Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00238

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
D 2 -ca C)// r a / G/ 3 / /





Morbidity and Mortality



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PrepOred by te I/h MEIrose 4-5131


For release December 29, 1961 Atlanta 22, Georgia Vol. 10, No. 51

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended December 23, 1961


Influenza Influenza B outbreaks have been con-
firmed in six of seven States in which acute respiratory
disease continues to spread. Isolates or serologic titer
rises have been obtained in California, Oregon, Colorado,
Arizona, Missouri, and Florida. Laboratory studies are
still in progress in the State of Washington.
The highest attack rates have been noted in school
children; industrial absenteeism, in general, has not been
significantly increased. Reported influenza and pneumonia
deaths do not at this time show increase above expected
levels either nationally or by district.
In England and Wales, Influenza B has been isolated
from outbreaks in several areas. A considerable rise in


influenza and pneu a deatr ba ed during the weeks
ending Decembe
No isola f Type A In f Virus (Asian or
other subtyp e as VtI been rep) ted n this country.
Californ l Outbrea' f respir tor disease previ-
ously report the major tn are of he State appear
to be spread' the rural areas. r have been con-
firmed as due t a B in th geles and greater
San Francisco areL' i
Oregon Five se s implicate Influenza B
in recent disease outbreaks in Oregon.
Washington State School absenteeism due to Influenza-
like disease has occurred in a belt of counties extending from


Table I. Cases of Specified Notifiable Diseases: United States
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)

Disease 51st Week Cumulative
(Seventh Revision of International Approxi-
Lists, 1955) First 51 weeks Since seasonal low week mate
Ended Ended seasonal
Dec. Dec. Median Median low
Weekly incidence low or sporadic 23, 24, 1 ?-C Median 1 c-5c point
-- Data not available i'& 11: 19e1 19 ., 195- 1ir61 19,-6 6lc L
1 196,: 195e- E.to
Quantity zero 19 l.- 61
Anthrax------------- --------062 7 18 f
Botulism---------------------- 049.1 6 10 *,
Brucellosie undulantt fever)-,----0O 4 7 7 566 729 778 A
Diphtheria------------------------055 5 18 29 570 846 911 261 500 546 July 1
Encephalitis, infectioua---------082 21 16 22 1,621 1,822 2,063 1,621 1,822 2,063 Jan. 1
Hepatitis, infectious, and
serum ----------------092,N998.5 pt. 1,195 996 319 71,402 40,148 18,801 18,700 14,355 4,764 Sept. 1
Malaria--------------------- 10-117 I 59 72 *
Measles-------------------..-----085 3,985 4,316 4,139 417,504 132,108 474,226 31,876 31,809 32,159 Sept. I
Meningitis, aseptic-----------340 pt. 19 38 -- 3,076 2,954 --- 3,076 2,954 --- Jan. 1
Meningococcal infections--------057 49 35 43 2,118 2,151 2,560 603 611 686 Sept. 1
Poliaoyelitis-------------------080 8 30 66 1,308 3,240 5,957 1,205 3,025 5,742 Apr. I
-Paralytic--------------080.0,080.1 6 16 33 853 2,256 3,037 793 2,088 2,917 Apr. 1
Nonparalytic-----------------080.2 8 16 310 643 2,012 285 616 1,9.7 Apr. 1
Unspecified--------.--------080.3 2 6 17 145 341 908 127 321 878 Apr. 1
Psittacosi----------- ------096.2 7 89 103 *
Babies in man------------------094 3 2 *
Streptococcal sore throat,
including scarlet fever-----050,051 5,663 5,303 --- 310,650 301,682 -- 91,439 --- -- Aug. I
Yphoid fever-------------------040 7 22 15 805 808 1,045 691 674 865 Apr. I
yphus fever, endemic-----------101 1 42 63 *
Babies In animale--------------- 45 26 65 3,329 3,282 4,111 695 511 770 Oct. 1








