Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00185

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text

NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISAS CENTER/0
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 17, No. 10


WEEKLY

REPORT


Week Ending

March 9, 1968


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL


CURRENT TRENDS
MEASLES United States

For the week ending March 9, 1968 (week 10), there
were 707 cases of measles 1 reported to NCDC. Since the
third week of 1968 (week ending January 20), the number
of measles cases reported each week has exceeded 500;
However, the previously noted low level of reported cases
in epidemiologic year2 1967-68 compared with the cases
reported in 1966-67 is continuing (Figure 1).
During the first 22 weeks of the current epidemiologic
year for measles, 9,443 cases were reported to NCDC.
This total is 28 percent of the 33,866 cases reported in
the comparable period in 1966-67.

The 10th week total for 1968 does not include reports from
Arizona and Oklahoma.
2The epidemiologic year for measles begins with week 41 of
the calendar year and ends with week 40 of the succeeding
year.


3,000-



2,500-



2,000-

I,

0 1,500-



1,000-



500-


CONTENTS
Current Trends
Measles United States ...................... 85
Meningococcal Disease 1968 . ... 87
Epidemiologic Notes and Reports
Measles Nashua, New Hampshire . .... 86
Preliminary Summary
Human Brucellosis United States, 1967 ......... .92



In the 4-week period, January 28 through February 24,
1968 (weeks 5-8), measles was notified from 376 counties
or health districts. This is an increase of 30 counties
over the 346 counties reporting measles in the previous
4-weeks period (weeks 1-4), but is 289 fewer than the
665 counties or health districts reporting during the com-
parable 4-week period in 1967. Of these 376 counties, 56
(15 percent) reported a total of 10 or more cases (Figure 2)
(Continued on page 86)


8 10
MAR


Figure 1
REPORTED CASES OF MEASLES BY WEEK, UNITED STATES
EPIDEMIOLOGIC YEAR 1967-68 COMPARED WITH 1966-67
FIRST 24 WEEKS (OCTOBER-MARCH)


1966-


.1967-68


46 48 50 52 2 4 6
DEC JAN FEB.
WEEK NUMBER






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MEASLES (Continued from front page)


Figure 2
COUNTIES OR HEALTH DISTRICTS REPORTING
A TOTAL OF 10 OR MORE CASES OF MEASLES
JANUARY 28 THROUGH FEBRUARY 24, 1968


~Cfr"




ae


17%



*' .* "'. *"'
r

( -i
-r' "" .


/ _
\."


J
*. r**. YP4


as contrasted with 203 of 665 counties (31 percent) re-
porting a total of 10 or more cases during the comparable
4-week period in 1967 (Figure 3).
Most of the nine geographic divisions showed signif-
icant decreases in the number of counties or health dis-
tricts reporting a total of 10 or more measles cases in
the 4-wveek period, January S2 through February 24, 1968,
over the .rr.-pnrlrtrne period in 1966-67. Two divisions,
the West North Central and the Mountain, recorded less
than 10 cases from any county. Only 19 cases recorded


Figure 3
COUNTIES OR HEALTH DISTRICTS REPORTING
A TOTAL OF 10 OR MORE CASES OF MEASLES
JANUARY 29 THROUGH FEBRUARY 25, 1967



-. -


4- i" l "

LOUiSi *N 4






counties reporting a total of 10 or more cases in this
4-week period in 1968 as compared with 40 states record-
ing counties reporting 10 or more cases in the comparable
4-week period in 1967. Of these 19 states, 11 (58 percent)
had only one county reporting a total of 10 or more cases,
as contrasted with 12 of 40 states (30 percent) with only
one county reporting a total of 10 or more cases during
the corresponding 4-week period in 1967.
(Reported by State Services Section and Statistics Sec-
tion, NCDC.)


