Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00184

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


Fs A.L oM CABLE D
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 17, No. 9


WEEKLY

REPORT


Week Ending

March 2, 1968


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


BUREAU OF DISEASE PREVENTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL
1 8


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
POLIOMYELITIS Hidalgo, Texas

Further information on the outbreak of paralytic polio-
myelitis in unimmunized preschool children in Hidalgo
County, Texas (MMWR, Vol. 17, No. 8), has become avail-
able. The ages of the three infants from Pharr were 3
months, 3 months, and 12 months, with onset of sympto
on January 28, February 6, and February 11, respective yyk
Prodromal symptoms were confined to the respiratory t
with accompanying fever; later, extensive flaccid par ii
developed in each-case. One 3-month-old infant dA f
respiratory failure 2 days after onset of symptoms.
polio virus was isolated at the Texas State Departm
Health Laboratory from the stools of the two survi

TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED
(Totals include r4


DISEASE


Aseptic meningitis ................... ...
Brucellosis ............................
Diphtheria.. ................. .........
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ...........
Encephalitis, post-infectious .............
Hepatitis, serum ........................
Hepatitis, infectious ....................
M alaria ...............................
Measles rubeolaa) .......................
Meningococcal infections, total ...........
Civilian .................... .........
Military ............... ...............
Mumps ...............................
Poliomyelitis, total .....................
P aralytic .............................
Rubella (German measles) ..............
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever....
T etanus ...............................
Tularemia ........... ................
Typhoid fever ..........................
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) .
Rabies in animals .......................


MARCH 2.
1968

30
1
14

19
13
58
785
51
736
69
60
9
5,041
1
1
1,221
11,589
2
1
4

70


CONTENTS
Epidemiologic Notes and Reports
Poliomyelitis Hidalgo, Texas .................. 77
Current Trends
Meningococcal Infections United States . .78
Meningococcal Infections Oklahoma. . .78
Measles Arizona . ..... 79
Surveillance Summary
QIaellosis October, November, and December 1967. .79
kn es/j -Noates
r "asures . . 84

patiO an f Ithe nervous tissue of the deceased patient.
Tnitial eo ic tests on the two survivors showed
9Turfold risencomplement fixation titers for Type I;
however, in ase, fourfold rises for Types II and III
also occu eWEeutralization antibody tests and strain
(Continued on page 78)

OS..: UNITED STATES


MARCH 4,
1967

22
5
1

21
19
37
822
62
2,834
62
49
13

1
1
1,209
14,711
1
1
6

inn


MEDIAN
1963 1967

27
4
3



859
3
9,396
79






12,024
3
2
6

R1


CUMULATIVE, FIRST 9 WEEKS
MEDIAN
1968 1967 1963 1967


237
8
29

132
73
578
7.223
411
4;859
735
677
58
42,892
4
4
6,869
101.953
15
15
30
3
R27


239
30
25

194
92
318
6,968
325
18.885
526
486
40

2
2
7,400
107,207
26
20
47
6
A91


239
34
31



7,286
21
70,911
526



2
2

97,449
32
40
47
6
R4R


TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ........................................... Rabies in man: ..................................... -
Botulism: ................................... .. ... Rubella, Congenital Syndrome: Colo.-l ................. 2
Leptospirosis: Hawaii-1 .............................. 3 Trichinosis: ....................................... 6
Plague: ............................................ Typhus, murine: ......... ........................... 2
Psittacosis: ...................................... 5












characterization tests on the Type I viral isolates are
pending.
These three infants resided in the town of Ph.,rr, two
patients lived in adjacent houses and were cousins. The
other infant lived about 15 blocks away and had no known
contact with the other cases. None of the infants had re-
ceived polio vaccine. All are members of lower socio-
economic families.
One additional case of paralytic poliomyelitis was
treated at McAllen General Hospital. McAllen, Hidalgo
County. This 18-month-old infant became symptomatic on
February 3 and developed asymmetric paralysis of three
extremities. Type I polio virus was isolated from a stool


MARCH 2, 1968


specimen. This unimmunized infant has resided in nearby
Reynosa, Mexico, in recent months, and had not traveled
from Reynosa before hospitalization.
Special emergency mass immunization clinics are
being held this week in Pharr to distribute Type I oral
polio vaccine to unimmunized preschool children and other
inadequately immunized persons. Clinics are also being
held in the rest of HliI Iio County tointensify the e-1-ling
trivalent oral polio vaccine programs. An active surveil-
lance program is being carried out.