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Portland, Oregon, northward to Seattle. In addition, two coun-
ties in north central Washington are involved: namely, Okano-
gan and Douglas Counties. Laboratory studies are in progress.
Colorado School outbreaks of Influenza-like disease
beginning in late November have extended to involve a number
of schools in south central and southwestern Colorado. Out-
breaks in south central Colorado have been confirmed as Type
- B Influenza; laboratory examination of specimens from other
areas is in progress.
Studies in the Durango area reveal that school absentee
rates rose in late November from 5 percent to 10 to 14 percent
at which level they persisted up to time of the Christmas
school closing. In only one of the schools did absentee rates
exceed 20 percent. During the December period from 45 to 55
percent of children in the different schools were absent for
varying periods, the majority with respiratory disease. In the
separate schools, the outbreaks appeared to move on a class-
room by classroom pattern with absentee rates in the individual
rooms ranging from 30 to 50 percent on peak days. Absentee
rates in the high schools were somewhat lower than in the
elementary schools. Although a number of the teachers were
afflicted, adult illness appeared to be relatively infrequent.
The five commercial firms in Durango reported no increase in
absenteeism and physicians reported seeing few adult cases.
Missouri and Illinois The appearance of influenza and
influenza-like disease in Missouri and Southern Illinois has
been multi-focal. Communities involved include Potosi, St.
Louis, Jefferson City, Boonville, Cape Girardeau, and nearby
Anna, Illinois. In general, the illness affected junior high
students first, high school students second, and elementary
school pupils last. School attack rates up to 40 percent were
noted.
In the Potosi outbreak, a telephone survey was under-
taken to determine community attack rates. Every fifteenth
household owning a telephone was included in the survey. The
occupants of sixty households constituted the study population.
Results are shown below:









M--


Throat swabbing from seven individuals have yielded
Influenza B virus in eggs and tissue culture.
(Information for this summary was obtained from: Dr. Henry
Renteln, California State Department of Public Health; Dr.
Grant Skinner, Oregon State Board of Health; Dr. Ernest Ager,
Washington State Department of Health; Dr. Cecil S. Mollohan,
Colorado State Department of Public Health; Dr. E. A. Belden,
Missouri Department of Public Health and Welfare; and a team
from CDC Kansas City).



EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Salmonellosis from Commercial Cake Mix Newfoundland

In October, 20 cases clinically typical of Salmonella
food poisoning occurred in the Come-by-Chance area in
Newfoundland. From five persons, Salmonella thompson
was isolated. Recovery in most was uneventful. However,
a four-month old infant was hospitalized with gastroenter-
itis and severe dehydration and died after prolonged
treatment. Salmonella thompson was recovered from
repeated stool cultures.
As part of the investigation, packets of cake mixes
obtained from a local supermarket were sent unopened to
the provincial laboratory and Salmonella tbompson was
isolated from the contents.
(Reported by Dr. I. Severs, Department of Health, New-
foundland and Dr. E.W.R. Best, Department of National
Health and Welfare, Canada in the Weekly Report of the
Epidemiology Division of Department of National Health
and Welfare, Ottawa, Canada)

Staphylococcal Food Poisoning Massachusetts

In mid-November, approximately 200 students and a
few school personnel of the 531 persons who ate a turkey
dinner at an elementary school cafeteria became ill three
to six hours later with nausea and vomiting. Ten of these
were hospitalized overnight.
Several turkeys were cooked at the school but one
was prepared in the home of one of the kitchen workers.
She cooked it in her oven at a high temperature for four
hours, between 12:30 and 4:30 A.M., then turned the oven
down to 1500 F. At 7:30 A.M., she removed it from the
oven and brought it to the school, where she sliced and
distributed it among five pans containing other turkeys
which had already been sliced. The extra turkey was not
under refrigeration from the time it was taken out of the
oven at 7:30 until the meal was served at 11:15 A.M.
The woman who cooked the extra turkey at home ap-
pearedto have a mild sinus infection. The culture material
taken from her nose was purulent and grew a coagulase
positive staphylococcus aureus. This organism was grown
(Continued on page 8.)