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
MEASLES Nashua, New Hampshire


During February and March 1968, an outbreak of mea-
sles occurred in Nashua (population i 1.1111U, New Hamp-
shire. By March 5, a total of 52 cases had occurred; these
included reported cases and unrecorded cases usually found
among siblings of reported cases. The epidemic peak oc-
curred in the week ending February 17 when 19 cases were
noted (Figure 4). Epidemiologic data were obtained on 41
of the 52 patients and showed that 52 percent of the cases


Figure 4
MEASLES CASES BY DATE OF ONSET*
NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 1968




-I..jaTION CAMPAIGN


-F-Ill
JzLAJ~ii'


1~~ ":- :OL CHILDREN
SCHOOL CHILDREN


were in children age 8 years or older in grade three or
above (Figure 5).
Because schools were closed for vacation February 26
hrou',h March 1, an epidemic control immunization program
was held on March 6. During the morning of March 6, four
teams comprised of local physicians, using jet injector
guns and measles vaccine from the NCDC epidemic aid
stockpile, visited 16 public and parachial schools.
A total of I .r'', school children (22 percent of school
enrollment) in grades one *hrouih six were immunized;
285 preschool children were immunized in two afternoon
clinics for a total of 1,910 immunized children. A follow-
up clinic is scheduled for March 23. Personnel from the

Figure 5
AGE DISTRIBUTION OF 42 CASES OF MEASLES
12- NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
JANUARY-MARCH 1968


I 2 3 4 5 6


I


F-1


7 8 9 0 1 1 12


AGE
YIEARSI


MARCH 9, 1968


27 3
.JAN
*Ift _


0 17 24 2
FEB
WEEK ENDING


9 16
MAR






Morbidity and Mortali


New Hampshire State Department of Health and Welfare
plan to conduct an immune status survey soon to locate
any other covert susceptibles and to direct future vaccine
distribution.


MARCH 9, 1968


CURRENT TRENDS
MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE 1968


The adjusted incidence rate of meningococcal infec-
tions in the United States for February 1968 (2:23 cases
per 100,000 population) is approximately 48 percent higher
than the rate of 1.51 cases per 100,000 reported in Feb-
ruary 1967 (Figure 6). Of the 735 cases reported to NCDC
during the first 9 weeks of 1968, military cases accounted
8 percent. The West South Central, South Atlantic, and
Middle Atlantic geographic divisions account for 24, 22,
and 15 percent, respectively, of the reported cases.
Of 162 meningococcal strains submitted to NCDC
between January 1 and March 5, 1968, 46 percent were
Serogroup B and 43 percent were Serogroup C. During
1967, Serogroups B and C comprised 66 and 21 percent
of 367 meningococcal isolates submitted to NCDC.
t Of the 1968 group C isolates, 69 have been tested for
sulfonamide sensitivity, and 24 (35 percent) were inhibited
by 1.0 mg. percent or less of sulfadiazine. In 1967, 60
percent of all group C strains were inhibited at similar
concentrations of sulfadiazine.


Figure 6
MONTHLY INCIDENCE OF MENINGOCOCCAL
INFECTIONS UNITED STATES
MEAN MONTHLY RATE
-1- 1960-1966


MONTHLY RATE
S 1966-1967
__ 1967-1968


SEP OCT NOV. DEC JAN FEB MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG.
MONTH
(Continued on page 92)


TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Totals include revised and delayed reports)

10th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 10 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE
March 9, March 10, 1963 1967 MEDIAN
1968 1967 1968 1967 1963 1967
Aseptic meningitis ...................... 28 28 25 265 267 267
Brucellosis ............................ 2 6 5 10 36 38
Diphtheria ............................. 3 3 29 28 38
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .......... 15 22 --- 147 216 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious ........... 11 14 -- 84 106 -
Hepatitis, serum ........................ 85 43901 663 361
Hepatitis, infectious .................... 936 858 8159 7,826 818
Malaria ................................ 54 62 2 465 387 21
Measles rubeolaa) ....................... 699 2,788 12,148 5,557 21,673 83,059
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 100 76 83 835 602 602
Civilian .............................. 86 69 763 555 -
Military ......................... ..... 14 7 -- 72 47 -
Mumps ................................. 7,060 --- --- 49,952 ---
Poliomyelitis, total ..................... 5 9 2 2
Paralytic ............................. 5 9 2 2
Rubella (German measles) ............... 1,305 1,655 8,174 9,055 -
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever.... 12,787 13,838 12.830 114,740 121,045 111,121
Tetanus ............................... 5 3 2 20 29 35
Tularemia ............................ 3 3 15 23 43
Typhoid fever ......................... 8 8 8 38 55 58
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) 2 3 8 6
Rabies in animals ....................... 87 88 86 714 779 730

TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Conn.-l ................. ... .............. 1 Rabies in man: ..................................... -
Botulism: ....................... .................. Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: Md.-1................... 3
Leptospirosis: ...................................... 3 Trichinosis: ................................... ..... 6
Plague: ......................................... Typhus, marine: ...... .............................. 2
Psittacosis: Wis.-l ................................. 6
No report from Oklahoma due to weather conditions; and no report from Arizona


ty Weekly Report 87


(Reported by William M. Prince, M. D., Director, Division
of Communicable Disease, New Hampshire State Department
of Health and Welfare; Sidney Curelop, M. D., Chairman,
Nashua Board of Health; and an EIS (' .. .)






88 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE 11. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
MARCH 9, 1968 and MARCH 11, 1967 (10th WEEK)

ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC HICELA Primary Post-
AREA MENINGITIS including Infectious Serum Infectious MALARIA
unsp. cases
1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968
UNITED STATES... 28 28 2 15 22 11 85 936 858 54

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 1 4 1 2 29 29 1
Maine.............. *4 3
New Hampshire...... 4 1
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts.... 1 1 2 1 1 10 16
Rhode Island ...... 1 1 1 4 3
Connecticut........ 1 7 6 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 1 2 2 4 36 139 130 2
New York City...... 2 4 29 48 44
New York, up-State. 1 2 3 18 43
New Jersey.......... 4 49 19 1
Pennsylvania....... 24 24 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 3 4 1 1 1 157 129 2
Ohio............... 1 1 1 45 34 1
Indiana........... 9 9
Illinois........... 2 2 1 60 53 1
Michigan........... 2 1 1 31 27
Wisconsin.......... 12 6

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 2 1 1 1 54 48
Minnesota........... 2 1 8 15
Iowa ............... 1 22 17
Missouri........... 1 1 16 15
North Dakota....... 1
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska........... 1 1
Kansas............. 6

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 7 4 3 4 6 83 94 36
Delaware........... .- 3 4
Maryland........... 4 1 3 6 13 17 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 2 1
Virginia........... 2 1 6 12 1
West Virginia ...... 4 8
North Carolina..... 5 7 4
South Carolina..... 1
Georgia............. 35 29 28
Florida............ 3 3 15 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 1 1 1 1 68 53
Kentucky........... 1 34 28
Tennessee.......... 1 1 1 20 18 -
Alabama............. 4 7 3
Mississippi......... 7 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 1 2 -1 70 116
Arkansas.............. 5 1 -
Louisiana.......... 1 1 13 8
Oklahoma............ --- -1 --- --- --- 5 -
Texas.............. 1 1 1 52 102

MOUNTAIN............. 2 60 63 5
Montana............. 8 4
Idaho............... 1 2 4
Wyoming............ 2
Colorado........... 31 7 5
New Mexico......... I 2- 4 23 -
Arizona............ --- --- --- --- --- --- --- 15 ---
Utah................ -- 11
Nevada............. -. 4

PACIFIC............... 12 13 4 6 5 38 276 196 8
Washington......... 1 2 2 21 22
Oregon.............. 20 28
California ......... 10 11 4 4 5 38 233 145 8
Alaska............. .. 1
Hawaii............. 1 2

Puerto Rico.......... 12 11


*Delayed Reports: Hepatitis, infectious


Me. 3







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 89


TABLE 111. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 9, 1968 and MARCH 11, 1967 (10th WEEK) CONTINUED


MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, MUMPS POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 699 5,557 21,673 100 835 602 7,060 5 5 9 1,305

