Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00169

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Fji~ i-j.


NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 18, No. 14

WEEKLY

REPORT

For
Week Ending
April 5, 1969


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE / PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE HEALTH SERVICES AND MENTAL HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
DATE OF RELEASE: APRIL 11, 1969 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
BOTULISM Torront County, Texas

On March 31, 1969, in Tarrant County, a 25-year-old
man developed an illness characterized by dizziness and
vertigo followed within 8 hours by blurred vision, diplopia,
and dysphagia. By the following morning generalized
weakness and progressive respiratory distress ensued
and he was hospitalized. He remained afebrile and alert.
On April 2 he was transferred to the intensive care unit of
a hospital in Dallas where tracheal intubation and assisted
ventilation were required. On April 4 a tracheostomy with
controlled ventilation was necessary. A repeat lumbar
puncture showed normal cerebrospinal fluid. His pupils
were dilated and reacted sluggishly to light. There was
complete ophthalmoplegia and lingual and pharyngeal


CONTENTS
Epidemiologic Notes and Roeorts
Botulism -- Tarrant County, Texas ............... 1 13
Summary of Reported Cases of Infectious S .phih,- ...... it4
Surveillance Summary
Human Brucello -si United States 196r .. .......... Ill
International Notes
Bolivian Hemorrh gic Fever La C:youba. BoUvi, ... IO


TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED Sl4C'
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
14th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 14 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE April 5, April 6. 1964 1968 MEDIAN
1969 1968 1969 1968 1964 1968
Aseptic meningitis ...................... 16 31 29 393 386 390
Brucellosis ............................ 3 3 4 26 26 53
Diphtheria............................... 2 5 4 40 42 42
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified ........... 13 22 28 271 210 335
Encephalitis, post-infectious ............. 3 8 21 67 123 194
Hepatitis, serum ...................... 109 96 1,409 1.011
Hepatitis, infectious ................... .910 937 12,793 11729 11.568
Malaria ................................ 30 35 6 633 622 81
Measles rubeolaa) ....................... 752 917 7.572 7.590 8,933 101,805
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 87 71 71 1,161 1.080 1,080
Civilian ............................. 77 64 1,076 981 -
Military ............................... 10 7 85 99
Mumps ................................. 2,539 4.950 33.682 71,045 -
Poliomyelitis, total ...................... 1 14 6
Paralytic ........................... ..- 1 14 5
Rubella (German measles) .............. 1,998 2,493 15,994 16.756
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever... 10.406 10.830 11,553 162.774 160.833 160,833
Tetanus ............................... 2 1 1 25 27 41
Tularemia .............................. 1 24 18 50
Typhoid fever .......................... 4 9 8 51 65 82
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky. Mt. spotted fever) .- 1 4 6
Rabies in animals .......................85 74 110 1 016 1.040 1.185

TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: .................. ........................ Rabies in man: .............. .................... -
Botulism: ............... .......................... 2 Rubella congenital syndrome: .............. .. ....... 2
Leptospirosis: ..................................... 11 Trichinosis: Ind.-l, Ohio-1 ................... ....... 22
P league: .............................. ............ T yphus. m urine: .................................... 3
Psittacosis: N. Mex.-1 .............................. 7
Data exclude report from Alaska.


i/w


4'











BOTULISM (Continued from front page)


when type A botulism toxin was demonstrated in the pa-
tient's serum using the mouse protection test. Serum taken Editor's Note:
from the patient 18 hours after treatment no longer con-
tained demonstrable botulism toxin. The patient expired The sour(
on April 9. covered. The F
(Reported by G. J. Vakkur, M.D., Attending Physician; home-canned
Staff, Tarrant County Health Department; M. S. Dickerson, demiologic ins
M.D., Chief, Division of Preventable Disease Control, state health d
Texas Department of Health; Anaerobic Bacteriology Lab- cians and publ
oratory, Bacterial Reference Unit, Laboratory Division, for any other c
NCDC; and an EIS Officer.)


SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS
CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Areas March 1969 and March 1968 Proviional Data
Cumulative Cuailative
Reporting Area March Jan-Mar Reporting Area March Jan-Mar
1969 1968 1969 1968 1969 1968 1969 1968
NEW ENCLAND.............. 26 26 79 91 AST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 104 145 290 366
Maine.................. 1 1 1 Kentucky................. 20 7 59 28
Ne Hampshire........... 1 1 Tennessee............... 30 26 100 77
Vermont................ Alabamn.................. 14 79 49 176
Massachusetts........... 12 9 44 57 Mississippl.............. 40 33 82 85
Rhode Island............ 5 9 11 13
Connecticut............. 8 7 22 20 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 326 323 862 867
Arkansas................. 15 14 34 35
MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 369 230 964 784 Louisiana................ 71 80 171 202
Upstate NHe York....... 15 16 73 49 Oklahoma................. 4 4 16 18
New York City........... 271 145 670 482 Texas.................... 236 225 641 612
Pa. (Excl. Phila.)...... 12 ,;22 42 68
Philadelphia....... ... 20 20 50 75 MOUNTAIN.................. 43 42 146 130
New Jersey.............. 51 27 129 110 Montana.................. 1 2
Idaho................... 1 2
EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 216 256 630 802 Wyoming.................. 1 3 -
Ohio.................... 34 53 99 143 Colorado................ 6 2 17 7
Indiana................. 30 22 89 68 Ne Mexico.............. 23 13 66 34
Downstate Illinois...... 14 9 68 44 Arizona................ 8 20 48 70
Chicago................. 75 89 212 280 Utah.......... ..... -
Michigan............... 63 80 161 262 Nevada.................. 5 6 11 15
Wisconsin............... 3 1 5
PACIFIC................... 157 176 467 403
WEST NORTH CENTRAL ...... 30 42 82 86 Washington .............. 3 2 10 8
Minnesota............... 2 7 7 13 Oregon.................. 3 3 13 8
IonU................. 3 2 12 4 California............... 151 170 444 384
Missouri................ 16 24 45 47 Alask..................- -
North Dakota............. 2 3 Hawaii................... 1 3
South Dakota............. 2 6 4 10
Nebraska................ 4 7 8 U. TOTAL............... 1,648 1,723 4,741 4,889
Kansas................. 3 4 4_-__
Kan .RRITORIES............. 107 111 307 262
SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 377 483 1,221 1.360 Puerto Rico.............. 107 106 304 238
Delaware......... ..... 1 4 4 9 Virgin Islands........... 5 3 24
Maryland................. 27 41 112 129
District of Columbia..... 53 62 131 180
Virginia................. 16 24 58 58
West Virginia............ 1 4 2 12
North Carolna.......... 49 67 134 184 Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
South Carolina.......... 39 53 153 150 through previous months.
Georgia.... .......... 76 71 245 203
Florida ................. 115 157 382 435


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS United States 1968*


In 1968, a total of 231 human cases of brucellosis
were reported to the NCDC. a decrease from the 248 cases
reported in 1967 (NIMWR, Vol. 17, No. 10) (Figure 1). In
1968. 34 states reported one or more cases with six states
(California, Georgia, Iowa, North Dakota, Tennessee,
Texas. and Virginia) recording 71 percent of the cases.
The greatest increase in cases over 1967 occurred in
Virginia with the largest decrease in Texas (Table 1). In
1968, more cases, 30, occurred in June than in any other
month with the fewest cases, 4, occurring in November
(Figure 2). This distribution is similar to that of 1967 when
more cases, 35. occurred in June than in any other month,
hut the fewest cases, 12. occurred in February.


