Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00214

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text



NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER r.,,7 .





t. s A









U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVI,. E HEALTH SERVICE
DATE OF RELEASE: MAY 2 1969 ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
MEASLES IN PREVIOUSLY IMMUNIZED CHILDREN
Governors Island, New York

Between Feb. 1 and April 12. 1969. 73 cases of mea-
sles occurred in residents of Governors Island. a ('oast
Guard installation off the southern lip of New York City:
11 of these ca-es \- ere in previously immunized children.
To date. 32 cases have been confirmed serologicall.y by
fourfold or greater increases in hemiagglutination inhibi-
tion and or complement fixation antibody titers. The re-
maining 41 cases were clinically and epidemiologically
compatible with rubeola and many had a high convalescent
antibody titer. Nearly all cases occurred in Caucasian
children, ri. il.. 1 .n the racial composition of the base
population, and 41 cases were in males.
Nearly all patients had a 2 to 3-day prodrome of
fever (101 to 105'F.). followed by cough. conjunctivitis.


Vol. 18, No. 17






For

Week Ending

April 26, 1969


ES AND MENTAL HEALTH ADMINISTRATION


14 ., -l
I m ei, >u 1. ip|' i(


Int rnational I I
S- A
Sm allpox .. .\I II I-. l,,, A fri<.> .. .. 1 | 1 i1,


1, .

coryza. and a 11. l .I -i;l.- ..L diuraiton.
Koplick spots were noted in severall patient-. Si\ child-
ren developed secondary otitis media and three de\ elopri
pneumonia.
Of the 73 case.-. 11 (15 percent) had documented his-
tories of previous measles immunization. Both further
attenuated and Edmonston B measles \accines had been
(Continued on page 142


TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
17th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 17 WEEKS
DISEASE MEDIAN
April 26, April 27. 1964 1968 MEDIAN
1969 1968 1969 1968 1964 1968
Aseptic meningitis ................... 41 30 30 489 484 478
Brucellosis ............................ 5 8 5 37 46 68
Diphtheria. ............................. 3 17 3 44 65 65
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 23 25 23 332 266 416
Encephalitis. post-infectious ........... 10 13 20 87 157 260
Hepatitis, serum ........................ 110 89 I 1.714 1.266
Hepatitis. infectious .................... 926 911 15,704 14.242 14.085
Malaria ................................ 52 23 5 798 726 91
Measles rubeolaa) .. ..................... 1.000 887 8.163 10.615 11.312 126,061
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 104 48 65 1,474 1.253 1,253
Civilian .............................. 84 40 1- 1,354 1,130- -
Military ............................... 20 8 120 123
Mumps ................................. 2.949 4.251 41.833 84,749 -
Poliomyelitis, total ..................... 1 15 7
Paralytic ........................... .. 1 15 6
Rubella (German measles) ............... 3,327 1.965 23,663 23,353 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever.... 9,319 9,081 10.104 193.636 190.509 190,509
Tetanus ................. .......... .. 2 1 1 34 35 52
Tularemia .............................. 3 2 3 30 22 51
Typhoid fever .......................... 9 3 4 71 78 103
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 3 2 2 5 8 8
Rabies in animals ....................... 91 75 96 1.333 1 287 1.509

TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ........................................... i Rabies in man: ..................... .......... ....
Botulism: Colo.-6 ................................... 9 Rubella congenital syndrome: .............. ....... 4
Leptospirosis: Hawaii-1, Ohio-1 ...................... 14 Trichinosis: N.Y. Ups.-2 ............................. 28
Plague: ........................................... Typhus, murine: ...... ... ... .. .. .... 5
Psittacosis: Conn.-l. Ohio-1 ......................... 9







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MEASLES (Continued front front page)


employed. The children had been immunized in Public
Health Ser\ice clinics, by private physician.s and in mass
immunization campaign, held across the country. Although
\Mea-les Immune Globulin had been used in some cases.
the dosage had rarely been recorded. Two of the 11 child-
ren had been immunized prior to 1 year of age. The inter-
\al from immunization to onset of illnes- ranged from 6
months to 5 year-. There was no apparent difference in
the clinical illness of accinated and unvaccinated children.
A measles immunity sur\ey was conducted following
the outbreak and data ae\re obtained on 6. percent of the
population under 1b years of age. The age distribution of
school age children in this sample corresponded \\ell with
school enrollment figures. Based on population estimates
from thi- -urte attack rates hb age and immunization
-tatus were calculated (Table 1): the overall attack rate


for measles susceptible children w\as 33.5 percent. while
that for previously immunized children was 2.4 percent.
Further studies of the transmission of measles in this
highly immune population are currently underway.

