Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00193

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


'NATIONAL CMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFI


HEALTH SERVICES AND MENTAL HEALTH ADMII


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
INFLUENZA A2 Hong Kong
An epidemic of influenza, affecting an estimated
300,000 persons in Hong Kong, has been reported. The
first cases became evident on July 13, 1968, with a rapid
increase in incidence reaching an apparent peak on July
25, 26. The disease has been clinically nild with symptoms
lasting from 3 to 4 days. Deaths have been few in number
and have occurred primarily in the very young and the aged.
Strains of virus have been isolated on primary cyno-
mologous monkey cell culture. All have been identified
as type A2 influenza by hemagglutination inhibition tests.
Serologic studies of patients are in progress.
.American residents have been affected to some extent.
Approximately 30 percent of the staff at the American


International Notes .-
Influenza A2 Hong K:.r -- . .. 277
Epidemiologic Notes and R. i jit-
Follow-up Arbovirus Disease United States . 278
Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Baltimore, Maryland 278
Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Upstate New York ... 279
Animal Anthrax and Presumptive Human Anthrax -
California ................... .. 279
Case of Poliomyelitis Kansas City, Missouri ....... 279
Consulate have experienced influenza-like illnesses dur-
ing the current epidemic.
No reliable reports of influenza in American tourists
have been obtainable. There has been no disruption of
tourist traffic.
(Reported by Medical Officer, USPHS, Foreign Quarantine
Program, Hong Kong; Dr. W. K. Chang, National Influenza
Center, University of Hong Kong; and the International
Influenza Center, NCDC.)


TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE.DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
30th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST30 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE MEDIAN
DISEASE July 27, July 29 1963 1967 MEDIAN
1968 1967 1968 1967 1963 1967
Aseptic meningitis ...................... 118 68 60 1,258 1,107 952
Brucellosis ............................ 3 5 116 153 153
Diphtheria. .............................. 1 2 5 95 60 98
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ........... 17 34 524 782 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious ............ 7 23 314 534 -
Hepatitis, serum ............ ........... .98 50 582 2,401 1,207 23,707
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 871 647 25,066 22,234
Malaria ................................ 28 51 6 1,223 1,149 59
Measles(rubeola) ....................... 232 286 1,318 18,684 56,338 235,343
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 49 26 35 1,817 1,531 1,752
Civilian .............................. 46 26 1,644 1.423
Military ............................... 3 173 108
Mumps ................................. 945 --- 120,280 -
Poliomyelitis, total ..................... 4 4 31 19 45
Paralytic ............................. 3 4 31 16 41
Rubella (German measles) ............... 397 327 -- 41,758 38,646 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever.... 4,278 4,778 4,071 274,342 296,884 267,496
Tetanus ............................... 3 9 6 81 121 138
Tularemia ............................. 3 4 6 121 96 145
Typhoid fever .......................... 8 5 9 174 225 237
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 14 11 16 132 153 134
Rabies in animals ........................ 52 98 84 2,135 2,656 2.656

TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ....................... ............... 3 Rabies in man: ...................................... -
Botulism: Calif.-1 ................................... 4 Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: ........................ 4
Leptospirosis: Tex.- ................................ 16 Trichinosis: ........................................ 40
Plague: ............................................ Typhus, marine: ..................................... 14
Psittacosis: ....................................... 28






278


Since the isolation of California Group \irus from mos-
quitoes in \isconsin and the isolation of western encepha-
litis \irus from mosquitoes in west Texas (MMWR, Vol. 17,
No. 29). eastern encephalitis virus has been isolated from
ponies in Delaware and New Jersey and from pheasants
in Maryland. Probable western encephalitis in horses has
been reported from Kansas. To date, no increase in human
ca.es of primary encephalitis has been reported to NCDC.
In a marshy rural area. east of Salisbury, Maryland, in
\\icomico County on the Delmarva peninsula. six ponies
recently developed symptoms of encephalitis and five of
the six ha\e died. In this same area. beginning on July 16.
there was a small die-off of pheasants from a population
of 11,500 pheasants and 2,500 partridges on a single farm.
On Friday. July 26. 200 pheasants and 10 partridges died,
and the birds are continuing to die at about the same rate.
Eastern encephalitis virus has been isolated from one of
the pheasants, and the area has been sprayed with malathion.
To date. other large pheasant farms in the area have not
been affected.
One July 20 in Millsboro. a community in southern
Delaware about 50 miles from Salisbury, Maryland, one
pony died of encephalitis. The New Jersey Division of
Laboratories has isolated eastern encephalitis virus from
the brain of this pony. The Millsboro area has since been
sprayed with insecticides. Eastern encephalitis virus has
also been isolated from the brain of a 4-year-old unvacci-


