Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00261

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUi


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
ASEPTIC MENINGITIS New Jersey

Between the 27th week (ended July 9) and the 40th
week (ended October 8). the New Jersey State Health De-
partment received reports of 12S cases of acute central
nervous system disease. Of these, 109 were designated
as aseptic meningitis; the remaining 19 had clinical en-
cephalitis. The reported cases of aseptic meningitis repre-
sent a definite increase from the 1965 Ne\ Jersey exper-
ience when only 56 were notified.
The peak incidence occurred in August and early Sep-
tember. Cases were reported from 17 of the 21 counties of
the State. Of the 109 cases. 84 occurred in persons less
than 25 years of age.


hcek Endinir i

October /, 1966




M _- S

CONitNi-

'. i l i .
uCuirrent iTrend

Wetastard S1pread Quarantine Measur . .


In general, the illnes- has been clinically typical
aseptic meningitis, with foIir. headache. \omiting. neck
stiffness, and increased cells (predominantly lymphocytes)
in the cerebrospinal fluid. Honeoer. in addition, there
have been some cases in which amorbilliform eruption has
been associated with the above picture.
(('onti/nueid on page 3L2)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
40th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 40 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE OCTOBER, OCTOBER 9, 1961-1965 MEDIAN
1966 1965 1966 1965 1961-1965
Aseptic meningitis .. 90 78 78 2.314 1,609 1,591
Brucellosis .. ................... .... 3 4 8 192 193 320
Diphtheria. ............. ....... 3 3 8 145 116 194
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ....... .. 67 40 --- 1.683 1.425
Encephalitis, post-infectious ........ 11 9 -- 616 567 -
Hepatitis, serum ................ .. 30 884 1.069 26123 33519
Hepatitis, infectious ... ... 594 24.458
Measles rubeolaa) .. .. .... 472 851 851 190,801 242.326 389.283
Poliomyelitis, Total (including unspecified) 2 2 20 73 48 323
Paralytic ............. .. ...... 1 18 67 39 276
N ,:,npi r.ll n.. .................. ... 6 -
Meningococcal infections. Total ......... 34 46 38 2.818 2,425 1.871
Civilian .. .. ... ..... .. 33 46 2,539 2.243
Military ...... .... ....... .... .. 1 --- 279 182 -
Rubella (German measles) .. .............. 233 --- -- 42,370 -
Streptococcal sore throat & Scarlet fever .. 6.054 5,907 4.652 326,751 304.519 263,914
Tetanus. ... .............. ...... .. 9 6 --- 146 206 -
Tularemia ............. ....... 5 5 134 197 -
Typhoid fever ....... ............... 13 18 15 297 333 411
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. Spotted fever) 7 7 -- 219 241

Rabies in Animals. .................... 50 53 60 3,230 3,431 2.980

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax:....................... .. 4 Botulism: Calif.-1 .
Leptospirosis: Hawaii-1. Tex.-I ........... .... 53 Trichinosis: Conn.-2 ....... ..... 81
Malaria:Cal.-2,Fla.-1,Mich.-l,Miss.-1,N.C.-8, Va.-1.Wash.-2 316 Rabies in Man: .. ..... ................. 2
Psittacosis: Conn.-1. Pa.-2, Wis.-2.. ..... ... ..... 40 Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: ........ 20
Typhus. marine: Ky.-1 .. ...... ... ... 22 Plague: .. ...... 4








342


Diagnostic confirmation by virus isolation and/or
serologic techniques has been obtained for 19 of the re-
ported 109 cases. These studies implicate a variety of
viruses: mumps cases; ECHO 9-5; Coxsackie B-2-2;
Coxsackie A-9 -2; Coxsackie B-5 -1; and ECHO 2- 1. More-
over, there were another seven cases reported in which a
well substantiated clinical diagnosis of mumps aseptic
meningitis had been made. An additional 15 agents have
been isolated in tissue culture; however, identification of
these has not been completed.


OCTOBER 8, 1966


Of the 19 cases of reported encephalitis, serologic
studies in two patients implicated Herpes Simplex virus
as the etiologic agent, while a clinical diagnosis of mumps
encephalitis had been made in a third patient.

(Reported by Dr. William J. Dougherty, Director, Division
of Preventable Disease Control Programs, Dr. Martin
Goldfield, Director, Division of Laboratories, and Dr.
Ronald Altman, Virology Laboratory, all of the New Jersey
State Department of Health; and an EIS Officer.)