I 1 I I


GE 6OUF


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".10 I








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 3

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED DECEMBER 24, 1960 AND DECEMBER 23, 1961

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Poliomyelitis 080 Brucel-
Menin- losis
Total Paralytic 080.0,080.1 gitis, (undu-
(Includes cases not specified by type) Nonparalytic aseptic lant
Area fever)
Area Cumulative, Cumulative, fever)
51st Week first 51 weeks 51st Week first 51 weeks 080.2 340 pt. 044

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1961

UNTIED STASS---------- 8 30 1,308 3,240 6 16 853 2,256 8 19 4

NEW ENGLAND------------------ 1 42 236 1 29 187 -
Maine---------------------- 6 53 6 52 -
New Hampshire-------------- I1 3 1 1 -
Vermont--------------------- 9 11 8 6 -- -
Massachusetts-------------- 18 34 10 23 -
Rhode Island--------------- 1 103 1 78 -
Connecticut---------------- 5 35 3 28 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC----------- 16 341 503 7 227 353 4 -
New York------------------- 13 253 277 5 163 176 3 -
New Jersey-------------- 1 35 85 28 61 1 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 2 53 141 2 36 116 -
EAST NOR1 CENTRAL ------- 1 6 178 561 5 109 350 9
Ohio----------------------- 2 48 129 2 22 67 4 -
Indiana-------------------- 1 3 20 145 2 11 111 -
Illinois------------------- 37 151 19 103 4
Michigan------------ ---- ---- 1 39 95 1 30 56 1
Wisconsin------------------ 34 41 27 13 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 80 178 36 104 3
Minnesota------------------ 6 55 6 45 -
Iowa -------------------- -- 21 23 10 4 2
Missouri------------------ 27 44 9 32 -
North Dakota--------------- 5 16 1 7 -
South Dakota--------------- 4 5 2 1 -
Nebraska------------------- 8 16 4 9 1
Kansas--------------------- 9 19 4 6 -
SOUTH ATIANTIC------------ 217 596 159 473 1 -
Delaware----------------- 2 1 -
Maryland------------------- 44 153 33 138 -
District of Columbia------ 3 5 3 5 -
Virginia------------------- 12 55 12 50 -
West Virginia-------------- 33 62 23 51 1 -
North Carolina------------- 21 93 11 70 -
South Carolina------------- 34 132 26 89 -
Georgia-------------------- 30 26 23 24 -
Florida-------------------- 38 70 27 46 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ----- 1 91 261 1 52 111 -
Kentucky----------------- 27 138 5 5 -
Tennessee------------------ 25 55 10 38 -
Alabama.------------------- 11 23 11 23 -
Mississippi---------------- 1 28 45 1 26 45 -
WEST SOU E CENTRAL----------- 5 156 295 2 88 190 3 -
Arkansas------------------- 3 23 37 1 12 27 2 -
Louisiana--------------- 2 55 52 1 44 32 1- -
Oklahoma-------------------- 4 17 12 -
Texas--------------------- 74 189 32 119 -
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 3 51 101 2 30 51 3
Montana------------------ 4 24 2 17 -
Idaho---------------------- 1 15 11 6 1 -
Wyoming-------------------- 1 22 1 -
Colorado------------------- 1 11 21 1 11 19 -
SNew Mexico----------------- 3 7 4 -
Arizona-------------------- 1 9 9 1 7 7 3 -
Utah----------------------- 8 7 4 2 -
Nevada-------------------- -
PACIFIC---------------------- 2 3 152 509 2 2 123 437 1 6 1
Washington----------------- 1 32 40 1 30 40 -
Oregon-------------------- 17 36 8 19 -
California----------------- 2 2 98 423 2 1 80 368 1 6 1
Alaska--------------------- 2 2 -
Hawaii------------------- 5 8 5 8- -

Puerto Rico----------------- 2 7 506 7 497 -











4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED DECEMBER 24, 1960 AND DECEMBER 23, 1961 Continued

(Py place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)


Diphtheria 055 Hepatitis, infectious, and
Encephalitis, serum 092,N998.5 pt. Masle
infectious
Area Cumulative, Cumulative,
51st Week first 51 weeks 082 51st Week first 51 weeks 085