J ULY 27, 1968


nated pony in Laureldale, Atlantic County. New Jersey.
The animal was noticed to be ill and died on July 22.
In Kansas, 21 scattered cases of encephalitis in horses
have been reported during the past 3 weeks. Ilihh tigers to
western encephalitis virus haxe developed in sentinel
flocks in Thomas County in the northwestern part of the
state, and four of the cases of encephalitis in horses oc-
curred in adjacent Sheridan County. Rainfall in July was
extremely heavy throughout the state, and Culex tarsalis
mosquito populations were reported to be high not only in
Thomas County but also in Republic and Riley Counties
in northcentral Kansas.

(Reported by Dr. John Janney, State Epidemiologist, Mary-
land State Department of Health; Dr. Thomas Ladson,
Director, Maryland Livestock Sanitary Service; Dr. George
Langford, State Entomologist, and Dr. Stanley Joseph,
Associate Entomologist, Maryland State Board of Agricul-
ture; Dr. Floyd Hudson, State Health Officer, Delaware
State Board of Health; Dr. Ernest Symington, State Veteri-
narian, State Board of Agriculture; Dr. Oscar Sussman,
Chief, Veterinary Public Health Program, Dr. Henry C.
Black, and Mr. Bernard Taylor, Division of Laboratories,
and Dr. Ronald Altman, State Epidemiologist, New Jersey
State Department of Health; and Dr. Donald l .'r e.r. Director,
Division of Dise'ase Prevention and Control, Kansas State
Department of Health.)


HAND, FOOT, AND MOUTH DISEASE Baltimore, Maryland


Since the last week in June 1968, approximately 60
cases of a disease characterized by vesicular lesions on
the soles of the feet, palms, buttocks, and mouth have
occurred in residents of the city and county of Baltimore.
The patients also had a low grade fever not above 100oF.
The number of cases reported each week has progressively
increased through July 20 (Figure 1). Of the affected per-
sons, 50 percent were children between 1 and 2 years of
age and only three were persons over 10 years of age
although the range in age was 10 months to 33 years. A
tentative diagnosis for this disease is hand, foot, and
mouth disease. An additional 100 cases of ulcerative
stomatitis without other lesions have also been reported.
Throat, stool, and vesicular fluids have been cultured.
and a Coxsackievirus Type A-16 has been isolated.
Cases of a similar disease have also recently been
reported from two other counties in Maryland, %\ -hirLi,,
D.C., Watertown, H~ .ic,.,r,.... (see below) and Rochester,
New York. ant Atlanta, Georgia.

reportedd by John H. Janney. M.D., ( '. '. Communicable
Disease Division, anu J.M. Joseph, M.D., Assistant Di-
rector, Bureau of Laboratories, Maryland State Department
of Health; John R. Pate, M.D.. Chief, Communicable Dis-
ease Control. District of Columbia Department of Public
Health; Julia L. Frietag, M.D., Director, Bureau of Epi-


Figure 1
HAND, FOOT, AND MOUTH DISEASE
(42 CASES) BY DATE OF ONSET
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND JUNE AUGUST 1968
30-


o 15-
z
w
U
U.




Sto
z 10-


9 16 23 30 7 14 21
JUN, JUL.
DATE OF ONSET


28 4
AUG.


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
FOLLOW-UP ARBOVIRUS DISEASE United States


1 ~







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


demiology, New York State Health Department; John E.
McCroan, Ph.D., State Epidemiologist, Georgia Depart-
ment of Public Health; and a team from NCDC.)
Editorial Note:
These illnesses present the characteristic features of
hand, foot, and mouth disease known to be caused by


Coxsackievirus Type A-16.1 Other Type A Coxsackievi-
ruses may be associated with this syndrome.


Reference:
IFroeschle, James et al: Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (Cox-
sackie Virus A-16) in Atlanta. Amer J Dis Child 14:278. 1967.