(Reported by M. S. Dickerson, M.D., Epidemiologist, Texas
State Department of Health; and two EIS Officers.)


CURRENT TRENDS
MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS United States


The number of meningococcal infections reported for
the eighth and ninth weeks of 1968 were 30 percent higher
than for the corresponding weeks of 1967 (Table 1). This
increase is partly due to an increased number of cases
reported from the military.



(Reported by Bacterial Diseases Section, Epidemiology
Program, NCDC).


Table 1
Meningococcal Infections
Week 1967 1968
No. Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total

1 41 1 42 42 1 43
2 68 8 76 67 0 67
3 68 5 73 82 3 85
4 41 3 44 89 10 99
5 49 4 53 115 10 125
6 55 3 58 83 1 84
7 62 2 64 78 4 82
8 53 1 54 61 20 81
9 49 13 62 60 9 69
486 40 526 677 58 735


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS Oklahoma


During the first 31 days of 1968, 28 cases of menin-
gooccal infection including 6 fatalities were reported
from Oklahoma. The absolute number of cases exceeded
the usual number for January (Table 2).

Table 2
Meningococcal Infection in Oklahoma
for January 1963-1968
Year Number of Cases in January
1963 7
196 4 2
1965 7
196 6 0
1967 2
196h 28

Of the 28 cases, 23 patients were age 15 years or
less; 15 patients were male and 13 were female. Three
family outbreaks were recorded. In each of two families,
two children were effected, and in a third family with


seven children, there were three cases including one
death. The remaining 21 cases had no known contact with
another case of meningococcal infection.
On January 17, cultures were taken on 50 children
who attended a school where one of the confirmed cases
was enrolled. Only 3 (6 percent) of these 50 students
were found to be carriers of Neeisseria *-, .' i;, .
Serogrouping of V. meningitidis isolates from 19 of
the 2S cases revealed 13 to be Group B and 6 to be Group C.
Tube dilution sensitivities were performed on 15 isolates;
five of these strains were inhibited by a concentration
of sulfadiazine of 1 mg. percent or less.
(Reported by L arry Chitwood, Ph.D.. Pediatrics Infectious
Disease Laboratory, and Robert C. Bowers, M.D., Resi-
dent, P.M. and P.tl., University of Oklahoma Medical
Center; William Schmieding, Ph.D., Director, Laboratory
Division, and R. LeRoy Carpenter, M.D., Director, Divi-
-son ofEpidemioloyy, OklahomaState Department of Health;
and an EIS Officer.)


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


POLIOMYELITIS (Continued from front page)






MARCH 2, 1968


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


MEASLES Arizona


During the past 8 years, 1960-1967, Arizona recorded
44,593 cases of measles and 79 deaths attributed to mea-
sles (Tables 3 and 4). In 1967, a low incidence year for
measles in Arizona, three of the 79 deaths occurred. The
cumulative number of cases reported for the first 9 weeks
of 1968 is 53 cases compared with 226 cases for the similar
period in 1967.
Age, race, and sex distribution for the 79 deaths are
presented in Table 4. Of the deaths, 90 percent were in
children under 5 years of age. Although Indians comprise
only 6 percent of the 1960 Arizona population, race dis-
tribution showed 61 percent of the deaths among Indians;
37 percent of the deaths were among whites and 2 percent
of the deaths were among the other races. Deaths were


Table 3
Reported Cases of Measles in Arizona, 1960-1967
Year Number of Cases Year Number of Cases
1960 4,863 1964 6,767
1961 8,570 1965 1,593
1962 6,305 1966 5,396
1963 10,033 1967 1,066
more prevalent among females (56 percent) than among
males (44 percent). Pneumonia was recorded on 67 (85
percent) of the death certificates.
(Reported by Melvin H. Goodwin, Jr., Ph.D., Director,
Division of Preventive Medical Services, Arizona State
Department of Health.)