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES


During the last 4-week period of the current epidemio-
logic year.* 1,722 measles cases were reported. This total
is 993 cases less than that reported during the comparable
4-week period in 1965 (Figures 1 and 2).
The incidence of measles is at the expected seasonal
low in all regions of the country, even 'h..,Tjh 16 States
reported mort measles during the current epidemiologic
year than during the preceding one. Only 375 cases were
reported for the week ending September 24, 1966, the low-
est number recorded for any week since the week ending
September 16, 1944.


A continuing trend of an apparent increase in measles
encephalitis is evident. For the first 40 weeks of 1966,
a total of 157 cases of encephalitis has been reported,
compared with 96 cases during the comparable period of
1965.

(Reported by the Childhood Viral Diseases Unit, Epidemio-
logy Branch.)

*The epidemiologic year for measles started with week 41 be-
ginning October 10, 1965, and closed with week 40 ending
October S, 1966.


Figure 1
MEASLES CUMULATED BY FOUR-WEEK PERIODS, UNITED STATES
EPIDEMIOLOGIC YEARS, 1964-65 AND 1965-66
COMPARED WITH 10-YEAR PERIOD, 1954-63


.............. 1964-65 Epidemiologic Year
--1965-66 Epidemiologic Year


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




ASEPTIC MENINGITIS (Continued from front page)


160,000


140,000


120,000


100,000


80,000


60,000


40,000


20,000


44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40
WEEK NUMBER







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Figure 2
FOUR-WEEK PERIODS UNITED STATES, 1956-1966


YEAR


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
AMEBIASIS Columbia, South Carolina


On June 11, 1966, a 55-year-old Negro woman died of
fulminant intestinal amebiasis after a 3-week illness. She
had lived in a small rural community 20 miles southeast
of Columbia, South Carolina, in a three-room wood-frame
house with two of her nieces and their six small children.
The house had no electricity, running water, screening,
or toilet facilities. Water for drinking and cooking was
obtained from a well located in sandy soil behind the
house. No privy was available and family members defe-
cated in the general area of the well. The well water was
also used by a family of eight living next door. The sec-
ond family had a pit privy and more adequate housing.
Five of eight stool samples from the patient's family
were positive for Entameoba histolytica and seven of the
eight family members had a positive hemagglutination
titer for E. histolytica. Four members of the neighboring
family had positive stool specimens. One of the four, a
43-year-old woman, was also serologically positive. She
complained of mild diarrhea and abdominal cramps of
2 years duration. No other members of either family were


symptomatic. Samples of well water were examined but no
ova or cvsts were found.
The Richland County Health Department recommended
that a pit privy be installed and that a new well be drilled
for use of both families. Those with positive stool exam-
inations were to receive appropriate therapy.

(Reported by Dr. G. E. McDaniel, State Epidemiologist;
Dr. John M. Preston, Director, Richland County Health
Department; and Mrs. Lila L. Bonner, Public Health
Nurse, Richland County Health Department, Columbia,
South Carolina: and an EIS Officer.)

Editorial Note:
The indirect hemagglutination test is useful in the
diagnosis of extra-intestinal amebiasis. It may be a use-
ful adjunct in the differential diagnosis of intestinal
amebiasis when used with appropriate sigmoidoscopic
and fecal examinations. It cannot be used routinely for
the diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis.


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
WESTWARD SPREAD OF CHOLERA


Late in 1965 cholera, which has been spreading west-
ward from its focus in Indonesia since 1960, extended
across Iran and reached the borders of Iraq and Turkey.
For the first time since the 1930's, cholera was offi-
cially reported from Iraq on August 14, 1966: as of Octo-
ber 1, there were 221 bacteriologically confirmed cases


with 17 deaths.* The outbreak has been confined to four
northeastern provinces, including the Baghdad province.
On September 26, Baghdad City and airport were declared
non-infected. All isolations have been of the El Tor variety.
*Preliminary data from the worldd Health Organization subject
to revision. (Continued on page 348)


343


OCTOBI:eR 8, 1966










344 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 8, 1966 AND OCTOBER 9, 1965 (40th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary Post- Both
AREA MENINGITIS BRUCELLOSIS including Infectious DIPHTHERIA Serum Infectious Types
unsp. cases
1966 1 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965 1966 1966 1965
UNITED STATES... 90 78 3 67 40 11 3 3 30 594 575

NEW ENGLAND.......... 5 4 1 2 22 33
Maine.............. 2 7 4
New Hampshire......- 1 4
Vermont..............- 3
Massachusetts...... 2 2 6 12
Rhode Island....... 3 2 1 3 3
Connecticut......... -5 7

