Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00208

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text

F


NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CEN R


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELI

HEALTH SERVICES AND MENTAL HEALTH ADMINIS1


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
INFLUENZA United States

During the week ending Decemiber 7. 1968, Kansas,.
New York, Virginia. and Oklahoma reported outbreaks of
influenza-like illness. Arizona and the District of (olumbia
isolated A2 influenza viruses from the outbreaks men-
tioned previously (MM\WR, Vol. 17. Nos. 47 and Ilh).
Scattered outbreaks of influenza-like illness were
reported in sceoral areas in Kansas. One university re-
ported an increase in incidence of febrile respiratory ill-
ness and in absenteeism rates. Specimens for laboratory
examination were obtained.
An outbreak of an influenza-like illness has occurred
in a university in mid-state New York. The outbreak pre-


Vol. 17, No. 49


WEEKLY

REPORT


Week Ending
member 7, 1968


SERVICE


i. nfu. ,nz i
([lil n /. : I.- F i ....) i onw., I- .lrT di ............. I
I nt iillirnionr l N(t-,,
Smnl lpox[) UlrutIuay .................. 1 ;O



dominant l has involved student- in re-id(t n dornitoric-
and approximately I,(X)0 cases were reported in a 1- oek
period. Laboratory studies are pending.
In \irginia. four isolated oulhreaks of influenza-like
illness occurred in the Richmond and Tid(-ewater areas.
In Oklahoma, isolated cases of influenza and one outbreak
(Continued uf pyage 4j


TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)

49th WEEK ENDED MEDIA CUMULATIVE, FIRST 49 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE December 7. December 9, 1963 1967 MEDIAN
1968 1967 1968 1967 1963 1967
Aseptic meningitis ...................... 74 60 38 4,198 2,901 2,041
Brucellosis .......... ................. 3 5 6 220 240 240
Diphtheria.... .......... .............. 3 10 10 223 197 197
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ....... ... 31 26 1,355 1,513
Encephalitis, post-infectious ...... 7 14 446 725
Hepatitis, serum ....................... 146 75 4.431 2,202 35647
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 961 909 43.137 36,523
Malaria ............ .... .............. 31 51 4 2.231 1,987 101
Measles rubeolaa) ....................... 268 367 2,712 21.712 61,099 256,450
Meningococcal infections, total ......... .. 45 35 47 2,404 2,026 2,619
C civilian .............................. 44 34 2.210 1,902
Militar-y................... ............ 1 1 194 124
Mumps -...... ........ ............. .. 2,256 142,347 -
Poliomyelitis, total ..................... 2 2 55 45 97
Paralytic ..................... ...... 1 55 32 89
Rubella (German measles) ............... 379 409 47,367 43,066
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever.... 10,972 10,195 8,732 403,693 419,777 368.505
Tetanus ............................... 1 7 7 154 216 261
Tularemia .............................. 2 3 166 159 233
Typhoid fever .......................... 9 6 10 382 388 428
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 1 277 297 251
Rabies in animals ....................... 56 88 72 3,173 4.019 4.019

TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ................... ............- ........ 3 Rabies in man: ................................ 1
Botulism: ..................... .. ..... .......... 7 Rubella. Congenital Syndrome: ..... ....... .. 5
Leptospirosis: Fla.-l, Md.-l, Tex.-1................... 56 Trichinosis: Mass.-1 ............................. .. -61
P league: ................... ...... .... ............. 3 T yphus, m urine: T ex.-2 ............... .. ... .. 32
Psittacosis: Calif.-1, Ill.-1 .................... .. .... 42


I .