Table 4
Measles Deaths in Arizona by Age, Race and Sex, 1960-1967
Age Group White Indian Other All Races
(years) Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total
Under 5 10 14 24 19 26 45 2 0 2 31 40 71
5 & older 2 3 5 2 1 3 0 0 0 4 4 8
All ages 12 17 29 21 27 48 2 0 2 35 44 79


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SALMONELLOSIS October, November, and December 1967


For the months of October, November, and December
1967, the total numbers of salmonellae isolations from
humans were 1,667, 1,805, and 1,366, respectively. The
weekly averages for the 3 months ( 417,361, and 342) dem-
onstrate the expected seasonal pattern (Figure 1). In
Table 5, the seven most frequently reported serotypes
from human sources are listed.
In October, reports from 29 states and regional labo-
ratories of the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported


472 nonhuman isolations represented by 54 serotypes. The
total number of nonhuman isolations increased to 943 in
November representing 75 different serotypes. In Decem-
ber, the nonhuman isolations decreased to 797 isolations
with 60 different serotypes. The seven most commonly
reported nonhuman serotypes are listed in Table 6.


(See page 84 for Tables 5 and 6)


Figure 1
REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLAE IN THE UNITED STATES


J F M A M J J A S N D
1963


J F M A M J J A S N DJFMAMJ JA SO'ND F M A M JJA SOUND
1964 1965 1966


J F M A M J J AS N D
1967


v'\/\


\".,A


V


/A-


vll**







80 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
MARCH 2,1968 and MARCH 4, 1967 (9th WEEK)


ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
ASEPTIC Primary
ARAMEIGII OPHTHIA Primary Post- MALARIA
AREA MENINGITIS R Lncluding nfectious Seru Infecious MAARIA
unsp. cases
1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1967 1968
UNITED STATES... 30 22 1 14 19 21 13 58 785 822 51

NEW ENGLAND.......... 5 1 25 31
Maine............ 1 *2 3
New Hampshire..... -
Vermont............ 2
Massachusetts....... 1 10 20
Rhode Island......... 2 1 11 2
Connecticut........ 1 2 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 4 1 4 3 2 17 129 147 5
New York City...... 1 4 1 9 30 41
New York, up-State. 2 1 *- 2 26 31
New Jersey.......... 5 35 26 4
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 2 1 38 49 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 1 5 1 3 161 125 1
Ohio................ 2 1 1 1 59 17
Indiana .......... 1 8 27
Illinois............ 2 42 25 1
Michigan........... 1 3 3 31 44
Wisconsin........... 21 12

WEST NORTH CENTRAL. .. 1 1 1 1 66 59
Minnesota.......... 1 1 14 8
Iowa............... 1 9 8
Missouri........... 37 42
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... 1
Nebraska............. .- 2
Kansas............. 4 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 4 2 2 1 2 1 4 67 64 17
Delaware............ 1 2
Maryland........... 1 1 2 *13 20 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 4 1
Virginia............. 1 1 7 7
West Virginia ...... 1 1 -
North Carolina ..... 1 7 11 7
South Carolina..... 2
Georgia............ 2 1 10 7 9
Florida............ 1 14 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1 1 58 70 1
Kentucky........... 17 40 *-
Tennessee .......... 1 31 17
Alabama............. 1 3 6
Mississippi.......... 7 7 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1 3 12 3 2 1 71 90 2
Arkansas........... 11 8
Louisiana.......... 2 2 I' 2
Oklahoma ........... 1 -1 i Ii
Texas............... 1 2 *12 1 3

MOUNTAIN............. 1 1 1 Ir.
Montana..... ......
Idaho................ *1
Wyoming............ 1 I
Colorado............. 1 *1 3 -
New Mexico.........
Arizona............ .
Utah............... .
Nevada .............

PACIFIC .............. 16 13 5 7 6 32 i1r : 1
Washington.......... I 1 1 1 h
Oregon............. 2 1 I 3. 1
California......... 10 10 3 7 6 32 1-' lih 1
Alaska .............
Hawaii............. 3 2 1 3

Puert, Ric ....... .

