Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00233

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
5 toL-/f-1* I%/..


Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

Prepared by the II C634-531

For release January 24, 1964 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UN
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR % EEK ENDED JANUARY 18. I


POLIOMYELITIS -No cases of poliomyelitis were re-
ported for the week ended January IS. For the first 3
weeks of 1964, only I case non-paralytic) of poliom eliti
has been reported in the United States.
The highest cumulative total of paralytic cases re-
ported for the first 3 weeks during the past 10 )ears was
197 in 1956. The previous lowest cumulative total was ,
reported one year ago.


YEAR PARAL'


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES- UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through prevTicus wiekxK
3rd Week Ended Cumulative. Firtt 3 WeeF
Disease Median M ed 1,n
1964 1963 [959 1963 116- 1'40? 1939 1963
Aseptic meningitis ............... 41 32 --- 889 .
Brucellosis ....................... 3 6 8 9 12 3
Diphtheria ...... .................. .... 2 2 16 11 i4 59
Encephalitis, primary niectious .. 9 --- 8
Encephalitis, poot-infectious ..... 15 --- J
Hepatitis, infecctou r including
serum hepatitis ................ 867 1,183 1,183 2,315 2,9i7 2,96;
Measles ......................... 5,601 8,615 8,150 13,932 21,112 22,10o
Heningococcal infections .......... 55 59 9 1.3 157 160
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. 1 10 1 8 33
Paralytic .................... .. 1 8 7 18
Nonparalytic ................... --- I ---
Unspecified .................. --- -
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .................. 8,077 9,828 --- 23,429 23,546 -
Tetanus ........................... 6 2 --- 14 13 ---
Tularemia ......................... 13 2 --- 30 15
ryphotd fever ..................... 7 5 8 16 12 19
Rabies in Animals ................. 1l 55 58 159 i6i 171

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Psittaco:is: WIs. 1
Botulism: Rabies in Man:
Leptspirospiros Va. 1 1 Smallpox
Malaria: N. Y. City I 5 Typhus-
Plague: Murine:
Rky Mt. Sported: N. C. 2, Ga. 1 3


U
S.el l







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS


Malaria Pennsylvania

A case of quartan malaria in a 56-year-old woman,
resident of Pittsburgh, Penni\vlania, has been reported.
Despite intensive investigation, no information suggesting
a possible means of acquisition could be uncovered.

In July 1963, the patient first experienced chills
which occurred every fourth day. A urinary tract infection
was discovered at that time; her symptoms were initially
ascribed to this disorder. Despite antibiotic therapy, the
symptoms persisted and, in late October, she entered a
Pittsburgh hospital. On physical examination, she was
found to have a spleen enlarged 2 finger breadths below
the costal margin.

In November, a laboratory technician noted malaria
parasites on a routine CBC. The slide was read as posi-
tive for plasmodium malariae at the hospital and con-
firmed at CDC. The patient was given chloroquine; later,
primaquine was substituted. She has remained afebrile
and asymptomatic since the institution of the above
therapy.

The patient was born in Czechoslovakia and immi-
grated to the United States at the age of 11. Since then,
she has never left the United States. She has never been
known to have had malaria at any earlier time during her
life. She has traveled throughout the northeast United
States on rare occasions, but no more recently than 10
years ago. During the past decade, she denies ever having
been outside Allegheny County and denies ever having
been in the southern United States. Furthermore, she
denies a history of drug addiction; she has never received
any blood transfusions. A check of 33 regional hospitals
and blood banks confirm a negative blood transfusion
history. Similarly, a check with local, State, and Federal
law enforcement agencies revealed no suspicion of nar-
cotics usage.

During the past 3 years, there have been 4 cases of
malaria in residents of Allegheny County. All of these
victims have been military personnel, who acquired the
disease while abroad. None have been known to have
experienced P. malariae.

(Reported by Edwin Brown, M.D., Chief, Division of Dis-
ease Control, and Herbert R. Domke, M.D., Health Officer,
Allegheny County Health Department; and, Dr. W. D.
Schrack, Jr., Director, Division of Communicable Dis-
ease Control, Pennsylvania State Department of Health.)


Staphylococcal Food Poisoning California

About 100 individuals became ill nth gastroentertris
attributed to staph.lococcal enteroroxin following a dinner
in a restaurant in a Los Angeles department store. An
estimate of 447 individuals attended the dinner, 21 were
hospitalized. No fatalities were recorded.