Brucellosis surveillance reports on 187 of the 231
cases were submitted to the Zoonoses Surveillance Unit,
NCDC. Of the 187 cases, 158 were males, and 131 of the
158 were between 20 and 60 years of age (Table 2). Of
the 158 males, 105 were packinghouse workers. In 73
cases among the male packinghouse workers (70 percent),
swine were listed as the most probable source of infec-
tion, while only nine workers (9 percent) were exposed to
cattle as the single most probable source. Of the total 187
cattle, 81 listed swine as the most likely source, 25 listed
cattle only, 21 noted cattle and swine, and 25 noted dairy
products. Of 75 persons on whom blood cultures were per-
formed, 42 had cultures positive for a Brucella species.


114


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


APRIL 5, 1969


ce of the type A toxin has not been dis-
atient and his wife denied any ingestion of
foods. The case is under intensive epi-
vestigation by officials of the local and
apartments. It would behoove all physi-
ic health officials in the area to be alert
ases compatible with botulism.













Figure 1
SEASONAL TREND OF REPORTED HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS
35, BY DATE OF ONSET,* 1968


Toble 1
Reported Human Brucellosis


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
MONTH OF ONSET
* IF MONTH OF ONSET WAS NOT GIVEN. MONTH OF POSITIVE LABORATORY
RESULTS OR THE MONTH REPORTED WAS USED OUT OF 187 REPORTS,
I WAS COMPLETELY UNKNOWN AND IS NOT REFLECTED IN THE FIGURE


Figure 2
REPORTED HUMAN BRUCELLOSIS
UNITED STATES 1949-1968


949 50 51 '52 53 54 55 56 '57


58 '59 60 61 62 63 64 '65
YEAR


* PROVISIONAL DATA


Table 2
Cases of Human Brucellosis by Age and Sex 1968

AGE GROUP SEX TOTAL PERCENT OF TOTAL
(Years) MALE FEMALE

0-4 1 0 1 0.5
5-9 2 2 4 2.1
10-14 7 0 7 3.7
15-19 6 1 7 3.7
20-24 21 25 13.4
25-29 29 2 31 16.6
30-34 18 5 23 12.3
35-39 21 3 24 12.8
40-44 9 5 14 7.5
45-49 15 3 18 9.6
50-54 8 0 8 4.3
55-59 10 1 11 5.9
60-64 3 0 3 16
60+ 4 1 5 2.7
Unknown 4 2 6 3.2
Total 158 29 187 99.9


STATE



Alabama
Alaska
Ar zona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

TOTALS

+Provisional data


FIVE YEAR
MEAN
1963-1967


3.0
1.2
2.0
6.2
18.6
0.8
0.8
0.0
4.0
11.2
1.4
1.6
18.4
2.4
85.2
5.6
3.2
6.4
0.4
0.8
2.2
4.2
10.6
5.2
10.4
0.4
8.4
0.0
0.0
1.4
1.0
5.0
3.6
1.6
1.8
8.4
2.0
4.0
0.2
0.0
9.8
7.8
21.2
6.4
0.4
20.6
0.6
0.8
7.8
0.4

6.4


COMPARISON
OF NUMBERS
OF CASES
REPORTED IN
1968 WITH 1967

-1
-4
0
-2
-2
-1
-1
0
-2
+6
-3
-1
-4
-1
-9
+2
-4
+2
+1
-2
+3
-6
-8
-3
-6
0
-5
0
0
+2
-1
+1
-1
+8
0
-4
-3
-7
0
0
+3
+6
-17
+1
0
+35
0
0
+1
0

-27


*One case with onset and recrudescence in 1968 counted as two cases.




The distribution of total cases with exposure to -wine (43
percent) and cattle (13 percent) was generally reflected in
the distribution of human isolates of Br. suvis (4h percent)
and Br. abortus (17 percent). In the 169 cases %where symp-
toms were recorded, feN er, chills, and malaise predominated.


I Reported by the Veterinary Public Health Sectiton, and
Statistics Section, Epidemiology Programn, .C('C.


