 12.0
4 S.flexneri 4 144 5.9 4 7.9
5 S.flexneri6 135 5.5 5 3.8
6 S. flexneri 1 77 3.2 6 3.6


146








APRIL 30, 1966


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


These six most common serotypes again account for
over 85 percent of all isolations. .'' '..' sonnei and
S. flerneri 2 have consistently been the two most com-
monly isolated.
The regional differences in distribution of the
S.flexneri and S. sonnei isolations are similar to previous
quarters, with about 75 percent of all shigella isolations
in the South being S. flexneri, compared to a range of 40
to 50 percent in the North. The ratio of S. flexneri to
S. sonnei isolations during the fourth quarter of 1965 was
highest in the Southwest, 4:27, and lowest in the North-
west, 0:75.
The 11 isolations of shigella from nonhuman sources
reported during the fourth quarter of 1965 are summarized
in Table 2.

Table 2


Number of
Isolations


Reporting
Center

North Carolina
Illinois
Texas (2)
Illinois
Connecticut (2)
Illinois (1)
Wisconsin (3)


Source


"Ice balls"
Monkey
Monkeys
Monkey
Monkeys


(Reported by the Shigella Surveillance Unit, CDC.)


Figure 1
SEASONAL INCIDENCE
OF REPORTED SHIGELLA ISOLATIONS
FOR 17 STATES* WHICH HAVE REPORTED
SINCE JANUARY 1964


140-


120-

v)
z
o 100-

_J
I-
0
S 80-



Lj
3 60-


( 40-
Li


1964---
1965--


J F M A M J J A S O N D

*ALASKA, ARIZONA. HAWAII, ILLINOIS, KANSAS, MARYLAND,
NEW JERSEY, NEW MEXICO, NORTH CAROLINA, NORTH DAKOTA, OHIO,
OKLAHOMA, OREGON, SOUTH DAKOTA,TENNESSEE, TEXAS, VERMONT


CURRENT TRENDS MEASLES


During the 4-week period ended April 22, 1966, there
were 32,790 cases of measles reported. This total is 3,882


cases less than the total notified during the preceding
4-week period (Figure 2).


Figure 2
MEASLES REPORTED BY FOUR-WEEK PERIODS UNITED STATES
EPIDEMIOLOGIC YEARS, 1964-65 AND 1965-66
COMPARED WITH 10-YEAR PERIOD, 1954-1963


............ 1964-65 Epidemrologic Year
- 1965-66 Epidemiologic Year


44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40
WEEK NUMBER


147


Serotype

S. flexneri
S. flexneri la
S. flexneri 3
S. flexneri 4b
S. sonnei


(n
o 151
0
o
ai
a 131
W
LJ

aI
d 9,
uj
< 74
o
LL
0 5,
ui
m
I 3
z








148


ASEPTIC
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS

1966 1s95 1966
UNITED STATES... 18 36 6

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2
Maine ..............
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont ............ -
Massachusetts..... 2
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut......... -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC....... 3 I 6 1
New York City...... 1
New York, Up-State. 2 1
New Jersey......... 1 1
Pennsylvania ...... 3 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL,.. 1 3 1
Ohio ............... i
Indiana ...........
Illinois ............ 3
Michigan....... ... 1
Wisconsin........... -


WEST NORTH CENTRAL.,.
Minnesota..........
Iowa...............
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota......
Nebraska ..........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware ..........
Maryland ..........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia ..........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina....
Georgia............
Florida ...........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky...........
Tennessee...........
Alabama. ...........
Mississippi .......

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas...........
Louisiana.........
Oklahoma ..........
Texas .............

MOUNTAIN............
Montana ...........
Idaho .............
Wyoming ...........
Colorado ..........
New Mexico.........
Arizona ...........
Utah...............
Nevada ............

PACIFIC..............
Washington .........
Oregon ............
California .........
Alaska..............
Hawaii..............


2
2




3



3












9


9


ENCEPHALITIS
Primary Post-
including Infectious
unsp. cass


2


1
1

- |


- -


Puerto Rico.......... I i


3


3













2
I :













2

1

1
- 2













2

1

1












1

1


DIPHTHERIA


Serum


HEPATITIS

Infectious


Both
Types


1966 1965


531

25

2

18

5

68
12
16
13
27

163
29
5
62
60
7

24
6
9
4


2
3

70

21
1
14
1
8
1
12
12

24
8
8
4
4

45
9
14
1
21

14

1

2
8

3


98
7
11
78
1
1


629

51
14
2
1
20
9
5

109
21
45
16
27

96
34
10
20
30
2

54
6
10
11
1

1
25

67

10
3
15
4
8
2
3
22

53
23
14
5
11

60
14
7
2
37

26
1
7
I
5
6
6



113
13
12
87
1


S22 19


M1orbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


(A.MS OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 30, 1966 AND MAY 1, 1965 (17th WEEK)








Morbidity and Mortality Weeklky I'port


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABII D)ISI ASlS: I NITIDI SIATFS