The symptoms experienced included nausea, vomiting,
stomach cramps and diarrhea. The incubation periods
ranged from 1V to 7 hours, with an average of 3 hours.
The average duration of illness was 12 hours.

Interviews were conducted with 62 of those who ate
at the special company dinner. All 62 ale ham, and 50 of
these experienced gastroenterntis. The remaining victims
were discovered on a telephone survey of the department
store employees the following da).

In addition, one of the food handlers took home
portions of the ham served at the meal. This ham was
then served to 9 friends, all of whom became ill with
gastroenteritis.

Samples of the food served at the meal were obtained
for laboratory analysis. Cultures of the sliced ham and
peas revealed coagulase positive staphylococci.

The canned hams used for the dinner were opened two
days previously, brushed with a topping of mustard,
brown sugar, and tomato sauce before being placed in a
walk-in refrigerator. The da, prior to the meal, 10 hams
were removed from the refrigerator and cooked in a 2500
oven for 4 hours, then cooled for 6 hours, and re-
refrigerated. Later that day, 15 hams were removed from
the refrigerator, cooked in the 2?00 oven for 4 hours, and
then kept at room temperature overnight. On the morning
of the dinner, the hams were sliced by a machine and then
allowed to incubate at room temperature. The slicing
machine was dirty with accumulated old food particles,
and was disassembled for cleaning but once a week. For
3 hours prior to the meal. the hams were warmed in an
oven before serving.

Nasal, nail and stool cultures of the two food hand-
lers were positive for coagulase positive staphylococci.
One of these handlers also had a positive throat culture.
No phage typing was done.

(Reported by Frank Listick. Pubic Hea.rh Santrartan.
Los Angeles City Health Depart'nent, and Dr Philip
K. Condit, Chief, Barcan of Comnr.unrcable Diseases.
California State Depatr.enr ol HEalth I







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




Tularemia Maryland


Three cases of tularemia were reported from Mar. land
during December. Two cases were serologically confirmed;
the third was bacteriologically proved. All 3 victims are
believed to have acquired the disease from skinning
rabbits on separate hunting ensuress.
Case #1 was a 69-year-old, white male, who saw an
apparently healthy rabbit in his backyard on October 30.
He shot and skinned it. On November 4, he experienced a
feer of 101-100.'.generalized malaise, nausea, but no
vomiting. He developed a lesion on his right index finger.
These symptoms continued, and he was admitted to a
hospital in rural Eastern Maryland on November 16.
Because he had shot the rabbit before the opening of the
hunting season, he was reluctant to volunteer this infor-
marion to his physician. The doctor, however, suspected
tularemia, because of the 2 cm. lesion on the patient's
finger and an enlarged lymph node in his axilla. After
obtaining a culture, he began streptomycin therapy. The
patient's temperature rose to 1040, but then returned to
normal within 3 days. The patient recovered. The culture
revealed Pasteurella tularensis. No serology was done.
Case #2 was a 55-year-old, white male, who hunted
rabbit and quail November 15 and 16 along the Delaware-
Maryland border. With his bare hands, he skinned the
several rabbits which he had shot. This was his only
exposure to rabbits or other wild animals.
On November 25, he developed a fever to 1020;
although he had a generalized malaise, he went to work
but left early because of the above symptoms. A few days
later, pustular abscesses developed on his left hand at
the site of abrasions which he had suffered traumatically
in his home prior to his hunting trip. He developed a mild,
non-productive cough. He was admitted to a Baltimore
hospital on December 2, at which time he had a temper-


nature of 1040. Localized abscesses, lymphangitis, and
tender, enlarged left axillary lymph nodes were noted.
A chest X-ray was negative.
Improvement followed the administration of broad
spectrum antibiotics. Because of a history of rabbit ex-
posure, blood was drawn for tularemia agglutination titers.
Two specimens, on December 10 and December 16, were
reported as 1/1280 by the State Laboratory. The patient
recovered uneventfully.
Case #3 was a 59-year-old, white male, who skinned
8 rabbits over a 2-week period, from November 16 to 30,
after hunting in wooded patches in suburban Baltimore.
On December 3, he felt feverish, weak, and had a
headache. Because of the persistence of these symptoms
and disorientation, he was admitted to another Baltimore
hospital on December 6. His temperature was 1020. On
physical examination, a pustule was noted on the distal
phalanx of his right index finger. No lymphangitis was
present. A large tender node was present in the right
axilla. His white blood count was 12,200. A chest X-ray
was negative. Treatment with a broad spectrum antibiotic
was begun.
The following day his temperature was 103.20 but
defervesced in succeeding days. On December 9, his
WBC was 5,400. He was discharged December 14. His
agglutination titers for P. tularensis were: December 9, 1/40;
December 10, 1/80; December 18, 1/1280.
In neither case 2 nor case 3 were cultures obtained
prior to antibiotic therapy.
The only other case of tularemia in Maryland in 1963
was the result of an accidental laboratory infection.
(Reported by Dr. John H. Janney, Acting Chief, Division,
of Epidemiology, State Department of Health, Baltimore,
Maryland.)


