Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00122

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text








Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


634-5131


For release November 1, 1963 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333 Vol. 12, No. 43

PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED OCTOBER 26, 1963


POLIOMYELIT
lytic, were rep
cases each we
and Pennsylva
nois, Wisconsi
The 10 ca
cases (301 o
figure remains
last year. Nine
the fewest ca
United States

POLIOMYELITIS
1
Paralytic
Total
POLIOMYELITIS
Paralytic
Total


IS Ten cases of poliomyelitis, all para- EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
orted for the week ending October 26. Two Botulism Canned Liver Paste Canada and U.S.A.-
re reported from Connecticut, New Jersey, Three cases of type B botulism, including one death, all
Lnia. Single cases were reported, from Illi- related to ingestion of a commercially canned liver paste,
n, South Carolina, and Florida. were reported from Montreal, Canada, for the week ending
ises bring the total thus far in 1963 to 352 October 26. All victims had consumed Paragon label
f which have been paralytic). This total canned liver paste, processed by Delicious Food Prod-
well under one-half the number reported ucts, Ltd., Montreal.
teen hundred and sixty-two represented the Shipments of this same product were made to the
ses of poliomyelitis ever recorded in the United States, to distributors in Elmhurst, New York, and

Union, New jersey. The New York shipment bore the

(CUMULATED WEEKLY) STTHROUGH 43RD WEEK Paragon label, while the New Jersey shipment carried the
963 1962 1961 1960 1959 Epicure Club label. From these two distributors, ship-
301 574 741 1932 4908 ments were made throughout the United States. The Food
352 724 1142 2798 7491 and Drug Administration and State and local health au-
(SIX WEEK TOTALS) 38TH THROUGH 43RD WEEK
75 158 224 620 1453 authorities have now accounted for most cans in commercial
90 18 224 3 62 890 2017 channels.453
90 188 362 890 2017 channels.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED ST Q. L
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week / -
43rd Week Ck ;t/ e
Disease Ended Ended First Wr weeks
Disease Median 1 -
October 26, October 27, 1958 1962 1
1963 1962 1963 1 19 1 1958 1962


Aseptic meningitis...............
Brucellosis .....................
Diphtheria......................
Encephalitis, infectious ..........
Hepatitis, infectious and serum...
Measles..................... ..
Meningococcal infections.........
Poliomyelitis, total ..............
Paralytic ....................
Nonparalytic.................
UnSpecified.................
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............
Tetanus ........................
Tularemia ......................
Typhoid fever ...................
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)......

Rabies in Animals ...............


49
8
9
26
841
1,207
51
10
10


5,146
4
6
5


54


64
6
18
35
970
1,708
32
22
20
1
1

5,019
8
2
10

4

44


9
24
49
863
1,536
36
118


1,538
311
215
1,307
35,923
363,931
1,990
352
301
35
16

279,132
225
245
451

170

3,137


343
1*66

45,517
449,640
1,777
724
574
107
43

259,004
238
241
520

209

3,121


31,455
402,004
1,879
2,805
1,924
590
291



701


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 4 Psittacosis: 67
Botulism: 34 Rabies in Man: 1
Malaria: colo. 1 83 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, marine: 24


