Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00124

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
6! 0/ /4/0ato


Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


ICM NC LDIAEET


634-5131


For release November 15, 1963


ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN 1HE UNITED STATI.S AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 9, 1963


POLIOMYELITIS- Six cases of poliomyelitis, all para-
lytic, were reported for the week ending November
9. Two cases were reported from Georgia, and
single cases were reported from Michigan, Ala-
bama, Texas, and Florida. The nation's total thus
far in 1963 remains well below one-half that re-
ported for a comparable period last year.
Florida has reported 10 cases of paralytic polio-
myelitis thus far in 1963. Of this total, 4 have
occurred in Jacksonville. All 4 cases have yielded
Type I polio virus. Of the 4 Jacksonville cases, 3,
including the case reported this week. have ended


fatally. All de
weeks. The m
Jacksonville w
who died of po


sonville victims have been unvaccinated Negroes.
Additional suspect cases are under surveillance.

Poliomyelitis (Cumulated Weekly) 1st Through 45th Week

1963 1962 1961 1960 1959
Paralytic 313 615 787 2053 5189


370 777 1210 2962 7858


Poliomyelits (Six Week Totols) 40th Through 45th Week


aths have occurred within the past 4 LOR
ost recent case was a 28-year-old Paralytic 64 2 4 1134
oman, an aunt of a 2-year-old male
iliomyelitis on October 25. All Jack- Total 76 287 1521

ID 0C 963 I4j
Table I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: N ED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through pr s ek)


45th Week Cum tive~
Ended Ended
Di sea so Median Firsk
November 9, November 10, 1958 -.1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis............... 41 35 -- 1,627 2,267 ---
Brucellosis .................... 2 3 11 316 350 638
Diphtheria ...................... 6 7 17 232 382 630
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 19 29 29 1,360 1,631 1,630
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 805 805 701 37,490 47,243 33,010
Measles ....................... 1,606 1,904 2,284 366,985 453,197 405,051
Meningococcal infections ......... 38 32 32 2,071 1,841 1,966
Poliomyelitis, total .............. 6 37 76 370 777 2,968
Paralytic .................... 6 28 56 313 615 2,043
Nonparalylic ................. 5 14 38 114 613
Unspecified..................- 4 6 19 48 312
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 6,042 4,691 --- 291,015 269,244
Tetanus ....................... 10 9 --- 242 251
Tularemia...................... 2 9 259 253
Typhoid fever .................. 8 11 12 472 554 731
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 2 3 -- 172 214
Rabies in Animals............... .59 44 58 3,281 3,222 3,222


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY


Anthrax:
Botulism:
Malaria: N. M. 5*, Kans. 1
'l .i i. ,.


*Delayed Reports for 1 case 4-6; 3 cases 7-13; 1 case 9-21


Cum.
4u Psittacosis: Calif. 1
34 Rabies in Man:
92 Smallpox:
Typhus, murine:


K


Vol. 12, No. 45


Cum.
68
1
26


Wekl


; --~-----------------------


Cum
2;








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Botulism Smoked Fish Products United States
Smoked products made from Great Lakes fish
or processed in establishments in the Great Lakes
region henceforth will be stored and distributed as
a frozen food, according to a release made jointly
by the National Fisheries Institute and the Food
& Drug Administration.
This action follows the Food & Drug Adminis-
tration's recommendation three weeks ago that all
products made from such fish then on the market
should be destroyed (see MMWR, Vol. 12, p. 358).
The distribution of smoked fish as a frozen item
is considered safe because the botulism toxin is not
known to develop below freezing temperature, ac-
cording to the FDA. Because the near-zero tem-
peratures normally expected of perishable frozen
foods may adversely affect the quality of certain
smoked fish products, such frozen smoked fish will
be distributed under conditions which will assure
that it is held at all times in the frozen state, but
not necessarily at the low temperatures generally
employed for other frozen prepared foods. Available
facts indicate that no additional protection would
be afforded by the lower tenpipr.i:turl. as long as
the product is maintained continuously in the frozen
state, according to the FDA. (Distribution of the
fish according to the above manner will be subject
to certain State and local requirrn-.ntc. however,
which may specify temperatures at or near zero.)
The FDA considers these measures adequate to
prevent botulism while technological studies are
being made to develop IIr:IIrl..-_ for long-range
application.