I 1 I







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA (Continued from front page)


of influenza-like disease were reported. Epidemiologic and
laboratory data on these outbreaks are pending.
A Public Health Service Field Station, Fort Collins,
Colorado, experienced an influenza A outbreak during the .u
month of November. As of December 2, 16 of 44 people
surveyed at the field station have recently had an influenza-
type illness. Six cases were reported as mild, seven as
moderate, and three as severe. The total number of work
days missed ranged from 0 to 4 with an average of 1.8
days. Hemagglutinating agents tentatively identified by
the fluorescent antibody method as type A influenza virus ...
were recovered from throat washings of two persons during
the acute phase of their illnesses. During the first 2 weeks
of November, only two cases of influenza were reported
by the Latimer County Health Department near Fort Collins;
however, during the last 2 weeks of November, 365 and


Figure 2
PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 1


Figure 1
INCIDENCE OF INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA-LIKE
DISEASE BY STATE AS REPORTED TO NCDC
SEPTEMBER 2, 1968 DECEMBER 10, 1968






U


U


UNITED STATES CITIES


WN CENTRAL E N CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND
10 CITIES 21 CITIES 14 CITIES








40 44 4B 52 4 a 16 ? 2 4 s 32 4o 44 46 SZ 4 U 12 6 24 12 32 40 44 4 52 6 2 i'6 20 24 28 13 i6
199 1969 6 1969 96 1963
MOUNTAIN o ES CENTRAL MIDDLE ATLANTIC
8 CITIES 8 CITIES o 20 CITIES










!9 ,964 963 |1969 l968 1969


PACIFIC
16 CITIES


WS CENTRAL
13 CITIES


SOUTH ATLANTIC
12 CITIES


EDK O 40 a4 404 52 4 8 2 16 20 4 28 i2 40 48 4 42 i66 2 4 44 4 2 5 4 8 1 i 24 8 36
1968 '969 9684 1969 196811969


DECEMBER 7, 1968


50
E
is

irrrw,
1






,,










319 cases,. re'specli ely, wret reported. Absrhl'elism in
th' IFort collins s high school was doubled during the se.c-
ond and Ihird w''ee.ks of No',ember. .\ dec'liine' to 269" ca,',e
wasr noltd during Ihe first w.'eek of DI)'ecbell.r.
The current stailt of influenza acti iti\ in the IUnitedl
statess is depicted in IFigure 1. \s illustrated in igLurre 2.
there has beeoanan incrcras in reported p.nciuinia-inilfli'nza
deaths in l122 I'.S. cities, exceeding the epidemic (Ihre>s-
hold. This excess miortality is denlonstrated in the \,esl
North ('Cntral. East North 'Central. Mountain. and middlee
Atlantic Di\i ionis.
(Reportld byi C. S. if/ollaan, il.".. Chief. S'Ncti. of Epi-


demiology!. C(olorado S/tat 11, purlm if of o I'!h, Il a1h/,
an, the Latimer C'ounlty lli'ali l)eparftmnti onilI/l K.
IIf i/lor, Dir.recor, S ction / of Epida'iol/it A',11i, S' ift,
department oi f /Health,. JanI t Ilo/d. .1)., D)ircr fr .' f
dent Itealt/l, NS rr.ic.s, uSart I n irrritfy of \1 r o rk, .1 in i
t 'ampus. and Jul/ia 1. F rrei/t M.I., D ir,. 'r.tor, t n r ,
Kpidi miolo>ly, \ 'u Yor/k Sate, c Dparltn'Irt if HII, ,/f.
R. IRI'Koy Carpenthr, 1.I).. Ilireclor, Dlrii, n of ',diii.mi
/lo/y. Uklldoima Statr lOeparimt'nif of lh al/ft, Pa'l '.
Ilhite, Jr.T l ).. director, lfrru1 ",f Kpidr i fo ,iP/y: 1/,,
the Zooino'(c S'cfion. E'(, hino al/ I' ://itfoii: Proq".am
V\'C. Fort Cofllin. 'Coloradii: a/.l KIN offi/eri.r