NEW ENGLAND.......... 43 252 222 5 41 24 539 202
Maine................ 9 31 2 1 *48 *9
New Hampshire..... 12 41 56 2 1 *33 -
Vermont........... 5 20 1 51 1
Massachusetts..... 18 126 71 5 22 12 287 58
Rhode Island....... 1 2 21 4 47
Connecticut........ 12 69 23 10 10 120 87

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 66 682 715 22 132 78 368 186
New York City...... 11 122 111 12 49 14 105 59
New York, Up-State. 36 380 158 1 10 22 NN 15
New Jersey......... 15 129 197 6 35 31 263 111
Pennsylvania....... 4 51 249 3 38 11 NN 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 178 1,486 1,710 8 78 55 1,448 260
Ohio.............. 8 109 278 2 19 22 49 36
Indiana ............ 23 229 202 10 5 133 16
Illinois........... 61 659 215 4 16 11 141 34
-Michigan........... 11 96 383 1 24 12 553 58
wisconsin.......... 75 393 632 1 9 5 572 116

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 117 940 8 38 30 853 82
Minnesota........... 2 42 6 5 19 4
Iowa................ 1 38 166 3 5 605 57
Missouri....-....... 6 21 2 6 9 103 -- 12
North Dakota....... 3 47 379 1 2 60 5
South Dakota....... 3 35 1 4 4 NN -
Nebraska........... 3 14 297 3 4 6 31 2
Kansas.............. 7 NN 1 13 1 35 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 59 433 2,177 19 182 113 308 83
Delaware............ 2 20 5
Maryland............ 2 32 39 1 11 14 18
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 6 5 20 -
Virginia............ 23 87 585 2 14 11 130 30
West Virginia..... *2 111 458 3 12 100 15
North Carolina..... 7 45 522 2 41 26 NN -
South Carolina..... 2 16 43 3 38 8 3 5
Georgia............ 3 9 11 32 13 -
Florida............ 23 133 495 38 24 55 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 100 2,690 4 62 61 1,807 24
Kentucky........... *- 37 883 2 24 18 *9
Tennessee.......... 1 16 796 1 15 28 1,778 14
Alabama............. 3 22 561 1 12 9 16 1
Mississippi........ 5 25 450 11 6 13 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 201 1,348 7,974 8 185 103 442 4 97
Arkansas........... 1,112 10 8 -
Louisiana.......... 1 39 2 44 42 2 3
Oklahoma............ --- 43 2,401 --- 38 5 --- -- -- -
Texas............... 201 1,304 4,422 6 93 48 440 4 94

MOUNTAIN............. 23 287 1,336 2 10 16 238 24
Montana............ 1 62 170 1 39 2
Idaho............... 3 10 133 2 1 18 3
Wyoming............ 2 30 12 19
Colorado............ 15 97 304 4 7 136 17
New Mexico........ 2 32 202 3 13
Arizona............. --- 53 293 --- 1 2 --- --- --
Utah................ 1 79 1 3 2
Nevada............. 2 143 2 2 2 10 -

PACIFIC............... 113 852 3,909 24 107 122 1,057 5 5 5 347
Washington.......... 23 254 1,992 1 16 8 199 114
Oregon.............. 25 207 486 1 10 10 36 13
California.......... 64 370 1,321 16 73 102 761 **5 **5 5 208
Alaska.............. 64 2 16 4
Hawaii.............. 1 21 46 6 8 45 8

Puerto Rico.......... 20 92 618 12 7 28 1

*Delayed Reports: Measles: W. Va. delete 8, Ky. delete 1
Mumps: Me. 22, N. H. 18
Rubella: Me. 5, Ky. 1
**Poliomyelitis, paralytic: Calif. 5 cases out of state






90 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 9, 1968 and MARCH 11, 1967 (10th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 12,787 5 20 15 8 38 3 87 714