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES DEATHS UNDER ONE YE4R OFAGE IN IOB U.S. CITIES
AvrOQ Number p Wk by Four-Wek Perods


The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the iour-seek period ending January 18 was 758
as compared arh an expected 766 weekly average.


TOTAL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE
RECORDED IN 108 CITIES


Week Ending
12 28 1 4 I 11 1 lB 4 Week Total Weekly Average
Observed 627 730 885 790 3,032 758
Expected 768 767 765 763 3.063 766
Excess -141 37 120 27 -31 -8


IW 0 i ecje abb **AL 6Al P "bb b ~ a~


(See Table, page 27)


ER Rcord










700 ..-- .--. .. .. ........-.-- -------------


NUMBIO

DEATh


--








24 Morbidity and Morlalily Weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 18, 1964 AND JANUARY 19, 1963 ( 3rd WEEK)


Asetic Encephalitis
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Poliomyelitis, Total Cases Poliomyelitis, Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative
1964 1963 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1963
UNITED STATES... 41 32 9 15 1 1 8 1 7

NEW ENGLAND.......... 3
Maine.............. -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 1
Rhode Island....... 1
Connecticut........ 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 4 6 1 -
New York City...... 2 -
New York, Up-State. 1 1 -
New Jersey......... 1 3 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 3 1 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 3 4 1 4 1 3
Ohio................ 1 2 1 1
Indiana............. 1
Illinois........... 2 2
Michigan........... 4 3 4 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 2 -
Minnesota........... i
Iowa............... 1 1 1-
Missouri............ -
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota ....... -
Nebraska...........-
Kansas.............- -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 9 2 1 2 1
Delaware............ 1 -
Maryland ...........
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia............ 1 -
West Virginia...... -
North Carolina..... 1 -
South Carolina..... 1 -
Georgia............ 1
Florida............. 8

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 6 2 -
Kentucky............ 4 4 -
Tennessee.......... 2
Alabama............ -
Mississippi........ 2 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 2 1 2 2
Arkansas............. 1 -
Louisiana.......... 2 2
Oklahoma............ 1
Texas............... 2 2

MOUNTAIN............. 4 6
Montana.............. I
Idaho............... -
Wyoming ............ -
Colorado............. 4 5
New Mexico......... -
Arizona............ -
Utah................ -
Nevada............... -

PACIFIC.............. 10 8 2 2 2
Washington......... 1
Oregon............... -
California......... 7 8 1 2 2
Alaska............. -
Hawaii............. 3 -

Puerto Rico









Morbidity and Morlalit VeekIl Report 25


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR % WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY IS. 1961 AND JANLARY 19. 196.I ( rd EEk) Contmnucd


IniIe1i..u H-piati :
Bruciio '._: : Dipht-.. r~a Lr,*:lud r._ : ruT, hitp3 Lt[ -: Tspre-.Lj Fc'.cr

Area Un.de r 20'. ,ar .rg
CuT. CuT. Total 20 vear i nd over I.Ijnkr,-n Cu iMul .. 'u1,.

1 9. 1" 6 lt,. 196- 196 196. 4: 13. 1,- 19 l.- I l l 6r,- ic-.

