Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00256

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
-S 2. 60/ 9: / '//3


Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepard by the


-
aekl


MElrose 4-5131


For release April 6, 1962 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA Vol. 11, No. 13
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 31, 1962


INFLUENZA Vermont reports small outbreaks of
influenza-like disease in the center of the State which
began in the middle of March. No other significant out-
breaks have been reported in the United States this week.
South Dakota reports a single serologic titer rise, bringing
the number of States confirming Influenza B to 41. Slightly-
above expected levels this week, pneumonia and influ-


enza deaths repo
expected levels f
Further outbr
in several addit
In France, a lii
military hospital


Germany, a widespread epidemic was recorded in Hesse
during January; in Canada, several limited outbreaks were
reported in Quebec.
Extensive epidemics confirmed as due to influenza
A2 have been reported from Hungary and Korea. Both were
associated with a high disease incidence.


rted by 108 United States cities exceed POLIOMYELITIS Three paralytic cases were reported
or the 13th consecutive week. this week; two from separate counties in Texas and one
breaks of Influenza B have been reported from Indiana. No concentration of cases to any localized
ional areas outside the United States. geographic area is yet apparent. The total of paralytic
united outbreak has been reported in a cases reported during 1962 is 49. Comparable figures
in Brittany: in the Federal Republic of during the previous five yeasllows:




Table I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASE NITE A ATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports throu pr vious k)


13th Week Cumulativ
Ended Ended
Disease Median
March 31, April 1, 1957 1961 to -I Median
1962 1961 1962 S' 1957 1961
Aseptic meningitis............... 11 29 --- 205 290 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 8 17 16 77 134 171
Diphtheria ...................... 5 8 10 134 200 217
Encephalitis, infectious.......... 32 40 35 336 342 307
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 1,193 1,856 469 17,974 23,026 7,088
Measles ......................... 21,946 14,531 16,428 171,136 151,176 167,088
Meningococcal infections ......... 50 50 54 672 653 739
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 3 4 15 76 103 216
Paralytic .................... 3 3 7 49 60 154
Nonparalytic .................- 1 4 10 25 36
Unspecified ................. 4 17 18 26
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 9,250 8,488 -- 114,892 124,315 .
Tetanus ........................ 4 --- --- 30 ..
Tularemia ...................... 7 --- --- 65 --
Typhoid fever................... 4 14 10 101 113 128
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... -- --- 3
Rabies in Animals ............... 88 72 80 1,008 850 1,099

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Anthrax: Psittacosis: Utah 1, wis. 1
Botulism: Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: Ga. 1


V


' ~' '


lc~oL~c~








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


2,000

1,800

1600

1,400



S1,000
-s
8 800

600.

400.

200.


AN 'FFR MAR


R PA MAY JUN )111 AUG


P ES OCT Nqy DEC


6 20 3 17 3 17 31 14 28 12 26 9 23 7 21 4 18 I 15 29 13 27 10 24 8 22


Polio (Cumulative Total) Through 13th Week
For Past Five Years


Total Cases
Paralytic


1962
76
49.


1961
103
60


1960
216
154


1959
296
211


1958
216
121


HEPATITIS A continuing decline -in hepatitis cases
is noted this week. (See graph, page 98). In each of the
regions, the total cases reported are below 1961 levels
except for New England which shows a moderate increase
over last year. Within this region, Maine, New Hampshire,
and Massachusetts account for the increased number of
cases.



EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Typhoid Fever Related to Raw Oyster Consumption -
Southeastern U. S.

During the last three months of 1961, a series of six
cases of typhoid fever occurred in Florida, Georgia and
Alabama, which subsequent investigation linked to a
common source. The first five occurred during the 17 day
period, October 16 to November 1; the sixth case experi-
enced onset of symptoms on December 19. All had con-
sumed raw oysters during the appropriate incubation
period. The oysters consumed by the first five cases
appear to have been processed by a single oyster shuck-
ing plant in Florida; those consumed by the sixth case
were taken from an oyster bed from which the processing
plant also received oysters.
Cultures obtained from each of these six cases have
grown Salmonella typhosa, phage type A. Bacteriologic
studies carried out by the CDC Enteric Bacteriology Unit
reveal that each possesses a peculiar insusceptibility to


an unadapred mutant of Vi phage II isolated previously at
the CDC laboratory. (Except for strains associated with
this outbreak all typhoid organisms of phage type A tested
at CDC thus far have proven susceptible to this phage.)
The first of the cases (see table) occurred in the
wife of the owner of the oyster processing plant. The
patient, who worked as an oyster shucker became ill on
October 16. A second case occurred on October 23 in a
35-year-old woman also employed as a shucker at this
plant. Both of these women frequently consumed oysters
raw while engaged in shucking operations. A third case
occurred on October 30 in a 21-year-old Negro male, the
brother-in-law of the maid, who works for the owners of
the oyster plant. He is known to have frequently consumed
food, including raw oysters, obtained from the owner's
house.