NEW ENGLAND........... 1,959 2 5 17
Maine.............. *73 -- 5 17
New Hampshire...... 41 -
Vermont............ 71
Massachusetts...... 223 1
Rhode Island....... 161 -
Connecticut........ 1,390 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 563 5 1 6 1 7
New York City...... 9 3 4 -
New York, Up-State. 488 2 1 4
New Jersey......... NN -
Pennsylvania....... 66 1 1 1 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,607 2 3 1 5 2 39
Ohio............... 145 1 4 1 20
Indiana............ 275 7
Illinois........... 376 1 1 1 1 4
Michigan........... 506 I1 I 3
Wisconsin.......... 305 1 5

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 718 I 4 2 15 139
Minnesota.......... 28 3 36
Iowa ...... ........ 163 -- 2 33
Missouri........... 11 1 2 2 1 30
North Dakota........ 234 8 28
South Dakota....... 55 I -
Nebraska........... *174 -- 5
Kansas............... 53 -1 -- 1 7

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,029 2 3 4 10 2 10 86
Delaware........... 5
Maryland.......... 267 2 3 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 17 -
Virginia........... 317 1 1 2 5 47
West Virginia...... 231 1 9
North Carolina..... 5 1 2 1 2 2
South Carolina..... 8
Georgia............ 17 1 1 5
Florida........... 162 3 4 21

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2,043 1 2 3 1 7 1 39 250
Kentucky............ 553 1 1 17 110
Tennessee.......... 1,262 2 1 5 22 130
Alabama............ 120 1 10
Mississippi......... 108 1 1 1 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 783 2 3 2 8 129
Arkansas........... 23 1 11
Louisiana.......... 2 2 2 1 18
Oklahoma .......... -- --- -- --1 --- --- 36
Texas.............. 758 1 7 64

MOUNTAIN............. 2,126 2 3 10
Montana........... 74 -
Idaho .............. 186 -
Wyoming............ *298 1
Colorado........... 1,315 1
New Mexico ......... 124 3 4
Arizona........... --- --- --- --- -- --- 5
Utah................ 129 -
Nevada. .. ........ -

PACIFIC............. 1,959 2 5 1 4 4 37
Washington ........ 341
Oregon ............. 205 -
California......... 1,230 2 5 1 4 4 37
Alaska............. 26 -
Hawaii............. 157

Puerto Rico.......... 9 1 6

*Delayed Reports: SST: Me. 25, Neb. 4, Wyo. 140
Tetanus: Md. 1 case 1967








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






TABLE IV. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 9, 1968


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under

Area All 65 years and Area A 65 years and year
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.----------
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass.---..
Fall River, Mass.----
Hartford, Conn.------
Lowell, Mass.-------
Lynn, Mass.---------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.-----
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.-----
Worcester, Mass.-----

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.-------
Camden, N. J.--------
Elizabeth, N. J.-----
Erie, Pa.------- ---
Jersey City, N. J---
Newark,.N. J.-------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.t----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.--------
Cincinnati, Ohio-----
Cleveland, Ohio-----
Columbus, Ohio-------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.-------
Evansville, Ind.-------
Flint, Mich.-----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.-------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.-------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


805
265
43
34
28
65
22
23
36
44
73
16
60
36
60

3,550
53
43
154
49
43
39
93
86
1,813
47
525
197
35
110
21
45
72
53
35
37

2,713
56
36
769
218
224
140
106
348
39
53
49
18
61
159
55
115
34
34
41
110
48

901
53
23
60
144
29
126
74
245
69
78


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


513
157
25
26
20
36
16
16
27
26
50
11
38
23
S42

2,109
33
28
89
19
24
27
57
39
1,114
29
304
103
25
58
13
29
38
33
26
21

1,570
25
18
431
139
118
82
65
194
25
24
28
9
44
96
37
75
14
22
21
72
31

568
39
19
40
87
21
75
45
156
36
50


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-----------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.-----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.-----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.------
Oklahoma City, Okla.--
San Antonio, Tex.-----
Shreveport, La.-------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.--
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah-----------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif*-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


