Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00264

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 15, No. 11




T

Week Ending
March 19, 1966


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBnL I ICE


CURRENT TRENDS
INFLUENZA UNITED STATES

Evidence of influenza virus activity continued to be
demonstrated this week as further scattered areas of
involvement were reported. Since publication of the
last United States Influenza Summary (MMWR, Vol. 15,
No. 10), an additional nine States have reported influenza
outbreaks. In six of these States (Delaware, Louisiana,
Nebraska, New Mexico, Tennessee, and Wisconsin),
epidemiologic evidence has indicated the presence of
one or more isolated outbreaks of influenza-like illness,
although laboratory studies designating the virus type
have yet to be completed. Colorado is the most recent
State to identify type A influenza.


CON" \ T\
Current Trends
Influenza United States APR I 6 ~
Epidemiologic Notes and I Py' 1 6 -6 J
A Hospital Nursery Outbrea of arrhea Due to .
Escherichi c li... ... . l 4 ,
'F i I ,,. H ~


(Jklahum 1 hi h I, .. (.I. a. n th. i r I J rd lt. L- r.pori lab
oratory evidence of both type A and type B influenza
outbreaks (Washington and Oregon, MMWR, Vol. 15,
No. 10). Illinois reports localized outbreaks in Cook
County due to influenza type B, while type A virus has
been isolated from a single patient in the same county
although no associated outbreak of type A influenza has
(Continued on page 94)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
llth WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 11 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE MARCH 19, MARCH 20, 1961- 1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis ........... ... ... 40 34 27 321 308 254
Brucellosis .............. .. ............. 2 10 9 37 43 65
Diphtheria ............ .... .... 2 9 10 29 51 71
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 36 33 257 332
Eni-pnallti s post-infectious ....... .... 20 25 178 152 -
Hepatitis, serum ....................... 23 859 948 245
"5 :8 :8.,725 ( 12,052
Hepatitis, infectious ......... ........... 725 859 94 7,885 8725 52
Measles rubeolaa) ...... ........... 9,642 11,535 13.733 75,531 94.594 114,371
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 1 3 3 2 36
Paralytic ................. ........... ... 1 3 2 2 31
Nonparalytic ................. -- --
Meningococcal infections. Total .......... 115 93 71 1.058 901 634
Civilian .............................. 107 88 908 836 -
Military .............................. 8 5 --- 150 65 -
Rubella (German measles) .......... ...... 1910 --- --- 13.379 -- -
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 14,711 11,506 11.099 126,680 122.627 108,881
Tetanus.................... ........... 1 2 21 38 -
Tularemia ............. ................ 4 2 44 49 -
Typhoid fever ........................ 2 1 6 55 76 76
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 1 -- 9 6 -

Rabies in Animals. ............... ..1 93 95 94 821 1,080 798

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Del.-I ........ .......... ....... ......... 2 Botulism: .... ... ... .. ... .....
Leptospirosis: ...... ....... ........ .............. 8 Trichinosis: Conn.-. Pa.-2, Calif.- ............... .. 23
Malaria: Md.-, NY Up-State-, Pa.-3, NH-I, Va.-l, Iowa-l, Calif.-3 62 Rabies in Man: .......... ..... ...... ...... .......
Psittacosis' Va 1 .14 Rubplla Congenital SY.ndrme 9
Typhus murine I








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CURRENT TRENDS
INFLUENZA UNITED STATES
(Continued from front page)


been apparent. Michigan has reported a similar episode
of localized outbreaks of type B influenza and an iso-
lation of type A virus from a single patient in the same
county (MMWR, Vol. 15, No. 10).
The pneumonia-influenza mortality data reported
from 122 United States cities indicate that the number of
deaths in the 16 Pacific cities has decreased somewhat
from the peak observed last week, although figures for
the area are still considerably above the epidemic thresh-
old. For the second consecutive week the mortality total
for the eight largest mountain cities has risen, placing
the total above the epidemic threshold for the first time
this year. The South Atlantic area has recently reported
mortality totals slightly in excess of the epidemic
threshold.
(Reported by the Influenea-Respiratory Disease Unit,
CDC.)