1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960 1961 1960


UNITED STATEBS--------. 5 18 570 846 21 16 1,195 996 71,402 40,148 3,985 4,139

NEW ENGLAND----------------- 8 13 50 29 2,393 1,144 686 266
Maine------------------- 3 7 1 203 82 164 5
New Hampshire------------- 1 204 34 57 36
Vermont------------------ 1 196 29 1 8
Massachusetts-------------- 7 9 28 8 1,048 540 377 161
Rhode Island--------------- 6 5 246 211 31 40
Connecticut---------------- 1 8 14 496 248 56 16
MIDDIE ATLANTIC-------------- 20 17 5 2 190 131 9,553 4,957 699 1,100
New York------------------- 7 5 4 1 76 39 4,109 2,636 421 445
New Jersey---------- 2 53 43 2,280 386 186 183
Pennsylvania--------------- 13 10 1 1 61 49 3,164 1,935 92 472
EAST NORTH CENRAL-------- 17 42 1 4 288 237 14,393 7,356 644 1,305
Ohio----------------------- 2 16 118 75 4,798 2,559 37 467
Indiana------------------ 2 8 24 37 2,089 874 39
Illinois------------------ 10 6 1 3 33 76 2,611 1,614 300 39
Michigan---------------- 3 10 1 105 45 4,500 2,071 217 287
Wisconsin------------------ 2 8 4 395 238 90 473
WEST NORTH CENTRAL-------- 2 1 56 66 1 1 142 76 6,892 2,797 82 158
Mfnnesota------------------ 2 40 38 63 25 1,730 531 17 2
Iowa---------------------- 1 2 9 45 9 1,948 444 6 25
Missouri------------------- 1 2 19 30 1,488 928 1 42
North Dakota--------------- 4 3 7 1 158 182 57 88
South Dakota--------------- 6 10 199 155 1 1
Nebraska----------------- 3 2 1 4 2 642 278 -
Kansas----------- --- 2 1 4 9 727 279 NN NR
SOUTH ATANTIC-------------- 4 135 236 7 1 149 83 9,078 4,563 220 344
Delaware--- ---------- 3 185 266 1 28
Maryland----------------- 1 1 13 12 772 465 25 20
District of Columbia----- 3 5 2 145 64 20 1
Virginia------------------- 1 17 41 1 25 15 1,511 790 78 143
West Virginia-------------- 1 4 28 15 1,598 872 66 29
North Carolina------------- 1 11 20 1 40 8 2,152 466 21 21
South Carolina------------- 14 50 10 4 522 190 9 58
Georgia------------------- 46 45 8 18 753 300 17
Florida-------- ----- 2 42 75 5 1 20 6 1,440 1,150 27
EAST SOUTH CNTRAL------- 2 46 139 1 82 134 10,612 5,822 386 359
Kentucky--------- ---- 9 56 15 43 3,117 2,026 293
Tennessee---------------- 3 9 1 40 68 4,156 2,025 310 65
Alabama-------------------- 1 27 39 5 13 1,806 1,228 1 1
Mississippi---------------- 1 7 35 22 10 1,533 543 75 -
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL---------- 3 11 263 295 2 2 38 59 5,057 3,010 234 75
Arkansas------------------.. 4 16 1 6 16 1,000 261 101 1
Louisiana------------------ 40 80 8 2 559 191 -
Oklahoma------------------ 9 25 2 340 332 4 -
Texas---------------- 3 11 210 174 1 2 22 41 3,158 2,226 129 74
MOUNTAI ------------- 12 36 55 87 4,026 3,147 232 180
Montana------------------- 2 3 2 17 342 196 51 29
Idaho---------------------- 11 9 3 321 329 22 19
Wyoming------------------- 5 1 158 39 35 1
Colorado------------------- 4 3 25 50 1,389 1,168 8 55
New Mexico------------- 5 4 2 3 323 341 NN -
Arizona------------------- 3 13 7 691 649 87 61
Utah---------------------- 7 4 6 657 299 29 5
Nevada-------------------- 1 145 126 10
PACIFIC---------------------- 13 2 4 6 201 160 9,398 7,352 802 352
Washington----------------- 7 1 41 28 1,093 1,001 328 91
Oregon--------------------- 16 17 L,468 1,125 89 78
California----------------- 2 1 4 5 128 112 6,334 4,888 153 179
Alaska--------------------- 4 1 15 3 431 252 232 4
Havai-------------------- 1 72 86 -