1,255
134
278
49
70
94
59
84
45
105
88
223
26

640
91
40
40
124
133
64
34
114

1,234
53
30
30
170
52
74
251
57
217
78
109
51
62

446
40
24
111
14
120
25
56
56

1,625
21
57
31
56
76
511
92
35
140
50
89
184
33
151
54
45


Total 13,169 7,735 560 563

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 141,833
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 84,887
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 7,951
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 6,117


Week No.
10


659
64
140
18
32
53
36
49
18
82
54
99
14

344
39
22
22
69
65
39
25
63

671
34
16
15
88
28
40
132
28
117
39
68
26
40

287
21
16
70
11
75
17
39
38

1,014
15
36
22
27
55
329
51
30
84
29
50
115
16
88
36
31











MENINGOCOCCAL (Continued from page 87)

Sulfadiazine sensitivity of 196H group B i tolates is
closely following the pattern for 1967. Of 75 group B
isolates, 46 (61 percent) w"ere inhibited by 1.0 mg. per-
cent or less of sulfadiazine. Similarly. 58 percent of 356
strains submitted to NCDC in 1967 were inhibited at the
uame sulfadiazine concentrations.

(Reported by RBaterila! Oisea ses Section and Statistics
Srcition. Epideimiology P1roraim, and Bacterial Reference
Unit and Hucterial S trology Unit. Laboratory Program,
N\

PRELIMINARY SUMMARY
HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS United States 1967


In 1967, a total of 248 cases of brucellosis in 35 states
was reported to NCDC. This is the lowest number of cases
reported since 19471 r',iiur- 7). Iowa reported the highest
number ofeases foran individual state (35 cases). \ ir-n,.,
Texas, and California reported 29, 27, and 21 cases. re-
spectively. Seasonal trends of human brucellosis in 1967.
by date of report. revealed that June was the highest month
with 35 reported cases. The lowest number of cases, 12,
was reported in February. Brucellosis surveillance reports
on 207 of the 248 cases were submitted to the Zoonoses
Surveillance Unit. NCDC. Of these 207 patients, 181 were
males and 107 were packinghouse workers. Probable
sources of infection for the packinghouse workers included
51 exposed to swine, 14 exposed to cattle, 34 exposed to
cattle and swine, 1 exposed to goats or sheep, and 7 wvth
unknown exposure. Of the 207 patients, six patients were
Alaskan Eskimos who were exposed to caribou as the
probable source of infection.


Figure 7
REPORTED HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS
UNITED STATES, 1947-1967*


w
* a .


.:
a
3"
z


. YEAR
YEAR


PRELIMINARY DATA


SOURCE NATIONAL MORBIDITY REPORTS


(Reported by eVeterinary Public Health Section and Sta
tlstics, Se tclio, \C'l C.)

lli7il mifirk^ thr. yi.i r of bchi -h t r^|)ort(-d intu cnid or humiir


MARCH 9. 1968


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA*
TION OF 11.000 IS F$'uP rC- .-T HE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, AT .N r a OP,-
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DSE a E .E TER
SAO-. SENCEA MD
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.. L ~NGMua M D
ACTING CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L, iHEP MN M
EDITOR MICHAEL B GREGOG MD,

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHnEL' a~ :F r.-.'_,. 'rO aE Or iNG
C*0 E*1C *T &rou MCa T L' t ^.,, r : .:.V *.j BLF D'SEASE
:,. r L : r. i a ,- ** u .. ,r .1 T [ F .: ...l T B S. 0.. o case
r..E.r,:-'.v.. WHICH ARE OF CURRENT .-'fE Arf TO HEALTH
CFF-i.L: A~*D WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELA'E'- re0 l.E ICO* TOL
OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS HGIuLa D BE
ADDRESSED TO:
NATIONAL r'.*.m.: bi DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA
ATTN: N! ,T *j:R
M o'- A-nD MORTALITY WEEKLY *EPORT


NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIO-aIL A.D aRE
BASED ON WEEK. TrL ..'. TO THE NCOC BY THE IDI lIDuAL
STATE HEALTH ,'P T TH' ii ftEE" .OkiCLuDEi
ON SATURDAY COMPILEODDATA ON N-" ,T....i.L n... .a RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY







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