UNITED 'TArE... 3 9 2 11 667 -on 3-6 0J 2-,315 ?,Q6; i Ib

NEW ENGLAND........... 1 116 59 53 330 417
Haine............... -4 21 23 128 lot
Neu Hampihir ...... 1 8 3 I 3- 37
Veirmonr ............ 18 I0 7 1 "- 10
Haisachu-ettr... .. l 10 5 5 130
Rhode I: l an ....... 1) 15 13
Conrec ticut... ..... 22 10) 1 .i 3

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 3 133 63 69 1 3' j? j -
lew Yjrk City...... I : 13 7l 67
New York, LTp-te. 3 .. ? 63 2.n -
New Jer e ,......... 3i ;6
PEnr.mylvanl ...... 33 1- 16 1 ?13. I 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1311 -5 31 97 411 I 2
Ohio................ 1? ; l 11 lI.'I I
indjan ... ... .. .... 3 2 3 27
l inol i .......... i 2 6 30 0 l I I
Michigan......... ..... -- 36 13 2'01
Wli corns n ......... 2 1 1 '. 24

WIST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 '' 33 11 h 1-6 135
Minnesot .......... 2 5 31
Iowa ............ 2 3 3 2 16
Mis-'ouri ......... 16 12 3 1 31 -7
North DakotaL ....... -. 1 3
South Dakots ....... 2 12 6
Nebr a k3 ........... 7 12
knsa.............. 10 1 65 2'0

SOUTH ATLANTrIC ....... I -3 1 197 378 2 6
Dela I are........... -
Maryland........... 10 ; 3 5 35
Dit. of Co l^b a.. ; i3
Virginia .............. 11 1 2 2 106
West Virginia....... I 12 'i 13 6,3
North Carol r.- ..... 5 15 i1o .. 7 i7
South Carolina.... 17 .
Ceoreia............ 1 I 5
Florida.............. 3 8 i1 i 6S 26 1

EAST SOUTh CENTRAL... l i 6- ? 22 160 333 2 3
Kentuicr....... ... ... 2 23 5 66 11' i
Tenn see. ......... i I 2- 1 3 .t 1 33 I 2
Alabara............. 2! 5'
H iS iisiipp ..... .. .- 3 2 t- 3-

WEST SOUTH CEll-AiL... 1 5.6 36 -20 133 1 1
Ar kans a .......... I 7 3 17 2
L-ui ia n ......... i1 1 5 r 17 17
Oklahona ............. -, -. 3 13
TI i ......... ...- 35 i; s i2 I2

MOUNTAIN ............ I 69 26 lu 33 161 215
Month na........... 6 2 i? -u7
Idano.............. 8 I 38
Wyom rg ............ 3 2 1 -
Colorado ........... 1 3 2 6. 331 3
New Mexico........ 28 17 : 3 23
Arizona.......... ... 6 6 29 '6
Utah............... 1 3 2; 20
Nevada.......... .... .2 3

PACLFIC ............... I 135 65 69 1 3 i 317 ? 3
Wa. ni ton ......... 16 11 -7 37
Oregon ............. 20 10 10 38 63
Californta.......... I 95 -2 33 ?6- 207 ? 3
A i .ka ...... ........ I 1 It.
HIuwai ............. 3 2 1 8

Puerto Rico 1 1 3 2 ?








26 Morbidil and Mlorlalil~ Beekl Reporl


Tablik (ASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANI AR Ix. I'l(, AND JANLIAR 19. 196 ( rd t EEK) Cuniinucd



M.err. : .. .c l '-re T ,.: y t and Rable: in
-1. 1 n r t : :3r let FEver T t a r.u Tul remi a An r.,al

Lutul -t L C u.,i. Cur. Lum.

i 1t-. I6- 1 6- 1 i 1 1963 lb-6 196- 1I6- i96. 196- 196

i.Nr TEr' -TaTE .. ..n 55 i-3 C 8,077 ,828 6 i- 13 30 41 159

NIT E .rI. ri D.......... 3)5. 1. 37 7 0 I
Jla ;............... 2.?2 8
. r p ...... 10 -
:.' r i r ... .... ... l
IMFI i r ..... -



MIDDLE iLALTLi. ...... 35 jj : 77 526 -. 5
T.- I- ',r : ....... 3- .:
r-.. ,ri r r i 285 3 4 3 212 258 I 4
S--1. ,. ... .. I 2 6 1 -
F .I ,.I ...... l. -1 6 92 7 I

EA T iLuRTH LErJTFL. I, :: 1 2. ( ij 2. ?1) 1 3 2 3 1 13
.r .. .............. 17- II' I I I 1 8
Indin.. ..... 6- i
III 2,-., 1........... -,i ]0 1, 11 I I 2
M ..,ia. .......... :.8 5 2 3 e i?) I i -1 2
S. .: ... ...... 1 I I i, i5- i 6 .