Age Sex Date of Onset Residence Occupation
28 F Oct. 16 Apalachicola, Fla. Shucker, wife of
owner
51 M Oct. 20 Melgs, Go. Farmer
35 F Oct. 23 Apalachicola, Fla. Shucker
21 M Oct. 30 Apalachicola, Fla. Brother-in-law of
maid for owner
10 M Nov. 1 Phenix City, Ala. Student
51 F Dec. 19 Volparoiso, Fla. Housewife

Since oysters from this shucking plant were known to
have been shipped during this period primarily within
Florida and to Georgia and North Carolina, all typhoid
cases of phage type A in these States were intensively
investigated by the respective State Health Department
authorities and CDC epidemiologists. In Georgia, during
the preceding six months, only one case known to have
been caused by a phage type A strain was recorded. This
occurred on October 20 in a 51-year-old white male farmer
from Meigs, Georgia. The patient regularly consumed large
quantities of raw oysters purchased from a grocery store


Current U. S. Hepatitis Incidence
/\ Compared With Years 1961, 1960, and 1957
I '\ SOUICE DATA. NOVS CDC
v ,,\

S.A
/1960

t1 \ /'-. i "
i "- ../:v\
:. '--/ A .

1960 '* .." "*...


19.. ." -


JAN 1:1:11 MAR UP nrT Nnu D Q


neen









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


in Meigs. It was established that this store is supplied by
a trucker who distributes oysters processed by the Florida
shucking plant. A review of North Carolina typhoid cases
revealed only one to be of phage type A. This occurred in
a non-oyster consumer; the organism did not show the
unique phage typing characteristics common to the other
strains.
Investigation about this time of a reported focal out-
break of typhoid cases in Phenix City, Alabama, revealed
one bacteriologically confirmed and several suspect
cases. The confirmed case was in a ten-year-old white
boy who became ill on November 1. He consumed oysters
on-the-half-shell at two restaurants in Columbus, Georgia,
on October 22. Both restaurants were supplied by a single
distributor who retained no records of purchases or ship-
ments. The bulk of the oysters he receives, however,
derive from Florida and, from known distribution patterns,
could have been obtained from the suspect oyster proces-
sing house.


Intensive investigations, both epidemiological and
laboratory, were carried out by the Florida State Board of
Health. These included the processing of over 1,500 cul-
tures of case contacts and employees of oyster shucking
houses plus cultures of oysters, bay water, drinking water
and sewage. One specimen only revealed S. typbosa. This
was from a previously unknown typhoid carrier, a 67-year-
old oyster longer who worked alone and sold oysters ex-
clusively to the single processing plant involved. The
organism isolated from him was phage type A and, like
those from the cases, was uniquely insusceptible to the
unadapted mutant Vi phage II.
Intensive investigation of all typhoid cases occurring
since early 1961 was undertaken by the Florida State
Board of Health but, until December, no additional related
cases were discovered. On December 19, a 51-year-old
white female whose home is in Valparaiso, Florida, de-
veloped an enteric illness later identified as typhoid
fever. S. typhi were recovered from her stool. Phage test-
(Continued on page 104)


MORTALITY SUMMARY TOTAL DEATHS REPORTED IN 108 CITIES


For the four-week period ending March 31, deaths
from all causes remained well above expected levels.
Excess mortality fluctuated (see table) during the period,
but averaged 435 deaths per week. In the corresponding
period of the 1960 Influenza A2 epidemic, the average
weekly excess mortality was 635 deaths.