Colorado
Increased incidence of influenza-like disease was
initially noted in Denver and Boulder Counties during
the first week of March. The small localized outbreaks
were evident primarily through increased school absen-
teeism in the greater Denver area. Recently, however,
there have been scattered reports of increased influenza-


like disease from counties in the north and west central
parts of the State.
Type A2 influenza virus was isolated from a student
at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
(Reported by Dr. Cecil S. Mollohan, Chief, Division of
Preventive Medical Services, Colorado State Department
of Health; Dr. Gordon Meiklejohn, University of Colorado
Medical School; and an EIS Officer.)

Ohio
Serological confirmation of type B influenza infection
has been reported in a patient who became ill during the
last week of February during an influenza outbreak in
Springfield (Clark County). Aside from this localized
outbreak, no evidence of similar outbreaks has been
reported elsewhere in the State.
(Reported by Dr. Calvin B. Spencer, Acting Chief, Bureau
of Preventive Medicine, and Dr. Charles Croft, Chief,
Public Health Laboratories, Ohio Department of Health.)

Oklahoma
Recognition of influenza activity in Oklahoma began
during the second week in March as outbreaks appeared
in Comanche and Oklahoma Counties. Eight patients
(Continued on page 100)


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
A HOSPITAL NURSERY OUTBREAK OF DIARRHEA
DUE TO ESCHERICHI COLI


During the last week in October 1965, three of four
infants who had been together in one room of a non-
newborn nursery developed diarrhea associated with
the recovery from stool specimens ofE. coli 0126:B16:NM.
The clinical picture consisted of frequent watery stools,
fever and dehydration. As each of the three infants had
been in the hospital for 45, 20 and 19 days respectively,
before the development of diarrhea, it was assumed that
the infections had been acquired in hospital.
Epidemiological investigation included a review of
the hospital bacteriological records. In the 18 months
prior to August 1965, no E. coli 0126:B16 strains had
been recovered from any pediatric patient in the hospital.
Since August 1965, however, six isolates of E. coli
0126:B16 were recovered in addition to the three isolates
from the cases which occurred in October. These nine
cases are listed in Table 1. Of the six isolates, two were
from infants who entered the nursery having acquired
E. coli diarrhea elsewhere (patients 1 and 4), two were
from infants who apparently acquired their infection
sometime after admission to the nursery (patients 2 and
3), and two were from infants who had never been in the


non-newborn nursery (patient 8-out-patient clinic; patient
9-orthopedic ward).
Six of the nine isolates were non-motile and their
flagellar type could not be determined. Five of these were
from infants with presumably hospital-acquired E. coli
diarrhea, and one was from an infant admitted to the
nursery with community-acquired diarrhea. The latter
infant (patient 1) was admitted 2% weeks before the first
infant with hospital acquired E. coli 0126:B16:NM infec-
tion developed diarrhea.
The three isolates that were motile were H. antigen
type 27. These were from the two infants who had not
been in the nursery and probably were not directly asso-
ciated with the nursery outbreak, and from one infant
who entered the nursery with diarrhea.
It appeared likely that E. coli 0126:B16:NM was
spread from one to another of the six infants. The one
notable finding was the long incubation period for several
of the cases. The most probable explanation appears to
be intermediate spread via infants or adults with inap-
parent infection. However, fluorescent antibody evaluation
of rectal swabs from every infant in the nursery on


FEBRUARY 19, 1966









FEBRUARY 19, 1966


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 1
E. coli type 0126:B16 Diarrhea Patients


Patient Number


Date of
Hospital
Admission

Aug. 13
July 29
Aug. 6
Sept. 19


Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Aug.