Dengue Fever Florida
A case of dengue fever in a 28-year-old, white
female who had visited Puerto Rico has been reported
from Florida. While in San Juan, this patient consulted
a physician because of her complaints of fever,
eyeball pain, sweating, and weakness. The next day
she returned to Miami. A scarlatiniform rash
appeared on the fourth day of her illness.
Blood specimens collected in Florida on the
third and fourth days of illness were examined for
St. Louis and Dengue I HI antibodies. The results
are as follows:


Day of Illness


St. Louis


Dengue I

< 1:20


4 1:160


Because the patient had been in Puerto Rico
for the 18 days prior to the onset of her symptomatol-
ogy, the case has been classified by Florida officials
as one of imported dengue fever.
No secondary cases of dengue are knowntohave
occurred in Florida.
(Reported by C. M. Sharp, M.D., Acting Director, Bureau
of Preventable Diseases, Florida State Board of Hea!ti;
John E. Davies, M.D., Director of Research and Epidemi-
ology, Florida State Board of Health; and Dr. William
Pond, I ,:. ',:.': of Miami Infectious Disease Research
Laboratory.)

Editor's Note: This is the 16th imported case of
clinical dengue fever reported to the Communicable
Disease Center thus far in 1963. Other cases occurred
in Michigan, New York, and Minnesota (see MMWR,
Vol. 12, pp. 270, 308, and 310). All victims are
believed to have acquired the disease while in either
Jamaica or Puerto Rico where there have been
epidemics of dengue-like fever.
Microsporum conis Nebraska
Within five days after the acquisition ofa kitten,
six children in one family developed ringworm-like
lesions which appeared over the trunk and extremi-
ties. No lesions occurred in the hair. Fluorescence
occurred upon examination under a Woods lamp. On
culture, the lesions grew Microsporum canis.
This family had purchased the kitten from a
local kennel in another section of the city, and be-
cause of the temporal relationship the family reported
this incident. A health department representative
was scratched by a playful kitten during his investi-
gation of the kennel; he could not find evidence of
lesions at that time.
Less than two weeks later, the investigator was
bothered by two itchy, distinct, slightly raised, dime-
shaped lesions at the site of the cat scratch. The in-
vestigator was puzzled until he read the report of
the cultures from the above family. He suspected
that he, too, was a victim of the same disease.
Woods lamp fluorescent was positive. Cultures con-
firmed his suspicion.
Another investigator discovered that a family
of eight children also had been victims of Micro-
sporum canis, proved by culture, which likewise had
recently acquired a kitten from the same kennel.
These two families lived in different sections of the
city and their only mutual contact was the kittens
acquired from the same kennel. This investigator
also became a victim of this infection.
The kittens were cultured and growth revealed
Microsporum canis from the axillary and inguinal
hairs, areas where apparently the sun did not kill
the organism.


378


> 1:160








Morbidity and Morta


The kennel was found to be unlicenced and op-
erating in an area whichwas not zoned for such busi-
ness; subsequently, it has been closed. A humane
society employee, who came to remove the kittens
from the kennel, became the third adult victim.
At least 18 cases, including the two health de-
partment investigators and the humane society
worker were uncovered in the investigation. One
secondary case included in this total occurred in the
child of one of the investigators. There were no pets
in his family and it is presumed that the case was
acquired from the father.
Of interest is the fact that all the children in
each of these two families acquired the infection -
that is, six of the six in the first family and eight of
the eight in the second family.

(Reported by E. D. Lyman, M.D., M.P.H., Health Director,
Omaha-Douglas County Health Department, E. A. Rogers,
M.D., Director of Health, Nebraska State Department of
Health, and an EIS Officer.)

Poliomyelitis Surveillance Summary 1962
There were 683 cases of paralytic poliomyelitis
submitted on individual case forms to the Polio-
myelitis Surveillance Unit of the Communicable
Disease Center during 1962. These cases have been
corrected for verification of diagnosis 60 days or
longer after onset of illness. When such a follow-up
report was not submitted, the preliminary diagnosis
has been retained.
The paralytic cases are presented in the follow-
ing table by age group and vaccination history.
The table includes 666 cases with residual paralysis
at 60 days, plus 17 cases with a preliminary diagnosis
of paralytic poliomyelitis for which no 60-day
report was received.


lity Weekly Report 379




Of the 683 paralytic cases, 49 percent occurred
in pre-school age children, compared to 39 percent
in 1961 and 43 percent in both 1960 and 1959.
The paralytic cases are presented in the following
table by age group and history of immunization
with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine.




TABLE 1
1962 PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS IN THE UNITED STATES
BY DOSES OF INACTIVATED VACCINE AND AGE GROUP

Doses of Inactivoted Vaccine
Age Group 0 1 2 3 4+ Unknown Total Percent
0-4 240 26 26 17 21 8 338 49.5
5-9 68 7 9 26 26 3 139 20.4
10-14 23 5 10 17 13 2 70 10.2
15-19 12 1 2 6 4 1 26 3.8
20-29 39 4 3 2 2 2 52 7.6
30-39 25 3 3 2 2 1 36 5.3
40+ 18 0 2 0 1 1 22 3.2
Total 425 46 55 70 69 18 683 100.0
Percent
Doses 63.9 6.9 8.3 10.5 10.4 100.0


There were 47 fatalities attributed- to polio-
myelitis for 1962, 43 of whom had bulbar involvement.
The fatalities are presented in the following
table by age group and by history of immunization
with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine, together with
the paralytic case fatality rate (per 100) for each
age group.

(continued on page 384)


TOTAL DEATHS REPORTED IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of total deaths in
108 cities for the four-week period ending Novem-
ber 9 was 11,233 as compared with an expected
weekly average of 11,306.

TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 UNITED STATES CITIES

WEEK ENDING
4 Week Weekly
10/19 10/26 11/2 11/9 Total Average

Observed 11,372 11,235 11,077 11,247 44,931 11,233
Expected 11,104 11,204 11,385 11,532 45,225 11,306

Excess 268 31 -308 285 -294 -73


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U S CITIES
*.- --,-o b, ..o -1. i ,.o1-1 ifl


S. ... .
C.-1 -7 --- -
c" r -- r^ '"l--^ -^



-' -- ---
--_960 7 1961i96
L -: : : ::I_- : '-:I:: ;"J


!- -


= I I
























Area


3:81 l1orlbilitil anld 11orlalitN \\% cekly IReport



Tabl i. CASIS ()F SPI'(IF ll) NOTIFIABLE I)ISIASES: INITEI) STATES

FOR W EI kS I NI)E)


NOVEMBER 9, 1963 AND NOVEMBER 10, 1962


Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
P)I io'yc lit is, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis


Cumulative Cumulative
45th w ek First 45 weeks 45th week First 45 weeks 45th week 45th week


1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 6 37 370 777 6 28 313 615 5 41 35

:NE E:'GLAND.............. 1 8 8 8 7 1 -
Ma ine ................. 2 2
Ne, {Hapshir .......
V r ........ ....... 1 1 1 1 -
a ach it ......... 3 6 3 6
Rhdc I la ....
C- ti t ........ .. 2 1 2 1

IIDDLE ATLA:7 IC......... 114 75 90 54 5 3
: Yr, ............ 9 57 6 39 4 1
SJr ............. 4 7 3 7
Pcnn ivauia ......... 101 11 81 8 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 10 53 119 1 8 42 88 1 8 5
Ohi .................. 8 19 4 17 -
Ind I n" ............... 2 4 20 2 3 16
Illinos ............. 5 17 53 4 16 37 6 4
,1lichigan ............. 1 2 16 19 1 2 16 15 2 -
Wisconsin............... 1 8 8 3 3 1 1

WEST NOR1H CENTRAL....... 6 38 5 27 4
linnisota.............. 4 7 4 7 3
Iw1. ................... 7 3 1
Mi sso. ri.............. 10 5
North Dakota......... 1 5 3
South Dakota.......... 1
Nebraska.............. 1 8 1 8
Kansas................

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 3 9 68 67 3 6 57 57 2 2
Delaware............... 1 1 -
Maryland.............. 1 3 2 1 1
District of Columbia.. 1 2 1 -
Virginia.............. 19. 8 13 8 2 2
West Virginia......... 4 3 9 4 3 9
North Carolina........ 2 3 13 2 3 11
South Carolina........ 7 6 6 6
Georgia ............... 2 2 21 16 2 20 13
Florida................ 1 10 11 1 10 8

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 3 69 70 1 3 64 58 1 4
Kentucky.............. 3 1 29 3 1 23 3
Tennessee............. 8 10 8 5 1 1
Alabama ............... 1 52 22 1 47 22 -
Mississippi........... 8 9 8 8 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 7 26 302 1 5 25 235 2 2 7
Arkansas.............. 4 5 18 3 4 17 1 1
Louisiana.............. 1 14 25 1 14 22 -
Oklahoma............... 21 16 1
Texas................. 1 2 7 238 1 1 7 180 1 1 6

MOUNTAIN................. 3 5 18 3 4 14 2 1
Montana............... 4 3 -
Idaho................. 1 2 1 1 -
Wyoming............... 2 1 -
Colorado.............. 1 3 1 2 1 1
New Mexico............ 2 1 2 2 2 -
Arizona................ 3 3 3 3 1
Utah.................. 2 -
Nevada................. -

PACIFIC.................. 4 21 80 3 18 75 1 21 9
Washington............ 2 5 2 5 2 2
Oregon................ 1 2 6 1 5 1 1
California ............ 3 17 69 3 15 65 19 6
Alaska................ -
Hawaii.............. -

Puerto Rico.............. 5 12 4 12 -









lMorbidily ani d Mlortalit Weekly Relport 381


Table 3. CASES OF SPECII:III) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

NOVEMBER 9, 1963 AND NOVEMBER 10, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 45th week
lative lative Under 20 &
45th week 45 weeks 45th week 45 weeks 45th week 20 yr. over Total 45th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 2 316 6 232 19 29 395 344 805 805 1,606 1,904

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 8 1 3 61 30 96 105 93 116
Maine................. -- 35 10 45 41 3 24
New lHampshire......... 11 7 20 4 16
Vermont............... 1 1 1 11
Massachusetts......... 6 8 8 17 47 21 40
Rhode Island.......... 2 1 2 1 1 2 22 -
Conecticut............. -- 1 6 4 12 11 47 25

NIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 7 22 5 6 75 72 147 176 312 235
New York.............. 4 13 4 2 43 48 91 86 93 59
New Jersey............ 1 4 < 12 11 23 28 89 39
Pennsylvania.......... 2 5 ,1 4 20 13 33 62 130 137

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 40 3 29 4 3 69 69 147 143 301 809
Ohio.................. 1 1 1 14 16 30 41 69 139
Indiana............... 6 2 10 7 4 13 11 44 10
Illinois.............. 1 21 1 13 1 2 21 19 42 35 44 24
Michigan................ 5 3 2 25 24 49 52 88 284
Wisconsin............. 8 2 2 6 13 4 56 352

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 168 39 2 14 10 34 42 56 77
Minnesota............. 9 15 1 1 5 7 9 2 18
Iowa.................. 125 1 2 2 5 11 20
Missouri............... 12 1 3 2 7 14 3 11
North Dakota.......... 2 1 5 5 1 11 33
South Dakota.......... 10 12 2 20
Ncbraska............... 6 8 3 1 4 6 15
Kansas................ 6 4 1 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 21 2 56 1 3 39 34 76 85 174 102-
Delaware.............. 1 1 2 16
Maryland .............. 1 5 2 7 5 30 5
District of Columbia.. 2 2 4 36
Virginia.............. 1 11 7 5 12 11 10 11
West Virginia....... I 10 4 16 17 59 32
North Carolina........ 4 2 5 1 13 11 24 21 6 9
South Carolina ........ 17 1 1 26
Georgia............... 3 18 5 5 9 3 3
Florida............... 3 14 2 2 5 8 16 4 26

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 14 20 4 37 25 63 63 120 85
Kentucky.............. 3 1 16 12 29 20 86 13
Tennessee ............. 6 3 3 14 8 22 25 30 66
Alabama............... 5 14 5 1 6 13 2 6
Mississippi........... 3 2 4 6 5 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 35 1 49 2 27 16 44 48 53 47
Arkansas.............. 8 2 1 2 2 6 2
Louisiana............. 8 1 31 8 2 11 10 3
Oklahoma.............. 5 6 2 2 4 1
Texas................ 14 10 1 19 10 29 28 53 41

MOUNTAIN.................. 9 5 1 16 10 58 29 176 179
Montana................. 1 2 3 113 25
Idaho..................- 19 4 4 7
Wyoming ................. 1 2 1 3 1 -
Colorado.............. 3 5 1 8 7 9 60
New Mexico............ 2 1 3 3 5 NN NN
Arizona.............. 3 11 6 32 16
Utah................... 5 -5 6 11 6 18 66
Nevada................ -

PACIFIC.................. 21 4 7 6 57 78 140 114 321 254
Washington............ 1 2 7 9 27 84 116
Oregon ............... .. 3 2 11 18 15 45 24
California............ 17 4 6 6 51 57 108 69 113 78
Alaska.................. 1 2 3 2 74 20
Hawaii ............... 1 1 2 1 5 16

Puerto Rico............... 1 12 5 2 7 15 14 17










:Morlidit% amd Mortality 11eeklk Report



labhl 4. ( AM S 1OF SP1 CIF1 lI) NO'l llIABil t DISIUASIS: ( N Il] 1) SIAIIS

I-OR IH KS I ND)lI)


NOVEMBER 9, 196( AND NOVEMBIER 10, 1962 (Continued)


ArSn.


iiii i~c iii


I. iiu


UNITED STATES.... 3 I


NEW ENGLAND.........
Maine...............
New Hampshire ......
Vermont............
Massachusetts .....
.-- T- --
c .r .. .. .


MIDDLE ATLANTIC.....
New York...........
New Jersey .........
Pe nnsylvania ......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL..
Ohi ................
Indiana............
Illinois...........
Michigan...........
Wisconsin .........

iTST NORTH CENTRAL..
Minnesota.........
Iowa........... ..
Missouri...........
North Dak ta.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC......
Delaware ..........
Maryland ...........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia............
Florida............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL..
Kentucky...........
Tennessee..........
Alabama............
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL..
Arkansas...........
Lou i siana.........
Oklahoma...........
Texa s..............

MOUNTAIN ...........
Montana............
Idaho.............
Wyoming.............
Colorado...........
New Mexico.........
Arizona............
Utah..............
Nevada.............

PACIFIC..............
Washington.........
Oregon.............
California.........
Alaska.............


2

1





3



1


2

10




2

2

3


1






3
2


1





1




10

10
1


rt waRico........... .
Puerto Rico....,.., 8


Sfreptococcal T1ickborne
Sre Throat S& Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky MIt. __
SSpot ted) C Cunu-
S' lative

I


916 411
543 35
1 17
9
55 62
30 55
287 233

220 258
181 152
27 53
12 53

440 373
86 98
68 42
72 38
127 121
87 74

224 117
23 17
46 34
18 6
67 33
4 1
1
66 25

556 508
2 5
4 10
4 2
154 118
179 198
28 54
78 15
6 6
101 100

1,046 799
144 43
827 659
28 9
47 88

576 580
2 1
2 3
8 7
564 569

1,164 757
47 23
54 76
144 22
425 225
221 171
136 120
137 120


900 888
169 198
29 28
541 608
53 50
108 4

8 3


T-t-llLil


I


-- -". l

S 31
2
15
13
1



7 107
4 79

3 28

6 499
5 293
S 47
1 70
S 47
S 42

6 858
1 226
1 304
3 151
33
1 92
S 31
S 21

5 471
1
I

181
5 111
16
10
77
74

6 248
3 113
3 115
20


7
5


12
2

1
6

3

2 85
1 44
5
1 36

5 60
4 26
7
1 11
11
5

26
3
3
16
- -
1
1
2

65
4
11

8
7
10
6
2
17

1 66
S 13
1 26
11
16

85
34
25
6
20

18



6
5
7



55
3
2
47
1
2

- -- --


- 13


382










383


Morbidity anid lorlalilN \W ecklN Report




'lahlLk 4 (A). TOTAl. DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o

For weeks ending AFor weeks ending
Area 11/9 11_____ Area 16 11

10/19 10/26 11/2 11/9 ___________ 10/19 10/26 11/2 11/9


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. ............
Bridgeport, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass ..........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, Mass ............
Lynn, Mass. ......... .....
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New l[aven, Conn ..........
Providenct, R.I...........
Somn rvill, Mass. .........
Sprincficld, Harss ........
Wat erbury, Conn. ..........
Worcester, Mass .........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y ..............
Allentown, Pa. ............
Buffalo, N.Y .............
Camden, N.J ..............
Elizabeth, N.J. ...........
Erie, Pa .................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J .............
New York City, N.Y .......
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...........
Reading, Pa. ..............
Rochester, N.Y ...........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa. .............
Syracuse, N.Y. ............
Trenton, N.J. .............
Utica, N.Y ..............
Yonkers, N.Y. ............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio............... .
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill. ..............
Cincinnati, Ohio............
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich. ............
Evansville, Ind. ..........
Flint, Mich. ..............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. .................
Grand Rapids, Mich .......
Indianapolis, Ind. ........
Madison, Wis. ..............
Milwaukee, Wis. ...........
Peoria, Ill. ..............
Rockford, Ill. ............
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Mi n. .............
Kansas City, Kans. ........
Kansas City, Mo. ..........
Lincoln, Nebr. ............
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ............
St. Paul, Minn. ...........
Wighita, Kans. ............


278
46
32
32
54
44
21
20
47
87
20
50
28
63


50
28
144
31
25
38
83
98
1,712
52
404
173
52
130
25
40
66
43
26
19


67
34
685
155
220
107
80
333
37
34
48
34
37
131
42
113
16
27
42
100
53


60
33
40
125
24
121
58
290
65
52


224
31
22
21
54
11
18
22
34
69
10
34
14
50


34
30
149
54
21
42
70
107
1,721
45
481
190
55
110
29
34
55
43
21
36


54
21
701
153
185
136
88
336
33
53
40
32
56
168
25
121
27
35
37
113
67


52
20
37
149
37
128
82
222
89
55


253
39
41
31
29
24
19
24
46
59
9
68
29
59


41
32
118
41
29
18
66
78
1,579
44
418
167
36
104
25
44
58
36
40
30


61
33
716
158
212
130
74
320
40
41
46
40
52
161
40
113
39
33
38
88
57


64
19
34
156
15
128
71
230
70
40


219
42
22
33
25
15
17
31
63
75
15
39
36
43


54
31
117
38
34
34
67
107
1,608
36
479
163
32
94
37
33
58
41
28
36


52
26
734
159
200
108
99
334
38*
40
50
34
56
209
20
106
27
31
39
94
58


50
29
49
132
27
113
89
214
80
54


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. .............
Baltimore, Md. ............
Charlotte, N.C ...........
Jacksonville, Fla. ........
Miami, Fla ..............
Norfolk, Va .............
Richmond, Va. .............
Savannah, Ga ....... .....
St. Petersburg, Fla ......
Tampa, Fla. ...............
Washington, D.C. ..........
Wilmington, Del. ..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, 'Ala. .........
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........
Knoxville, Tenn...........
Louisville, Ky. ...........
Memphis, Tenn. ............
Mobile, Ala. ..............
Montgomery, Ala. ..........
Nashville, Tenn. .........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex ..............
Baton Rouge, La. ..........
Corpus Christi, Tex ......
Dallas, Tex ..............
El Paso, Tex. .............
Fort Worth, Tex .........
Houston, Tex. ............
Little Rock, Ark. .........
New Orleans, La. ..........
Oklahoma City, Okla ......
San Antonio, Tex. .........
Shreveport, La. ...........
Tulsa, Okla ..............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex ...
Colorado Springs, Col ...
Denver, Colo. .............
Ogden, Utah................
Phoenix, Ariz .............
Pueblo, Colo. ..............
Salt Lake City, Utah.......
Tucson, Ariz. .............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. ..........
Fresno, Calif. ............
Glendale, Calif. ..........
Honolulu, Hawaii...........
Long Beach, Calif. ........
Los Angeles, Calif. .......
Oakland, Calif. ...........
Pasadena, Calif. ..........
Portland, Oreg. ...........
Sacramento, Calif.........
San Diego, Calif. .........
San Francisco, Calif .....
San Jose, Calif. ..........
Seattle, Wash. ............
Spokane, Wash. ............
Tacoma, Wash. .............


18
38
37
41
59
507
94
29
135
59
102
207
39
132
44
38


98
260
39
75
76
44
71
31
62
57
188
45


89
49
27
133
127
27
31
107


30
29
16
105
36
61
163
43
177
69
87
38
43


28
20
111
25
89
17
53
50


17
45
39
43
72
542
70
40
107
63
99

35
133
55
43


San Juan, P.R. .............. 25 24 (--) (---)


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


11,247
406
747
6,173


NOTF: All deaths ev lace of occrrence.


.*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIOA

3 IIIII 6IIIIIIU 0
3 1262 08864 0387


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TABLE 2
POLIOMYELITIS FATALITIES BY DOSES OF INACTIVATED
VACCINE AND AGE GROUP. UNITED STATES, 1962

Total Case
Doses of Inactivated Vaccine Paralytic Fatality
Age Group 0 1-2 3 4+ Unknown Total Cases Rote(%)
0-4 11 0 0 3 1 15 338 4.4
5-9 2 1 1 3 0 7 139 5.0
10-19 5 4 2 0 0 11 96 11.5
20-29 5 0 0 0 1 6 52 11.5
30-39 4 0 0 0 0 4 36 11.1
40+ 3 0 0 0 1 4 22 18.2
Total 30 5 3 6 3 47 683 6.9

As in past years, the paralytic case-fatality
rate increased with age, showing a step-wise increase
in the age groups 0-9 to 10-39 to over 40 years of
age. The overall paralytic case-fatality rate of 6.9
per 100 compares with 9.3 in 1961, 9.5 in 1960,
8.3 in 1959, and 7.4 in 1958.

INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
International Certificates of Vaccination
Reports have been received by the Division of
Foreign Quarantine of the U. S. Public Health
Service that many persons traveling abroad have
their immunizations recorded either on a physician's
prescription blank or have the international vac-
cination document improperly completed. Conse-
quently, in some instances, these travelers are being
detained at international ports of entry.
International travelers should be warned that
smallpox and cholera vaccinations, when required
for international travel, must be recorded on the
World Health Organization approved International
Certificates of Vaccination form, and all information
must be complete, including the "Approved Stamp",
which is the stamp of the local or State Health De-
partment. Other approved stamps include those of the
Department of Defense, Public Health Service, and
those special stamps issued by the latter agency.

ERRATA
In the line listing of malaria cases aboard the
M /V Ranborg (see MMWR, Vol. 12, p. 367), the
onset date listed for Case No. 2, Chief Steward,
is incorrect. It should read October 11 rather than
October 4.

Two typographical errors appeared in the table
listing the 12 most prevalent salmonella serotypes
identified from human and non-human sources in the
United States in MMWR, Vol. 12, page 348. The
number of additional types of salmonella isolated
from humans should read 92, not 82. Thus, the total
number of different serotypes isolated is 104,
as is correctly stated in the text. Also, the correct
total for non-human isolations should be 3078, not
3978.


In addition to the established procedures for
reporting morbidity and mortality, the Com-
municable Disease Center welcomes accounts of
interesting outbreaks or cases. Such accounts
should be addressed to:
Lawrence K. Altman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortal it Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanta, Georgia 30333


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