OUTBREAK OF SALMONELLOSIS Jersey City, New Jersey


An outbreak of salmonellosis, iniolling 17 of I1 per-
sons who attended a family Thanksgi\ing dinner in .Jerse,
City. Newi Jersey. occurred on Noaember 2S and 29. 196S.
The persons ranged in age from 7 months to 56 ears. On-
set of illness \\ s 3: to 17 hours after the meal, with a
median of 7 hours. Symptoms included vomitingg (100 per-
cent). diarrhea (100 percent), fever (94 percent). and ab-
doninal pain (h' percent). As a result of the outbreak. 1.5
persons were hospitalized; the mean duration of hospitalt-
zation was greater than 6 days (two patients are still in
the hospital). T o indiidualsdidual ied as a result of the out-
break: the first, a 17-year-old boy. died without hospitali-
zation 37 hours after onset of illness, and the second, a
5t6i-ear-old woman. diedl in the hospital 3 days after onset
of illness. Neither patient had any known underlying medi-
cal illness and neither was receiving any medication prior
to illness. At autopsy the only abnormal finding was seiere
enterocolitis in both cases. Cultures from all those in-
iolxed as well as the as)mptomattic person w\ho consumed
the meal were posit ie for Salmonella n tte'ritidit.
The suspect meal was a traditional Thanksgix ing
dinner including turkey and *iiiIl ,_. Because all foods
were consumed by noarl eoverione at the meal. food hi--
tories did not implicate a single vehicle. cultures s of left-
over lurke\. stuffing, and grave yielded S. ,iteiritidis in
the following concentrations: from the turkey (1.0 X 10)
salmonella per gm). 'the stuffing (1.2 X 10i salmonella per
gmi). and the gravy (2.9 X 101 salmonella per gm). No other
pathogens werre identified.
rThe turkey er\e'd i was a 23 11b frozen turkey pur-
chased on Notember 23 and kept in a freezer. It w as thaied
bx placing it in the bottom of the refrigerator on the night
prior to Thanksgi\ ing: it w as cooked at 300 F. for 7 hours
and consumed immediatelI after cooking. The : .ii._


consisted of grade :. eggs. bacon, ai local proce-'ed
fresh Italian sweett sausage brad., and gilet- from the
turkey'. The grax \ was a commercial product hoateod ju-t
prior to dinner. Following the outhr'ak. the partialIl con-
sunied turkey wais examined and was noted to be mlarkedl
undercooked.
-lthough contaminated turkey was ino-I likely the
vehicle ,' ausing this outbreak, tih posl ibilitx that the
sausage w as the vehicle has not been excluIded. Further
investigation is now in progre-'.
(leported by Ronald Altm;anu. .41)., Acltiin l)irector. )Dii-
siio of 'Pr ,r-rntable l)isean s. martinn Director of Laboratories, iiiand Harold Rocifeld. .)iV.\l..
Di,,isioi of t re renta6ble Oiscrsdiis. \r i' Jurse/y PDparfiiimnt
of fHealth. Wlalter Lesyin.ki. Iealtlh officer. .Jrsy 'Ciy
lieallb department: Domiinic fauriello. M1. .. l',si/cian-
in-(/'harf. Infectious [)iea 's i ard, a .,'ers'y 'iFty l'd/'ial
C(',ener. anid ma1 EIS ufficrr.)
Editorial Note:
Salmonella gastroenteritis is usually a mild. -elf-
limited illness., ith fatal case- usually confinedi to \oung
infants, thie elderl and persons with -sc re under ing
medical problems. The -e \rit of this outbreak presuim-
ably reflects hoth a \ier large inoculum n of almonellae
and an extremely x irulenlt strain. \ large iMnoiulmT l re-
tepaled hi, the quantitative smlit- of the conltaminated
foods is also indicated by both ihe short median incubu-
tion period of 7 hour ad he hi aan i i attack riat. Xlthough
virulence cannot be asses ed. (, i'i'ir/i i/li i- a sal-
monella -erotipe more likely to cause seriou- illne--. Of
1.277 i-olattion of thi- seroti pe reported in 1967. 19).
percent \e're nion-fecal isolation- (blood. urine, etc.) in
contra-t with 11.2 percent from the>e ourls 'e- for all -al-
monella serotIpes.