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 17 6 8 12 14 95 107
New York City...... 3 1 5 8 10 27 30
New York, Up-State. 3 3 14 28
New Jersey.......... 10 3 1 4 26 19
Pennsylvania....... 1 2 3 28 30

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 16 1 11 6 3 1 113 116
Ohio............... 1 3 11 3 23 28
Indiana............ 2 14 15
Illinois........... 8 1 1 33 25
Michigan............ 3 4 -2 42 39
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 1 1 9

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 9 2 18 5 32 27
Minnesota........... 2 9 2 7 2
Iowa............... 1 2 9 6
Missouri........... -- 10 9
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska........... 3 5
Kansas ............. 16 3 3 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 6 2 6 4 4 2 1 3 57 49
Delaware............ 2 1
Maryland ..........- 1 10 9
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... 1 3 9 20
West Virginia...... 6 3
North Carolina..... 1 2 1 8 2
South Carolina..... 1 3 -
Georgia............ 2 1 3 -
Florida............. 5 1 3 4 1 15 13

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 1 2 1 3 31 16
Kentucky........... 14 4
Tennessee.......... 1 1 1 1 1 8 5
Alabama............ 2 6 5
Mississippi........ 1 1 3 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 13 12 13 1 1 53 45
Arkansas........... 3 3
Louisiana.......... 4 7 1 5 5
Oklahoma ........... 2 -
Texas............... 9 12 5 1 43 37

MOUNTAIN.............. 1 5 6 40 22
Montana............ 1 4 9
Idaho ............. 3 -
Wyoming ............ 2
Colorado ........... 4 2 6
New Mexico......... 5 12 2
Arizona............ 1 13 4
Utah................ 1 1 1
Nevada............. 3

PACIFIC.............. 37 28 3 5 3 10 151 160
Washington......... 1 2 1 5 10
Oregon............. 1 1 29 13
California......... 35 25 2 3 3 10 114 125
Alaska............ 1 4
Hawaii............. 1 1 2 8

Puerto Rico .......... 16 5


1 I I


I(I I I 1 I









345


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATlS

FOR WI:KS INDI)ED

OCTOBER 8, 1966 AND O(TOBER 9, 1965 (l0th WEEK) CONTINI' ID


AREA





NEW ENGLAND...........
Maine .............
New itampshi re......
Vermont............
Massachusetts......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut ........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City...... i
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania.......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio ...............
Indiana ............
Illinois...........
Michigan..........
Wisconsin..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota ..........
Iowa ...............
Missouri..........
North Dakota...... i
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas..............

SOUTH ATLANTIC........
Delaware...........
Maryland............
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia ...........
Florida............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky...........
Tennessee .........
Alabama............
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas ..........
Louisiana..........
Oklahoma ..........
Texas ..............

MOUNTAIN...............
Montana...........
Idaho. ..............
Wyoming............
Colorado...........
New Mexico.........
Arizona............
Utah................
Nevada ............

PACIFIC..............
Washington .........
Oregon ............
California .........
Alaska ..........
Hawaii .............
Puerto Rico ......


MEA


1966





11
4
4

2

28
2
2
7
17

101
5
14
11
40
31

26

7
1
18


NN

51

4

4
17



23

13
1
6
5
1

92


5
87

20
12
2

3

2

1

130
78
14
25
11


-3-


MENINCOCOCCAL INFECTIONS,
SALESS (Rubhela) TOTAL


Cumulative


i
I


I


1966






1


1966



2,290
215
80
239
787
72
897

18,064
8,295
2,538
1,855
5,376

68,944
6,360
5,716
11,376
14,557
30,935

8,724
1,643
5,316
532
1,116
40
77
NN

15,358
257
2,110
383
2,180
5,328
495
658
234
3,713

19,784
4,732
12,333
1,694
1,025

24,742
971
99
492
23,180

12,024
1,832
1,587
166
1,318
1,133
5,302
641
45

20,879
3,711
1,843
14,648
535
I.


1965



36,876
2,816
381
1,283
19,303
3,938
9,155

14,945
2,439
4,157
2,622
5,727

56,104
8,902
1,888
2,777
26,579
15,958

16,646
690 1
9,050
2,594
3,745
115
452
NN

25,237
505
1,166
78
4,103
13,897
391
1,052
617
3,428

13,978
2,586
7,937
2,335
1,120

31,026
1,084
108
206
29,628

19,852
3,739
2,798
849
5,690
677
1,339
4,556
204

27,662
7,266
3,277
13,055
186
31 .'