Weekly


1 CMMUNICBLE ISESE CNTE








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


No cases of botulism, related to this product, have
been reported in the United States, as of noon Wednesday,
October 30.
In the Montreal outbreak, 2 of the cases were broth-
ers, who made sandwiches from a can of the liver paste.
The elder, a 17-year-old, consumed 3 sandwiches
while his 16-year-old brother had but a few bites of
another sandwich for supper on October 19.
The following day, the elder brother, who consumed
the greater quantity, experienced numbness of his mouth,
dizziness, diplopia, urinary retention, and weakness to
the point that he was unable to walk. He retired for the
evening and was found dead in bed the next morning,
about 36 hours following the meal.
Early the morning of his brother's death, the younger
victim began experiencing diarrhea, dizziness, and
diplopia. He was immediately hospitalized and treated
with bivalent antitoxin. He has since recovered unevent-
fully.
The can providing the liver paste for their sand-
wiches had been discarded and could not be located.
However, Clostridium botulinum type B was demonstrated
in remaining portions of the sandwiches.
Following Canadian publicity of the outbreak, it was
learned that a 17-year-old male had been treated in
Montreal with bivalent antitoxin September 2 for a case
of diagnosed botulism. This patient had experienced
headache, nausea, vomiting, dysphonia, diplopia and
respiratory weakness. He was placed in a respirator. He
recovered. The vehicle concerned was originally thought
to be home preserved strawberry jam; subsequently,
Paragon brand liver paste has been implicated.
In addition to the above cases, approximately 25 to
30 others were treated with antitoxin as suspect cases
of botulism. They had consumed the same product and
had experienced gastrointestinal, but no neurological,
symptoms. These have not been officially reported as
botulism cases.
No cases of botulism were reported from elsewhere
in Canada.
The commercial product was removed from the
shelves of the stores in the 6 provinces in which it was
offered for sale: Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova
Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Ontario.
Laboratory tests on cans randomly selected from the
shelves are in progress.
The processing plant is being investigated by
Canadian Food and Drug officials. The plant has had no
previous incidents of food poisoning and has allowed
voluntary Canadian inspection annually for the past 2
decades.
The liver paste was made from pork liver.
(Reported by Dr. E.W.R. Best. Chief. Epidemiology Divi-
sion. Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa,


Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.)

Editor's Note: The liver paste is the third botulism
incident reported in North America this year to involve
a commercially processed product. The first was the
canned tuna fish (see \.MlR, Vol. 12, p. 95) and the
second was the smoked whitefish chubs (see MMWR,
Vol. 12, pp. 329, 337 and 345).









Botulism Smoked Fish Products United States

The Food & Drug Administration, acting on the basis
of its own findings and on the advice of a special advisory
committee on botulism, has recommended the destruction
of all products currently on the market which are made
from Great Lakes fish or processed in establishments in
the Great Lakes region. The FDA made two exceptions,
with the provision that the criteria can be established with
with certainty: "(1) That the fish was heated immediately
after it was packaged in a manner that would assure a
temperature of at least 1800F. for at least 30 minutes in
the coldest part of the fish. Such fish should be marked
'Perishable Keep Under Refrigeration', or, (2) that the
fish was frozen immediately after packaging and has since
been maintained continuously in a frozen condition."
The FDA based its decision on the 3 known outbreaks
of Type E botulism which have occurred during the past
3 years from fresh water fish obtained from the Great
Lakes, (See MMWR, Vol. 12, pp. 329, 337, and 345), and
on subsequent laboratory tests which it performed on such
fish under special conditions.
The FDA release stated further: "These outbreaks,
including recent findings from the Tennessee and Michigan
outbreaks, indicate that Clostridium botulinum type E
spores are present in the incoming fish, the smoking
establishments, or both. Bulk and packaged smoked fish
packed by three Michigan firms, held deliberately by FDA
laboratories without refrigeration for several days, showed
evidence of type E botulinus toxin ....
"The organism is capable of germination, growth, and
toxin formation at temperatures within the normal refrigera-
tion zone, as low as 38*F., within 31-45 days in one case.
Growth and toxin formation has not been reported at 360F.
and below for longer periods. Existing conditions for
shipping and handling packaged and bulk smoked fish
products do not insure against growth in toxin formation
if the organism is present. Freezing of products immedi-
ately after processing, and maintaining in the frozen con-
dition until delivered to the consumers, will prevent
development of the toxin."


358









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Dengue-Like Illness Puerto Rico
During the past week, 543 cases of dengue-like ill-
ness were officially reported to the Puerto Rico Department
of Health, bringing the 1963 total to 16,771 through Octo-
ber 28.