Puerto Rico-------------- 1 2 59 139 14 35 959 777 32 35

NN-NOL NOLIrlable







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 5


Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, AND
PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED DECEMBER 24, 1960 AND DECEMBER 23, 1961 Continued

(By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Seventh Revision of the International Lists, 1955)

Strepto-
coccal Typhoid fever 040 Typhus
Malaria Meningoccocal Psitta- sore fever,
infections cosis thora endemic ables in
throat, endemJ c
Area etc. Cumulative,
10-U17 057 096.2 050,051 51rt Week first 51 weeks 101

1961 1961 196E. 19fl 1961 1961 196i l961 19.ei 196i 1961 196:

UNTED STAT~ES--------- 49 35 5,663 7 22 805 808 45 26

W ENAND- ---------------- 1 1 268 1 21 11 -
Maine---------------------- 1 5 1 2 -
Nev Hampshire------------- 1 -
Vermont-------------------- 2 -
Massachusetts-------------- 1 80 1 15 5 -
Rhode Island-------------- 3 2 -
Connecticut---------------- 146 3 4 -
MIDDLE ATLANTIC-------------- 11 10 262 2 101 62 1
New York------------------ 4 1 136 55 35 1
New Jersey----------------- 3 62 17 7 -
Pennsylvania-------------- 7 6 64 2 29 20 -
EAST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 11 11 462 1 3 110 102 12 4
Ohio----------------------- 3 1 77 1 3 47 32 3 1
Indiana-------------------- 106 24 25 5 2
llinois------------------- 4 2 62 29 21 1 -
Michigan------------------- 4 6 91 7 16 2 1
Wisconsin------------------ 1 126 3 8 1 -
WEST NORTH CENTRAL----------- 3 3 119 37 48 8 6
Minnesota----------------- 24 5 1 2 1
Iowa----------------------- 2 1 18 2 11 1 1
Missouri------------------- 7 23 26 1
North Dakota-------------- 2 40 1 1
South Dakota--------------- 1 5 3 4 3 -
Nebraska------------------- 1 3 1 1
Kansas--------------------- 25 3 2 1 1
SOUTH ATLANTIC--------------- 9 2 253 1 9 134 126 4 7
Delavare------------------- 6 1 1 -
Maryland------------------- 1 1 8 4 6 -
District of Columbia------- 1 13 10 -
Virglnia----------------- 72 20 24 1 4
West Virginia-------------- 2 1 111 11 14 2 3
North Carolina------------- 4 49 16 9 -
South Carolina------------- 6 6 8 18 -
Georgia------------------- 1 40 27 -
Florida-------------------- 2 3 21 17 1 -
EAST SOUTH CENTRAL--------- 2 3 1,025 1 2 88 124 3 -
Kentucky ----------------- 2 1 19 33 1 -
Tennessee----------------- 1 1 947 1 51 58 2 -
Alabama------------------- 2 8 1 12 25 -
Mississippi---------------- 1 68 6 8 -
WEST SOUTH E5TRAL----------- 2 722 3 161 211 13 6
Arkansas------------------ 1 30 56 1 5
Louisiana---------------- 2 5 27 59 1 1
Oklahoma----------------- 2 14 12 -
Texas---------------------- 715 2 90 84 11 -
MOUNTAIN-------------------- 3 1,048 2 64 49 1 1
Montana-------------------- 35 20 13 -
Idaho------------ -------- 176 1 3 -
Wyoming------------------- 1 46 3 4 -
Colorado------------------ 2 163 7 1 -
New Mexico----------------- 233 2 17 16 1 1
Arizona------------------ 223 10 10 -
Utah----------------------- 172 2 2 -
Nevada------------------- 4 -
PACIFIC-------------------- 10 2 1,504 3 1 89 75 4 1
Washington---------------- 525 7 5 -
Oregon------------------- 3 26 1 8 -
California----------------- 7 2 847 3 1 78 61 4 1
Alaska-------------- 88 1 -
Haaii------------ 18 3 -