(Reported by Charles M. Grace, ,1.D., Capt.. USPHS,
Senior ltedical Officer, and I. James Wledner. 4 .D., Lt.,
USPIIS. U.S. Coast Guard Dispensary, Governors Island;
Laboratory Division. NCDC; and a team of EIS Officers.)

Editorial Comment:
A number of cases of measles occurring in previously
immunized children have now been reported. On Governors
Island. 15 percent of the cases had documented histories
of vaccination : however. the attack rate in this group was
less than 3 percent, demonstrating the need to determine
denominator data in evaluating vaccine efficacy.


Table 1
Measles Attack Rates by Age and Immunization Status, Governors Island, New York
Feb. 1-April 12, 1969

ge Toal No. of Person.- with Immunized/* Unimmunized*
(Yor) Population Hi-torx of Measles, No. Attack PopNo. Attack
SeBefore Januair 1969 Population Rar Populitei Cases Rate

;1 ) 0 1 0 0 61 4 6.6
1-4 30(i 12 206 .5 2.4 a 27 46.6
5-9 :17s 133 209 6 2.9 36 23 63.9
1()-14 20:; 139 46 0 0 l 5 27.8
1i-lh ;1 45 4 0 0 12 3 25.0
Total 1.010 359 466 11 2.4 185 62 33.5

Snlh no hii ,r\ .I, 11. ..- lT lN.- fnir J.iu. ir\ i t19 1il


TRANSFUSION MALARIA New York City


On April :'0. 196.h a 19-year-old white man \aso ad-
mitted to a New York (it\ hospital with a temperature of
102 F. and hopaiosplenomegaly. He had experienced four
attack- of chill- and fe(,(r in the preceding 12 datla -. On
Max 1 h he had a -piking temperature to 10-1 F. Examination
of peripheral hlood films then revealed the presence of
P/asnmodium malarior parasites. Chloroquine therapy wNas
Ipromptl. in--tituted. On \Max 3 hle became afehrile and
reimained- -o thereafter.
The patient lhd not premiou- history of tunleplained
febrile opi-odeto or oereas- ira\el. bul \ a- addicted to
heroin. Between Feb. 23 and 2.5. 196If. hile in a New
lork (ity ho-pital, lie had received three exchange trans-
Ifuiion-. con-i-ting of 1 units of \hole blood iand 26 units
of pltmnia, for Iretatment of se-re hepallti- with pre-con'a.
Bi February 29, lih had improved and ,\\a i discharged.
Between lMa\ Itit; and April 1. 1969, in\ -tigation of
lhe 142 donor- a-i Itconducted. Of the 16 w\hole blood donors.
only 12 i could lie rontacted: 11 had no history of malaria
or travel to mulariouli area- but the twelfth donor had
hIlen born and re'aredI in Honduras: attempts to obtain
-rrumt from thi dolr for malaria serolog\ twere tunsuc-
ce-f-ul. ()f the 26 p laima donors. 23 were contacted one
had recently train\ le-d in malarious areas but his serumi


contained no antibodies to malaria (indirect fluorescent
technique). Four plasma donors had been born in Puerto
Rico and a fifth donor was a native of Greece: all five
had resided in their homeland at a time when P. malaria
wa i- endemic there: none of the fi\e would consent to sero-
logic screening for malaria.
(Reported by Mlurray Wifttner, ll..., Jauobi Hospital, ANeu'
Y}'rk City; Vincent Guinee, II.D.. I.P.I.. Director, Pre-
reiitable Dis eases, and Howard B. ." il.).. (Chief.
Tropical diseasee icvision. \'ew York ('ity Health )epart-
Imen t.)