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 30, 1966 AND MAY 1, 1965 (17th WEEK) CONTINUED


AREA


MEANS


1966


UNITED STATES... 8,163

NEW ENGLAND ......... 56
Maine.............. 5
New Hampshire......
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts ...... 26
Rhode Island....... 1
Connecticut......... 24

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ..... 532
New York City...... 254
New York, Up-State. 74
New Jersey.......... 57
Pennsylvania........ 147

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2,791
Ohio ............... 312
Indiana............. 395
Illinois........... 345
Michigan............ 484
Wisconsin.......... 1,255

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 446
Minnesota........... 48
Iowa................ 341
Missouri........... 5
North Dakota....... 51
South Dakota....... 1
Nebraska............
Kansas............. NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 565
Delaware............ 14
Maryland............ 82
Dist. of Columbia.. 19
Virginia........... 66
West Virginia..... 130
North Carolina..... 17
South Carolina..... 25
Georgia............. 8
Florida............. 204

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 836
Kentucky............ 77
Tennessee.......... 666
Alabama............. 38
Mississippi......... 55

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,284
Arkansas............ 98
Louisiana .......... 4
Oklahoma........... 11
Texas.............. 1,171

MOUNTAIN............. 516
Montana............. 83
Idaho............... 57
Wyoming............. 4
Colorado........... 57
New Mexico.......... 65
Arizona............. 227
Utah............... 23
Nevada.............

PACIFIC.............. 1,137
Washington.......... 108
Oregon.............. 48
California......... 975
Alaska.............
Hawaii............... 6
Puerto Rico.......... 68


LES (Rubeola)

Cumulative
1966 1965
125,966 162,029

1,458 29,735
162 2,128
25 341
204 573
564 16,440
62 3,196
441 7,057

14,318 6,990
7,202 750
1,522 2,195
1,530 1,208
4,064 2,837

46,871 30,853
4,062 6,318
3,168 1,140
9,149 1,204
7,672 16,359
22,820 5,832

5,951 12,202
1,385 385
3,346 6,727
376 1,907
796 2,829
4 64
44 290
NN NN

9,647 18,222
134 403
1,457 685
326 28
1,022 2,867
3,615 10,716
167 210
451 751
185 528
2,290 2,034

14,132 10,222
3,979 1,980
8,177 5,642
1,267 1,785
709 815

15,074 23,068
523 882
72 58
323 135
14,156 21,993

7,064 12,725
1,073 2,882
712 1,800
93 635
737 3,082
530 483
3,679 549
216 3,156
24 138

11,451 18,012
1,960 5,124
843 2,437
8,514 8,306
58 106
76 2,039
1,553 1,175


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
TOTAL

Cumulative
1966 1966 1965


1,454

72
8
4
2
25
11
22

198
31
52
62
53

175
52
24
46
30
23

80
16
3
38
4
2
9
8

289
3
30
4
30
23
43
45
40
71

105
46
31
22
6

231
12
132
16
71

51
1
7
2
11
8
15
5
2

253
18
18
209
5


POLIOMYELITIS
Total Pa

1966 965 166


1 3 3 -


RUB ELLA
ira lytic
Cunu lat iv
1966 1966

6 2,003

168
24


73
10
S 61

74
S 40
S 33

I
1

S 709
192
152
82
: 100
S 183

1 116
1 1
111
1
3




1 233
2
20
1
S 55
79


19
1 i 7-
57

195
48
146
1


3 6


I
2 6

171
7

50
38

75
1


1 331
1 126
30
166
2
__ .7


1 3


I








150


STREPTOC
SORE THR
AREA SCARLET

196

UNITED STATES... 10,482

NEW ENGLAND........... 1,610
Maine.............. 185
New Hampshire...... 14
Vermont.............
Massachusetts...... 291
Rhode Island....... 64
Connecticut........ 1,056

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 309
New York City...... 30
New York, Up-State. 214
New Jersey......... NN
Pennsylvania....... 65

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,363
Ohio................ 142
Indiana............ 301
Illinois........... 303
Michigan........... 363
Wisconsin .......... 254

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 486
Minnesota.......... 7
Iowa................ 261
Missouri ........... 8
North Dakota....... 130
South Dakota....... 28
Nebraska........... 2
Kansas.............. 50

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,004
Delaware............ 36
Maryland............ 115
Dist. of Columbia.. 25
Virginia............ 388
West Virginia...... 234
North Carolina..... 13
South Carolina..... 72
Georgia ............ 7
Florida............ 114

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,625
Kentucky............ 300
Tennessee .......... 1,148
Alabama............. 107
Mississippi ........ 70

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 956
Arkansas ........... 8
Louisiana.......... 1
Oklahoma............ 54
Texas .............. 893

MOUNTAIN............. .. 1,610
Montana............. 60
Idaho.............. 130
Wyoming. ........... 27
Colorado........... 1,001
New Mexico.......... 209
Arizona ............ 66
Utah............... 117
Nevada..............