CHINESE FOOD POISONING Florido


.\n outbreak of food poisoning occurred in Pompano
Beach. Florida. on October 17. 196h. during a dinner in a
(Chinese restaurant. Of a total of fixe person- (four womtien
and ione man) eating the meal. three womotn became ill \xith
s\mnplonl characterized h' perioral Iare-thesia. temporal
and suboccipital headache, facial -I 1. i and nausea.


The incubation period wa, appro\imatel, 10 minute> and
duration of illness. :t0 minute,- to 2 hours.
Food hiitories implicated on ton -oup a- the I ie le
of infection. The wototon soiup prepared daily\ andi -
ntmali of coriniercial won ron. erten-., pIork. l['lp per. sox
(Co' in 'I~{ on piayti 6tj)/


l)l.'l:MIl: Rt 7. 1968


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report







456 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 7, 1968 AND DECEMBER 9, 1967 (49th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Nl ( o Primaryst-
AREA MENINGITIS including Infectious Serum Infectious
unsp. cases
1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968
UNITED STATES... 74 60 3 3 31 26 7 146 961 909 31

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 1 1 7 63 28 1
Maine? ............. 1 2
New Hampshire...... 4 -
Vermont........... 1 2
Massachusetts...... 1 1 29 12
Rhode Island....... 16 3
Connecticut........ 1 6 11 11 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 9 9 -3 1 36 126 162 1
New York City...... 1 2 23 45 72
New York, up-State. 2 1 1 1 4 15 16
New Jersey......... 6 5 7 42 25 1
Pennsylvania ...... 1 I 2 24 49

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 14 6 -- 9 9 6 154 124 7
Ohio............... 5 7 32 48
Indiana............ 1 1 -- 5 13
Illinois........... 5 1 1 -2 45 22 5
Michigan........... 8 4 3 1 4 56 35 2
Wisconsin ......... 6 6 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 1 1 44 62 5
Minnesota.......... 4 1 19 26 -
Iowa............... 10 9
Missuri........... 6 20
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota ... 1
Nebraska ........... 1 2
Kansas............. 7 4 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 8 3 1 3 6 2 29 112 74 5
Delaware........... 2
Maryland........... 1 4 2 4 15 10
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 3 2 5 6
West Virginia...... 7 8
North Carolina..... 2 2 13 12 5
South Carolina..... 2 7 4
Georgia............ -- 12 18
Florida............ 2 -1 1 2 2 25 50 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 8 1 1 75 92
Kentucky........... -- 31 40
Tennessee.......... 1 1 1 1 29 26 -
Alabama............ 1 4 9
Mississippi ........ 11 17

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 10 2 3 2 5 72 75
Arkansas ........... 1 1 1 6 1
Louisiana.......... 2 1 3 -- 4 14 13
Oklahoma............ 1 1 10 -
Texas*.............. 7 1 51 52 -

MOUNTAIN............ 2 1 2 3 42 25 5
Montana............. 1 5
Idaho.............. 1 4 4
Wyoming............ 1 -
Colorado........... 1 2 -2 11 4 4
New Mexico......... 5 8
Arizona............ 9 3
Utah............... -- 5
Nevada............. 1 -- 6

PACIFIC.............. 30 26 10 5 4 59 273 267 6
Washington......... 1 2 1 1 19 18 2
Oregon............. 2 1 27 18
California.......... 25 24 8 5 2 57 218 227 4
Alaska............. 3 3
Hawaii.............. 4 -1 6 1

Puert R ......... 38 9

*Dielayd reports: Diphtheria: T1x.
tepatitiis, erum: Pa. delete 1
HIipatitis, inl tious: M-. delete 1, Pa. delete 3







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 457


TABI.E III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 7, 1968 AND DECEMBER 9, 1967 (49th WEEK) CONTINUED


MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, MUMPS POI.IOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA Tota I.irayt it
ACumulat ive Cumulative t -- rl