Tltal

1966


POLIOMYIELIl IS

IPralyt ic i

19 65 1966 1, 96 1966 |


Cuinuiative
1966



124
10
9
4
50
14
37

343
48
96
102
97

443
119
81
81
119
43

150
34
22
57
11
5
18
13

480
4
48
12
55
34
125
49
63
90

247
87
84
54
22

381
35
140
19
187

88
4
5
6
48
10
10

5

562
40
34
469
15

- \


965



121

7
7 1
43

*l

314
54
91
81
88

350
93
44
98
76
39

123
27
9
52
11
3
10
11

460
8
44
9
55
24
94
60
57
109

190
75
60
33
22

315
15
174
20
106

86
2
9
5
24
11
16
16
3

464
34
33
371
18
-+- :

!'


i i -4

II ll i


3 (90
15
1 11
2 21
24
19


1








-


I


I


------~










346 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 8, 1966 AND OCTOBER 9, 1965 (40th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER RABIES IN
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE ANIMALS
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted)

1966 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum. 1966 Cum.
1966 1966 1966 1966 1966
UNITED STATES... 6,054 9 146 5 134 13 297 7 219 50 3,230

NEW ENGLAND.......... 662 1 4 1 3 10 3 1 75
Maine............. 27 25
New Hampshire...... 5 25
Vermont............ 29 -- 1 22
Massachusetts...... 86 2 1 3 6 1 3
Rhode Island....... 67
Connecticut........ 448 1 2 4 2 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 78 13 2 51 1 41 3 198
New York City...... 3 5 22 1
New York, Up-State. 63 2 11 13 3 185
New Jersey......... NN 2 7 12 -
Pennsylvania....... 12 4 1 11 1 16 12

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 465 1 17 3 18 1 38 17 5 420
Ohio................ 40 4 3 18 9 2 192
Indiana............. 101 1 4 3 8 1 4 1 91
Illinois........... 136 3 6 4 8 1 57
Michigan........... 112 4 6 34
Wisconsin.......... 76 2 1 6 1 46

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 326 1 10 16 1 27 4 14 722
Minnesota.......... 8 2 5 164
Iowa............... 120 1 5 1 143
Missouri........... 2 6 10 13 3 3 221
North Dakota....... 169 1 3 36
South Dakota....... 13 2 1 79
Nebraska........... 2 2 2 21
Kansas............. 12 1 1 2 1 6 1 1 58

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 798 1 31 10 3 56 5 105 6 418
Delaware........... 14 1 2 -
Maryland........... 141 3 1 9 1 26 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 171 1 5 2 2 13 31 3 216
West Virginia...... 192 1 2 49
North Carolina..... 14 4 3 6 4 26 4
South Carolina..... 8 2 1 11 5
Georgia ............ 7 7 2 1 4 15 1 91
Florida............ 251 10 9 55

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 861 2 18 1 20 1 36 37 3 414
Kentucky........... 70 2 2 1 6 9 87
Tennessee.......... 573 1 3 1 11 19 22 1 287
Alabama............ 159 7 4 6 6 2 20
Mississippi........ 59 1 6 3 5 20

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 542 3 34 1 60 1 29 1 8 9 661
Arkansas........... 4 1 46 2 2 73
Louisiana........... 2 1 8 3 8 1 42
Oklahoma........... 47 2 7 9 1 5 4 168
Texas............... 493 2 20 4 1 10 1 4 378

MOUNTAIN............. 1,312 2 6 13 3 83
Montana............. 24 2 7
Idaho............. 23 -
Wyoming............ 37
Colorado........... 804 2 3 2 -17
New Mexico......... 262 1 2 1 -13
Arizona ............ 83 1 -4 36
Utah............... 79 2 3 3
Nevada ............. 1 -- 7

PACIFIC.............. 1,010 17 3 1 37 1 9 239
Washington......... 263 11 13
Oregon......... .... 35 -1 1 4
California......... 630 16 3 1 23 1 9 222
Alaska.............. 50
Hawaii ........ .... 32 2 -
Puerto Ric .......... 7 1 44 11 1 16










Morbidity and Mortality WeeklI Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED OCTOBER 8, 1966

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Week No.