HAND, FOOT, AND MOUTH DISEASE Upstate New York


Clinical cases of a disease resembling classical
hand, foot, and mouth disease have been occurring in
Broome County, New York, for about a month. The illness,
occurring chiefly among children 2 to 7 years of age, is
characterized by vesicular eruption on the hands, feet,
and mouth. Except for poor food consumption because of
painful, ruptured vesicles in the mouth, the illness is mild
and of 5 to 7 days duration. A preliminary investigation


suggested more than 200 cases distributed throughout the
county.
(Reported by Cameron F. McRae, M.D., Health Commis-
sioner, Broome County; Israel Rosefsky, M.D., James F.
Johnson, M.D., and John Ford, M.D., Binghamton, New
York; James O. Culver, M.D., Public Health Physician,
and Julia L. Frietag, M.D., Director, Bureau of Epidemiol-
ogy, New York State Health Department, and an EIS Officer.)


ANIMAL ANTHRAX AND PRESUMPTIVE HUMAN ANTHRAX California


Between June 19 and July 12, an outbreak of animal
anthrax was documented in Inyo County, California. Dead
animals were found on 34 different farms and included 148
cattle, 13 tule elk, two horses, one burro, and one mule.
Cultures obtained at autopsy from dead animals on 18
farms yielded Bacillus anthracis. Animal carcasses were
disposed of either by burning or burying.
A 63-year-old male who participated in the disposal
operations reported that-he had been bitten on his leg by
a horsefly "that had flown from a dead animal." Several
days later on June 30, the man developed fever and mal-
aise and an inflamed pustular ulcer at the same site as
the bite. Inguinal adenopathy subsequently developed, and
a black eschar formed over the site of the initial lesion.
The wound was debrided and gram-positive bacilli were
detected in the debrided material. Culture results are pend-
ing. The patient was begun on penicillin therapy and has
made an uneventful recovery.


Previous outbreaks of animal anthrax occurred in
Inyo County as recently as 1963. During the first 2 weeks
in July, following this recent outbreak, 20,000 cattle and
horses were immunized with live attenuated anthrax vaccine.
(Reported by Victor Hough, M.D., Health Officer, Inyo
County; Ben Dean, D.V.M., Chief, Veterinary Section,
and Philip K. Condit, M.D., M.P.H., Chief, Bureau of Com-
municable Diseases, California State Department of Public
Health; and H. G. Wixom, D.V.M., California Department
of Agriculture.)

Editorial Note:
Transmission of anthrax by infected horseflies has
been previously postulated1; however, in this case, direct
contact with infected material cannot be excluded.
Reference:
1Sen, S.K., and Minett, F.C.: Experiments on the Transmission
of Anthrax through Flies. Indian J Vet Sci Anim Husb 14:149,
1944.


CASE OF POLIOMYELITIS Kansas City, Missouri


On July 5, 1968, a 5-year-old boy from a suburb in
Kansas City, Missouri, complained to his mother of head-
ache, stiff neck, abdominal cramps, and pains in his right
leg. He also had a low grade fever and walked with a
slight limp. By July 7, he was unable to walk, and on
July 8, he was admitted to a hospital. On admission he
had flaccid paralysis of the right leg. He had a white cell
count of 8,200 with a normal differential, and his spinal
fluid had a total cell count of 98 cells per mm3 (all cells
were lymphocytes), protein of 49 mg percent, and sugar of
56 mg percent. On July 12, poliovirus type 2 was recovered
from the stool and throat washing of the patient; this virus


was subsequently recovered from the stool of the patient's
sister who has remained well to the present time. The boy
and his sister had no history of poliomyelitis immunization.
Epidemiologic investigation revealed that the boy
and his family had been in Clinton, Missouri, on June 15
and 16. At Clinton, he attended a centennial celebration
and had close association with a woman and her two chil-
dren who had recently arrived from Costa Mesa, California.
Between the boy's return from Clinton and onset of ill-
ness, he had close contact with three neighborhood chil-
dren and he attended a carnival in Kansas City and visited
(Continued on page 284)


279


JULY 27, 1968








2811 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE 111. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 27, 1968 AND JULY 29, 1967 (30th WEEK)

ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC P1 1 Primary
AREA MENINGITIS includinAg Infectious Serum Infectious MALARIA
unsp. cases
1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968
UNITED STATES... 118 68 3 1 17 34 7 98 871 647 28

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 37 24
Maine.............. 3
New Hampshire...... 1 1
Vermont........... -
Massachusetts...... 1 25 13
Rhode Island....... 3 4
Connecticut........ 8 3