PACIFIC.............. 1,519
Washington......... 479
Oregon............. 30
California ......... 915
Alaska............. 45
Hawaii............ 0
Puerto Rico .......... 7


OCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
OAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)

6 1966 Cum- 1966 Cum. 1966 1Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966


4 24 1 7 110
3 1 12 -
3 6 104
3 6 -
2 3 1 1 6

3 12 1 15 18 216
3 1 7 13 117
S 1 3 1 2 47
S 1 5 2 2 17
1 2 17
3 1 18

S 2 3 1 10 1 21 326
S 7 62
S 3 2 71
S 2 1 1 5 5 123
6
S33
S I 7
S- 2 1 1 6 24

8 6 3 18 6 21 202



S2 6 2 7 129
1 1 8 29
2 2 3
1 1 2 2
3 -- 1 4 27
4 1 2 2 17

2 12 7 21 218
2 I 6 33
6 4 13 177
2 4 2 2 8


8 11 1 4 1 10 313
2 9 1 38
3 1 1 17
I 4 88
3 1 1 2 6 170

1 1 6 4 29
1 7


1 2 1

1 3 15
-1 3
1

1 4 1 5 8 82

- 1
1 4 1 3 8 82



S 15 1 4 3


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 30, 1966 AND MAY 1, 1965 (17th WEEK) CONTINUED








Mlorbiditv and Mortality Weekl, Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED APRIL 30, 1966


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and 1 year
Ages and over Influenza Alld r Influnza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.--------
Lowell, Mass.----------
Lynn, Mass.------------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.-------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.--------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.---------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, I11.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.*-------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


756
249
38
31
21
64
24
23
17
41
75
16
53
29
75

3,411
47
33
180
47
34
60
59
121
1,730
42
509
204
50
93
18
35
55
34
28
32

2,684
69
32
772
170
225
124
75
376
42
57
42
31
56
138
33
139
37
51
54
98
63

907
68
36
42
163
31
113
77
238
80
59


464
145
23
26
12
32
11
15
13
21
46
13
39
18
50

2,034
29
21
109
26
21
38
44
60
1,029
29
302
105
32
60
8
28
37
16
18
22

1,537
43
20
421
99
128
75
49
211
21
30
26
16
34
80
17
80
22
29
37
58
41

559
45
23
20
100
22
69
51
143
56
30


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.---------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah--
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.*------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,189
124
263
53
58
78
47
83
36
94
69
235
49

603
99
46
42
100
141
61
28
86

1,202
27
39
20
160
42
73
226
73
199
94
110
75
64

414
47
26
120
13
102
16
39
51

1,623
18
43
20
57
76
499
103
37
114
76
108
163
42
166
55
46


Total 12,789 7,363 568 698

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 225,744
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 631,389
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 11,108
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 11,504


Week No.














CURRENT TRENDS MEASLES
(Continued from page 147)

A comparison of the incidences during the same two
4-week periods in 1964 and 1965 is shown below:


Year Weeks 9 to 12 Weeks 13 to 16 Difference

1964 66,809 99,637 +32,828
1965 4 -t .1 45,560 + 1,209
1966 36,672 32,790 3,882

During weeks 13 to 16 in 1964, 25 States reported an
increase of more than 250 cases over the preceding 4-week
period, with a range of 264 to 8,158 cases. The following
year, only six States reported an increase over the compa-
rable preceding 4-week period with a range of 328 to
1,611 cases. During the same time periods in 1966, three
States reported more than a 250-case increase with a range
of 345 to 829 cases. This earlier seasonal decline in inci-
dence, during a year when a severe measles epidemic was
expected, is being studied in relation to the overall distri-
bution of measles vaccine and to the mass measles immu-
nization campaigns being conducted by local health author-
ities.
(Reported by the Childhood Virus Disease Unit, Epidem-
iology Branch, CDC.)






INTERNATIONAL NOTES
VARIOLA MINOR IN BRITAIN


One non-imported laboratory confirmed case of variola
minor in Walsall, Staffordshire, England, has been reported
to the World Health Organization.
The patient is a 16-year-old girl who began to have
symptoms on April 16. The clinical course of the illness
is reported to have been very mild and the girl is making
a good recovery.
There are two other suspect cases in a 14-year-old
boy and a 4-year-old girl who are under observation in
hospital. Both were living in close proximity to the con-
firmed case.
The source of infection has not yet been identified
and epidemiological investigations are continuing. All
known contacts of the proved case and of the suspect
cases have been vaccinated and placed under surveillance.


(Compiled from information received from the Ministry of
Health, London, through the U.S.P.H.S. Division of
Foreign Quarantine, and from the WHO.)


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIR
TION OF 15.600. IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DI
CENTER. ATLANTA, GEORGIA.


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER. M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE, M.B.,
F. R. C. P. E.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO,
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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APRIL 30, 1966


152






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US. DEPOSITORY
US DEPi^OSnTORY


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