*Prelimin arv data.


APRIL 5, 1969


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report








116 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 5, 1969 AND APRIL 6, 1968 (14th WEEK)


ASEPTIC ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
MENIN- BRUCEL- DIPIITHHIA Primary including Pt- MALARIA
LOSIS Serum Infectious
AREA GITIS LOI unsp. cases o Serum Infectious
Cum.
1969 1969 1969 1969 1968 1969 1969 1969 1968 1969 1969
UNITED STATES... 16 3 2 13 22 3 109 910 937 30 633

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 2 71 33 31
Maine. ............* 1 2 -
New Hampshire...... 2 2
Vermont............ 4
Massachusetts...... 38 9 25
Rhode Island....... 1 19 14
Connecticut........ 2 7 8 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 4 1 16 44 154 141 1 68
New York City...... 1 10 19 57 47 4
New York, up-State. 2 20 26 13
New Jersey ....... 3 1 1 21 4 37 1 27
Pennsylvania....... 5 2 73 31 24

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 6 2 1 12 152 137 6 46
Ohio................ 5 3 34 33 3 7
Indiana............. 1 14 7 3
Illinois........... 1 2 1 1 42 44 19
Michigan............ 8 52 40 3 16
Wisconsin.......... 1 10 13 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 2 1 1 23 67 2 45
Minnesota.......... 1 1- 1 21 3
Iowa.......... ... 1 7 22 4
Missouri........... 5 22 1 12
North Dakota...... 1 2
South Dakota....... 1 -
Nebraska........... 3
Kansas............. 1 1 8 1 1 21

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1 1 1 2 1 3 133 86 14 211
Delaware........... 2 5 1
Maryland.......... 1 18 22 5
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 2 2 -
Virginia ........... 15 4 10
West Virginia...... -- 10 8 -8
North Carolina..... 11 11 111
South Carolina..... 1 9 1 1 19
Georgia............ 43 29 2 52
Florida............ 1 1 1 3 23 15 13

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 1 1 63 58 22
Kentucky ........... 1 16 14 17
Tennessee.......... 1 1 14 32 -
Alabama.*........... 20 4 5
Mississippi........ 13 8

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 2 1 2 60 67 1 19
Arkansas............ 4 2 1 5
Louisiana.......... 2 1 2 17 8 12
Oklahoma............ 8 3 2
Texas.............. 2 31 54 -

MOUNTAIN............. 1 37 77 2 44
Montana............ 2 13 -
Idaho............... 1 1
Wyoming ... .......... -
Colorado............ 40 1 39
New Mexico......... 15 8 2
Arizona............ 1 9 9 1
Utah............... 5 3 1 1
Nevada............. 6 3 -

PACIFIC.............. 5 1 46 217 271 4 147
Washington......... 1 33 19 5
Oregon............. 1 13 21 5
California......... 4 1 44 169 229 4 126
Alaska............. --- --- --- --- --- --- --- 2 ---
Hawaii............. 1 2 11

Puerto Rico......... 12 11 1


* Delayed reports: Hepatitis, serum: N.J. delete 3
Hepatitis, infectious: Me. 1, N.J.


delete 5, Ala. 3







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 117


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: IINITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
APRIL 5, 1969 AND APRIL 6, 1968 (14th WEEK) CONTINUED



MEASLES (Rubl la) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, Mlt P PO.IOMYELITI RIUBELLA
TOTAL
AREA Tot. ii iralyv i
Cumulattive Cumulative r avt


UNITED STATES... 752 7,590 8,933 87 1,161 1,080 2,539 1 1,998

NEW ENGLAND........... 27 332 342 2 33 53 329 155
Maine.............. 2 13 1 2 24 5
New Hampshire. .... 70 53 6 -
Vermont ............ 1 1 55 3
Massachusetts...... 6 67 127 16 26 107 -85
Rhde Is and. ...... 9 1 1 4 4 40 27
Connect 'ut ........ 21 183 148 1 12 14 103 35