Editorial Comment:
The patient may hate acquired his infection \ia blood
transfusion or from self-use of contaminated syringes. On
rare occasions, malaria may also be transmitted by plasma
transfusion, prresumahly because some red cells are often
present in plasma.1,2


I)tihninr Vin N, ad Zukoma. T. \.: Trman-mission of Maalri, bl
Illsid Tranlm. fusion; An Epid'lnuologi-tal Study in the IUSSR.
Bull \,10 ,7;:S53-56, 1965.
2.io,.ncr, E. aind Ne, Housor, I.. IR.: Studles on the Transt mi.-si-
hi1it of Malari.I 1) Plaisma Tr;anIfusion. Amer J M(ld Sui
'06: 1 1 1-16. 1913.


APRIL 26. 1969







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
SMALLPOX West and Central Africa'


Through April 16, 1969.* a total of 253 case.-, of
smalllpox Awer reported to thie world d Health Organization
( 110) hy the 19 countries, parti(-ipatitng in the I -ost and
(Central \frican Regional Smallpox Eradication and Mea-
-les ( control Program. This i- a decrease of sh.2 percent
from the 2.11il c: -as recorded during (th comparable
period in 196s. Figure I -how\ the long terin trend of re-
ported smallpox cases in their region since January 1916s,
in comparison waith the lman monthly number of reported
cases during the period 1960-19617.
Table 2 shows the w eekl\ reported smallpox case in
the 19 countries during the first 11 weaek, of 1969 colm-
pared \ith total ca-(- reported during the comparable
196h lpriod. In Nigeria. 45 cases occurred during January


and 1'F hruar.'\ 1969 aw which \ er,' not reporli d III \i, l ) until
the second week in March.
Through March I31 of {hiI Year, a total of 7T. i0.0 0
'ntialpox II\ accinat ion- hia\ ie it en adini ii -toried t hrot~uoul
the 19-countr\ artea -inc t ihe 1[ ailnd ( ttral \ifrI n;i
Regional Smalipo|\ Eradication and M\lf;>h I- ( control Pro-
gram fir-i got undeirw,,a\ in Januar, 1967. The I-tinratn d
population of thi' area is 111 million per-oin-

(Ri'port"i'd /) t/ e' Smal [ipo.r Erodi Ri', fProgram. \ //)'.)


"fl It;, report hr gh Iiii


lDotai r.-inrt>-< is.rr i hr-. ii.h M.>r< h 1


, I I I. s


Figure 1
REPORTED SMALLPOX CASES BY MONTH
1960-67 AVERAGE, 1968 AND 1969
WEST AND CENTRAL AFRICA


/ I


/\
/ \
/ \
/ \
/ \


N
N
N A-


JAN FE I p APR MA I UNEI' AUG I SEp ROC NOI C JAN FEB AR I MAy JUNE I UL S AA I aPt i T I Nov D1 '




Table 2
Provisional Number of Smallpox Cases by Week West and Central Africa

SJanuary February M arch
Week Ending 11 l 1 b 15 22 1 1 Total Total Same
to Date Period 196s
Heek Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 s 9 10 11 1969

Country*
(ameroon 7 3 1 3 1 1 22
Chad -
Dahomey 3 2 1,3
Ghana 1 3 2 6 2
Guinea 11 1 1 2J25
Liberia ,
Mali 1 1 27
Niger 1 13 0- 290
Nigeria 3 1 5 9 3 10 11 10 9 5 45 111 9,20
Sierra Leone 13 6 1 3 19 11 1 516 249
Togo 11 2 1 2 2 3 2 1 1 27 201
U paper Volta -

Total 203 2.16l
*No ca s reported from II 'ntrat XAfri an ll'uli .- (In1 I {1 A (t n l I sr (, r at. St'q gail an\id ,iurr.t. li.