*Delayed Reports: Diphtheria: Tex. 12
Encephalitis, primary: Colo. 2 cases 1967
Encephalitis, post-infectious: N.Y. Upstate I case 1967
Hepatitis, serum: Ida. 1
Hepatitis, infectious: Me. 1, Md. 5 cases 1967, Colo. 31 cases 1967
Malaria: Ky. delete 1 case 1967, Colo. 10 cases 1967







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 81


TABLE 111. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 2, 1968 and MARCH 4, 1967 (9th WEEK) CONTINUED


MEASLES (Rubeola) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, MUMPS POLIOMYELITIS RUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA Cumulative Cumulative Total Paralytic
Cum.
1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1967 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 736 4,859 18,885 69 735 526 5,041 1 1 4 1,221

NEW ENGLAND........... 22 209 202 1 36 18 170 144
Maine.............. *2 9 24 2 1 *38 *24
New Hampshire...... *1 29 52 2 1 9 3
Vermont ............ 5 20 1 23 5
Massachusetts...... 12 108 66 1 17 6 57
Rhode Island....... 1 20 4 21 -
Connecticut........ 7 57 20 10 10 79 55

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 143 616 638 19 110 70 213 123
New York City...... 20 111 98 7 37 12 103 53
New York, Up-State. 95 344 1154 3 9 20 NN 23
New Jersey.......... *26 114 172 3 29 29 110 46
Pennsylvania....... 2 47 214 6 35 9 NN 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 169 1,308 1,496 4 70 48 1,799 257
Ohio............... 3 101 244 17 17 71 42
Indiana............. 40 206 189 10 5 185 35
Illinois............ 72 598 174 1 12 9 213 38
Michigan........... 15 85 324 1 23 12 772 71
Wisconsin.......... 39 318 565 2 8 5 558 71

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 110 806 1 30 27 612 109
Minnesota.......... 2 29 1 6 5 66 4
Iowa............... 37 155 3 3 399 85
Missouri........... 6 15 4 8 23 *- *- 2
North Dakota....... 3 44 298 1 32 9
South Dakota....... 3 16 3 4 NN -
Nebraska........... 1 11 293 1 6 15 -
Kansas............. 7 NN 12 1 77 9

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 50 374 1,846 13 163 104 231 66
Delaware............ 2 2 16 4 12 2
Maryland ........... 2 30 37 1 10 14 23 13
Dist. of Columbia.. 4 6 2 5 9 -
Virginia........... 6 64 470 12 11 31 16
West Virginia...... 30 109 412 3 11 89 13
North Carolina..... 1 38 446 5 39 25 NN -
South Carolina..... 1 14 30 2 35 7 7 8
Georgia............. 1 3 9 2 21 11
Florida............ 7 110 420 1 38 21 60 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 92 2,397 6 58 57 760 81
Kentucky............ *3 38 846 4 22 16 *549 17
Tennessee.......... 15 732 14 26 178 33
Alabama............ 19 386 2 11 9 30 31
Mississippi........ 1 20 433 11 6 3 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 189 1,147 6,984 8 177 87 446 1 1 4 66
Arkansas........... 1,100 1 10 4 1 -
Louisiana.......... 1 30 1 42 36 1 3
Oklahoma............ *1 43 2,100 3 38 4 1 7
Texas............... 188 1,103 3,754 3 87 43 443 *1 *1 4 56

MOUNTAIN ............. 87 264 1,117 2 8 13 334 111
Montana............ 52 61 167 1 6 4
Idaho............... 7 126 2 1 36 -*-
Wyoming............. 2 28 12 33 1
Colorado............ *11 82 226 2 4 6 111 38
New Mexico......... 7 30 176 3 60 6
Arizona............. 15 53 226 1 1 59 45
Utah................ 1 61 1 29 17
Nevada.............. 2 123 -

PACIFIC.............. 68 739 3,399 15 83 102 476 264
Washington.......... 26 231 1,761 3 15 7 156
Oregon.............. 19 182 448 4 9 10 19 12
California.......... 23 306 1,086 8 57 83 449 83
Alaska.............. 59 2 8 3
Hawaii.............. 20 45 2 10