Puerto Rico--------------- 5 22 25 -







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY


The chart shows the number of deaths reported for
117 major cities of the United States by week for the cur-
rent year, a 5-week moving average of these figures
plotted at the central week, and an adjusted average for
comparison. For each region the adjusted average was
computed as follows: From the total deaths reported each
week for the years 1956-1960, 3 central figures were
selected by eliminating the highest and lowest figure
reported for that week. A 5-week moving average of the
arithmetic mean of the 3 central figures was then com-
puted with adjustment to allow for population growth in
each region. The average value of the regional increases
was 2 percent which was incorporated in the adjusted
average shown in the chart.
Table 4 shows the number of death certificates re-


JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC


ceived during the week indicated for deaths that occurred
in selected cities. Figures compiled in this way, by week
of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of
deaths occurring during the week. However, differences
are to be expected because of variations in the interval
between death and receipt of the certificate and because
of incomplete reporting due to holidays or vacations. If a
report is not received from a city in time to be included
in the total for the current week, an estimate is used.
The number of deaths in cities of the same size may
also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex
composition of the populations and because some cities
are hospital centers servingthe surrounding areas. Changes
from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in
part to population increases or decreases.


Table 3. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths. Data exclude figures shovn in parentheses in table 4)

st 50th percent Cumulative, first 51 weeks
week week Adjused change,
ended ended average, adjusted
Are De Dec 51st average
D. 1D. eek to 1 1961 1960 een t
23, 16, 1956-60 current change
1961 1961 week1 ____

TOTAL, 117 REPORIIIM CITIES---------------------- 12,190 11,781 12,143 +0.4 585,320 587,303 -0.3

New England--------------------------------(14 cities) 769 787 734 -+.8 36,177 36,985 -2.2
Middle Atlantic--------------------------(20 cities) 3,351 3,314 3,301 +1.5 165,784 163,625 +1.3
East North Central--------------------------(21 cities) 2,6401 2,510 2,587 +2.0 125,169 127,002 -1.4
West North Central---------------------------(9 cities) 895 741 855 +4.7 39,982 40,720 -1.8
South Atlantic-------------------------(11 cities) 1,034 1,041 1,050 -1.5 50,558 50,262 +0.6
East South Central---------------------------(8 cities) 531 532 535 -0.7 26,573 26,559 +0.1
West South Central--------------------------(13 cities) 994 1,055 1,137 -12.6 49,961 51,036 -2.1
Mountain-----------------------..----------(8 cities) 375 398 376 -0.3 18,697 18,479 +1.2
Pacific---------- ---- ------------------ (13 cities) 1,601 1,403 1,568 +2.1 72,419 72,635 -0.3

*Includes estimate for missing reports.








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 7


Table 4. DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES

(Py place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Area


51st
week
ended
Dec.
23,
1961


EW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.------ 284
Bridgeport, Conn.-------- 43
Cambridge, Mass.--------- 42
Fall River, Mass.------- 24
Hartford, Conn.---------- 56
Lowel, Mass.------------ 24
Lynn, Mass.-------------- 24
New Bedford, Mass.------ 33
New Haven, Conn.--------- 53
Providence, R.I.--------- 59
Somerville, Mass.- ---- 10
Springfield, Mass.------- 35
Waterbury, Conn.--------- 36
Worcester, Mass.--------- 46