WE -T !iiR Ti CEiTr.' L.. I :6 J2 I 8 I1 52
Hr ,rn .L .. 2.......... 2 1 31 16 9
1 :.' ...... ).j) 6 .i lb
r : : ur ..... ..... I.- : 6 3 2 12
i r h ak. ....... .8 I I i.- 7 3 6
..rr. ....... I 13 I I 8
rr. ... .. ..
.a, ...... ..... l -

SCiT iT ,TLA'T I C .6 73, 3 6 7 26
Sci . .
rl r .I ... .... .


W 'r. ,, n ...... Il 1 2 2 26. -
fI rr r.' n6..... I 3 J 6 37 61 3 -

rr. .r ... 2 2 8 1
br-.......... ..1 3 2 i
I I ._ .. .. .. 2 1- 2.6 '. I 4

E/; T ,.r. ,ill :EI.T.AL.. 435 .I II I 6 1.33, I 2 2 7 li 35
r .. ..... 2 163 I I I 7
T-r. :... .... r 6 ii I 1 1 i 9 26
Si.. .. ... .. 6m' i 1j i.. -. 1I 1 I1 2
': L: pP ....... 9 6 -

Wii T : .nilH ..F TRAL .. iL 3 l I 91 81 8i l I i 5 20
Ar -. ............ i 8 I I 6
L : in .......... i 3 3 8 I I
i ih i -, . I 6- 6 -l 2 6 1 3
T .......... .. 612 87 ; 3 11

MO,...i T r ... .? .1 ,-. ,1 1 I .
r, ; ............ -3 13
i .al, ............ 2 12 2I 0
S .r .. ........ 1 1 .; B 1 1 -
I '- 1 ......... I .0 -
A i.- 1-i: .. .. .. .16 -. .3 I
Arr .n. I 6 1.1l 3 3
Ulr n.......... ... .. I 1 03 1 -
Irc ............. i -. I. i

PA-. LFi... .. . 1, 6 i 5 1 3 i, 2 2 3
i-r. .-11 1 2 .6. -.I 2 -

r 1 :L.......... .. 2, 2j I-
: l l.rr.,-,. i . u 12 2 3
AH I. .... ........ II i -. 3 1
H .r . 3 -

Puerto Rico 10| -









lorbidilv and Mortalilv Weekly Report 27





Tabl, (() TOTAL DEATHS L UNDER I ) EAR OF AGE IN REPORTING (.ITIES



(Tablei -'(A), 4(B), 4(C), and .(D) all bh pu. lish.d in c'qu ince CiVT.rin i- f3 r- w.k prc.n:.)'


Ftor .-. ; en- rrjin F'?r i= -dE i r.jli-i
Area Ar -a

12,28,1 63 |_./6L. 1 l/ii.'6. I /18,6- 1__' l .6'6 t.,6. i,ilr6 i I .'fi


NEW ECNGLilD:
Boston, .- ............. .. 13 17 13 17
Bridgiep rt. Connr .......... 1 5 1 1
Cambr i-E. fta ........... i-
Fall RI vEr, Ma, ... .... 1 1 1 1
Hartford, ,Conr ....... ..... 3 6
Loivl, L-........ .......... 2
Lynn,, 1.... ........... .. 2 1 1
ce E.rdiford. M .. .... I 1
iNe Hai r.n, Conr.r........... i2 3
Pro., ido .-:i I ........... 5 8 1 5
Soic rvill,. I aK i.......... -
Spri ngfi Ctj, ila "......... 5 o 2 I
Waterbur/, Conr. ...... .. 2 1 1 1
Worce tc r, ai : i........... 5 1 3 1

MIDDLE ATLANflIC:
Aibany, Ni.Y............. .. 3 2 -
Allent, o r., Pa ............. 2 1 3 1
Euffal.:, .Y .............. 5 it' 13 12
C -. den, 1j. .............. 8 2 5 6
E lizit. n i.i.......... 3 3 1 3
Er., P ...................... I 4 -
j.r- _. .'_ i. ....... 3 3 3 5
Ne-.ark. li.J. ............ 22 ? 21 5
I-, i. rli' t., [. ..... .. 72 86 100 96
PatE r iCr, .[i ....... 2 2 2
F laj1 lpr,'. p ........ 26 21 36 12
Pitri u.rgt, P ............ 7 10 10 4
R al 'ing, P3........... .. .. I1 3
R:.cheirr, r.Y ............ 5 8 8 3
ScnE .- c ad ,. lj. Y.......... 2
icriotor.. Pa.............. 1 1 1
Syr acu 1i .. ............ 1 3 3
Ir rc r,, I. .......... ... 7 2 i 2
Lri c liN................ t 6 4
rke.-r li.'l'.. ...... ........ 2