NA /
A- /
Noa -


.PHIL. 26, 1969


\







144 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE Il. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 26, 1969 AND APRIL 27, 1968 (17th WEEK)


ASEPTIC ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ENIN- BRUCEL- D- IITPllIUll Primary including Poit- MALARIA
AREA ITIS LOSI unsp. cases Inf.to, Serum Infectious
Cum.
1969 1969 1969 1969 1968 1969 1969 1969 1968 1969 1969
UNITED STATES... 41 5 3 23 25 10 110 926 911 52 798

NEW ENGLAND........... 2 2 6 56 34 1 32
Maine.............. 3 3
New Hampshire...... 3 1 2
Vermont............. 2 1 -
Massachusetts....... 2 2 27 19 1 26
Rhode Island ....... 1 14 2 -
Connecticut........ 1 1 4 7 8 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 8 6 7 40 184 138 5 89
New York City...... 3 1 33 55 50 8
New York, up-State. 1 1 1 26 22 3 17
New Jersey.......... 7 1 2 5 54 22 1 30
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 3 1 49 44 1 34

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 6 7 1 5 168 144 8 71
Ohio............. 2 3 1 33 38 9
Indiana............. 21 6 1 6
Illinois........... 2 2 2 47 49 5 32
Michigan............. 2 2 3 58 39 2 23
Wisconsin........... 9 12 I

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 3 1 5 1 34 80 5 56
Minnesota.......... 1 1 8 22 3
Iowa. *............. 1 2 9 17 5
Missouri........... 1 1 1 5 32 2 15
North Dakota....... 2
South Dakota........ 3
Nebraska........... 5 3
Kansas............. 4 4 9 3 28

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 2 1 5 1 5 74 97 11 248
Delaware........... 1 1
Maryland. ......... 2 3 14 11 5
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 1
Virginia........... 1 2 1 9 20 2 12
West Virginia....... 2 7
North Carolina..... 1 1 8 13 7 131
South Carolina..... 9 1 1 23
Georgia............ 10 11 1 60
Florida............. 2 1 2 21 32 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 1 44 41 25
Kentucky............ 4 6 14 20
Tennessee.......... 1 21 15 -
Alabama ............ 1 9 5 5
Mississippi......... 8 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 2 3 4 79 74 1 22
Arkansas.......... 4 5 5
Louisiana.......... 1 1 2 1 4 15 11 1 15
Oklahoma........... 12 6 2
Texas............... 2 48 52

MOUNTAIN............. 1 1 1 45 48 4 58
Montana ........... 6 7 -
Idaho .............. 1 1 1
Wyoming............ 2 -
Colorado............ 12 19 3 52
New Mexico......... 5 2 1 3
Arizona............ 1 1 12 5 1
Utah.............. 9 11 1
Nevada ...........- 1

PACIFIC.............. 15 1 4 3 6 47 242 255 17 197
Washington ......... 1 1 1 31 24 5
Oregon............. 3 1 12 16 5
California.......... 11 4 2 6 45 192 215 17 167
Alaska............. 3 -
Hawaii............... 1 4 20

P~irt Ri .... 1 .. 29 25 1
* Delaecd reports: Aseptic meningitis: Ohio 1, Iowa 2
Encephalitis, primary: Iowa 2
Hipatitic serum: Md. 1(1968)
Malaria: Iowa 1







1Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reporl 11S


TABLE II1. ( ANS )OF SPI(FIED) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES I NIT I) STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 26,1969 AND APRIL 27, 1968 (17th WEEK) CONTINUED


MFAS1ES (Rutb~,l ) MIFNIN(XOCOCCAL INFECTION, MlIMPS P O"IOMYELITI RI HIEI.I
TOTAL
ARI EA. 4 5 4 2 I I,





NEW NiLAN)...... 49 538 431 2 39 64 474 266
n .......... 2 13 1 3 4 41 29
Ne.w lhi, hi re. ..... 4 164 58 6 1 9
V, -,mt ............ 2 1 1 156 2
M ',. th ... 12 90 155 19 28 138 91
Rho, l-I ma........ 9 1 4 5 34 12
C .n.. t i u t ........ 33 271 203 1 13 20 104 123