1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 268 21,712 61,099 45 2,404 2,026 2,256 5- 379

NEW ENGLAND.......... 15 1,260 927 2 139 81 334 1
M.aine. x........... 38 262 6 3 51
New Hampshire...... I 142 78 8 3 2
Vermont............ 3 34 1 1 88 -
Massachusetts...... 5 384 393 2 74 37 100 21
Rhode Island ....... 39 62 9 6 16 --
Connecticut........ 9 654 98 41 31 57 7

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 42 4,575 2,514 2 42 335 170 1 9
New York City...... 20 2,362 514 86 62 22 4
New York, Up-State. 3 1,340 630 72 83 NN 1 3
New Jersey......... 9 698 594 1 147 108 148 14
Pennsylvania....... 10 175 776 1 120 83 NN 38

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 42 4,124 6,090 7 301 279 387 9 75
Ohio................ 5 325 1,181 82 94 30 2 4
Indiana............. 10 719 656 3 43 31 -
Illinois........... 9 1,419 1,165 3 67 61 82 9
Michigan .......... 5 322 1,017 88 72 85 3 34
Wisconsin.......... 13 1,339 2,071 1 21 21 190 16

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 37 446 2,954 2 128 94 274 3 30
Minnesota.......... 18 136 29 21
Iowa... ..... ..... 36 144 783 1 11 19 186 I 3
Missouri........... 81 340 41 19 5 2
North Dakota....... 138 886 4 3 44 4
South Dakota....... 4 58 5 7 NN
Nebraska............ 1 51 657 9 15 9
Kansas............. 10 94 1 29 10 30 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 21 1,669 7,295 8 482 399 133 3 21
Delaware............ 13 51 12 8 8 3
Maryland........... 103 178 1 41 55 18 -- 7
Dist, of Columbia.. 6 25 1i 15 6 1
Virginia.. ........ 9 331 2,315 3 47 43 7 4
West Virginia...... 3 315 1,463 13 38 50 4
North Carolina..... 3 320 927 2 96 86 NN -
South Carolina..... 1 23 513 61 32 17 1
Georgia............ 4 42 93 59
Florida............ 5 549 1,781 2 102 63 27 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 503 5,487 6 215 162 85 1 13
Kentucky........... 103 1,430 1 95 45 20 2
Tennessee.......... 64 2,023 4 68 72 64 6
Alabama ............ 95 1,357 27 29 1 -
Mississippi........ 241 677 1 25 16 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 68 5,223 18,078 12 348 256 173 24 43
Arkansas........... 2 1,404 1 21 41 1
Louisiana.......... 25 156 3 97 99 -
Oklahoma............ 1 129 3,359 55 19 1 2 3
Texas............... 67 5,067 13,159 8 175 97 172 21 39

MOUNTAIN ............. 15 1,073 4,869 2 45 40 153 27
Montana............ 58 331 6 5 2 -
Idaho.............. 21 399 1 12 3 6 -
Wyoming............ 1 55 202 3 1
Colorado............ 1 522 1,626 1 14 13 27 12
New Mexico......... 11 154 606 1 5 43
Arizona............. 1 234 1,053 5 6 57 1 8
Utah............... 21 383 I 4 18 -
Nevada............. 1 8 269 3

PACIFIC .............. 28 2,839 12,885 4 321 380 547 12 7
Washington......... 8 596 5,654 1 51 37 122 1 9
Oregon............. 8 585 1,702 5 30 12 7
California......... 12 1,612 5,206 3 228 298 353 11 -6
Alaska............. 11 141 11 46 -- 15
Hawaii.............. 35 182 14 4 14

Puerto Rico .......... 1 489 2,241 20 5 26 -
D*1. ived reports: Meas .s: Vi.
Mumps: M1. 5
Rub, llI,: lM 1, I-wa. d lte 2








458 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 7, 1968 AND DECEMBER 9, 1967 (49th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 10,972 1 154 166 9 382 1 277 56 3,173