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 288 2,309 1,283 11 142 169 103 90
New York City...... 213 1,614 328 3 31 32 88 45
New York, Up-State. 18 220 663 2 21 27 NN 28
New Jerse......... 22 247 236 3 49 63 15 17
Pennsylvania ....... 35 228 56 3 41 47 NN

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 84 851 2,065 17 142 113 771 457
Ohio............... 6 96 162 6 45 27 72 46
Indiana............ 28 248 328 2 22 17 129 207
Illinois........... 10 154 854 6 27 27 86 41
Michigan.... .. 7 86 135 2 39 30 237 20
Wisconsin ... ... 33 267 586 1 9 12 247 143

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 16 236 204 4 61 48 246 156
Minnesota.......... 1 6 1 10 12 84 6
Iowa............... 134 40 1 9 3 145 106
Missouri......... 11 59 22 10 2
North Dakota....... 5 65 2 12 15
South Dakota ...... 3 4 NN -
Nebraska ........... 16 85 24 1 7 4 3 22
Kansas........... 7 1 13 13 2 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 142 1,304 786 18 217 238 157 343
Delaware........... 34 99 7 3 2 1 12
Maryland ........... 11 41 18 15 15 18
Dist. of Columbia.. 5 1 4 9 5
Virginia.......... 47 507 151 29 16 25 53
West Virginia...... 13 127 140 2 12 6 59 91
North Carolina..... 25 116 202 2 31 53 NN -
South Carolina..... 13 63 8 2 34 44 29 57
Georgia........... 1 3 2 30 45 -
Florida........... 10 380 229 9 56 48 28 107

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 46 214 8 62 89 146 127
Kentuky................ 1 20 64 5 20 32 81 39
Tennessee.......... 11 43 2 27 28 65 81
Alabama .............. 40 1 9 14 1
Mississippi........ 15 67 6 15 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 133 1,846 2,276 9 159 220 290 1 239
Arkansas ........... 2 2 19 12 -
Louisiana. ......... 2 53 1 4 42 55 -
Oklahoma............ 105 100 1 10 43 10 92
Texas .............. 131 1,686 2,175 2 88 110 280 1 147

MOUNTAIN ............. 19 182 425 29 13 197 98
Montana............ 3 54 4 1 17 1
Idaho................ 36 11 5 2 9 7
Wyoming............ 39 -- 4
Colorado........... 19 180 6 7 17 33
New Mexico......... 17 74 41 5 72 21
Arizona............. 2 48 96 6 1 68 29
Utah............... 1 2 1 14 3
Nevada............. 1 2 2 2

PACIFIC............... 42 484 1,338 18 316 137 300 333
Washington......... 34 336 5 41 23 92 26
Oregon............. 15 114 283 8 14 18 10
California......... 26 320 692 13 257 91 179 257
Alaska.............. --- 13 --- 4 --- --- -.
Hawaii ............. 1 3 27 6 9 11 40

Puerto Rico..........= 23 177 160 6 16 9
*Delayed reports: Measles: N.J. delete 1
Meningococcal infections: N.J. delete 4(1968), Mont. I
Mumps: Me. 2








118 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE III. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 5, 1969 AND APRIL 6, 1968 (14th WEEK) CONTINUED


STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER FVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 169 1969


UNITED STATES... 10,406 2 25 24 4 51 1 85 1,016

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,370 2
Maine..*........... 3 -
New Hampshire...... 24 -
Vermont............ 42 1
Massachusetts...... 288 -
Rhode Island....... 108 -
Connecticut ....... 905 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 460 4 1 7 3 25
New York City...... 30 2 1 5 -
New York, Up-State. 332 2 1 3 25
New Jersey......... NN -
Pennsylvania....... 98 1 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,350 3 2 1 4 3 44
Ohio. ............ i111 1 3 7
Indiana............. 476 1 1 10
Illinois........... 262 1 1 1 9
Michigan........... 312 2 1 1
Wisconsin.......... 189 1 17