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 UNITED STATES CITIES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
3/10 3/17 3/24 3/31 Total Average
Observed 12,472 12,414 11,906 12,059 48,851 12,213
Expected 11,844 11,806 11,759 11,703 47,112 11,778

Excess 628 608 147 356 1,739 435


13,500|


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


&-INFLUENZA Aa


NUMBER
12,000
RECORDED
OF 1,EATHS*

DEATHS

1 1,000 I i l-
"EXPECTED
NUMBER\


S10._ _i 000_ -----


IILL zI zi z


7 13I 7 13 1 7 11 7 13
1960 1961 | 1962 1 1963


NCE


*'CALCULATED FROM 1954-'60 EXPERIENCE


(See table, page 103)


Period number I

*BY PLACE OF OCCURRED


* 1


I I I


I I L











100 llorbidilt and l1orilail. eekly Report


T.ible CASES OF SPE( IIED) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES I NITED) STATES

FOR X E[KS ENDED

APRIL I, 1961 AND MARCH 31, 1962



Policpamyr licis, Aseptic
Poltiomyelitis, Tocal Cases Poliomyeliti Paralytic lonpara lIic M enns gitis


Area


Cumulative Cumulative
13ch week First 13weeks 13th week First 13 weeks 13th week 13th week


1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961 1962 1961

UNITED STATES...... 3 4 76 103 3 3 49 60 1 11 29

NEW ENGLAND............. 3 3 2
Mair ........ ......... -
New Hampshire.......... -- -
Vermont................ -
Massachusetts........ 2 2 2
Rhode Island ........- -
Connecticut........... 1 I -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 29 6 1 16 5 2 -
New York.............. 29 3 16 2 -
New Jersey............ 2 2 -- -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 1 9 16 1 1 6 10 1 6
Ohio................... 1 4 8 1 4 4 1
Indiana............... 1 4 1 1 2 1 -
Illinois.............. 1 3 3 1 3
Michigan.............. 1 2
Wisconsin............. 3 1- -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 5 2 1 2 1
Minnesota............. 1 1 1
Iowa .................. 3 -
Missouri..... ......... -
North Dakota.......... -
South Dakota.......... -
Nebraska.............. 1 I -
Kansas............... -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 5 10 5 6 1 2
Delaware ............. 2 -
Maryland............. -
District of Columbia.. -
Virginia .............. I 1 1
West Virginia......... 2 -
North Carolina......... 1 3 1 2 -
South Carolina........ I -
Georgia......... ..... I I 1 1- -
Florida............... 2 1 1 1 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 3 13 2 2 1 2
Kentucky.............. 13 2 -
Tennessee............. 1 1 -
Alabama............... -
Mississippi ........... 2 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 13 13 2 11 5 3
Arkansas............. 1 -
Louisiana............. 4 3 4 2 -
Oklahoma............... -
Texas.................. 2 9 9 2 7 3 3

MOUNTAIN................. 5 15 3 9 1 3
Montana............... 2 1 1 1 -
Idalo ................. 3 1 -
Wyom.ing ............... -
Colorado.............. 3 3 1
New Ilexico. ........... I 3
Arizona............... 2 2 -- -
Utah................... 1 5 ---
Nevada................ -

PACIFTC.................. 2 7 25 1 5 18 1 5 10
Washington........... -
Oregon................ 2 1 1 1
California............. 2 6 22 1 4 16 1 4 9
Alaska................ -
Hawaii ................ 1 1 1 1 -

Puerto Rico............... 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 -










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 101


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 1, 1961 AND MARCH 31, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
Infectious Infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 13th week
lative lative Under 20 &
13th week 13 weeks 13th week 13 weeks 13th week 20 yr. over Total Total 13th week
1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1961
UNITED STATES...... 8 77 5 134 32 40 643 457 1,193 1,856 21,946 14,531

NEW ENGLAND.............. 4 6 36 33 69 41 2,389 1,322
Maine................. 1 12 3 15 1 309 20
New Hampshire.......... 1 1 1 4 70
Vermont............... 5 6i 3
Massachusetts......... 1 3 20 24 44 20 1,243 628
Rhode Island........... 1 2 1 1 4 94 395
Connecticut........... 1 1 3 5 8 10 630 206

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 2 8 5 83 93 176 237 4,238 2,219
New York.............. 2 4 1 29 49 78 120 2,651 1,030
New Jersey............ 2 31 19 50 65 1,173 549
Pennsylvania......... 1 4 2 23 25 48 52 407 640