Area


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.-------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.-------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, III.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind .-----------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, lowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.------
Wichita, Kans.--------


f 1I .u

All 65 years
Ages and over


784
264
40
36
35
70
26
22
19
47
72
12
49
31
61

3,238
56
28
136
46
28
36
53
85
1,685
44
493
186
51
100
28
37
60
26
32
28

2,711
74
46
774
155
215
127
96
375
52
51
49
35
52
153
40
153
37
41
23
110
53

821
68
32
24
111
29
119
72
232
86
48


482
134
29
28
24
40
15
14
15
28
48
9
32
25
41

1,922
36
15
80
25
16
21
32
36
989
26
303
108
36
63
18
27
33
18
24
16

1,512
41
30
398
96
109
64
52
206
29
27
28
17
42
99
20
87
23
28
11
68
37

527
50
23
16
69
23
77
49
136
59
25


Fr" u.T .1,
and
Influenza
All Ages


*Estimate ba:cd on average percent of divisional total.


II- 1. ,1*.
1 year
All
Causes


65 years
and over


+ 4*4


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif .------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,123
106
300
43
56
96
46
70
33
68
68
194
43

532
83
51
34
95
119
36
33
81

990
35
16
37
122
28
66
191
43
174
83
109
46
40

370
34
21
101
17
69
23
64
41

1,391
22
37
25
34
67
399
74
32
98
72
93
165
47
148
32
46


and
Inf luenza
All Ages


i year
All
Cause.


74
12
15

7
6

4
2
2
3
13
5

29
3
3
1
13
6
1
1


75
3

1
12
3
3
3
3
16
5
8
2
7

18
1
2
3
1
5

6


57
1


5
3
20
7
1
4
1


Total 11,960 6,855 447 673

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 502,613
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 288,021
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 21,026
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 26,756


347


I I I I









348 Morbidity and Mo





WESTWARD SPREAD OF CHOLERA
(Continued from page 343)

In Iraq health authorities have given one cholera
vaccination to almost the entire population and have set
up special hospitals to deal exclusively with cholera
cases. In Baghdad all persons with severe diarrhea are
immediately hospitalized as cholera suspects, even t' -h.il
many of them have the common summer diarrhea.
There have been no reported cases of cholera in
Turkey, Syria. Jordan or Saudi Arabia. During recent
months cholera has been reported from the following
countries: Burma, India, Indonesia. Nepal, Pakistan, the
Philippines, Thailand. and Vietnam.

(Reported by the Enterir Dieseases Unit, Baterial Dis-
rtasi Section, Epidemiology Branch, (')C; and from in-
formation compiled from WHO Bulletins, \ 8os. 34-40, 1966.)



QUARANTINE MEASURES

Travel Restrictions Middle East
Countries in the eastern Mediterranean are imposing
rigid requirements for entry even for travelers who have
been \accinated against cholera. For this reason it is
suggested that travelers planning to visit these countries
should conduct their business whenever possible in non-
cholera areas before entering cholera infected countries.
A summary of the restrictions follows:
Jordan will quarantine all arrivals from Iraq for the
incubation period of the disease.
Iran. Saudi Arabia. and Turkey will not permit trav-
elers from Iraq to enter the country. There are certain
exceptions for returning citizens and residents but quar-
antine restrictions are applicable to them.
Lebanon denies entry to travelers who have been in
Iraq. India, Burma, Thailand, South Vietnam and the
Philippines the previous 10 days.
Syria will quarantine travelers with or without a
valid cholera vaccination certificate for a maximum period
of 48 hours.



Erratum, Vol. 15, No. 38, p. 326:
In the fourth paragraph of the article entitled
"Diphtheria South Carolina," a portion of the text was
omitted. Beginning with the third sentence, the paragraph
should read:
Each household contact was treated with 1,000 units
of diphtheria antitoxin, a dose of diphtheria toxoid,
and la -day course of oral penicillin. Each carrier
was given 10,000 units of antitoxin and 2.4 million
units of procaine penicillin each day until three con-
seculivc throat cultures were negative. The clini-
cally ill patients were treated with 20.000)-0,000
units of antitoxin and 2.4 million units procain,
penicillin per da\.


irtality Weekly Report


OCTOBER 8, 1966


NIV OF FL 6IB..


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U.S. DEPOSITORY


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THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 15,600. IS PUBLISHED- AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA. GEORGIA
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER DAVID J. SENCER. MD.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.O. LANGMUIR, M.D.
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE INVES-
TIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH OFFICIALS
AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF COM-
MUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
TO:
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
ON SATURDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.



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