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,251 4 47 13 1 2 74
Maine. ............. 221 2 55
New Hampshire...... 35 1 1 2
Vermont........... 20 47 11
Massachusetts...... 186 1 7 1 2 5
Rhode Island....... 11 -
Connecticut........ 878 2 3 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 189 19 10 35 22 2 53
New York City...... 10 11 18 --
New York, Up-State. 165 4 7 8 5 2 43
New Jersey......... NN 1 4 7
Pennsylvania ....... 14 3 3 5 10 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 681 16 11 1 48 9 3 282
Ohio ............... 127 2 1 1 20 7 92
Indiana............. 114 2 1 7 90
Illinois........... 97 8 8 19 2 1 39
Michigan .......... 222 3 -1 17
Wisconsin.......... 121 1 2 2 44

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 472 15 16 1 40 9 22 794
Minnesota.......... 46 2 2 12 258
Iowa............... 127 4 2 1 2 121
Missouri........... 14 5 7 26 3 5 116
North Dakota....... 95 2 128
South Dakot......... 35 1 3 2 4 97
Nebraska........... 60 3 1 4 1 27
Kansas .............. 95 5 1 4 1 47

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 991 32 12 2 64 142 7 389
Delaware........... 19 1
Maryland............ 143 3 9 18 6
Dist. of Columbia.. 12 2 1 2
Virginia........... 230 4 3 10 44 2 133
West Virginia...... 219 2 2 1 50
North Carolina..... 20 2 3 4 39 12
South Carolina..... 154 4 1 4 9
Georgia............ 24 3 4 15 27 2 79
Florida............ 170 12 2 1 21 3 2 106

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,802 16 9 46 57 18 683
Kentucky........... 162 1 2 10 10 14 365
Tennessee......... 1,285 6 5 21 39 3 295
Alabama.*........... 103 6 2 5 1 26
Mississippi ........ 252 3 2 13 3 7

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 853 1 31 48 51 30 4 486
Arkansas........... 21 5 15 18 6 62
Louisiana.......... 2 10 7 6 1 46
Oklahoma........... 57 9 15 14 3 123
Texas .............. 773 1 16 17 12 9 1 255

MOUNTAIN............. 2,823 1 9 21 5 89
Montana........... 60 -
Idaho.............. 142 -
Wyoming............. 539 1 -- 3
Colorado............ 1,372 3 5 4 4
New Mexico......... 370 8 39
Arizona ............ 154 1 6 39
Utah............... 154 5 1
Nevada............. 32 1 3

PACIFIC .............. 1,910 20 4 5 64 1 323
Washington ......... 769 1 2 2
Oregon. ............ 98 1 1 5 -- 6
California......... 659 18 3 4 56 1 315
Alaska............. 116 -- 1 1 -
Hawaii.............. 268 -

Puerto Rico.......... 2 12 5 20

*Delayed reports: SST: Me. 10
Tetanus: Ala. 1








Morbidity and Mortality W'eekly Reporl






TABLE IV. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 7. 1968


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and Il yar
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and ver Inluenza Al
All Ages Causes All Ages (Cause,


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, lowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------.
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


787
262
38
20
30
63
40
22
43
67
72
9
49
31
41

3,832
64
57
170
52
36
43
71
118
1,915
58
440
287
64
143
36
60
100
47
31
40

3,098
68
39
904
188
245
153
95
441
49
64
64
29
65
188
51
146
41
48
40
118
62

993
63
28
42
160
40
137
81
299
84
59


473
147
20
16
22
35
27
14
33
38
37
7
32
17
28

2,215
33
33
95
32
25
24
40
54
1,113
29
241
145
48
93
27
37
65
28
24
29

1,747
36
26
478
117
135
85
63
244
31
33
41
12
44
110
23
84
23
29
23
68
42

604
42
15
22
91
26
84
54
171
65
34


157
6
4
8
3

1
4
15
75

14
14

4

1
5
2

1

135
2
1
36
6
13
5
3
23
1
2
3
3


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-----------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.------.
Chattanooga, Tenn.----
Knoxville, Tenn.------
Louisville, Ky.-------
Memphis, Tenn.--------
Mobile, Ala.------------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.------.
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------.
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.------..
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.--...
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------.
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,387
144
281
69
95
121
66
90
56
101
86
224
54