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 20 1 3 1 2 156 90 254 351 2,208 4,404
Ohio.................. 59 28 91 117 502 918
Indiana ............... 1 2 1 24 9 33 56 355 207
Illinois .............. 16 1 17 15 36 45 442 480
Michigan.............. 1 2 2 53 35 88 132 730 1,093
Wisconsin.............. 2 3 3 6 1 179 1,706

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 5 37 2 25 48 28 92 190 1,186 540
Minnesota, ........... 1 4 2 9 12 6 24 22 45 14
Iowa ................. 18 1 12 9 21 87 934 234
Missouri.............. 1 16 4 26 30 98 173
North Dakota........... 1 1 1 2 3 7 104 50
South Dakota........... 1 3 2 2 5 3 -
Nebraska.............. 1 6 11 4 20 2 69
Kansas................ 2 6 1 7 5 12 19 NN NN

SOUTH ATANTIC........... 1 6 1 25 5 4 77 60 140 241 1,303 1,433
Delaware............... 1 1 25 10 84
Maryland .............. 1 1 6 6 12 21 99 128
District of Columbia.. 1 1 3 4 4 40 4
Virginia............. 1 4 20 12 34 28 400 379
West Virginia......... 10 1 12 44 500 225
North Carolina........ 2 4 4 2 29 15 44 53 13 267
South Carolina........ 2 3 4 7 17 25 89
Georgia .............. 1 2 4 2 2 30 32 48
Florida............... 1 1 10 1 8 16 24 19 184 209

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 3 8 1 113 28 144 322 1,760 1,226
Kentucky.............. 49 10 61 53 322 538
Tennessee.............. 2 4 44 8 53 143 1,188 496
Alabama............... 1 3 9 5 14 73 46 143
Mississippi........... 1 1 11 5 16 53 204 49

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 1 6 54 3 52 28 103 119 4,42 522
Arkansas............. 1 1 6 1 7 24 4 56
Louisiana............. 1 1 7 21 6 29 11 2 1
Oklahoma.............. 3 1 4 4 101 -
Texas................. 5 43 2 24 21 63 80 4,31f 465

MOUNTAIN ................. 2 7 11 12 46 94 1,006 684
Montana.............. 6 1 2 3 12 228 75
Idaho................. 4 6 23 56
Wyoming .............. 10 3 4
Colorado.............. 1 4 5 18 31 419 97
New Mexico............ 1 1 1 7 N W NN
Arizona..............- 10 11 240 416
Utah .................. 1 5 5 10 15 90 32
Nevada................ 2 3 4

PACIFIC................... 2 1 10 10 23 67 85 169 261 3,431 2,181
Washington............ 12 7 30 46 1,321 317
Oregon ................ 10 12 23 38 709 170
California ............ 2 1 5 10 23 45 65 110 130 1,377 1,678
Alaska................. 5 46 14 10
Hawaii................. 1 1 1 10 6

Puerto Rico.............. 1 11 27 3 30 15 130 22










102 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 1, 1961 AND MARCH 31, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
13th wk. 13 weeks 13th week 13thwk. 13th w-. 13th wk. 13th wk. 13 weeks 13th week 13 weeks
1962 1962 1962 1961 1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1962 1961 1962


UNITED STATES.... 50 672 9,250 8,488 4 7 4 101 88 72 1,008

NEW ENGLAND......... 6 42 574 729 2 -
Maine............... 6 53 51 1 1
New Hampshire...... 1 3 2 25 -
Vermont............. 2 2 1 12 -
Massachusetts...... 1 15 117 254 1 -
Rhode Island....... 4 39 69 -
Connecticut........ 2 12 362 318 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 9 105 607 1,160 12 1 1 24
New York........... 2 49 374 716 6 1 1 14
New Jersey......... 5 24 85 284 4 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 32 148 160 2 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 9 141 908 1,135 1 12 8 5 148
Ohio............... 2 43 111 247 1 4 1 50
Indiana............ 1 14 144 193 8 1 70
Illinois............ 1 21 192 185 3 1 15
Michigan........... 2 54 242 299 3 2 7
Wisconsin.......... 3 9 219 211 2 6

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2 32 339 259 2 1 6 15 22 306
Minnesota.......... 3 37 9 2 2 52
Iowa............... 1 6 93 73 7 8 136
Missouri........... 9 16 29 2 1 5 3 6 52
North Dakota....... 1 2 119 68 2 1 25
South Dakota....... 1 1 4 37
Nebraska........... 5 1 1 1 3
Kansas.............. 6 73 80 I