MIDDLE AI'lANh IC..... 408 3,613 1,695 18 201 205 181 132
N". Yo rk (I ty...... 323 2,548 528 3 40 39 127 67
Nw YS k, j,-iState. 22 359 792 3 35 36 NN -- 43
,w h ............ 25 342 312 9 75 71 54 19
rnn iva,.......... 38 364 63 3 51 59 NN -- 3

EAST NORiH ( ENTRALL... 86 1,109 2,481 16 191 132 678 667
Ohi,. ......... 25 141 199 3 68 35 44 84
SInd an,.............. 27 328 396 3 26 18 !38 183
Illi nois ........... 14 194 1,022 3 33 30 142 139
Mic hi an........... 4 109 157 4 52 37 119 -- -139
Wis -o in. ......... 16 337 707 3 12 12 235 122

,-EST NORTH CENTRAL... 40 335 251 3 70 62 170 289
innm s. ta .......... 1 7 1 13 15 20 33
I,.w .* ........... 29 205 50 10 4 105 210
Mi s ,ur ........... 14 64 1 25 18 15 7
Nor t Dakota ...... 6 91 2 15 4
South Dakti ....... 4 4 NN
\ hr.ika........... 9 107 27 8 5 4 35
Kansa- .......... 2 2 8 1 14 14 11

SIOTH ATIANTIC....... 129 1,621 966 13 264 273 151 356
a iware ........... 25 158 7 4 3 1 4
landd ........... 1 14 57 4 25 17 18 54
DiIt. of Clumbia* 6 1 6 10 1 27
irginia................. 65 660 189 1 32 19 25 52
Wevt Virginia...... 5 150 153 12 6 62 75
N, rth .irolina..... 10 139 254 3 40 58 NN -
th C ,arlina..... 9 81 10 1 40 48 9 18
Gc.r i a............ 1 3 2 42 48 -
F .r i .......... .. 14 418 287 1 63 64 35 126

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 7 56 289 3 80 102 137 166
Kentucky. .......... 6 27 73 2 24 40 57 55
Tlinn sse ......... 13 46 1 34 32 80 97
Alabama ............ 49 13 14 -- 7
1i s si ppi ........ 1 16 121 9 16 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 187 2,454 3,036 24 224 238 432 1 592
Arkan sas........... 3 1 23 14 2 1
Lu i iana.* ........ 7 72 2 14 63 61 -
Oklahoma........... 1 106 101 3 23 45 116 430
Texas.............. 185 2,273 2,933 6 115 118 314 1 161

MOUNTAIN..... ....... 31 268 539 31 16 205 91
Montana............. 4 55 4 2 35 -
Idah[ ............... 2 38 11 5 3 10 -
Wyom Ing.......... 42 -
Colorado ........... 5 25 241 6 7 15 44
New Mexiio ........ 12 119 50 6 44 10
Arizona ............ 12 80 119 7 1 92 32
'tah ............... 1 16 1 9 3
Nev.da......... ... 1 5 2 3

PACIFIC............. 63 621 1,624 25 374 161 521 768
Washingtn........ 4 43 411 48 26 219 -- 99
Oregon............. 3 124 330 1 9 14 6 32
C.lifornia ......... 56 436 850 17 299 111 235 545
Alaska............. 13 6 10 51 31
Hawaii ............ 5 33 1 8 0 10 1 61

Pt,,rt, Rin.......... 60 313 236 1 8 16 29 12
SDelayed reports: M. a.sles: Mass. delete 1, lowa 23, La. 1
Mumps: Me. 2, D.C. 1
Rubella: Ale. 4, La. delete 1







116 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE II1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 26, 1969 AND APRIL 27, 1968 (17th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCA I TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA IPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER FFVK (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1 4 641 19 69 1969 1 9bQ 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969
UNITED STATES... 9,319 2 34 3 30 9 71 3 5 91 1,333

NEW ENGLAND............ 1,572 1 4
Maine ...... ... 12 3
New Hampshire...... 53
Verm nt ............ 64 1
Massachusetts...... 262 -
Rhode Island ....... 111 -
Connecticut........ 1,070 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 567 5 1 9 36
New York City...... 44 3 6 -
N-w York, Up-State. 486 2 1 34
New Jersey.. ...... NN -
Pennsylvania....... 37 2 2