774
126
80
44
134
184
46
53
107

1,428
41
52
32
180
73
82
268
80
191
105
176
65
83

605
65
43
189
17
118
28
66
79

1,869
19
62
42
57
108
616
130
46
129
66
85
225
41
139
54
50


719
62
141

50
64
34
43
30
86
54
96
28

409
67
35
26
75
98
23
28
57

783
29
30
18
105
38
50
125
41
95
59
94
42
57

334
40
23
89
9
72
16
41
44

1,109
16
32
31
30
67
380
62
32
72
31
49
122
30
85
37
33


Total 14,773 8,393 672 667

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 622,571
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 357,605
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 24,636
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 29,432


Week No.








460 Morbidity and Mo



CHINESE FOOD POISONING -f(rintinued iroin page 4.5,5

-auce. and chicken broth. The chicken brolh i< flavored
11h i ono-udiium1 glutamnate (\S(;). often in Iexcoss. The
restcaurani used a 100 lb barrel of \I(1SG e ery 6 to S weeks.
No specimens weroobtained to determine the concentration
of \lSG in th1 soup al though h undii olved crYItals of \IMSG
Editorial note in oup.

(i e ported 6y E. ('Cl,,irtn Prather, M.D.. l.P.H!.. director,
Division of K/pideltiilog/y. F/irida tatcr Boardl of Health.
'Paul It'. Htibitb ,, 1V.D.. Dire ltir, and Will//ard C. Oalbreath.,
kireji jtrd Siii',ri, t,. Director of Sanitlaioh, Troord/
( 'al lle ,lli P fItpritmend ini an EIS Offif er.)

Editorial Note:
Chine(s1- food poisoning has. recently, been ascribed to
mionosodiuin Ill anlate into\ication.1 The onset of s ymptoms-
in -usce)ptibl individuals usually occurs Sithin 10 to 20
minutes after in estion of food containing excess \IMG.
The most common sym ptorms are tingling and sensation of
weakness in the facial and temporal regions and over the
upper hack. neck. and arm.,, and often a feeling of warmth
o\ er the -ame areas. Females appear to be more suscepti-
ble than males on an equal dose basis.'


!K>,f>r. nc <- :
' h umbur 11.11., m.id B k, Ir .: (-nrr d1. 279:105. 196S
2\mb -o:-, %1arlpri t ;l.: (I)rrr tpo, nd n(',.' N-', Eng J Med,
"27 : 105,. 196S.







INTERNATIONAL NOTES
SMALLPOX Uruguay'


In late .\ugust. a 3-year-old girl. a resident of San
Sebastian near the location of Hospital in Ri\hera Depart-
nment, Iruguay. developed smallpox. The case was origi-
nally reported as being imported: ho-e\er. investigation
re,\ aled that it was s-econdar\ to an imported case. The
index case- a I ,, ear-old man, came to Hospital. Uruguay.
from Cruz de San Pedro. Brazil, approximately 90 km
north of Hospital. Ihile con alescing from smallpox.
To date in 196s. no other smallpox case has been
reported from Iruguay.
( reported by t/h irma/lporz Eradicatioii Prograrmn \('C.)


l\t>rild Hialth ()ru:nii.: l n ic (kly Epidrmnlo o i iri-l Record,
' ,(IS1617,


rtality Weekly Report


DECEMBER 7, 1968


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17,000 IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER. M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D,
CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
EDITOR MICHAEL B GREGG, M.D,

IN ADDiTiON TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL
OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
ATTN: THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT

NOTE: THE DATE IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON FRIDAY: COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL
BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


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