Puerto Rico.......... 17 72 503 6 12 7 13 1

*Delayed Reports: Measles: Me. 1, N.H. 1, N.J. r, Ky. delete 4, Okla. delete 5, Colo. 136 cases 1967
Mumps: Me. 25, Ky. 303
Poliomyelitis paralytic: Mo. 1 case 1967, Tex. 1
Rubella: Me. 7, Okla. 5, Ida. delete 1







82 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE Il. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 2, 1968 and MARCH 4, 1967 (9th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Gum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968 1968
UNITED STATES... 11,589 2 15 1 15 4 30 3 70 627

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,679 2 1 12
Maine.............. *18 1 12
New Hampshire ...... 34
Vermont ..... ...... 49 -
Massachusetts...... 286 1
Rhode Island....... 109 -
Connecticut........ 1,183 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 629 5 5 2 6
New York City...... 34 3 4 -
New York, Up-State. 505 2 1 1 4
New Jersey ........ NN -
Pennsylvania....... 90 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,460 2 1 3 4 2 37
Ohio............... 282 1 1 4 1 19
Indiana............. 322 1 7
Illinois........... 306 1 1 4
Michigan........... 309 1 I I 3
Wisconsin.......... 241 4

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 458 1 4 2 13 124
Minnesota.......... 24 6 33
Iowa................ 265 3 31
Missouri........... 11 1 2 2 2 29
North Dakota....... 93 1 20
South Dakota....... 45 1 -
Nebraska........... 3 5
Kansas............. 17 1 1 6

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,187 1 2 3 2 6 2 9 76
Delaware ........... 7 -
Maryland........... *380 1 1 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 11 -
Virginia........... 329 1 1 2 7 42
West Virginia...... 236 8
North Carolina..... 33 1 1 2 1 2
South Carolina..... 10 -
Georgia............. 16 1 1 5
Florida............. 165 2 2 1 17

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,841 I 3 2 6 1 29 211
Kentucky........... 93 I 1 1 17 93
Tennessee.......... 1,377 2 4 10 108
Alabama............ 210 1 2 10
Mississippi........ 161 1 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,036 I 2 11 121
Arkansas........... 23 1 10
Louisiana.......... 4 1 2 18
Oklahoma........... 103 1 3 36
Texas.............. 906 I 5 57

MOUNTAIN............... 2,197 2 1 7
Montana ............ 52 -
Idaho............... *356 -
Wyoming............ *354 *1 1
Colorado........... *879 1 -
New Mexico......... 305 1
Arizona............. 107 5
Utah............. .. 124 1 -
Nevada ............. 20 -

PACIFIC .............. 1,102 1 3 3 2 33
Washington ........ 380 -
Oregon .............. 214 -
California......... 392 1 3 3 2 33
Alaska............. 34 -
Hawaii............. 82 -

Puerto Rico.......... 5 2 5

*Delayed Reports: SST: Me. 3, Md. 66 cases 1967, Ida. 233, Wyo. 211, Colo. 715 cases 1967
Rk. Mt. Sp. Fever: Colo. 1 case 1967
Rabies in Animals: Wyo. 1








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






TABLE IV. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 2, 1968


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and year Area All 65 years and I year
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.-------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.---------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.-------
Erie, Pa.------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. 3.--------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.----
Pittsburgh, Pa.------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.-----
Schenectady, N. Y.---
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio-----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich;---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


737
240
48
29
35
51
30
24
26
52
53
14
45
28
62

3,710
52
43
162
42
33
44
83
100
1,943
41
512
227
53
101
27
60
74
48
36
29

2,827
78
36
823
208
224
132
90
371
49
53
44
12
57
173
32
141
51
22
46
130
55

914
76
22
28
153
45
133
53
287
74
43


462
131
34
21
22
31
18
16
19
32
33
11
29
12
53

2,208
29
25
100
22
18
29
51
32
1,165
25
290
128
39
70
20
42
41
31
31
20

1,619
42
23
461
138
124
71
55
193
29
28
23
8
39
95
12
88
24
12
33
82
39

608
50
21
16
106
33
87
34
187
52
22


47
25
3

1

2
1

2
3
1
4

5

159
3
2
2
2
1
3
9
13
81
5
4
8
6
4
2
6
1
4
1
2

104

7
41
12
3
3
1
6
2
1
3
2
6
2

3
2
1
3
5
1

35
3
1
6
1
3
2
2
10
4
3


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-------
Baton Rouge, La.------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.--------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.----------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,415
122
319
66
114
114
65
96
55
94
105
204
61