FAST NORTH CENTRAL... 882 3 2 6 3 72
Ohio............... 201 4 17
Indi na ............ 137 1 3 20
I lini. ........... 148 1 1 13
Michigan .......... 271 2 2 -- 1
Wisconsin ......... 125 21

WEFT NORTH CENTRAL... 343 1 4 25 250
Minnesot .......... 16 3 57
Iowa ............... 76 1 32
Mi sosuri .......... 4 3 -- 6 79
North Dak t a........ 89 33
South Dakota........ 34 13
Nebraska........... 67 8
Kansas............. 57 I 15 28

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,132 8 2 13 3 9 24 395
D l war ........... 5 -
Maryland........... 191 2
Dist. of C ,umbia.A 3 2 -
Virginia........... 309 9 225
West Virginia ...... 182 1 2 5 64
North Carolina ..... 30 1 1 5 2 3 4
South Carolina..... 87 I 1 1 -
Georgia............ 4 1 1 2 2 29
Florida............. 321 3 4 1 8 73

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,310 4 1 6 8 3 4 11 232
Kentucky........... 118 2 6 131
Tenn ssiee.......... 998 2 5 7 3 4 4 78
Alabama............ 145 1 23
Miis s sipp ....... 49 1 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 704 2 8 2 4 11 9 173
Arkan-as........ .. 9 2 6 2 14
Louisiana ........... 6 1 5 13
Ok lahm: 1 ........... 66 1 2 2 28
Texas .... ...... .. 623 1 2 2 5 5 118

MOUNTAIN ............. 1,587 2 1 11 3 48
M ta na .. ........ 2 -
Idalho ................. 148 -
Wyming..* .......... 300 5 1 29
Cul radio ........... 714 1 2 -- 2
New Mexi co......... 187 1 2 7
Arizona ........ .... 69 1 2 7
t h .................. 144 -
Nevada............. 1 3

PACIFIC .............. 1,222 5 1 16 1 16 123
Wasningto- ......... 379 1 1 -
Or .............. 99 -
Calif.-,nla.. .... 588 4 1 15 1 16 123
Alas .ka.............. 65
Hl 3,ril .............. 91

PFu rto Ric ......... 11 2 3 1 8

* Delayed reports: SST: Me. 12, Ohio delete 3, D.C. 1
Rabies in animals: Wyo. 17







ilorbidit ani Mlorlalilt \\ ekl Report







IABHI. IV I)ATII IN 122 1 NITI1) SIAIIS (ITh11 FOR W'1li INI)II) APRIL 26,1969


(By place of occurrence and week if filing certificate.


NEW ENGLANID:
B stone, Mass. --------
Bridgeport, iC nn-----
Cambridg Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hiartford, Conn,-------
1. v ll. Mas-.---....----
Lynn, Mas, .----------
Now Bcdfrdl, M ........
New H(jve, I asn.-----
Provid n t. R. 1.-----


Wat, I lur s C li .
SpriC ng! it Mas.------
Watei bt' ry. (,,nI .------


MIDDI. ATLANTIC:
Ait in ., N. Y.----------
Al l, nt wn, P i.--------
Bufialo, ?N. Y.--------
Camdi n, N. I ---------
Elizahb th, N. T.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersr y tity, N. I.----
Newark, N. I.---------
New, Y rk City. N. Y.--
Paterson, N. i.--------
Philad.lphlii Pi .-----
Pitt buri 4h, PF .- ------
i, P ----------
R .ch I, N. ------
S ,h t ,t N. YN. -
i il al-,. i ----------
y .c N. Y.-------

"t ii, N. Y ----------
Y nkr rs, N. Y.---------

EA'I NORTH CENTRAL ;
krn, Oi ----- ----
Snton, 'hi-----------
Chiasg, Il .---------
Cinilnnati Ohi ------
Cleve land, Ohi .--------
C ,lu:hI o ..---------
Dajyt,, OiA i-----------
[Ietroit, N'llh.--------.
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Cary, Ind.-------------
Crand Rapids, MLii.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.----------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
P oria, IIl.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo. Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