Eahil NORTH CE[lt--"L:
Akron, ')h.: ................ 8 5 6 4
anr r :., iio. .............. 5
Chicac iil.............. 5 5" 66 43
Cir, -; nnic Or n ......... ... i 5 17
Clr- t la.'n., Or. ,:.. ........ 10 13 15 12
Co i .-.i On ... ........ 6 9 8
Day or., COh o .............. 3 12 il 9
Detroic, M. h.............. 17 19 31 18
Ev anriv ., inJ ........... 1 -
Flini, Mih ........ ....... 5 5 1 3
Fort UWar,. In ........... ... I I 2
Car., inr. .... .......... .. 1 2 1
Grand.- Ra /i: Mtln ........ 3 1 2
Inrd a Apf :.'i L ir.J ......... 6 / 15 11
Ma ,:n, iL ... ........ 2 2 5 1
ML la .J E, il .......... i i 10 10
P- ri ii ............... 2 1 1 3
.c. i f:.r iii ............. 3 1
"-:urn Er.i id.......... 1 2 1
ic l le, Or :.............. 2 6 3
Youngrt :..-i, OL.......... 1 3 3 1

S7 [lORT >: CEiTRAi:
De Mlr.e-., 'o.i.......... I 5 1 1
Duldth, M. rn .............. 1 1*
ar.sa Ci >, in.. ........ 2.. 3 6
Kan.-a CIEt, f1c ........... 3 6 5 9
L nc:.in, litbr............. .- I 7 1
MinnEapoi ., M an......... 8 1' 11 12
Omjna, Niebr............... 6 7 9
it. L.,u M. ............. I 16 15 13
't. Paul, MAinr............ 5 5 9
WichicE Ka ;ni.............. 2 1 4

E.'ti-atr. bn-id on a.Eragei percent ctf iL.i;e; l total.
rotal for previous ue.Vs Lrc lud reported correcc i.l.

NOTF 11 deals b, pla-r o.1 ac-.e.e


,OLTri AiLAJTIiC.
ttlanr. a L ..... ...... .7 22 5.
Bal. I ...:.re, M ............ 17 l2 iq 22
C a r 1 :.t t [.L: ........... 3 3 3 1
Ja:k" r l F a ... 6 2 j
Pii m i, Pla.............. 2 3
.: r f.: Ik, V ............ 5 8 6
iF.:hTi-,,r. Va ............. 7 5 3
.. a ** a.*-. -i Ca.,, ,, B a
t. Pce r: ,ur g F a ...... 5 2
T i-.p a, f L ............... ? 6 3 3
wai ", ngc :,-, ........... 10 12 16 23
w im i gi C :-n, 1 .......... 2 5 3

E.A. EL-OuTi iE[iTFAL:
B.rm .rg r. Al .......... 2 2 i0 10
'haicr r an:,s 6. Tenr ........ 1 3
:r' -.tii ll.. Iern ......... 2 2 6
L... i . .
L,:, I I- ............... 5 8 13 8
Me.pri T n r ............ 7 11 15
M.:.liC, .Al .............. 2 12 3
M.:o r.i me r a. ..... .. 3 3 3 3
Ij.in. 1 E, ar......... 6 16

Tl c L.'LiTi C.EI1TRAL:
Au r i n, T ... ........... 3 6 3
E ar: P-.:.u. e, La. .......... 1 6
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 3 1 7 3
Dallas, Tex.............. 6 11 12 13
El Paso, Tex............. 5 4 6 12
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 7 5 4 4
Houston, Tex ............. 11 11 20 16*
Little Rock, Ark......... 6 3 16 5
New Orleans, La .......... 10 18 17 11
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 10 5 6 13
San Antonio, Tex.......... 15 12 19 12
Shreveport, La........... 2 4 6 9
Tulsa, Okla............... 6 1 5 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 13 3 3
Colorado Springs, Colo... 2 1
Denver, Colo.............. 2 18 6 10
Ogden, Utah............... 4 1 1
Phoenix, Ariz............. 6 4 6 9
Pueblo, Colo............. 3 1
Salt Lake City, Utah .... 4 1 4
Tucson, Ariz............. 6 1