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 15 8 3 1 1 47 123 127 5
New York City...... 4 4 31 45 55
New York, up-State. 1 2 1 6 17 26
New Jersey......... 9 1 7 25 19 1
Pennsylvania....... 1 2 2 1 3 36 27 4

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 13 9 3 15 1 2 108 84 2
Ohio................ 6 1 1 13 26 19 1
Indiana............. 2 -- 7 5
Illinois........... 2 6 2 1 1 22 39 1
Michigan........... 5 1 1 37 16
Wisconsin.......... 1 16 5

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 9 2 2 1 3 70 43 2
Minnesota.......... 5 1 2 9 9 1
Iowa...*... ...... .. 2 -- 2 7 7
Missouri..*........ 36 24
North Dakota....... 1 1
South Dakota....... 9 7-
Nebraska............ 1 1 -
Kansas............. 1 10 1 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 32 6 1 2 94 64 1
Delaware............ 2 9 4 -
Maryland........... 2 2 1 16 10 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 -
Virginia........... 19 1 7 6
West Virginia...... 3 11 5
North Carolina..... 1 1 2 14
South Carolina..... 1 3
Georgia............ 1 17 13
Florida............ 5 2 28 9 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 13 4 67 40 2
Kentucky........... 1 1 27 8 1
Tennessee.......... 2 6 4 25 14
Alabama ........... 3 8 1
Mississippi....... 6 12 10

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 22 4 4 4 2 64 77 1
Arkansas........... 1 4
Louisiana.......... 13 1 3 3 2 17 8 1
Oklahoma.....*...... 1 1 1 3 9
Texas... ........... 8 3 43 56

MOUNTAIN............. 2 1 3 54 19 11
Montana............ 1 6 2
Idaho.............. 1 4
Wyoming.............
Colorado............ 1 1 2 31 6 11
New Mexico......... 2 4
Arizona............ 6 5
Utah................ 5 2
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.............. 25 18 1 7 3 4 44 254 169 4
Washington.......... 2 25 15 -
Oregon............ 1 25 17
California.......... 23 16 1 7 3 4 43 203 132 4
Alaska............. -- 1 2
Hawaii............ .. 2 3

Puerti Rico......... --- 2 --- -- --- -- 19

Delayed reports: Brucellosis: Iowa 7, Okla. 1 case 1967
Diphtheria: Tex. 4
Hepatitis, infectious: Okla. 7, P.R. I
Malaria: Mo. 12, Hawaii delete 1








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 281


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 27, 1968 AND JULY 29, 1967 (30th WEEK) CONTINUED


MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, MUMPS POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 232 18,684 56,338 49 1,817 1,531 945 31 397

NEW ENGLAND.......... 15 1,127 806 1 91 60 89 1 64
Maine.... ......... 35 233 6 3 11 2
New Hampshire...... 141 74 7 2 -
Vermont ............ 2 34 1 3 3
Massachusetts.*.... 7 361 316 1 41 30 50 1 33
Rhode Island....... 4 5 62 7 4 9 18
Connecticut........ 4 583 87 29 21 16 8

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 87 3,705 2,167 7 326 250 126 83
New York City....... 71 1,790 421 67 44 120 48
New York, Up-State. 14 1,178 .543 1 55 60 NN 31
New Jersey......... 2 598 478 2 118 88 6 3
Pennsylvania..... 139 725 4 86 58 NN 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 37 3,605 5,137 6 218 201 230 1 63
Ohio............... 4 287 1,125 1 59 69 16 4
Indiana............ 12 632 585 28 22 20 10
Illinois........... 3 1,333 904 3 50 47 26 1 4
Michigan........... 4 242 879 1 62 48 32 14
Wisconsin.......... 14 1,111 1,644 1 19 15 136 31

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 368 2,803 5 94 66 35 1 7
Minnesota.......... 15 130 21 16 1 -
Iowa................ 1 95 743 6 12 24 1
Missouri........... 81 330 31 13 3 1 5
North Dakota....... 1 125 834 3 1 6 -
South Dakota....... 4 52 4 6 NN
Nebraska............... 38 621 6 12 1
Kansas............. 10 93 5 23 6 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 18 1,422 6,715 14" 374 292 77 1 53
Delaware............ 15 43 7 6 1 -
Maryland............ 3 88 146' 1 27 34 15 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 6 22 14 10 8 -
Virginia............ 3 293 2,121 1 29 35 7 12
West Virginia...... 6 264 1,346 9 20 16 9
North Carolina..... 281 840 73 63 NN 1
South Carolina..... 13 506' 56 28 1
Georgia............. 4 32 12 73 44 -
Florida............. 6 458 1,659 86 52 30 30