670
216
41
31
29
54
32
12
27
53
49
10
42
22
52

3,294
51
30
140
39
26
40
63
61
1,653
42
507
219
43
116
31
46
82
45
31
29

2,676
71
37
766
182
213
129
70
366
42
71
45
17
28
158
47
150
52
43
27
91
71

820
74
30
50
133
18
97
71
217
59
71


65 years and
and over Influenza
All Ages


1 year
All
Causes


I -3
3
1I

I 1
2
1
3

1
2


159
7





'6
10
2

1
5
5
78
1
26
15

6





2
I I









1
I -2





- I

40
6
10
10
5
22
3
7
4

I -9
9
2
5
2

I ?
2



47
47

2
7
7

6
2
7
4I
5


Excludes f tial deaths)
-----,_


Area




SOCTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.-----------
Bailtim re, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacks1 nville Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-----------
N,,rfolk. Va.-----------
R lhm nd V. -.----------
iavannah, ia.-----------
t Prt rshur F1, --
Tamp1, Fla.-----------
Washington, C.------
Wilminct ,n, I) 1 .-....-

EAST (S1'H C FNIRAi:
Birm, n hi ii, 1. Chat ino o ;M, Ir nll.-----
Knovi i T'nil.-------
I ou V 1, K ---------
Memphis, o. I' ---------
Mobile, Al,.-----------
M etg-,( ry, AI i.-------
Nas'v n.- ......------

WEST SOUIH i('CEilAI :
Aus tin, .-----------
Baton KouLg, Li.-------
Corpus Christi, T ,.-c --
Dailas, l1x.-----------
El Paso, tx.----------
Fort Worth, T>- .--------
Houst- n, Te ----------
Litti R1,ck, Ark.------
New Orleans, Lan-------
Okihma City, Okl.l.---
.in Ant i ni, cx. .------
hrivepo t, L --------
Tulsa, Ok i.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Ht..---
C lorad, Sprinis, C .o.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, itah-----------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Col .----------
Salt LakI City, IUtah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.---------


All
Age


1,287
135
248
45
90
127
69
70
34
81
77
250
61

668
93
55
53
133
145
40
34
115

1,178
34
58
31
148
60
92
254
65
145
79
106
52
54

419
51
29
102
16
101
27
41
52

1,671
18
52
36
38
88
531
95
50
136
64
109
167
47
160
36
44


65 v i a,
iidi v, r


658
59
124
2(
44
69
36
38
210
62
46
115
25

332
47
28
38
65
67
17
15
55

626
19
26
17
73
34
60
115
35
78
42
66
29
32

230
24
16
50
12
55
15
24
34

1,007
14
31
25
20
51
332
53
37
85
36
55
94
26
97
22
29


: 1
All y,"





2






46
5

7




46
3
7
7
18
3
2

4

37
6
2

3
1
3
4





2
6

12
3

3


1


Total J 12,683 7,161 454 591

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous w'ceks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 238,154
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 138,172
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 14,186
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 10,639


Week No.













ERRATUM, Vol. 18, No. 15, p. 122

In the first paragraph of the article "Measles on

Oreoon-Idaho Border," the third sentence should he cor-
rected to read "The ;39 c.ase il Nys.a \ore distributed

aniong 1.i families, eight of w hom were Mel\,ican-American

Ilase migrants." The word "Ihaei" \a. unintentionally

omitted from the original article. This word is important
for it contrasts these families, who are residents of Mal-

heur County. with those "in migrant" families. who migrate

into Oregon seasonalls.


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 18.500 IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER. ATLANTA. GEORGIA.

DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER. M.D.
CHIEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D.

EDITOR MICHAEL B. GREGG, M.D.
MANAGING EDITOR PRISCILLA B. HOLMAN

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL
OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO'
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
A TLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
ATTN: THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT

NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON FRIDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL
BASIS ARE OFFICIALLY RELEASED TO THE PUBLIC ON THE SUCCEED-
ING FRIDAY.


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