766
114
61
51
140
179
51
64
106

1,311
28
32
40
172
48
85
277
60
175
97
134
62
101

509
42
29
158
18
115
29
56
62

1,865
28
49
34
57
77
575
117
57
140
67
104
224
46
168
54
68


791
63
171
34
74
71
35
44
33
70
64
98
34

415
55
34
31
84
97
26
34
54

720
22
19
20
91
34
48
136
40
83
54
85
35
53

283
19
16
94
13
62
19
27
33

1,173
20
23
23
35
54
360
73
33
94
48
61
122
27
112
41
47


Total 14,054 8,279 598 665

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages -------------------------128,661
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 77,149
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 7,394
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 5,56


Week No.
9











SALMONELLOSIS (' ii ued from ,p~ie 79)

Table 5
Summary of Seven Most Frequently Reported Serotypes
from Humans for October, November, and December 1967

wSrot yp Rank Number Percent

S. ,ity /smuTi and S. t'p i
r iuI c' C iIpen! ed 5 1 1,421 29. I
S. n ,rt *2 332 6.9
S3 :12h 6.S
S. Srid iihr 4 327 6.S
S. E ii-y pit0 5 291 6.0
S. i,6 264 5.5
S. typli 7 109 2.3
Total 3,072 63.5

Total all serotype, 4.a3h 100.0


Table 6
Summary of Seven Most Frequently Reported Serotypes
from Nonhumans for October, November, and December 1967

Serot ypes Rank Number Percent

S. typ/fii-murium and typhi-
m murium rr. cope4nhagen 1 261 11.8
S;. iiiitu *2 177 8.O
S. infantri 3 149 6.7
S, Iriditelir 4 119 5.4
S. orinirnb!urij 5 86 3.9
S. saint-paul 6 83 3.8
S. rim 4bu)tsl, e 7 62 2.8
Total 937. 42.4

Total all serotypes 2,212 100.0


(Reported by the Salmonellosis Unit, Bacterial Diseases
Section. Epidemiology Program, \NC'C.)


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
QUARANTINE MEASURES


Aidditir nal lmnmuinization Information for International
Trarcl. 1967-681 edition, Publicl Health Serevice
I'ublication ,o. 384


AFRICA
Central African Republic Page 27
I under yellow fe(ver, delete all previous information.

Niger.a Page 32
Delortc all information concerning cholera.

Somaliland (French) Page 34
Delete Somaliland (French), and inert: French Territory
of thI Afarr and the Issla (formerly Somaliland. French).
Note : The mallpox and cholera immunization requirements
rmaiu n the same: howav,-r. under yellow fever, after the
words 1 yeoar of age and o\er, add: No certificate required
on arrival at Jibuti.


MARCH 2. 1968


THE '.. AND MORTALITY WEEKLv REPORT. WITH A CIRCUl. A
TION .. S '*L ..t -' "RE NATIONAL COMMON CABLE
DISEASE CENTER AT- .. :A
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVIo. r*.'fA M,D,
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A.O.- M0D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L, "'.'-' M.S
EDITOR MICHAEL B GREG. MD

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCE -. .. .'.
* *AND MORTALITY THE t .-.. ..:* '. LE D'. tF
r -ELCOMES ACCOUNTSOF r .' i. '-.--. : *.
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST 'C' TIL .-
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE :'Sr.:.L
OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS :-*.*. L.L rF
ADDRESSED TO:
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISSEA CENTER
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333
ATTN: THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT


NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC 5B INL,* C ,'
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS THE REPORTING -r .. .r .r
ON SATURDAY COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED
ON THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY





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