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 545 5,074 9 158 123 93 1 31
Kentucky............ 3 175 1,315 6 64 34 26 1 9
Tennessee.......... 1 56 1,794 2 51 51 62 16
Alabama............ 85 1,309 1 23 25 5 6
Mississippi........ 229 656 20 13 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 40 4,578 16,987 4 293 211 89 17 32
Arkansas.......... 3 1,404 1 20 28 -
Louisiana.......... 2 150 81 82 -
Oklahoma........... 1 111 3,320 49 16 1
Texas............... 39 4,462 12,113 3 143 85 89 16 32

MOUNTAIN............. 8 956 4,537 27 27 68 20
Montana............ 66 277 3 4
Idaho............... 20 374 11 1 12 3
Wyoming.............. 51 178 1 1
Colorado............ 5 486 1,523 8 12 17 6
New Mexico......... 88 573 3 2 -1
Arizona............. 3 219 987 1 4 28 10
Utah................ 21 356 1 4 4
Nevada............. 5 269 3 2

PACIFIC............... 21 2,378 12,112 3 236 301 138 9 44
Washington......... 514 5,400 37 25 5 -1 5
Oregon.............. 14 471 1,539 18 24 13 6
California.......... 7 1,356 4,888 3 168 239 76 -- 8 21
Alaska.............. 2 130 2 9 19 2
Hawaii............. 35 155 11 4 25 10

Puerto Rico.......... -- 354 2,059 --- 19 11

Delayed reports: Measles: Mass. delete 4, Pa. delete 12
Meningococcal infections: Ark. delete 1
Rubella: Me. 3








282 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 27, 1968 AND JULY 29, 1967 (30th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 4,278 3 81 3 121 8 174 14 132 52 2,135

NEW ENGLAND.......... 463 2 46 5 65
Maine.. ........... 6 50
New Hampshire...... 21 1 2
Vermont............ 16 46 10
Massachusetts...... 56 1 2 2
Rhode Island....... 36 -
Connecticut.......... 328 1 2 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 112 12 7 1 14 7 3 25
New York City...... 6 6 1 8 -
New York, Up-State. 105 4 7 3 1 3 18
New Jersey......... NN 1 -
Pennsylvania ....... 1 2 3 5 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 313 8 8 25 1 5 4 196
Ohio............... 21 1 12 1 3 2 77
Indiana............. 66 1 1 3 1 66
Illinois........... 54 5 5 9 2 23
Michigan........... 136 2 -1 9
Wisconsin.......... 36 1 1 21

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 146 3 9 8 1 4 13 528
Minnesota........... 19 1 10 152
Iowa............... 28 1 1 1 1 87
Missouri........... 6 2 7 3 1 77
North Dakota....... 31 82
South Dakota....... 6 1 1 1 79
Nebraska........... 28 3 1 1 24
Kansas............ 28 1 1 27

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 605 2 16 7 41 7 72 5 227
Delaware........... 2 -
Maryland........... 96 1 8 7 4
Dist. of Columbia.. 37 1 2 2 -
Virginia........... 176 1 3 1 8 2 26 2 89
West Virginia...... 157 1 1 30
North Carolina..... 3 2 2 2 2 23 9
South Carolina..... 13 1 1 3 -
Georgia............ 6 2 10 2 11 34
Florida............. 115 6 2 11 2 2 61

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 907 9 6 2 23 4 26 11 485
Kentucky............ 29 1 1 5 6 5 236
Tennessee.......... 814 2 4 2 13 2 16 6 227
Alabama............ 64 3 2 3 21
Mississippi........ 3 1 5 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 404 1 17 3 31 2 19 14 8 378
Arkansas........... 7 4 1 6 4 1 1 44
Louisiana.......... 7 1 6 1 6 3 34
Oklahoma............. 7 1 7 4 7 2 111
Texas.............. 383 7 12 2 8 6 5 189