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 1 I
Fresno, Calif............ 7 1 2 3
Glendale, Calif.......... 5 5 1 2
Honolulu, Hawaii......... 3 12 6 4
Long Beach, Calif........ 1 3 1 4
Los Angeles, Calif....... ; 33 36 22
Oakland. Calif........... 5 3 6 21
Paia.d r.- : f i .......... 2 1 3 1
F:rtiJB Or ............ 7 4 9 8
i cr- .criC., Cai ........ 3 6 6 3
lar DLi.e.g:, Calii........ 2 13 6 6
a.- Fr .- i,:., Ca t i..... 13 10 7 10
Ban ji:;., Calif.......... 4 2 3
i.a3 tle r,............. 3 8 5
SFt arin,, Wash............ I 3 3 5
Ti am Wajh... .... .... .. 2

SAn Ju., P.T .............. 5 3 6


oCurrent WEEk Mortality for 106 Selected Cities

.4(A) Total M.ortality, all ages ................... 12,642
u(b) Pr.e;-on ia-InfluEnza Deaths, 11 ages ........ 633
4(C) total Deaths unaer I Year of Age............ 790
4(D) Total DEaths, Persons 65 years and over ..... 7,192







28 Morbidily and Mo




Dengue-like Illness Puerto Rico

For the week ended January 18, a total of 539 cases
of dengue-like illness were reported to the Puerto Rico
Department of Health. Of this total, 138 were delayed
reports.
(Reported by Rafael Timothee, M.D., CDirctor. Prerntnlive
Medical Services, Puerto Rico Departlrrent of Health.)


rla


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Smallpox Peru
Peru has declared itself free of smallpox as of
January 16.
Four confirmed cases of smallpox had been reported
from Peru (See MMWR, Vol. 13, p. 20). The) were the
first smallpox cases reported in Peru since 1954.
All four victims were males, 24 to 40 years of age.
Two acquired the disease in areas of the Department of
Loreto (in Eastern Peru, near the Brazilian border', and
2 secondary cases were infected in a Lima hospital.
November 8 was the date of onset for the first case,
from the District of Pucallpa, Province of Coroncl Portillo,
Loreto.The 2 secondary cases occurred in Lima, November
22 and December 18. The fourth case, diagnosed in another
Lima hospital, became infected in Iquttos, Province of
Maynas, with an onset date of December 10.
The diagnosis of these cases was confirmed by chick
embryo culture.
(Reported in Weekly Epld c.'a:.g R; po',r Parn erl-
can Sanitary Bureau, Vol. 36, No. 3. lurivar, i/. /i641i.

Editor's Note: This outbreak once again demonstrates the
influence of the hospital in propagating smallpox. In most
outbreaks occurring by importation into smallpox free
areas, such as the epidemics in Great Britain (1061-621,
Germany (1961-62), and Sweden (1963 hospital acquired
cases have constituted about hall the total.


The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. wrih a circulation
of 10,500 is published by the Commun.cable D-sease Center,
Atlanta, Georgia.


Chief, Communicable Disease Center
Chief, Epidemiology Branch
Chief, Statistics Section
Asst. Chief, Statistics Section
Chief, Surveillance Section
Editor, MMWR


- --


UNBV OF FL LIB
DOiCUMENT DEPT





U 5 DEPOSITORY


James L Goddard. M.D.
A. D. Lor.gmiur, M.D.
R. E Sertng, Ph D.
I. L. Sherman, M S
D. A. Henderson, M.D.
L. K. Airman, M.D


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIII Ill IIM I IIHIIIllAI
3 1262 08864 3217
lity Weekly Repori




In addition to the established procedures for reporting morbidity
and mortality, the Communicable Disease Center welcomes
accounts of interesting outbreaks or cases. Such accounts should
be addressed to:

Lawrence K. Alrman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanta, Georgia 30333



Notes- These pro.vs;on. data are based on wo-ky t.legramsr o the Comnmnl.
cable Dicsras Cnteor by Phe indivdual Srate health deparlim.nts.
Symbols- --Data not available
SQuanfity zero
Procedures for confrurcion of various monralit curve. may be obtained rom
Statistics Section. Communicable Disase Center, Public Hfalte Svelrce.
U. S. Deporftnnt of Health. Educarnon, and Welae,., Atlanta. Georgia 30333.




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