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y.- ----- 65
Allentown, Pa.----------- 33
Buffalo, N.Y.------------ 153
Camden, N.J.------- 55
Elizabeth, N.J.--------- 27
Erie, Pa.---------------- 45
Jersey City, N.J.------ 73
Newark, N.J.----------- 81
New York City, N.Y.------ 1,785
Paterson, N.J.----------- 36
Philadelphia, Pa.-------- 463
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------- 162
Reading, Pa.------------ 22
Rochester, N.Y.---------- 112
Schenectady, N.Y.-------- 15
Scranton, Pa.------------ 33
Syracuse, N.Y.---------- 70
Trenton, N.J.------------ 53
Utica, N.Y.-------------- 33
Yonkers, .Y.------------ 35

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-------------- 49
Canton, Ohio------------- 37*
Chicago, Il.------------ 825
Cincinnati, Ohio--------- 139
Cleveland, Ohio---------- 221
Columbus, Ohio----------- 121
Dayton, Ohio------------- 82
Detroit, Mich.----------- 387
Evansville, Ind.--------- 30
Flint, Mich.------------- 47
Fort Wayne, Ind.--------- 43
Gary, Ind.--------------- 41
Grand Rapids, Mich.---- 49
Indianapolis, Ind.------- 154
Madison, Wis.--- --- 30
Milwaukee, Wis.---------- 136
Peoria, Ill.-------------- 42
Rockford, Ill.----------- 32*
South Bend, Ind.------- 25
Toledo, Ohio------------- 97
Youngstown, Ohio-------- 53

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa--------- 45
Duluth, Minn.------------ 28
Kansas City, Kans.----- 35
Kansas City, Mo.--------- 142
Lincoln, Nebr.------- (20)
Minneapolls, Minn.- ---- 142
Omaha, Nebr.------------- 97


50th
week
ended
Dec.
16,
1961


Cumulative,
first 51weeks


1961 1 1960


+ -t


262
37
26
34
64
32
24
35
30
71
14
51
37
70


47
39
146
38
33
40
68
92
1,721
40
500
214
26
95
24
37
49
45
24
36

59
42
746
147
208
135
79
349
37
35
38
30
60
146
40
127
24
28
25
100
55


48
16
35
116
(39)
122
67


12,453 12,814
1,993 2,089
1,516 1,550
1,405 1,448
2,510 2,553
1,266 1,209
1,135 1,244
1,327 1,301
2,293 2,278
3,190 3,297
671 684
2,246 2,296
1,373 1,427
2,799 2,795


2,371 2,204
1,752 1,797
7,394 7,360
2,164 2,145
1,506 1,492
1,998 1,992
3,542 3,595
5,167 4,963
84,750 83,809
1,977 2,006
25,562 .24,637
9,752 9,832
1,192 1,207
5,170 5,152
1,224 1,191
1,800 1,988
3,138 3,191
2,297 2,077
1,463 1,382
1,565 1,605

2,897 2,902
1,644 1,770
37,827 39,062
7,971 8,029
10,331 10,743
5,889 6,060
4,082 3,921
16,991 17,074
1,843 1,895
2,171 2,065
1,938 1,873
1,587 1,564
2,318 2,098
7,328 7,397
1,700 1,677
6,273 6,416
1,461 1,562
1,454 1,474
1,451 1,499
5,055 5,093
2,958 2,828


2,776 2,815
1,299 1,293
1,917 1,818
6,536 6,422
(1,435) (1,321)
6,056 6,343
3,540 3,725


Area


WEST NORTH CENTRAL-Con.:
St. Louis, Mo.---------
St. Paul, Minn.---------
Wichita, Kans.------....

SOUTH ATIANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------.
Baltimore, Md.----------.
Charlotte, N.C.---------
Jacksonville, Fla.-------
Miami, Fla.--------------
Norfolk, Va.-------------
Richmond, Va.------------
Savannah, Ga.-----------.
St. Petersburg, Fla.---..
Tampa, Fla.----------
Washington, D.C.--------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.---------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-------
Knoxville, Tenn.--------.
Louisville, Ky.-----
Memphis, Tenn.-------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.--------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------.
Baton Rouge, La.--------
Corpus Christi, Tex.-----
Dallas, Tex.-----------.
El Paso, Tex.------------
Fort Worth, Tex.------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.--------
New Orleans, La.--------
Oklahoma City, Okla.----
San Antonio, Tex.--------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.-----
Colorado Springs, Colo.--
Denver, Colo.-----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---.---...
Pueblo, Colo.-------
Salt Lake City, Utah-----
Tucson, Ariz.------------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.------
Fresno, Calif.-------
Glendale, Calif.--------
Honolulu, Hawaii------
Long Beach, Calif.-------
Los Angeles, Calif.-----
Oakland, Calif.-------
Pasadena, Calif.--------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-------
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.----
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.-..------
Tacoma, Wash.---------