DENGUE-LIKE ILLNESS
By week of onset*


number
of cases
25-

20-

15-

10-

5-

0-

30-

25-

20-

15-

10-


BARRIADA
MARRERO


BARRIADA
FRAILES
LLANOS


swik ealng 3! 17 14 21 28 5 12 Is 26
week ending 10 I 1926
AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER
*NOTE: DATA INCOMPLETE FOR WEEK ENDING OCT. 26


Intensive day-to-day surveillance continues in Bar-
riada Frailes Llanos and Barriada Marrero in the townshop
of Guaynabo. Attack rates in these population groups are
as follows:





Dengue-like Attack
Period Area Population Illness Rate(%)
August 1 -
October 29 Guoynobo Township* 898 291 32.4
August 1 Barriada Frailes
October 23 Llanos 488 173 35.5
August 1 -
October 23 Borriada Marrero 209 80 38.3
*From morbidity survey conducted on October 29.




The epidemic curves for Barriada Frailes Llanos and
Barriada Marrero are shown (left). In one community the
incidence of cases droppedabruptly following a peak during
the week ending September 28, whereas new cases have
continued to occur in the other area.


In addition, the total attack rate for females is sig-
nificantly higher than the attack rate for males in Barriada
Frailes Llanos; there is no significant difference in
Barriada Marrero.


(Reported by Victor Gonzales, M.D., Director, Bureau of
Health, Puerto Rico Department of Health, and a team from
the Communicable Disease Center.)

(Continued on page 364)


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES


The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending October 26 was
759 as compared with an expected weekly average of 764.


TOTAL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 CITIES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
------------------- 4Week Weekly
Total Average
10/5 10/12 10/19 10/26

Observed 761 789 717 770 3,037 759

Expected 761 763 765 767 3,056 764


Excess 0 26 -48 3 -19 -5


(See table, page 363)


359











360 lorlbiditk and Mlortalilt ecekly Report


Table ; CASFS OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 26, 1963 AND OCTOBER 27, 1962


Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
43rd week First 43 weeks 43rd week First 43 weeks 43rd week 43rd week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 10 22 352 724 10 20 301 574 1 49 64

NEW ENGLAND.............. 2 7 7 2 7 7 2 1
Maine................. 1 1 -
New Hampshire........- -
Vermont............... 1 I I
Massachusetts......... 3 6 3 6 1
Rhode Island.......... 1
Connecticut........... 2 2 1 2 2 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 4 1 112 74 4 1 89 53 8 3
New York.............. 1 8 57 1 5 39 8 1
New Jersey............ 2 3 6 2 3 6 -
Pennsylvania 2 101 11 2 81 8 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 2 5 51 101 2 4 41 75 8 5
Ohio ................. 1 8 18 1 4 16 2 2
Indiana................ 4 18 3 14 -
Illinois.............. 1 4 17 45 1 3 16 31 4 1
Michigan.............. 15 14 15 11 2 2
Wisconsin............. 1 7 6 1 3 3 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 5 38 2 5 27 1 5
Minnesota............. 4 7 4 7 1 5
Iowa................... 1 7 1 3 -
Missouri.............. 10 5 -
North Dakota.......... I 1 3 -
South Dakota........... 1 -
Nebraska.............. 1 8 1 8
Kansas................ -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 2 62 56 2 53 49 6 4
Delaware .............. 1 1 I 1
Maryland.............. 3 1 1 1
District of Columbia.. 2 1 -
Virginia.............. 18 8 13 8 1 1
West Virginia......... 3 5 3 5 1 1
North Carolina....... 3 10 3 8 -
South Carolina ........ 1 7 6 1 6 6 -
Georgia.............. 19 14 18 13 -
Florida............... 1 8 10 1 8 7 3 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 64 67 1 60 55 2 4
Kentucky.............. 1 26 1 20 1 1
Tennessee ............ 1 8 10 1 8 5 1 -
Alabama............... 48 22 44 22 3
Mississippi........... 7 9 7 8 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 9 25 294 8 24 229 I 7
Arkansas ............. 2 5 14 2 4 14 -
Louisiana............. 2 14 24 1 14 21 I
Oklahoma .............. 3 20 3 15 2
Texas................. 2 6 236 2 6 179 5

MOUNTAIN.................. 1 5 15 1 4 11 3 3
... .. .. 4 3 l
Montana.............. 4 3 1
Idaho ................. 1 2 1 1
Wyoming................ 2 1 1-
Colorado.............. 2 1 1 3
New Mexico............ 1 -
Arizona............... 3 3 3 3 1
Utah................... 1 2 1 2 -
Nevada................ -

PACIFIC.................. 3 21 72 3 18 68 19 32
Washington............ 3 2 5 3 2 5 2 1
Oregon................ 2 5 1 5 -
California............ 17 62 15 58 17 31
Alaska. .............. -
Hawaii................

Puerto Rico...............- 5 12 4 12









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 361


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 26, 1963 AND OCTOBER 27, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 43rd week
lative lative Under 20 &
43rd week 43 weeks 43rd week 43 weeks 43rd week 20 yr. over Total 43rd week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 8 311 9 215 26 35 432 367 841 970 1,207 1,708

NEW ENGLAND ............. 1 8 65 44 112 91 88 75
Maine................. 25 11 36 37 4 20
New Hampshire......... 14 6 23 15 1
Vermont ............... 1 7 6 13 2 9 10
Massachusetts......... 6 14 5 19 32 19 25
Rhode Island........... 2 2 2 4 17 1
Connecticut........... 5 14 19 1 39 18

MIDDLE ATLANTIC........... 1 8 22' 1 7 80 73 153 176 233 129
New York............... 1 4 13 1 4 45 49 94 90 118 59
New Jersey............ 1 4 12 9 21 33 56 32
Pennsylvania.......... 3 5 3 23 15 38 53 59 38

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 3 39 1 24 3 3 71 51 126 148 210 524
Ohio................... 1 1 2 10 14 24 40 40 50
Indiana ............... 6 1 6 7 4 11 18 24 31
Illinois.............. 2 20 12 1 14 9 24 33 34 39
Michigan .............. 5 3 1 1 40 24 64 50 56 166
Wisconsin............. 1 8 2 3 7 56 238

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 166 39 3 23 13 43 51 36 96
Minnesota........... 8 15 1 2 5 18 5 31
Iowa................... 2 124 1 13 7 21 6 18 6
Missouri.............. 12 1 4 2 6 12 4 6
North Dakota........... 2 1 1 4 8 51
South Dakota.......... 10 12 1 1 1
Nebraska.............. 6 8 1 3 6 1
Kansas................ 6 3 5 7 4 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC.... ;...... 1 19 1 50 6 2 54 42 97 106 144 94
Delaware............. 3 3 1
Maryland.............. 9 7 16 12 19 5
District of Columbia.. 1 1 1 1 1 1
Virginia............... 1 9 6 4 10 11 48 16
West Virginia......... 1 1 13 8 21 20 57 41
North Carolina........ 4 2 1 20 10 30 34 5 11
South Carolina....... 17 1 1 4 4 3
Georgia............... 3 18 2 3 5 1
Florida ............... 3 1 11 6 3 6 10 24 10 15

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 13 18 3 2 40 21 61 95 78 91
Kentucky.............. 3 2 9 6 15 27 26 37
Tennessee............. 6 3 3 16 10 26 32 52 52
Alabama ............... 4 12 11 3 14 15 2
Mississippi.............. 3 4 2 6 21 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 35 7 45 8 23 25 53 50 64 88
Arkansas ............. 8 2 1 1 4 5 7 3
Louisiana............. 8 6 27 9 8 19 5 1
Oklahoma .............. 5 6 1 2 2 3 1 -
Texas..................... 14 1 10 6 13 11 27 35 60 87

MOUNTAIN ................ 9 5 2 1 11 9 41 50 87 250
Montana ............... 1 2 2 4 6 55 176
Idaho................. 14 3 18 20
Wyoming................ 1 1 1 4 -
Colorado.............. 3 2 1 6 20 2 26
New Mexico............ 2 1 5 3 8 4 NN NN
Arizona................ 3 1 4 7 6 10
Utah.................. 5 2 2 4 3 6 17
Nevada................ 3 1

PACIFIC.................. 1 21 4 8 12 65 89 155 203 267 361
Washington.............. 1 2 10 16 26 24 79 105
Oregon............... 3 3 9 13 15 23 43
California............. 1 17 4 7 10 49 61 110 113 101 102
Alaska.......... ...... 2 3 5 43 52 91
Hawaii................ 1 1 1 8 12 20

Puerto Rico............... 1 12 20 5 25 18 14 12











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


'Iahlt < (.ASES OF PI( : IHI D NOTI'II ABLE D1SIAS1S: I NIT I 1) S IATl S

IOR \ IFIKS MINDED

OCTOBER 26. 1963 AND OCTOBER 27, 1962 (Continued)


Intcct i

Area

43rd wk.
1963

UNITED STATES... 51

NEW ENGLAND........... 5
Maine............. 1
New Hampshire .....
Vermont............ 1I
Massachusetts...... 2
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut......... 1

MIDDLE ATIANTIC..... 4
New York............ 1
New Jersey..........
Pennsylvania....... 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 8
Ohio...............
Indiana............
Illinois............
Michigan........... 5
Wisconsin.......... 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2
Minnesota.......... 1
Iowa...............
Missouri........... 1
North Dakota........
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 6
Delaware...........
Maryland............
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia........... 2
West Virginia......
North Carolina..... 3
South Carolina....
Georgia............ 1
Florida.............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1
Kentucky........... -
Tennessee.......... 1
Alabara............-.
Mississippi.........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 5
Arkansas...........
Louisiana........... 3
Oklahoma.............
Texas.............. 2

MOUNTAIN............ 7
Montana.,...........
Idaho..............
', hl ........... 3
I l ........... 1
New Mexico..........
Arizona........... 1
Utah............... 2
Nevada.............

PACIFIC............. 13
Washington.......... 2
Oregon..,........... 2
California ......... 9
Alaska..............
Hawaii.............
Puerto Rico.........


umu-
at ive
43 weeks


Sore Thr.at & Tetanus
Scarlet Fever


43rd week 43rd wk.


Typhus
(Rcky Mt.
Spotted)


Tularenia


43rd k. 43rd wk.1


1963 1963 1962 1963 1963


1,990

124
18
4
5
58
11
28

272
126
41
105

309
80
45
60
92
32

122
24
7
35
13
7
25
11

363
4
51
6
82
19
67
20
30
84

140
31
64
23
22

178
11
74
31
62

70
3
6
7
20
4
11
16
3

412
34
31
326
12
9


8


5,146 5,019 4

355 470
20 126
3
16 12
60 56
24 50
235 223

202 213
149 107
21 41
32 65

457 370
56 51
99 82
63 58
160 94
79 85

223 151 1
8 6 1
50 64
19 7 -
42 29
5 -
5
5 -
99 40

545 439 3
4 3
29 12
1 3
160 107
185 87
48 25 1
42 38
2 3 -
74 161 2

954 823
40 68
864 673
32 13
18 69

536 422

14 2 -
16 -
506 420

948 1,192
76 53
60 105
81 72
216 370
309 366
141 81
65 143
2

926 939
247 325
12 23
492 575
37 14
138 2 -
2 8 -


Typhoid Fever

Cumu-
lative
43rd wk. 43 weeks


451

12
2

1
6

3

83
43
5
35

53
21
7
10
10
5

26
3
3
16

1
1
2

62
4
11

8
7
9
4
2
17

63
13
24
11
15

83
32
25
6
20

16



6
3
7



53
3
2
45
1
2


Rabies in Animals


Ir .
43rd week 43 weeks
1963 1962 1963

54 44 3,137

1 1 31
S 1 2
1 15
13
I



1 6 100
1 4 75

2 25

5 479
2 282
1 44
1 67
44
1 42

19 15 819
10 6 213
5 7 298
2 2 138
32
89
1 29
1 20

11 4 450
1
1

8 1 172
S 2 110
14
9
3 73
1 70

4 4 243
1 1 113
3 2 112
1 18


9 5 584
2 1 72
1 2 44
2 1 53
4 1 415

S 3 124



2 16
S 37
1 57
3
11

4 6 307

1 12
3 6 286
9


12 13


f











363


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER I YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area I Area
10/5 10/12 10/19 10/26 __10/5 10/12 10/19 10/26


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............... 13 18 12 13
Bridgeport, Conn.......... 4 5 3
Cambridge, Mass........... 1 1 -
Fall River, Mass.......... 3 2 1
Hartford, Conn............. 3 5 5 4
Lowell, Mass............... 2 3 2 -
Lynn, Mass................ 1 3
New Bedford, Mass.......... 1 1
New Haven, Conn............ 2 2 2 1
Providence, R.I........... 7 2 5 6
Somerville, Mass.......... 1 -
Springfield, Mass......... 3 4 3.
Waterbury, Conn............ 3 2 2 1
Worcester, Mass........... 2 4 2

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y............... 2 1 1 2
Allentown, Pa............. 2 2 1 2
Buffalo, N.Y............... 12 -9 6 8
Camden, N.J................ 3 7 3 8
Elizabeth, N.J............ 2 2
Erie, Pa.................. 4 4 2 1
Jersey City, N.J.......... 6 3 7 1
Newark, N.J................ 1 6 7 7
New York City, N.Y........ 87 88 85 117
Paterson, N.J............. 1 2 4 3
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 30 27 11 39
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 12 18 11 7
Reading, Pa............... 2 3 -
Rochester, N.Y............. 5 8 6 6
Schenectady, N.Y........... 1 -
Scranton, Pa.............. 3 .
Syracuse, N.Y........ ..... 1 2 6 5
Trenton, N.J............... 7 2 5 4
Utica, N.Y................ 1 2 -
Yonkers, N.Y............... 1 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................ 4 6 2 6
Canton, Ohio.............. 4 2 2 2*
Chicago, I l............ 49 48 47 45
Cincinnati, Ohio.......... 6 13 6 9
Cleveland, Ohio........... 4 21 24 15
Columbus, Ohio............. 6 9 16 12
Dayton, Ohio............... 2 5 6 7
Detroit, Mich............. 25 30 19 11
Evansville, Ind........... 2 2 1 1
Flint, Mich.............. 7 2 5 3
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 1 3 1
Gary, Ind................. 3 2 2
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 2 3 1 5
Indianapolis, Ind......... 9 14 9 11
Madison, Wis............. 3 4 2 2
Milwaukee, Wis............. 5 5 4 5
Peoria, Ill............... 2 3 2 2
Rockford, Ill............ 2 4 5
South Bend, Ind........... 2 1 3 2
Toledo, Ohio............... 6 6 3 6
Youngstown, Ohio........... 1 2 1 4

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa........... 3 4 4 1
Duluth, Minn............... 1 -
Kansas City, Kans.......... 7 3 2 4
Kansas City, Mo............ 9 4 3 9
Lincoln, Nebr............. 1 2
Minneapolis, Minn......... 7 7 9 8
Omaha, Nebr................ 5 13 5 2
St. Louis, Mo.............. 16 7 21 12
St. Paul, Minn............. 3 2 4 8
Wichita, Kans............. 4 2 7 3

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga..............
Baltimore, Md............
Charlotte, N.C...........
Jacksonville, Fla........
Miami, Fla..............
Norfolk, Va.............
Richmond, Va............
Savannah, Ga.............
St. Petersburg, Fla......
Tampa, Fla...............
Washington, D.C...........
Wilmington, Del..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala..........
Chattanooga, Tenn........
Knoxville, Tenn..........
Louisville, Ky............
Memphis, Tenn............
Mobile, Ala..............
Montgomery, Ala...........
Nashville, Tenn..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex...............
Baton Rouge, La..........
Corpus Christi, Tex......
Dallas, Tex...............
El Paso, Tex.............
Fort Worth, Tex..........
Houston, Tex..............
Little Rock, Ark.........
New Orleans, La..........
Oklahoma City, Okla......
San Antonio, Tex.........
Shreveport, La...........
Tulsa, Okla...............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex......
Colorado Springs, Colo...
Denver, Colo.............
Ogden, Utah..............
Phoenix, Ariz.............
Pueblo, Colo..............
Salt Lake City, Utah.....
Tucson, Ariz..............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif..........
Fresno, Calif............
Glendale, Calif..........
Honolulu, Hawaii.........
Long Beach, Calif........
Los Angeles, Calif.......
Oakland, Calif...........
Pasadena, Calif..........
Portland, Oreg...........
Sacramento, Calif........
San Diego, Calif.........
San Francisco, Calif.....
San Jose, Calif..........
Seattle, Wash............
Spokane, Wash............
Tacoma, Wash.............


2
1
3
14
1


12
2
3
7
8
7
3
9


6
1
5
13
5
4
23
19
16
4
5
5
4


5

8
2
4
2
4
2


San Juan, P.R............... 5 2 5 4


"Current Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age.............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


11,256
390
770
6,195


CORRECTION: Austin, Texas, week ending 9/21, no




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IU IIIIIII 1 IIIIII
3 1262 08864 0379


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Bot Rabies North Carolina
Since the first proved rabid bat was discovered in
North Carolina in late July, 1963, approximately 100
residents of the State have been placed on an anti-rabies
immunization regimen because of definite or probable
exposure to bats. Most of the instances represent unpro-
voked attack by bats upon humans during the daytime
hours.
In only 8 instances, however, have bats collected
at the site of the attack been shown to be rabid by direct
microscopic examination or by the fluorescent antibody
technique.
The low incidence of proved bat rabies in the cap-
tured, peculiarly behaving bats suggests that another
disease may be responsible in many cases. One possi-
bility presently being considered is the effect of
insecticides. Further investigation is in progress.
(Reported by Dr. Jacob Koomen, Assistant Secretary and
State Health Director, North Carolina State Board of
Health.)

Editor's Note: Since rabies virus is known to occur in
salivary glands in animals without being present in their
central nervous systems, it is imperative that all bona
fide bat bites receive post exposure vaccine treatment
unless the salivary glands, as well as brain tissues, are
specifically examined and found to be negative.


In addition to the established procedures for reporting
morbidity and mortality, the Communicable Disease Center
welcomes accounts of interesting outbreaks or cases.
Such accounts should be addressed to:
Lawrence K. Altman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanta, Georgia 30333


DuLC U MENI T S DEP"



U *. DEPOT SI

U.S. DEPOSITORY


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
One case of paralytic poliomyelitis was reported in
Canada for the week ending October 19. This brings the
Canadian total to 92 thus far in 1963.
This week's case was reported from Quebec, bringing
that province's total to 85 so far in 1963.
For the comparable period in 1962, 52 cases of para-
lytic polio were reported from Quebec, whereas 87 cases
were reported from the entire country. In 1961, for a
comparable period, 99 cases of polio were reported in
Quebec, and 165 cases throughout Canada.
(Reported in '. ,, Report of Canadian Department of
National Health and Welfare.)


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