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 318 1 3 12 183
Minnesota.......... 57 1 47
Iowa............... 73 -- 1 27
Missouri ........... 3 3 65
North Dakota....... 116 2 24
South Dakota....... 24 -
Nebraska.*......... 9 1 8
Kansas............. 39 1 4 12

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,278 6 10 5 29 326
Delaware ........... 12 -
Maryland............ 329 ---
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 -
Virginia........... 379 12 204
West Virginia...... 142 2 8 48
North Carolina..... 28 1 4 1 1
South Carolina..... 200 1 -- -
Georgia............ 21 1 3 21
Florida............ 167 2 4 1 6 52

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,636 1 3 4 7 1 14 185
Kentucky........... 309 2 7 109
Tennessee.......... 1,128 1 1 4 6 1 5 60
Alabama............ 94 2 16
Mississippi........ 105 ---

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 653 3 2 7 19 137
Arkansas........... 24 4 8
Louisiana.......... 1 2 6 13
Oklahoma........... 36 1 2 4 22
Texas.............. 592 3 9 94

MOUNTAIN ............. 2,033 2 10 28
Montana ............ 33 -
Idaho.............. 267 -
Wyoming*............ 91 5 11
Colorado........... 966 1 2
New Mexico......... 298 1 2 7
Arizona............. 166 1 5
Utah ............... 211 -
Nevada............. 1 1 3

PACIFIC............... 1,308 1 5 3 11 5 86
Washington......... 204 1 1 1 -
Oregon ............ 97 -
California......... 883 4 2 10 5 86
Alaska............. --- --- -
Hawaii.............. 124


Puerto Rico.......... 2 1 2 3 I 5


SST: Me. 13, Ohio 1
Rabies in animals: Nebr. 6, Wyo. 1


* Delayed reports:







MorbiditN and Mortalilt W ekl I report







TABLE IV. DEATHS IN 122 INIT II) STATES (ITII:S FOR WEEK MINDED APRIL 5, 1969

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Area


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-*---
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.----------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.4 ..-------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio-----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


B t 4 *l1 B ..I


All Causes

All 65 years
Ages and over


Pneumonia
and
Influenza
All Ages


Under
1 year
All
Causes


Area


All Causes


Pneumonia


and
65 years If n
and over Inlluenza
and over
All Ages


B 4 B + *4 B B 1 4


428
138
26
21
22
31
19
6
12
28
30
4
33
19
39

1,789
30
21
79
20
21
28
34
42
922
25
256
72
35
73
18
16
26
16
31
24

1,486
32
19
410
137
112
69
32
207
22
25
26
7
22
89
23
96
21
22
19
65
31

480
37
4
15
88
17
68
45
139
24
43


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, FIa.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.---------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Ttx.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Ho-us ton, Te. ----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shrevepor t La.--------I
Tulsa, Okla.- ---------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah-----------
Phoenix, Ariz.---- ----
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.---------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Clendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.*------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,248
104
266
51
90
125
51
74
52
99
76
218
42

602
81
35
42
119
168
47
35
75

1,190
42
41
25
163
44
92
212
49
162
84
134
67
75

439
47
23
109
13
119
20
45
63

1,587
24
50
30
48
107
387
90
33
134
59
110
209
40
161
54
51


655
48
151
13
48
76
23
41
25
77
43
97
13

334
47
19
28
67
96
23
19
35

643
27
29
17
88
22
48
92
23
73
55
75
40
54

270
28
9
66
12
71
12
35
37

1,002
17
33
28
22
66
261
51
22
88
33
65
124
26
96
37
33


49
5
9
1
1


5
8
8
3
8
1

44
3
3
8
20
2
1
3
4

66
9
3
1
4
2
5
5
5
5
4
6
4
13

19
1
4
7

1

1
5

59
1
2


3
19
5
1

2
3
7
2
6
1
2


Under
1 year
All
Causes

40
3
5
3
1
4
3
2
5
2
4
3
5

25
2
6
1
5
3
4

4

65
1

1
9
4
9
10
3
11
5
4
3
5

15
1
2
3

4
2
3


Total ____12,255 7,087 506 540

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 199,225
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 115,691
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 12,650
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 8,916