San Juan, P. R.-------


51st
week
ended
Dec.
23,
1961


50th
week
ended
Dec.
16,
1961


Cumulative,
first 51 weeks


1961 1 1960


9 ~ 9


296
64
46


124
287
37
56
77
56
69
24
(--)
53
209
42


99
43
21
145
76
58
35
54


30
30
13
130
36
54
165
89
170
78
107
39
53


30
19
99
24
82
17*
56
48


18
(59)
(24)
36
59
554
97
49
174
60
80
207
(45)
164
64
39

(35)


246
54
37


116
275
39
73
88
44
76
16
(90)
67
214
33


102
49
31
80
129
29
31
81


37
41
29
109
39
52
190
45
195
90
112
54
62


25
16
122
12
91
26
57
49


24
(47)
(27)
37
61
491
96
34
77
50
72
219
(38)
159
45
38

(24)


12,128
3,348
2,382


5,788
12,561
1,870
2,970
3,867
2,513
3,963
1,644
(--)
3,321
10,046
2,015


4,417
2,366
1,411
5,816
5,794
2,068
1,651
3,050


1,724
1,450
1,118
6,318
1,813
3,277
8,245
2,877
8,582
2,804
5,204
2,585
2,784


1,613
843
5,865
862
4,210
868
2,472
1,964


869
(2,234)
(1,680)
2,052
2,844
25,599
4,984
1,726
5,558
3,149
4,547
9,942
(1,786)
6,744
2,450
1,955

(1,670)


12,416
3,518
2,370


5,985
12,833
1,953
3,001
3,636
2,030
3,957
1,709
(3,617)
3,315
9,858
1,985


4,351
2,412
1,429
5,791
5,678
2,133
1,737
3,028


1,716
1,462
1,169
6,361
1,936
3,403
8,425
2,926
9,120
3,804
5,117
2,739
2,774


1,626
844
6,121
831
3,913
821
2,482
1,841


872
(2,272)
(1,876)
2,105
2,820
25,396
4,907
1,760
5,593
3,006
4,639
10,072
(1,779)
6,954
2,436
2,075

(1,748)


*Estimate based on average percentage of divisional total.

() Figures shown in parenthesis are from cities which have
been reporting less than five years and hence are not in-
eluded in Table 3.


I I I




11 IIII II 111111111111111 III I
3 1262 08863 9926


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


also from samples of the turkey, beans, garbage from the
kitchen, vomitus from one of the patients, and from a swab
from the still unwashed knife, with which the suspect
turkey had been sliced. Bacteriophage typing of the
staphylococci isolated was not reported.
(Reported by Nicholas J. Fiumara, M.D., Director of
Division of Communicable Diseases, Massachusetts
Department of Public Health.)


International Notes Quarantine Measures
No changes


SOURCE AND NATURE OF MORBIDITY DATA

These provisional data are based on reports to the
Public Health Service from the health departments of
each State and Puerto Rico. They give the total number
of cases of certain communicable diseases reported
during the week usually ended the preceding Saturday.
Total figures for the United States and the Pacific Divi-
sion include data for the States of Alaska and Hawaii.
Cases of anthrax, botulism, and rabies in man are not
shown in table 2, but a footnote to table 1 shows the
States reporting these diseases. When diseases of rare
occurrence are reported by a State (cholera, dengue,
plague, louse-borne relapsing fever, smallpox, louse-
borne epidemic typhus, and yellow fever) this is noted
below table 1.


INIV OF FL LIB
.D8C METS DEPT
DOC~g^ -



U.S. DEPOSITORY


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