SOUTH ATIANTIC...... 7 105 615 614 3 1 15 16 5 86
Delaware............ 12 4 17 -
Maryland............ 4 23 46 2 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 6 2 2 1 2 -
Virginia........... 1 22 243 181 1 3 8 1 44
West Virginia...... 2 8 161 244 -1 7 4 25
North Carolina..... 2 28 38 29 -
South Carolina..... 1 6 35 27 1 -
Georgia............. 6 2 9 2 -3 1
Florida............ 13 107 59 3 1 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2 45 1,459 1,626 1 9 15 11 148
Kentucky........... 1 11 78 368 2 4 1 39
Tennessee......... 19 1,253 1,204 1 4 11 5 104
Alabama............ 1 9 4 16 3 5 5
Mississippi........ 6 124 38 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL. 64 980 539 2 1 1 33 21 16 215
Arkansas .......... 8 6 15 1 1 3 2 2 34
Louisiana.......... 27 3 3 1 1 11 3 2 10
Oklahoma........... 4 55 23 3 7
Texas............... 25 916 498 16 16 12 164

MOUNTAIN............ 2 21 1,829 1,407 1 6 2 4 11
Montana............ 1 3 102 47 1 -
Idaho.............. 3 144 134 -- -
Wyoming............ 2 135 41 2 -
Colorado........... 1 4 835 429 2 -
New Mexico......... 270 334 1 2 2 5
Arizona............ 6 200 165 1 2 6
Utah............... 143 254 -
Nevada.............. 3 -

PACIFIC.............. 13 117 1,939 1,019 1 6 10 8 70
Washington......... 2 11 800 441 -
Oregon.............. 12 54 50 -
California.......... 11 90 1,041 463 1 6 10 8 70
Alaska.............. 4 16 64 -
Hawaii............. 28 1 -


Puerto Rico......... 4 1 20 1 -I 1 1 6










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




Table 4 (A). TOTAL DFATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


103


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.o


For weeks ending AFor weeks ending
Area 317 3/ 3/31 3/10 Area37

_____________ 3/10 3/17 3/24 3/31 _____ ______3110 3/17 3/24 3/31


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. ...............
Bridgeport, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass. ..........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, Mass. .............
Lynn, Mass. ...............
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New Haven, Conn. ..........
Providence, R.I. ..........
Somerville, Mass. .........
Springfield, M ss. ........
Waterbury, Conn .........
Worcester, Mass. ..........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ..............
Allentown, Pa. ............
Buffalo, N.Y. ..............
Camden, N.J. ...............
Elizabeth, N.J. ...........
Erie, Pa. ................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y. .......
Paterson, N.J. ...........
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...........
Reading, Pa. ..............
Rochester, N.Y. ...........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa. ............
Syracuse, N.Y. ...........
Trento N.J. .............
Utica, N.Y. ...............
Yonkers, N.Y. .............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio................
Chicago, Ill ..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio.............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio................
Detroit, Mich. ............
Evan>ville, Ind. .........
Flint, Mich. ..............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. ................
Grand Rapids, Mich. .......
Indianapolis, Ind. .......
Madison, Wis. .............
Milwaukee, Wis. ...........
Peoria, Ill. ..............
Rockford, Ill. ............
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn. ..............
Kansas City, Kans. .......
Kansas City, Mo. ..........
Lincoln, Nebr. ............
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ............
St. Paul, Minn ...........
Wichita, Kans .............


297
47
36
22
59
21
27
33
48
66
10
41
25
74


52
40
168
35
35
35
73
110
1,899
52
512
170
37
127
25
37
72
55
35
38


70
39
823
172
228
156
78
406
31
62
45
40
51
180
37
115
41
32
20
116
65


50
18
58
146
43
128
88
226
71
58


290
41
27
33
61
23
29
22
52
72
17
54
25
68


63
43
158
44
27
39
86
118
1,918
30
589
165
31
119
30
44
80
57
34
40


47
36
794
164
251
138
83
408
27
48
37
29
60
152
46
145
26
26
50
113
69


60
22
36
145
34
111
81
251
73
39


268
37
38
35
59
33
30
24
54
63
14
44
20
69


46
49
152
41
36
62
71
99
1,812
35
519
271
35
98
20
46
63
43
31
35


54
31
763
175
219
134
77
369
35
49
41
31
52
154
39
121
28
24
36
117
55


68
22
37
126
31
104
74
212
70
62


255
53
33
36
67
18
23
39
46
68
14
54
24
49


54
44
128
63
28
49
79
132
1,709
36
594
258
19
114
20
43
72
60
35
30


45
47
764
137
212
100
79
356
51
45
43
43
57
123
26
121
25
20
27
102
62


56
21
45
129
18
115
72
237
67
43


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. ..............
Baltimore, Md. ...........
Charlotte, N.C. ...........
Jacksonville, Fla. ........
Miami, Fla. ..............
Norfolk, Va. ..............
Richmond, Va. .............
Savannah, Ga. .............
St. Petersburg, Fla ......
Tampa, Fla. ...............
Washington, D.C. ..........
Wilmington, Del. ..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala. ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........
Knoxville, Tenn. ..........
Louisville, Ky. ..........
Memphis, Tenn. ............
Mobile, Ala. ..............
Montgomery, Ala. ..........
Nashville, Tenn. ..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. ..............
Baton Rouge, La. ..........
Corpus Christi, Tex ......
Dallas, Tex, .............
Ei Paso, Tex. .............
Fort Worth, Tex. ..........
Houston, Tex. .............
Little Rock, Ark. .........
New Orleans, La. ..........
Oklahoma City, Okla. ......
San Antonio, Tex. .........
Shreveport, La. ............
Tulsa, Okla. ...............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Nex. ......
Colorado Springs, Colo. ...
Denver, Colo. .............
Ogden, Utah................
Phoenix, Ariz. ............
Pueblo, Colo. .............
Salt Lake City, Utah.......
Tucson, Ariz. ............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. ..........
Fresno, Calif. ...........
Glendale, Calif. ..........
Honolulu, Hawaii..........
Long Beach, Calif. ........
Los Angeles, Calif. .......
Oakland, Calif. ..........
Pasadena, Calif. ..........
Portland, Oreg. ..........
Sacramento, Calif. ........
San Diego, Calif.........
San Francisco, Calif. .....
San Jose, Calif. ..........
Seattle, Wash. ............
Spokane, Wash. ............
Tacoma, Wash. .............


123
275
37
45
70
62
94
33
107
63
220
35


69
51
25
95
141
35
34
68


31
39
32
131
56
75
237
77
196
75
111
49
39


29
24
137
24
96
20*
55
45


San Juan, P.R. ............... 39 39 27 26


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages...................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


12,059
571
757
6,722


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTF Al deaths by place of occurrence.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11111 IIIIIII III 1111111111111111111111 1 11111i 111111111
3 1262 08863 9991


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ing at CDC revealed it to have the same characteristics
as those obtained from others in the outbreak. The woman
had eaten raw oysters on the halfshell on December 5.
The oysters were traced to their source, the same bay
from which the other oysters derived. They had been
harvested on either November 28, 29 or 30; the tonger
collecting these oysters worked in the same portion of the
bay covered by the proven typhoid carrier. No other rela-
tionship could be established between these oysters and
the known carrier or the other five cases; further studies
are still in progress.
The oyster processing plant was closed immediately
after the initial case was recognized; oysters in distribu-
tional channels were confiscated.
Intensive investigations of the entire oyster industry
in Florida have revealed no evidence of additional sour-
ces of contamination with enteric pathogens.
(Reported by Dr. James O Bond, Director, Bureau of
Preventable Disease, Florida State Board of Health;
Dr. W. J. Murphy, Director, Epidemiology Service, Georgia
Department of Public Health; Dr. W.H.Y. Smith, Director,
Preventable Diseases, Alabama State Department of
Public Health; Dr. Jacob Koomen, Asst. Director, Divi-
sion of Epidemiology, North Carolina State Board of
Health; and the Staff of the Communicable Disease
Center.)



INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
Immunization Information for International Travel
1961 edition Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following information should be deleted from the list
of Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


City
New York
New York City


I UNIIV OF FL Li--
N-
SEPOSITORY



L US DEPOSITORY


Center Clinic Hours Fee
Trans World Airlines, Inc. Tuesday Yes
Medical Unit, Hangar No. 4 11 a.m.-noon
LoGuardia Airport
Tel. OLympia 9-6000,
Ext. 266


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