Week No.
14







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
BOLIVIAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER La Cayoba, Bolivia

An outbreak of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF)
occurred during January and February in La Cayoba, Bolivia,
a small agricultural community, 40 km north of Magdalena
in the Province of Itenez, Department of Beni. There were
10 suspected cases with six deaths' among the 245 resi-
dents. Virus, isolated from the spleen of one fatal case
and from the blood of two other subsequently fatal cases,
was identified as Machupo virus, causative agent of BHF.
Machupo virus was also isolated from 12 of 40 Calomys
callosus rodents trapped inside the houses of La Cayoba.
Seven of the 12 positive rodents were caught in one house
where three cases had occurred (two were fatal). Prior to
the outbreak, only one of 120 La Cayoba residents had
Machupo virus neutralizing antibodies.
Approximately 100 residents fled from the town during
the outbreak and the remaining 145 were quarantined for
30 days in a deserted agricultural experimental station,
4 km north of Magdalena. Food was supplied by friends
and relatives in Magdalena. A team of five Machupo-immune
persons, employed by the hemorrhagic fever commission
since 1965 to carry out rodent control measures in San
Joaquin. was sent to La Cayoba. Kill traps and poison
were used to eliminate rodents. Corn, rice, yucca, and
banana crops were harvested and destroyed so that they
would not be available to support rodent populations. The
control measures, lid..,._i, drastic economically and psycho-
logically to the residents of La Cayoba. appear to have
stopped the outbreak and avoided spread to Magdalena.

(Reported by Luis Valverde Chinel, M.D., Chief, Hemor-
rhagic Fever Commission, La Paz, Bolivia; and Patricia
Ann Webb,. .D., Middle America Research Unit, Balboa
Heights, Canal Zone.)

Editorial Comment:
Machupo virus is transmitted to man by contact with
the rodent Calomys callosus; human to human transmission
is rare.2 The incubation period is approximately 7 to 15
days.
Ecologically. the isolated community of La Cayoba
resembles Orobayaya, a town 45 km to the east, where
the disease occurred with devastating intensity in 1960-
1962 (107 cases with 44 deaths among 600 residents.)3


References:
'Pan American Sanitary Bureau Regional Office of the World
Health Organization, i weekly Epidemiological Record. 41(13):68.
2Douglas, R. Gordon, Jr., et al: Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever
Probably Transmitted by Personal Contact. Amer J Epid 8(1):
S5-91, 1965.
3MacKenzie, Ronald B. et al: Epidemic Hemorrhagic Fever in
Bolivia. Amer J Trop Mled 11:620-625, 1964.


APRIL 5, 1969


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17,000 IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER, M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
EDITOR MICHAEL B. GREGG, M.D.
MANAGING EDITOR PRISCILLA B. HOLMAN

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL
OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE
ADDRESSED TO:
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
ATTN: THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEeKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON FRIDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL
BASIS ARE OFFICIALLY RELEASED TO THE PUBLIC ON THE SUCCEED-
ING FRIDAY.


0
X to



____0
g :__


I
m



-4
m

0 Xr


> r
z z-o

a M -4 z > -I >

- r m
Mn rn rZ


on <
> m m

M X
z;;

m1
-4

0
z


-E -








US. DEPos RI Oy






0




"C
0 |




?E




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ED8WO612A_Z8PICN INGEST_TIME 2012-07-16T17:19:47Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00169
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES