Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00166

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


9d


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE / PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE (
DATE OF RELEASE: JANUARY 10, 1969 ATLANTA,


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
INFLUENZA United States


Since December 21, 1968 (MMWR, Vol. 17, No. 51),
increased influenza activity has been reported from 18
states. The predominant change occurred in the South
Atlantic Division where six states reported widespread
occurrence for the first time. As of January 4, 1969. wide-
spread influenza activity has been reported in 38 states,
regional occurrence in five states, and isolated outbreaks
in six states. Isolated documented cases have occurred
in Louisiana (Figure 1). The West South Central and East
South Central Divisions continue to report the least in-
fluenza activity.
\ihou-,lh 43 states have reported widespread or re-
gional influenza activity over the past 4 months, many
states indicate that the epidemic in their state is declin-


[.i.lin u logic N port

Surveillance Sunmmn
TuI m r i ohX ( i.
S lmoni ello-I a -- July, f l
Intrrn.ttlonal Notd,.
S dllpox orhl.wid .. .. .....


ing. The Alaska State Department of Health reports that
their outbreak peaked in mid-October, and that reports of
respiratory illness have been essentially normal since
early December. Other states report that the total number
of influenza cases has started to decline, but that a true
assessment can only be made after schools reopen follow-
ing the Christmas vacation.
(Cortinued on page 2)


TABLE I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
1st WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST WEEK
DISEASE MEDIAN
January 4, January 6. 1964 1968 MEDIAN
1969 1968 1969 1968 1964 19G6
Aseptic meningitis ..................... 18 28 28 18 28 28
Brucellosis ........................... 1 3 1 3
D iphth r a ....................... ....... 3 1 1 3 1 1
Encephalitis, primary:
Arthropod-borne & unspecified .. ........11 14 18 11 14 18
En(cephalitis, post-infectious ............. 2 9 8 2 9 8
Hepatitis, serum ........................ 87 46 87 46 ( 6
hepatitis, infectious .................... 637 598 644 637 598
M alaria ................................ 26 19 5 26 19 5
Measles rubeolaa) ............. ..... ..... .162 233 3,191 162 233 3.191
Meningococcal infections, total ........... 38 42 42 38 42 42
Civilian ............................. ..35 41 35 41
Military ................... ....... 3 1 3 1
Mlumps ........ ................... 1,208 2.590 1,208 2,590
Puolomy lltis, total ................. -
Paralytic .. .... ...... ............ -
Rubella (G G rman measles) .......... ..... 207 304 207 304
Streptococcal sore throat & scarlet fever.... 8,521 8,799 8.320 8,521 8,799 8,320
Tetanus ........ ... ... ....... .... 2 3 2 3
Tularenia ........... ............. ...... 3 4 3 4
Typhoid tleor ............ ...... .. ... 2 2 2 2 2 2
Typhus, tick-borne (Rky Mt. spotted fever) 1 2 2 1 2 2
Ra is in animals .......................... 44 68 68 44 68 68

TABLE II. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthra\: ..................... .... .... ... Rabie. i1n mian: ...... ........ --
Botuilitn: ................... ............... .. Rubella congenital syndrome: .....
I .epto pirosl :* ..................................... T r ch in is: ..................... ... ...............
Psittacosis: ............ ................ ... r.

*Delayed reports (1968): Leptospirosis: Fla. 1. Iowa 8


Vol. 18, No. 1

WLE tY

kLPORT

For






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA (Continued from front page)


Excess total mortality and excess pneumonia-influenza
mortality in 122 U.S. cities continued to rise for the fifth
consecutive week. This week the reported pneumonia-
influenza deaths totaled 1,523 (Figure 2). Increased
pneumonia-influenza mortality occurred in all geographic
divisions except for the Mountain Division which has
shown a decline for 2 consecutive weeks. The East South
Central Division exceeded the epidemic threshold for the
first time.

(Reported by the Respiratory Diseases Unit, Viral Dis-
eases Section, Epidemiology Program, NCDC.)

Figure 2
PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN


Figure 1
INFLUENZA UNITED STATES
SEPTEMBER 2, 1968-JANUARY 4, 1969


U--
C--
El~-~~


122 UNITED STATES CITIES


PNEUMONIA-INFLENZA DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES


JANUARY 4, 1969






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
TUBERCULOSIS CASES ON REGISTERS -United States 1967


On DIecmber :,1. 1 67. There \\er an estimated
:1i5,1000 tuihorulotia s c-ases on regi-dters in sInt(' and Ilocal
litalh (l ii d 'partimenti i t lir ni ted Stat o T' hl total in-
cludeh d :2 00(0 paltit-ni s \\iith acli\r ithtrcitul si \\ho \ier
in hn-pdilal- and -anatorla anId '.((000 paltillnt- \\\th nacli\\
liiu rcul'uoi \\ho \ vrer r( e e ll ing i ar( in clinic- anld from
pri atie ph,.-s l'ians (Table I ).
During the Il-\ ,ar period since 1963( changes tc-
currii withinin the ctalogoiritsO of thiitirvulowsi cast.i' oni
rotnsor-tr. End-of-\r ar figure's for 19167 showed a decrease


in ho-pitalizld ;catt -, romi l(4.0i ii 1 ;i to 3 r 2.000 in
1 9i e7, : 27 pIri(rnt riducl tl nll ani rl ail' ( drciro in thr i
n ni/her of acli\v un- d, o ,r care mut~d- of ho-pil"o l .
On e)(' min r :31. 19 6:1. r. trri i -63 1 lt (;1I00 iunho-p) ial
ized wa with a t ,- dli+,a- ;in(] at th1 ,nd of 1967+
151.000 ca so,. In tih e +;l(+oneri of -'olher than ucti.,
.a-'v, r(etaini d oiln I lulirculoi.- rgi.t(r--" llrri x, r
2151.000 on D c) brInlh :1,. 19. ;. and 23S0.10 on DIL c I.th r
31. 1967. an intcrena e of 10.7 pircont.
(R'rport/ed by 1'Tuhi re itiosi Pr /r inr \{'flt '.


Table 1
Cases on Current Tuberculosis Registers' United States

Type 196: 1964 196.5 1966 1967

Hospitalized case- 14.01)0 4.2,000 40,000 ;37.000 32.000
I'nhospitalihzed acti cases 61,000 63,000( 60,000 5;.000 5.1)000

Arti l dis easo case- 105.)00 105,00( 100((00 90.001) 77.000
\ll other case- on current rogistcrs' 215,000 215,000 2.'5,000 280.000 23Sih.()0

Total cases on registers 320,00.0 320 000 325.0000 320.000 315.000(
'* iE ia tod.
**(' witih ti ix uIn)d'triir in' aI -iIl i. nit i. under curr lnt sup ori- In.
No() : F'ut r uli, r 'tp rs in ludn ro< )rdi of thie h ( c urr ntli\ undm ,r <;ir t, thi< < .c--, for ,Ih. h aiita l it\ h not
k -rn d tttrminr(d. ,iind im-ti-t\o r ..-- under su[cr\ a.-io l- A.o retained d on health dfpartmn t roll ,tro record- of p1-opldo ,wh.
f:ily to rei pond to tro. i im nt or th n) ha\ re(,!i\'td in;ald, u rt it or intnrrupt,d treatnmwnt.


SALMONELLOSIS July, August, and September 1968


During July. August. and September 196h. the total
numbers of -salmonella isolation from humans wtere 2.20):.
1.939. and 2.090, respecti\ely, and the xweekl\ a\ erages
for the 3 months were 4tl. 41 5. and 523. respectively
(Figure 3). The 10 most frequently reported serotypes
from human and nonhuman sources are listed in Table 2.
For the same 3 month-. 942. 697. and h19 nonhuman iso-
lations \were reported.
During these 3 months. 199 isolation of Salmoiella
jur'iana from humans \\re reported to NCDC. IUsually.
with the exception of S. lyphi, serotypes most frequently

continuedued on pagq S)


Figure 3
REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA
IN THE UNITED STATES









''


Table 2
10 Most Frequently Reported Salmonella Serotypes from Humans and Nonhumans
July, August, and September 1968
HIMAN Number Percent NONHt'MA N Numher Percent
typhimurnui in 1,603 25.7 typimrnrirum 426 17.3:
ntteritidis 600 9.6 lhidelberry 172 7.0
h/idIelbery 45. 7.3 .c rfttni, i ry 1310 .5.:
niitwport 408 6.5 infaitis 12 5.2
saint-paul 355 5.7 monte riden 127 5.2
infant, 322 5.2 arnatuir 103 4.2
thompson 262 4.2 einmtbulIete 9;) 3.1S
jiria ina 199 3.2 suinat-pau 93 1 3.
typhi 191 3.1 derby S 2 3.3
blockley 129 2.1 newport 79 3.2
al.l. .r I I .' I _' ,. .r I ',
Total all serotypes 6.232 Total all ,rotypes 2. I:
'Inc lude \'.ir copei nhayct


JAN ARY 4. 1969







4 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE 111. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
JANUARY 4, 1969 AND JANUARY 6, 1968 (1st WEEK)


FSP1i ENCEPHALITIS HEPATITIS
FN1i.- 01illI ii Primary including I',- MALARIA
AREA unp. cases Serum Infectious
AREA crn.s 1I
Cum.
Otil) 1,0") 91 9 }qf11 ) 1'I H a I 964 r 19('{ 1 9 146 l8 ( I6q 1(i69
UNITED STATES... 18 3 11 14 2 87 637 598 26 26

NEW ENGLAND.......... 5 43 20
Maine.*............ 6 2
New Hampshire...... 2 2
Vermont ........... .. 1
Massachusetts......- 1 21 8
Rhode Island. ...... 8 4
Connecticut........ 3 6 4 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 3 4 49 130 126 -
New York City...... 2 43 71 28
New York, Up-State. 1 1 5 22
New Jersey......... 3 2 12 55 -
Pennsylvania ....... I 3 42 21

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 8 3 6 62 66 3 3
Ohio............... 1 2 3 1 25 26 -
Indiana .......... -
Illinois........... 2 5 2
Michigan........... 5 3 27 19 3 3
Wisconsin......... 1 1 5 19 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 28 35
Minnesota .......... 1 3 2
Iowa.......... ... 4 3
Missouri........... 19 26
North Dakota ....... -
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska............ 2
Kansas............. 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 1 1 90 58 9 9
Delaware............. 2 4
Maryland.A ......... 1 1 6 12
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia ........... 1 5 14
West Virginia...... 9 6
North Carolina.....- 11 2 9 9
South Carolina..... 1 4-
Georgia............ 21 10
Florida.*.......... 32 10 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 61 68
Kentucky........... 2 24 37 -
Tennessee.......... 21 14 -
Alabama............ 10 11 -
Mississippi........ 6 6 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 1 2 55 47 1 1
Arkansas........... 1-
Louisiana.......... 1 1 8 1 1
Oklahoma.......... 1 1 15 7
Texas.............. 1 32 39

MOUNTAIN............... 1 1 1 1 30 20 4 4
Montana ............ 1 4 5 4
Idaho.............. 1
Wyoming............. -
Colorado ........... 4 4
New Mexico......... 1 1 1 5 3
Arizona............ 9 7
Utah................ 4 6
Nevada ............. 6- -

PACIFIC.............. 9 2 4 2 22 138 158 9 9
Washington......... 14 -
Oregon ........... 1 9 17 -
California......... 8 2 3 2 22 126 112 4 4
Alaska............. 1 4
Hawaii............. I 2 11 5 5

Puerto Ri .........- -

*Delayed report ( [q8): Aeptic imnningtis: Fla. 2
Diphtheria: Fla, delete 2
Encephalitis, primary: Md. I
Hepattiis, rum: Fla. 2
Hepatitis, Infe tious: Me. 3, Fla. 33, P.R. 3








11orbiditl aind M.orality VWekly Report .


I'AB.I III. (ASIS OF SP(CliFiiI) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: IINITII) SITAI IES

FOR WEFKS ENDI)

JANUARY 4, 1969 AND JANUARY 6, 1968 (Ibt WEEK) CONTINUED


'EASI.ES (Rub i, .) MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS, MUMPS POIO I MYLII R11 I SI A
TOTAL
AREA T, t I P 'r Io"lt
IA Cumu I i i ve Cumula tive 1


IUNITED TAI F ... 162 162 233 38 38 42 1,208 7

NEW ENCLAND.......... 11 11 6 2 2 3 237 1
Maine., ........... 3 -
New Hampshire* .... -
VWrmnt........... .-. 54
Massachus t t ...... 3 3 6 1 I 2 b62
Rhode 1sl.Amd....... 32
Connc t i t ........ 8 8 1 1 1 57

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 50 50 27 6 6 3 51 -
New York ity...... 27 27 6 1 1 16 -
New York, tp-lite. 1 1 12 1 1 NN
New Jersey......... 13 13 9 3 3 1 35
Pennsylvan i....... 9 9 1 2 NN -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 11 11 42 5 5 6 254 .7
Ohio. .......... 8 2 31
Indiana...... ...... 3 3 16 1 42
IIlinois ........... 4 4 2 2 14
Michigan............ 1 1 2 3 3 3 37 -
Wisconsin.......... 3 3 12 130 14

WET NORTH CENTRAL.... 18 18 9 3 78 14
Minnesota ......... 9 9
I wa ............... 4 4 56 -4
Mitssouri............ 1 7 5
North Dakta ....... 6 9 5
South Dakota......... I 1 NN
Nebraska........... 5 5 6
Kansas............ 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 23 23 28 7 7 7 108 43
Delaware .. ... .. .. 10
Maryland........... 1 1 1 23
ist. of C lumbia.. -
Virginia............. 11 1 5 2
West Virginia...... 6 6 13 1 1 1 32 12
North Carolina..... 2 2 NN
Stuth Carolina.*... 3 3 1 1 22
Ceor ia ... ........- -
Florida ............ 1 1 9 4 4 4 29 19

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ... 8 1 1 2 62 13
Kentucky. .........- 1 37 -
Tennessee .......... 8 1 1 1 21 10
Alabama ............ 3
Mississippi........ -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 36 36 52 3 3 10 188 20
Arkansas........... -
Louisiana ......... 1 l 2
Oklahoma........... 6 5 3 2
Texas............... 36 36 46 2 2 3 185 -- 16

MOUNTAIN ............. 5 5 14 3 3 2 72 17
Montana........... 1 32 3
Idah .............. -
Wyoming............ -
Colorado............ 2 -- 11 -
N w Mexic ......... I 1 1 1 28 2
Arizona............. 4 4 1 1 -
Itah .......... ... -- 1 4
Nevada............. 2 2 -

PACIFIC.............. 8 8 47 11 11 6 158 21
ashington......... 15 14 -
Orei on............. 4 4 13 1 14 -
California......... 4 4 16 10 10 5 118 12
Alaska ............... -
Hawaii ............. 3 1 1 12

Puerto Rico........... 5 5 2

*D-layvd reports (1968): Measles: S.C. 2, Fla. 6
Meningococcal infections: Fla. I
Mumps: Me. 2, N.H. 1, Fla. 32
Rubella: Me. 2, S.C. delete 2, Fla. 4








6 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE II. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
FOR WEEKS ENDED

JANUARY 4, 1969 AND JANUARY 6, 1968 (1st WEEK) CONTINUED



STREPTOCOCCAL TYPHUS FEVER
SORE THROAT & TETANUS TULAREMIA TYPHOID TICK-BORNE RABIES IN
AREA SCARLET FEVER (Rky. Mt. Spotted) ANIMALS
Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum. Cum.
1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969 1969
UNITED STATES... 8,521 2 2 3 3 2 2 1 1 44 44

NEW ENGLAND........... 1,074 -
Maine. .. .......... 13
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont ............ 139
Massachusetts...... 166
Rhode Island ....... -11
Connecticut........ 645

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 144
New York City...... 4
New York, Up-State. 122
New Jersey......... NN-
Pennsylvania ....... 18

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 372 1 1 2 2
Ohio................ 18 -
Indiana............ 66 -
Illinois........... 9 1 1
Michigan ........... 149 1 1
Wisconsin.......... 130 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 351 1 1 4 4
Minnesota.......... 42 -
Iwa ............... 58 2 2
Missouri........... 5 1 1 2 2
North Dakota ....... 89 -
South Dakta........ 24 -
Nebraska............ 121 -
Kansa. ............. 12 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 1,091 15 15
Delaware ........... 13 -
Maryland............ 198 -
Dist. of Clumbia.. -
Virginia........... 199 -- 9 9
West Virginia...... 152 2 2
North Carolina..... 36 -
South Carolina..... 270 -
Georgia ............ 16 2 2
Florida.*.......... 207 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2,105 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 11
Kentucky ........... 159 5 5
Tennessee.......... 1,809 -- 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 5
Alabama.. ......... 101 1 1
Mississippi........ 36 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 865 4 4
Arkansas ..........
Louisiana.......... 5 -
Oklahoma .......... 76 -
Texas............... 784 -- 4 4

MOUNTAIN ............. 1,729 1 1 -- 6 6
Montana ............ 28 -
Idaho.............. 169 -
Wyoming............ 85 -- 1 1
Colorado.*......... 996 -
New Mexico......... 176 1 1 2 2
Arizona ............ 190 -
Utah................ 85 -
Nevada..............- 3 3

PACIFIC......... ..... 790 1 1 1 2 2
Washington......... 27 -
Oregon............. 56-
California......... 553 1 1 1 1 2 2
Alaska ............. 15 -
Hawaii ............. 139 -

Puerto Rico .......... 1

*Delayed reports (1968): SST: Me. 28, Fla. 139
Tetanus: Ala. 2
Typhoid: Colo. delete 1
Rabies in animals: Fla. 1







Mlorbidity and Mortalit W1veekly Reporl


Week No. TABLE IV. DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES (ITIS FOR WF1K Nl)DI) JANUARY 4, 1969

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.-------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.----------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.----------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa -----
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


\ 1 I- .. .

11 65 years
zes Iand over


1,080
348
67
37
50
87
31
24
43
88
90
4
79
22
110

4,360
76
81
203
49
43
58
70
108
2,166
63
567
302
79
160
37
62
104
53
35
44

3,617
114
57
1,084
174
177
162
109
551
48
76
58
60
81
241
35
164
47
70
91
133
85

1,105
83
33
48
202
32
160
88
318
104
37


660
201
45
26
34
39
22
20
30
50
51
2
53
16
71

2,608
44
54
113
26
24
40
35
33
1,294
39
335
181
54
111
24
44
73
34
24
26

2,073
56
42
568
112
104
87
61
314
30
44
33
35
55
129
24
113
27
38
54
88
59

671
59
26
27
116
21
96
39
197
66
24


and
Inf luenza
All Ages


1 year
All
Causes

36
11
2


8



5


3

6

147
3
1
11
5

3
4
21
56
6
16
9
1
5
1

I
1
2
1

143
5
4
56
4
2
8
3
16

4
3
5
1
14
1
6
2
3
2
3
1

39
3

4
9

4
7
6
5
1


Area


SOUTH ATIANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.----------
Norfolk, Va.----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.-----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.-----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.----------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.-----------


All 65 years
Ages and ovr


1,696
164
372
67
105
143
91
136
33
95
82
335
73

729
107
58
59
142
152
24
32
155

1,398
44
58
16
195
68
113
193
24
296
122
144
57
68

589
49
37
124
33
156
21
82
87

1,676
26
56
28
52
121
412
95
44
126
98
122
222
53
104
55
62


and
Influenza
All Ag.s


i year
All
Causes


Total 16,250 9,362 1,523 633

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------ 16,250
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 9,362
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 1,523
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age---------------. 633


1 I I







8 Morbidity and Mi



SALMONELLOSIS continuede d from page 3)

isolated from humans are commonly cultured from non-
human sources as sell. However. S. jariana has been only
rarely isolated from nonhuman sources. In the past year,
invelOigations of the human outbreaks due to S. jaciana
hale failed to isolate this organism from a nonhuman
vehicle.
(Reported by the Salmonellosis Unit, Bacterial Diseases
Section, Epidemiology Program, NCDC.)





INTERNATIONAL NOTES
SMALLPOX Worldwide'

From January 1 through December 5, 1968, a total of
59,652 cases of smallpox were reported to the World Health
Organization. For the comparable period in 1967, there
were 109,707 reported cases. In comparing the 1968 period
with the 1967 period, a reduction of 46 percent was ob-
served for reported smallpox cases during the current year.
Figure 4 shows the areas of the world currently en-
demic for smallpox and those having smallpox as a result
of importations. With the exception of single case importa-
tions into Belgium and the United Kingdom, virtually all
outbreaks in the non-endemic areas during this year oc-
curred by importations from endemic areas which are geo-
graphically contiguous.

Figure 4
AREAS IN WHICH SMALLPOX HAS BEEN REPORTED
IN 1968


I Countries presumed to be endemic for smallpox

Areas into which smallpox has been imported


At present, 27 countries are considered endemic for
smallpox. Several of these, including Liberia, Mali, South-
ern Rhodesian, Swaziland, and Zambia, have reported only
sporadic cases, many only as a result of importation. It
is possible that these countries can become non-endemic
in the near future, provided the direct spread of smallpox
from nearby endemic areas is interrupted.
(Reported by the Smallpox Eradication Program, NCDC.)

R ifrrenc,:
I\\orld health Organizatiun Weekly Epidemiological Record,
13i(50):649.


mortality Weekly Report


JANUARY 4, 1969


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THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 17.000 IS PUBLISHED AT THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
DIRECTOR, NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
DAVID J. SENCER. M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
EDITOR MICHAEL B. GREGG, M.D.
MANAGING EDITOR PRISCILLA B. HOLMAN

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE
INVESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL
OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD' BE
ADDRESSED TO:
NATIONAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
ATTN: THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT

NOTE: THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE
BASED ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE NCDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES
AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON FRIDAY; COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL
BASIS ARE OFFICIALLY RELEASED TO THE PUBLIC ON THE SUCCEED"
ING FRIDAY.




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