MOUNTAIN ............. 772 6 2 11 1 3 2 54
Montana ............ 7 -
Idaho.............. 106 1 1 -
Wyoming............ 10 1 1 1 3
Colorado........... 510 3 2 2 3
New Mexico......... 114 6 1 21
Arizona............. 14 2 2 27
Utah............ ..... 11 2
Nevada........... -

PACIFIC.............. 556 14 1 1 28 1 6 177
Washington......... 36 -
Oregon.............. 49 1 1 1 4 3
California......... 324 12 23 1 6 174
Alaska............. 32 -
Hawaii............. 115 -

Puerto Rico .......... --- --- 6 --- --- 1 --- -- 16

Delayed reports: SST: Me. 9







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






TABLE IV. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JULY 27, 1968


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and year Area All 65 years and I year
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.-------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.----------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
-Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.------ ----
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.----------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.--------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.----
Lincoln, Nebr.-------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.-----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


704
221
47
22
31
61
27
21
17
33
69
12
44
42
57

3,502
43
37
147
54
37
40
81
87
1,776
53
496
206
63
110
34
31
83
54
34
36

2,621
61
41
738
150
S200
133
68
374
45
66
55
42
66
133
33
145
37
26
50
97
61

783
48
14
38
122
23
120
81
221
71
45


449
130
31
17
22
35
19
14
13
21
38
8
24
31
46

2,096
22
25
84
35
24
28
61
39
1,062
31
284
112
45
73
24
18
55
27
23
24

1,476
31
24-
401
85
99
74
33
215
26
32
29
20
47
67
17
93
24
19
39
62
39

477
35
6
24
79
11
69
42
140
45
26


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.----------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.-------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.-------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.--------
Seattle, Wash.----------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.-------


Total 12,625 7,193 426 593


Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for


previous weeks


All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 389,319
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 225,936
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 16,506
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 17,989


Week No.
30


1,165
139
233
49
67
116
41
69
40
80
53
215
63

686
102
69
29
149
158
58
38
83

1,108
46
39
36
147
56
72
202
55
140
80
118
37
80

425
57
33
116
20
79
21
47
52

1,631
21
43
34
61
110
512
96
32
135
62
89
166
40
136
42
52







284 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



CASE OF POLIOMYELITIS (('ontined from page 279)
THE MORBIDITY AND MORTAL
TION OF 17.000. IS PUBLISH
a trailer camp in Belton, Missouri. The family from Cali- DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA.
DIRECTOR. NATIONAL COMML
rornia. after leaI intg (linton, visited families in Leaven- CIEF OLOG O
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROG
worth. Kansas, in Shawinee, Kansas, and in Raytown, ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS S
Missouri. \ll families were contacted, all had been im- EDI
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTAI
miinized against poliomrelitis. and no person reported a MOR^BI DT'..0 ?., n, I.*
CENTER WE L."M : ACCO.I N
recent illness. The source of the bov's infection has not INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARI
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE
vet heen determiined. OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
ADDRESSED TO:
NATIONAL
ATLANTA,
(Reported hy J. M. Singleton III, M.D., Health Officer, ATTN: ~'E ED
Jackson county Miss ouri; Edwin 0. Wicks, M.D., Kansas
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS
City Health Department, Kans a City, Missouri; E. A. BASED ON WEEKL ii Ej
STATE HEALTH DE'A-Tui
BeClden. Director, Bureau of Communicable Disease, ON SATURDAYl COMPILED DA
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY
Missouri Department of Public Health and Welfare; Philip
K. Conditi, M.D., M.P.H.. Chief, Bureau of Communicable
Diseases, California State Department of Public Health;
Ecological Investigations Program, NCDC, Kansas City,
Kansas; and an EIS .'.*' -.)


JULY 27, 1968

o


ITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
ED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
GEORGIA.
INICABLE DISEASE CE. TE
,'- iC .. SENCER. MCO.
RAM c LaNG..,nr M.O0
SECTION IDA L. .RMAr M.S.
MICHAEL B. GREGG, M.O

BLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
THE *T.CNAL :G.O u ABL. E DISE S- _
v OF N T E .rES *G O. I 6E == OR Ca.iE
E OF C.R-E'CN *NTe- E To M.E'L ..-
C.l-ECI v "ELICTECE 10 InE CONICTOL
ES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
CO,.aMUN.: 6L-t DISEASE CENTER

ANC. MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT

REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
-M. TO THE NCDC BY T.E ,.PD'.0DUaL
rTS THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLuDES
TA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
Y.


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