Stayed in
Non-Newborn
Nursery


11
6
12
18**


Date of Onset



Aug. 30
Sept. 3



Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 30
-


Interval:
Admission-
Onset


33 days
29 days



45 (lays
20 days
19 days


Oct. 12


Antigen Typing


Non-Motile
Non-Motile
Non-Motile
Motile
H. type 27
Non-Motile
Non-Motile
Non-Motile
Motile
H. type 27
Motile
H. type 27


*Co-index cases.
*'Acquired in another hospital from which patient was transferred.
***Date specimen received.


November 2, and from many of the staff caring for the
three babies who became ill in October, showed no
inapparent infections to confirm this hypothesis. Similarly,
cultures of surface and air samples obtained from the
area where the infants with E. coli diarrhea were isolated
did not yield any specific isolates.
Control measures consisted of isolation procedures,
reducing the number of admissions to the nursery, and
antibiotic treatment of all cases ofdiarrhea in the nursery.


The infants were treated with neomycin, to which the
epidemic strain was sensitive, in total daily doses of
50-100 nm ki, for a minimum of 7 days. No further cases
of hospital-acquired E. coli diarrhea occurred thereafter.


(Reported by Dr. Kenrad Nelson, Research Epidemiologist,
Chicago Board of Health; Dr. Samuel Andelman, Com-
missioner of Health, Chicago Board of Health; and an
EIS Officer.)


SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS-FEBRUARY 1966 AND FEBRUARY 1965
CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Areas February 1966 and February 1965 Provisional Data

February Cumulative February Cumulative
Reporting Area Jan-Feb Reporting Area Jan-Feb
1966 1965 1966 1965 1966 1965 1966 1965
NEW ENGLAND............... 48 38 96 77 EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 190 190 375 413
Maine.................... 1 1 1 1 Kentucky................. 13 21 24 29
New Hampshire............ 1 2 1 3 Tennessee................ 19 47 50 104
Vermont................ Alabama.................. 85 100 184 214
Massachusetts ........... 33 19 65 40 Mississippi............. 73 22 117 66
Rhode Island............ 1 4 4 6
Connecticut.............. 12 12 25 27 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ...... 203 189 443 380
Arkansas................. 16 23 34 35
MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 338 408 681 802 Louisiana............... 41 50 96 113
Upstate New York......... 26 52 61 83 Oklahoma................ 12 15 31 29
New York City........... 224 235 429 487 Texas.................... 134 101 282 203
Pa .(Excl. Phila.) ...... 14 13 41 29
Philadelphia............. 23 27 43 39 OUNTAIN................. 27 48 66 92
New Jersey............... 51 81 107 164 Montana................ 2 2 5 3
Idaho................... -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 247 233 488 460 Wyoming.................. -
Ohio.................... 41 59 89 98 Colorado.............. 2 3 9 5
Indiana.................. 8 9 14 12 New Mexico............... 9 12 16 21
Downstate Illinois. ..... 15 15 36 35 Arizona.................. 12 22 33 42
Chicago.................. 79 82 155 169 Utah.................... 1 1 2 7
Michigan................ 93 62 170 136 Nevada................. 1 8 1 13
Wisconsin................ 11 6 24 10
PACIFIC................. 146 161 334 333
WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 47 27 100 67 Washington............... L 11 8 20
Minnesota........... .. 3 3 5 10 Oregon................. 3 4 5 8
Iowa..................... 9 15 4 California ............. 140 142 317 299
Missouri................. 15 14 46 32 Alaska.................. 1 1 2 2
North Dakota............. 3 4 Hawaii.................. 1 3 2 4
South Dakota............. 11 4 13 8
Nebraska.............. 1 3 7 8 U. S. TOTAL.............. 1.781 1,879 3,634 3,776
Kansas................... 5 3 10 5
TERRITORIES.......... .... 78 61 162 124
SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 535 585 1,051 1,152 Puerto Rico.............. 77 61 159 123
Delaware................ 6 3 11 Virgin Islands........... 1 3
Maryland................. 44 31 79 68
District of Columbia..... 22 45 68 89
Virginia................. 27 34 45 71
West Virginia............ 6 5 15 9
North Carolina........... 96 109 175 174 Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
South Carolina .... .... 67 69 154 146 through previous months.
Georgia.................. 117 105 199 200
F-i ..... II i A


Hospital-
Acquired
Infection

No
Yes
Yes

No**
Yes
Yes
Yes

No

No










96 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 19, 1966 AND MARCH 20, 1965 (llth WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 40 34 2 36 33 20 2 9 23 725 859

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 3 3 1 1 13 51
Maine ............. 1 8
New Hampshire...... 1 5
Vermont............
Massachusetts...... 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 23
Rhode Island....... 3 11
Connecticut........ 1 6 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 5 14 4 2 1 14 112 150
New York City...... 1 I 7 2 1 12 29 26
New York, Up-State. 1 1 4 2 1 33 85
New Jersey......... 1 3 1 1 16 20
Pennsylvania ....... 2 1 34 19

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 1 3 4 3 1 1 2 148 151
Ohio............... 2 1 2 38 47
Indiana............ 1 1 9 6
Illinois........... I 1 3 1 17 25
Michigan............ 3 2 73 56
Wisconsin.......... 11 17

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 1 2 5 7 3 2 84 44
Minnesota.......... 3 1 3 6 2 8 3
Iowa............... I 1 1 1 16 15
Missouri............ 45 5
North Dakota....... 1 -
South Dakota....... 3 1
Nebraska........... 1 2
Kansas............. 1 13 18

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 2 2 1 3 91 57
Delaware........... 2 2 2
Maryland............. 2 17 16
Dist. of Columbia.. 2
Virginia........... 1 25 8
West Virginia...... 2 11
North Carolina..... 10 7
South Carolina..... 1 -
Georgia.............. 3 15 1
Florida............ 1 1 19 10

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 7 2 1 1 1 58 83
Kentucky............ 3 7 1 32 24
Tennessee.......... 1 1 14 41
Alabama............ 2 1 7 13
Mississippi........ 1 5 5

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 10 5 1 .5 3 1 56 84
Arkansas........... I 1 4 19
Louisiana.......... 1 2 1 6 18
Oklahoma............ 3
Texas.............. 10 3 1 4 1 43 47

MOUNTAIN.............. 2 1 3 4 16 80
Montana............ 1 1 4
Idaho............... 19
Wyoming............. 1
Colorado............ 1 4 16
New Mexico.......... 1 2 8 18
Arizona............. 2 10
Utah................ 1 1 2 1 13
Nevada......... ..--

PACIFIC.............. 14 10 6 6 3 1 3 147 159
Washington......... 1 2 1 20 10
Oregon............ 1 1 -- 12 23
California.......... 13 9 6 2 2 1 3 112 121
Alaska............. 1 3
Hawaii.............. 2

Puerto Rico.......... 6 61










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 19, 1966 AND MARCH 20, 1965 (11th WEEK) Continucd


AREA



UNITED STATES...

NEW ENGLAND..........
Maine ..............
New Hampshire......
Vermont............
Massachusetts ......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania .......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio.............. ..
Indiana.............
Illinois ..........
Michigan...........
Wisconsin .........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota .........
Iowa................
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware...........
Maryland...........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia.............
Florida............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky............
Tennessee..........
Alabama............
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas...........
Louisiana..........
Oklahoma............
Texas...............

MOUNTAIN.............
Montana.............
Idaho...............
Wyoming.............
Colorado...........
New Mexico.........
Arizona.............
Utah ..............
Nevada.............

PACIFIC..............
Washington.........
Oregon..............
California.........
Alaska.............
Hawaii..............


MEASLES (Rubeola)


1966

9,642

105
18
1

19

67

915
506
96
115
198

3,626
288
165
979
554
1,640

624
172
369
44
38

1
NN

664
16
99
16
114
167
61
26
1
164

935
151
590
114
80

1,282
19
5
29
1,229

672
100
53
19
53
70
362
15


819
175
58
579
2
5


Puerto Rico.......... 77


Cumulative
1966 1965
75,531 94,594

927 20,241
124 1,787
12 277
161 246
327 11,371
47 2,291
256 4,269

10,116 3,534
5,061 346
1,051 1,281
1,109 634
2,895 1,273

30,286 16,369
1,979 3,444
1,941 691
6,786 521
4,500 8,685
15,080 3,028

3,416 7,739
1,021 203
1,529 4,458
224 981
604 1,901
2 51
36 145
NN NN

5,669 12,116
84 217
1,000 413
271 12
495 1,739
2,258 8,084
117 152
278 263
126 335
1,040 901

8,750 5,313
2,875 547
4,857 3,269
680 1,127
338 370

6,880 12,495
121 655
52 26
131 71
6,576 11,743

3,876 7,599
615 2,181
485 1,166
65 296
376 1,182
147 226
2,067 252
114 2,230
7 66

5,611 9,188
1,373 2,850
463 1,395
3,716 4,008
20 78
39 857
834 543


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
TOTAL

Cumulative
1966 1966 1965


115

3
1

1

1


11
2
2
3
4

15
4
2
1
7
1

3

1
2





19

1

6

2

5
5

7
4
2

1

13

4

9

2










42
1

37
2


I -


1,058

55
6
7
2
21
4
15

115
20
24
38
33

156
40
20
33
49
14

53
10
11
20
3
1
2
6


I


1,058

55
6
7
2
21
4
15

115
20
24
38
33

156
40
20
33
49
14

53
10
11
20
3
1
2
6

179

18
2
23
7
38
25
29
37

91
50
23
13
5

159
9
54
5
91

34
2
1
1
20
4
5

1

216
11
8
185
10
27


901

42
7
2

17
5
11

133
20
32
44
37

100
28
14
21
20
17

49
11
1
27
3
2
1
4

181
3
14
3
20
12
31
25
29
44

53
22
17
10
4

147
9
74
14
50

37

5
2
8
5
11
4
2

159
9
13
135
1


3


POLIOMYELITIS
RUBELLA
Total Paralytic
Cumulative
1966 1965 1966 1966 1966

1 1 2 1,910

209
6
16

74
3
S110

107
46
58

3

583
S 22
S89
S183
S53
236

-- 126
S 16
-105

5




180
6- 6
35

S55
31

S 21

32

S267
S185
82



S1 1


1
1

183
5


19

150



1 1 1 254
1 1 1 109
S 24
115
2

2


1










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


98 CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 19, 1966 AND MARCH 20, 1965 (llth WEEK) Continued


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)
1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966


UNITED STATES... 14,711 1 21 4 44 2 55 1 9 93 821

NEW ENGLAND........... 2,072 2 1 2 1 7
Maine.............. 198 -
New Hampshire...... 75 2
Vermont............. 44 1 5
Massachusetts...... 425 2 -
Rhode Island....... 72 -
Connecticut........ 1,258 2 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 568 4 12 1 4 63
New York City...... 40 3 5-
New York, Up-State. 430 3 4 60
New Jersey ......... NN 3 3
Pennsylvania....... 98 1 1 1 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2,080 11 9 30 111
Ohio................ 249 3 5 18 62
Indiana............. 614 2 1 8 21
Illinois........... 364 5 2 9
Michigan........... 456 2 10
Wisconsin.......... 397 1 2 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 602 1 3 5 1 12 191
Minnesota.......... 34 3 36
Iowa............... 356 2 5 45
Missouri........... 13 1 1 2 4 78
North Dakota....... 142 3
South Dakota....... 16 19
Nebraska........... 9 5
Kansas............. 32 2 1 1 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,611 5 1 6 10 6 11 115
Delaware.......... 38
Maryland........... 217 2 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 -
Virginia........... 418 2 5 2 7 84
West Virginia...... 520 1 1 11
North Carolina..... 25 2 1 3 -
South Carolina..... 86 1 1 1 -
Georgia............ 3 2 1 1 13
Florida............ 300 2 1 3 7

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,926 1 12 5 10 129
Kentucky............ 254 2 1 1 17
Tennessee.......... 1,436 6 3 8 109
Alabama............ 115 1 4 1 1 3
Mississippi ........ 121 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,272 1 6 2 9 1 2 1 1 19 151
Arkansas........... 3 1 7 1 1 3 21
Louisiana.......... 12 4 1 1 1 9
Oklahoma........... 77 1 8 16
Texas.............. 1,180 1 2 1 1 1 7 105

MOUNTAIN ............ 2,577 1 1 6 2 10
Montana ........... 93 -
Idaho............. 230 -
Wyoming ............ 27 -
Colorado............ 996 2 1
New Mexico.......... 781 2 3
Arizona............. 199 1 5
Utah............... 251 1 1 3 -
Nevada............ -

PACIFIC.............. 2,003 3 1 4 4 44
Washington......... 766 -
Oregon............... 45 1 -
California.......... 1,035 3 1 3 4 44
Alaska ............. 86
Hawaii 71- -


... .....
Puerto Rico .......... 131 3 -- 3









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Week No. Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 19, 1966

11 (By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area Al 65 yearsInfuand Area All 65 years and 1 year
Ages and over Infllensa A Ages and over All na Au
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.-------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.----------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


789
242
43
30
31
58
29
26
23
53
70
17
59
39
69

3,425
55
38
163
34
31
42
91
103
1,617
40
595
216
47
113
22
33
62
61
29
33

2,646
74
39
737
185
215
136
79
368
42
49
52
31
37
147
32
149
38
36
47
97
56

947
60
46
43
153
24
133
86
292
60
50


488
139
29
19
21
27
16
16
18
35
41
13
41
24
49

2,003
29
26
87
18
18
30
58
46
951
23
357
103
32
82
12
17
38
34
19
23

1,513
48
26
393
121
117
81
46
203
30
26
32
16
23
85
17
87
20
21
28
56
37

571
43
35
24
97
10
86
45
166
34
31


SOUTH ATLANTIC: 1,246 678 71 63
Atlanta, Ga.----------- 147 75 9 12
Baltimore, Md.---------- 256 140 10 9
Charlotte, N. C.------- 42 17 2 2
Jacksonville, Fla.----- 83 43 6 6
Miami, Fla.------------ 100 53 7
Norfolk, Va.----------- 68 37 7 3
Richmond, Va.----------- 86 44 1 3
Savannah, Ga.----------- 37 18 3
St. Petersburg, Fla.--- 86 73 9 2
Tampa, Fla.------------ 102 65 14
Washington, D. C.------ 195 84 9 17
Wilmington, Del.------- 44 29 1 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL: 676 375 39 33
Birmingham, Ala.------- 102 48 4 3
Chattanooga, Tenn.----- 68 42 5 2
Knoxville, Tenn.------- 36 21 2
Louisville, Ky.-------- 150 89 17 6
Memphis, Tenn.---------- 124 69 5 7
Mobile, Ala.----------- 43 23 1 4
Montgomery, Ala.------- 44 25 5 2
Nashville, Tenn.------- 109 58 2 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL: 1,200 638 65 67
Austin, Tex.----------- 57 34 8 3
Baton Rouge, La.------- 41 18 1 4
Corpus Christi, Tex.--- 32 13 3 1
Dallas, Tex.----------- 150 80 7 5
El Paso, Tex.---------- 45 29 7 4
Fort Worth, Tex.------- 85 44 3 8
Houston, Tex.----------- 218 112 11 7
Little Rock, Ark.------ 57 28 1 4
New Orleans, La.------- 200 99 6 14
Oklahoma City, Okla.--- 72 41 3 4
San Antonio, Tex.------ 131 76 5 10
Shreveport, La.-------- 50 25 7 3
Tulsa, Okla.----------- 62 39 3 -

MOUNTAIN: 503 301 43 24
Albuquerque, N. Mex.--- 44 24 9 3
Colorado Springs, Colo. 13 12 3
Denver, Colo.----------- 139 75 4 9
Ogden, Utah----------- 21 16 2 -
Phoenix, Ariz.---------- 146 85 22 7
Pueblo, Colo.----------- 13 12 I
Salt Lake City, Utah--- 62 35 4
Tucson, Ariz.---------- 65 42 3 -

PACIFIC: 2,069 1,387 129 76
Berkeley, Calif.------- 26 20 4 -
Fresno, Calif.--------- 39 24 1 3
Glendale, Calif.------- 57 47 5 -
Honolulu, Hawaii------- 64 30 2 10
Long Beach, Calif.----- 113 75 11 6
Los Angeles, Calif.---- 822 581 54 30
Oakland, Calif.-------- 97 58 9 4
Pasadena, Calif.------- 42 31 3 -
Portland, Oreg.-------- 142 96 2 5
Sacramento, Calif.----- 71 38 2 1
San Diego, Calif.------ 110 72 9 9
San Francisco, Calif.-- 226 135 18 6
San Jose, Calif.------- 47 31 1 -
Seattle, Wash.--------- 129 89 5 1
Spokane, Wash.--------- 45 30 2 -
Tacoma, Wash.---------- 39 30 1 1

Total 13,501 7,954 704 635

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 146,979
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 85,432
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 7,262
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 7,538








100


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CURRENT TRENDS
INFLUENZA UNITED STATES
(Continued from page 94)

from the greater Oklahoma City area have demonstrated
four-fold serologic rise to influenza type B. In addition,
A2 virus was recently isolated from a patient in the
Oklahoma City area. Custer County Indian Health Hospital
has submitted serologic specimens which demonstrate
that both type A and type B infections are occurring in
the reservation area served by the hospital.
(Reported by Dr. F.R. Hassler, Chief, Laboratory Services
and Communicable Disease Control, and Mr. Ray Wilson,
Virology Laboratory, Oklahoma State Department of
Health.)


Texas
Nine counties in Texas have been reporting scattered
outbreaks of influenza-like illness beginning in the middle
of February. School absentee rates reflect the involvement
of children; industrial absentee data do not reflect com-
parably affected adult groups.
From three counties in the southeastern part of the
State (Galveston, Lavaca and Travis), there have been
numerous serological identifications of type B influenza
infection.
(Reported by Dr. Van C. Tipton, Director, Division of
Communicable Disease Control; and Dr. J.V. Irons, Chief
of Laboratories, Texas State Department of Health.)




INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES


International Certificates of Vaccination, PHS-731


Page 11, paragraph 4. India, Pakistan, and Ceylon have
indicated that they will now accept the 10-day period
for the validity of the Yellow Fever Vaccination Cer-
tificate rather than the 12 days after vaccination which
they required previously.




Public Health doctors at Sydney Airport in Australia
refuse to recognize validity of WHO International Cer-
tificates of Vaccination without full longhand signature
of vaccinating physician in his own handwriting. The
certificate must also be complete in all other details,
including the "approved stamp."




*Attention State Health Officers:


International Certificates of Vaccination


The date of vaccination on these certificates should be
recorded in the following sequence: Day, month, year -
the month to be written in letters and not in figures.


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A C.KCuLA.
TION OF 15.600. IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DOSEAiE
CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
EDITOR: MMWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE, M.B.,
F. R. C. P. E.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVEST.
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEK. T, i .'AMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH ::A-T-E TS7 THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONALBASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


UNIV OF FL LId
DOCUMENTS DEPT.






U.S. DEPOSITORY


FEBRUARY 19, 1966


o

o d
O



C
_J c
=


m


0 n


>







r)



Mn




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EESDEXTLP_0XGFQ2 INGEST_TIME 2012-10-15T13:54:08Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00264
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES