Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00121

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text






Morbidity and Morta



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WE&


.-


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

Prepared by the


For release March 29, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA .. 12. No 1
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 23, 1963


INFLUENZA One or more outbreaks of influenza-like
disease have now been reported from 38 States and the
District of Columbia. Evidence of influenza has now ap-
peared on the West Coast with serologic evidence of
influenza A2 infection occurring in sporadic cases in
northern California and an outbreak of influenza-like ill-
ness reported from San Joaquin County in north central
California for the first time this week. Influenza A2 virus
has been isolated or confirmed by serologic titer rise as
the causative agent of one or more outbreaks in 27 States
and the District of Columbia. Reporting confirmed out-
breaks for the first time this week are the States of Ari-
zona and Kentucky. Outbreaks are now subsiding in a
number of areas in the Eastern and Middle Western United
States. The number of pneumonia-influenza deaths re-


ported weekly for 108 cities has remained above the epi-
demic threshold since the week ending January 12, but a
sharp downswing from the peak reached during the week
ending March 22 has occurred this week.


Arizona Outbreaks of influenza-like illness have
been reported from the San Carlos, Apache and Papago
Indian Reservations, beginning about March 14. Public
Health Service outpatient clinics at Sells, San Carlos,
and White River have reported at least 200 cases to date.
Illness has been of acute onset with fevers of 102-1030 F.
of 2-4 day duration. All age groups have been affected.
(Reported by Dr. W. S. Baum, Area Medical Officer in
Charge, Public Health Service, Division of Indian Health,
Phoenix, Arizona).


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
12th Week Cumulative
Disease Ended ended dian First 12 weeks
Disease Median
March 23, March 24, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 15 16 -- 267 196 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 11 7 10 76 70 147
Diphtheria...................... 7 6 6 79 129 197
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 28 30 34 261 312 302
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 912 1,223 763 12,992 16,804 8,758
Measles........................ 14,721 19,241 16,500 129,187 149,146 149,146
Meningococcal infections......... 61 57 60 691 628 685
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 1 4 14 36 72 200
Paralytic .................... 1 3 6 32 45 113
Nonparalytic.................- 5 2 12 61
Unspecified..................- 1 3 2 15 26
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 11,207 8,926 -- 120,142 105,645
Tetanus ........................ 3 1 --- 39 30 ---
Tularemia ...................... 1 3 --- 49 58 ---
Typhoid fever ................... 11 7 9 76 98 120
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 3.
Rabies in Animals ............... 89 125 102 783 923 989


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
oum. com.
Anthrax: 1 Psittacosis: Calif. 1 18
Botulism: Mich. 3 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Md. 1, N.C. 1 24 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 2


SABL1 1-1FAI 1( \ I








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA-LIKE DISEASE OUTBREAKS, U.S.A.
January I through March29, 1963 By County


Springerville Follow-up: Five influenza A2 iso-
lates have been obtained from individuals ill with
influenza-like illness during the recent outbreak in
Springerville. (MMWR, Vol. 12, No. 9).

(Reported by Dr. Lloyd N. Farner, Commissioner of
Public Health, Arizona State Department of Health).

Californio An outbreak of influenza-like illness
has occurred in a State hospital in San Joaquin County.
The outbreak began about March 17, and about 200 cases
in the total population of 4,000 have occurred to date.
Illness has been characterized by the acute onset of fever,
cough, and myalgia of 2-4 days duration. Laboratory
studies are presently under way. In the last 3 weeks sig-
nificant titer rises to influenza A2 virus have been demon-
strated in paired sera from 8 sporadic cases in 5 counties
in the northern part of the State.
(Reported by Dr. Philip K. Condit, Chief, Bureau of Com-
municable Diseases, California Department of Public
Health).

Georgia Outbreaks of influenza-like illness have
been reported in 8 additional counties mostly in the
central and east central portions of the State. These out-
breaks have been community wide and school closings
have occurred in several areas. Serologic evidence of
influenza A2 infection has been obtained from 2 cases


in Floyd County and one case each from Pierce and
Bibb Counties.
(Reported by Dr. W. J. Murphy, Director, Epidemiology,
Georgia Department of Public Health)


Kentucky Two or more laboratory confirmed cases
have been reported from outbreaks in Jefferson, Trigg,
and Trimble Counties. Epidemics have now subsided in
most areas of the State.
(Reported by i. Clifford Todd, State Epidemiologist,
Kentucky Department of Health).

Maine Increased incidence of influenza-like illness
has been reported from several towns in Waldo County for
the week ending March 16. In addition, 250 cases of
influenza-like illness have been reported from Southern
Hancock County. One town in northern Penobscot County
reported an elementary school closing on March 14 and 15
with large numbers of cases.
(Reported by Dr. Dean H. Fisher, Director, CDC, Bureau
of Health, Maine Department of Health and Welfare).


Montana -An outbreak of influenza-like illness, thus
far confined to a single small community, has been re-
ported from Deer Lodge County in the western part of the
State. Typical cases were first seen in early March, with
the peak of the epidemic occurring during the week end-








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


ing March 16. All age groups appeared to be affected
about equally. Laboratory specimens have been collected
and are currently being processed at the State laboratories
in Helena.
(Reported by Dr. Mary E. Soules, Director, Disease Con-
trol, Montana State Board of Health).

Rhode Island An outbreak of influenza-like illness
has been reported among students at the University of
Rhode Island (Washington County). Increased inci-
dence of acute respiratory disease was first noticed in
early February and approximately 200 cases were esti-
mated to have occurred. Paired sera from 3 ill individuals
at the school have shown significant rises in influenza
A2 antibody titer.
(Reported by Dr. James E. Bowes, Acting Director, Divi-
sion of Epidemiology, Rhode Island Department of Health).


Comparative Influenza Age Specific Attack Rates
The figure below shows age specific attack rate
curves for a school family illness survey undertaken in
Tangipahoa Parish, La., during the influenza A2 epidemic
of 1957 in comparison with curves from samples in 3
similar surveys undertaken during the current 1963 in-
fluenza epidemic. Of particular interest is the lack of
high attack rates seen in the junior and senior high
school age groupings during the current season when
compared with the 1957 curve.

COMPARATIVE AGE SPECIFIC ATTACK RATES
INFLUENZA, 1957 and 1963

TANGIPAHOA PARISH, LOUISIANNA
FAMILY SURVEY- 1957
so
PEMBROKE, NORTH CAROLINA
FAMILY SURVEY- 1963
70
.. --- -- BALTIMORE, MARYLAN
FAMILY SURVEY- 1963
60
HOPI INDIAN RESERVATION-ARIZONA
S\ FAMILY SURVEY- 1963







IO


0 20 o0 40 5 60 70 8
AGE IN YEARS


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Botulism Wayne County, Michigan

A tuna fish salad, prepared from commercially canned
tuna fish, which contained botulism toxin Type E, resulted
in clinical illness in three womerywho ate of the salad.
Two of the victims died.


On Thursday morning, March 14, 1963, between 10
and 11 A.M., two of the women (patients A and B) had
prepared and eaten tuna salad sandwiches from a freshly
opened 6% oz. can of tuna fish. At approximately 12:30
P.M. the same day, the third woman (patient C) arrived
for lunch, but consumed only a small portion (approxi-
mately one teaspoon) of the tuna fish salad which re-
mained.
Onset of illness occurred in patients A and B between
6:30-7:00 P.M. on March 14, approximately within 8 hours after
eating the lunch. Patient A first complained of not being
able to focus her eyes and shortly thereafter complained
of feeling severely ill with difficult breathing. Throughout
the evening and night, she experienced intermittent vomit-
ing, along with the continued complaints of not being able
to breathe and see. Although extremely weak, there was
no obvious paralysis of extremities or face. There was no
diarrhea, fever, or chills at any time during the illness.
The patient became increasingly weak, with difficult
breathing, and expired on March 15, about 12 hours after
onset of symptoms.
Patient B, also complained first of visual difficulty
followed by vertigo and marked weakness. During the night
of March 14, she vomited frequently and on March 15
experienced difficulty in speaking. She was admitted to
the hospital at 9:20 A.M. on March 15. Physical examina-
tion revealed her to be acutely ill with generalized mus-
cular weakness and a peculiar sallow color. Temperature
was 96.20F., pulse 92, respirations 16, and blood pressure
of 115/80. Positive physical findings included dilated
pupils and bilateral ptosis. There was generalized muscle
weakness, primarily of the face and neck, with slurred
speech and weak voice. Respiratory excursion was poor
and her abdomen was flaccid without tenderness. Deep
tendon reflexes were symmetrical and hypoactive. No
sensory loss was noted. The patient could hold her head
up and elevate her arms only briefly. Provisional diagno-
sis was botulism and she was given five million units
each of botulinus antitoxin A and B. Because of poor
respiratory exchange, a tracheostomy was performed on
March 15. On Sunday, March 17, she experienced cardiac
arrest which responded to closed chest resuscitation. On
Monday, March 18, she received five million units of
botulism antitoxin Type E intramuscularly and five million
units intravenously without response. She remained semi-
comatose throughout the remainder of her hospital course
until she expired on March 19.
Patient C, who had ingested only a small amount of
the salad, although asymptomatic, was hospitalized and
received botulinus antitoxin A and B on Friday afternoon,
March 15. While in the emergency room at 6:00 P.M., she
became ill with vomiting and difficult breathing when
lying down. She experienced no other complaints although
she was noted to have unequal pupils. On Sunday, March
17, she was discharged with no complaints.
(Continued on page 98)








96 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Pneumonia-influenza mortality During the week
ending March 23rd, 957 pneumonia-influenza deaths were
reported by the 108 cities. The number of excess deaths
was 431, a decline of 154 from the 585 excess deaths
reported during the previous week. The cumulative total of
excess pneumonia-influenza deaths since the week ending
January 5th is now 3,071. The comparable total for the
1960 epidemic was 4,021.
All divisions (except the Pacific which has shown
no excess mortality this year) reported decreases during
the week ending March 23rd, but the numbers still remain
above normal levels.
Total deaths The number of deaths from all causes
reported during the week ending March 23rd was 13,422, an
excess of 1,476 over the expected level for this week,
but a decrease from the 1,977 excess deaths reported
during the previous week. The cumulative excess for
deaths from all causes since the week ending January 5th
is now 15,810, a number larger than the 13,882 excess
deaths from all causes reported during the comparable
period of the 1960 epidemic.


Older ages Among persons 65 years of age and
older the average weekly number of deaths from all causes
was 8,249 for the four-week period ending March 23rd. The
total number of excess deaths during this four-week period
was 5,361, a number greater than during any four-week
period of the 1960 epidemic. Since January 5th the cumu-
lative total of excess deaths at age 65 and over has reach-
ed 9,550. In 1960 the comparable total was 7,944.






DEATHS AMONG PERSONS 65 YEARS AND OVER
ALL CAUSES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
3/2 3/9 3/16 3/23 Total Average
Observed 8,576 8,369 8,294 7,758 32,997 8,249
Expected 6,946 6,926 6,899 6,865 27,636 6,909
Excess 1,630 1,443 1,395 893 5,361 1,340


DEATHS AT AGE 65 AND OVER IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


8,500


U,Uuu

INFLUENZA A2

7,500
RECORDED INFLUENZA B
DEATHS*

7,000



6,500
/ 6, "EXPECTED"
/ NUMBER""

6,000----- -


5,000 I I I I I I
PERIOD NUMBER I 7 13 I 7
1960 1961


13 I 7
1962


1963


* BY PLACE OF OCCURRENCE


"'CALCULATED FROM 1957-1961 EXPERIENCE


(See table, page 103)


NUMBER


OF


DEATHS







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Following the death of Patient A, the empty tuna can
and other materials used in preparation of lunch were ex-
amined. Clostridium botulinus organisms and botulinus
toxin were recovered from the can of tuna involved and the
intestinal contents of one of the fatal cases. Subsequent
studies showed the strain to be Type E, an uncommon
variety almost exclusively associated with fish.
(Reported by Harold Lambert, M.D., Associate Epidemiol-
ogist, Michigan Department of Health, Joseph G. Molner,
M.D., Director, Wayne County Health Department, and a
team from the Communicable Disease Center.)



Typhoid Fever Four cases of typhoid fever in the
United States, occurring among individuals returning from
Zermatt, Switzerland, have been reported. (See Inter-
national Notes). All have been confirmed by culture)
Listed below are data concerning time of exposure in
Zermatt:

LOCATION AGE SEX ONSET DATES IN ZERMATT
New York, N. Y. 24 F March 3 February 15-23
Berkeley, Calif. 40 M March 1 February 19-26
Hartford, Conn. 18 F March 7 February 5-17
Allentown, Pa. 23 F Unknown February 16-23


Exposure appears to have been confirmed to a relative-
ly short time during mid-February. Approximately 20 charter
ski flights have returned to the United States since March
4, with over 2,000 passengers, many of whom had been in
Zermatt. Additional cases of typhoid fever may be antici-
pated.
(Reported by: Dr. Harold Fuerst, Director, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, New York City Department of Health;
Dr. Rebecca Proctor, Epidemiology Section, Bureau of
Communicable Diseases, California State Department of


Health; Dr. James C. Hart, Director, Division of Preven-
table Diseases, Connecticut State Department of Health;
and, Dr. William D. Schrack, Director, Division of Com-
municable Disease Control, Pennsylvania State Department
of Health.)




INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
Typhoid Zermatt, Switzerland
The following information has been reported by
Dr. Reimert Ravenholt, Epidemiologist, Division of
Foreign Quarantine, Public Health Service, Paris, and
is based in part on an official report from the Swiss Min-
istry of Health dated March 23, 1963
The first known case of typhoid fever in Zermatt
developed in a laborer who arrived in Valais Canton on
February 6, 1963. He became ill on February 13 and was
hospitalized in a Zermatt clinic until February 25.
Typhoid fever was first suspected by the Zermatt physi-
cians on March 10. A bacteriologist from Geneva began
inquiries on March 12. At that time from 10 to 20 suspect
cases were known. By March 20, a total of 13 cases had
been confirmed but source of infection had not yet been
identified.
Dr. Ravenholt reports on March 26 that a total of
about 250 cases have been identified in Europe Of these
180 are in Switzerland, 43 in Great Britain, 8 in West
Germany, 5 in Holland, 3 in Austria, 8 in France, and 1
in Belgium. The cases in Britain, Germany, and Holland
have been confirmed as S. typhi phage type E-1.
From limited information submitted by Dr. Ravenholt
and the 4 cases in the United States (See Typhoid) the
period of exposure appears to have occurred in mid-
February.












Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


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100 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 23, 1963 AND MARCH 24, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
12th week First 12 weeks 12th week First 12 weeks 12th week 12th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES....... 1 4 36 72 1 3 32 45 15 16

NEW ENGLAND ............. -
Maine ................. -
New Hampshire.......... -
Vermont............... -
Massachusetts......... -
Rhode Island.......... -
Connecticut........... -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 6 28 1 6 15 1
New York............... 1 4 28 1 4 15
New Jersey............. 1 1 -
Pennsylvania 1 1 I -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 8 8 7 5 2 3
Ohio .................. 2 4 1 4 1 -
Indiana............... I 2 1 -
Illinois............... 4 2 4 2
Michigan............. 2 2 1 -
Wisconsin.............. 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 1 5 1 1 2
Minnesota.............- -
Iowa................... 1 3 1 2 -
Missouri................. 1 2 -
North Dakota........... -
South Dakota........... -
Nebraska..............
Kansas................ -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 3 6 2 5 2 1
Delaware..............- -
Maryland.............. -
District of Columbia.. 1
Virginia.............. I
West Virginia...........
North Carolina......... 2 1 2 1
South Carolina......... 1
Georgia ............... 1 1 1 -
Florida ............... 2 2 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL .....,. 2 2 I 1 I 3 3
Kentucky ............... 2 3
Tennessee................ 1
Alabama ............... 2 1 1 1 1
Mississippi ...........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 10 12 10 9 1
Arkansas........... ..
Louisiana............. 9 4 9 4
Oklahoma.................
Texas................... 1 8 1 5 1

MOUNTAIN.................. 5 4
Montana.................. 2 1
Idaho................ -
Wyoming ..............
Colorado...............
New Mexico ............ -
Arizona................ 2 2 -- -
Utah................... 1 -
Nevada................. -

PACIFIC.................. 1 1 6 6 1 1 5 4 7 8
Washington ............ 2
Oregon................ 1 I 1
California............ 1 1 5 6 1 1 4 4 7 6
Alaska................
Hawaii................ -

Puerto Rico.............* 2 2 2 2 2 2 1











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 101


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 23, 1963 AND MARCH 24, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Area Cumu- Cumu- 12th week
lative lative Under 20 &
12th week 12 weeks 12th week 12 weeks 12th week 20 yr. over Total 12th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 11 76 7 79 28 30 478 388 912 1,223 14,721 19,241

NEW ENGLAND .............. 3 1 5 37 41 78 60 636 1,965
Maine................. 22 15 37 16 8 169
New Hampshire......... 1 3 4 10 9 38
Vermont ............... 2 2 2 82 67
Massachusetts ......... 2 1 1 10 11 21 18 118 939
Rhode Island.......... 1 3 1 1 2 3 60 119
Connecticut........... 1 3 9 12 11 359 633

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 4 2 9 4 10 108 96 204 167 1,481 2,976
New York............... 3 2 4 2 9 43 57 100 93 746 1,654
New Jersey............ 1 13 16 29 23 268 1,036
Pennsylvania .......... 1 4 2 1 52 23 75 51 467 286

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 5 1 6 5 2 79 51 135 320 6,119 2,265
Ohio................... 1 24 21 47 89 555 308
Indiana .............. 2 16 1 17 42 152 418
Illinois.............. 1 5 2 2 1 14 13 28 97 418 598
Michigan .............. 1 1 2 1 23 13 36 86 1,447 707
Wisconsin............. 1 2 3 7 6 3,547 234

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 9 59 3 28 3 17 18 42 91 810 653
Minnesota.............. 1 5 15 2 4 25 257 38
Iowa.................. 6 44 1 4 3 7 18 227 443
Missouri............... 1 3 1 3 10 12 23 22 113 26
North Dakota.......... 2 210 125
South Dakota........... 1 3 7 4 21
Nebraska .............. 2 3 4 4 12 3
Kansas ................ 2 3 1 4 8 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 14 4 2 55 40 98 147 1,450 1,272
Delaware.............. 1 26 14
Maryland.............. 2 1 22 6 28 17 172
District of Columbia.. 1 2 2 1 28
Virginia............... 1 2 4 8 13 32 509 442
West Virginia......... 1 12 5 18 16 378 470
North Carolina........ 1 11 13 24 53 37 41
South Carolina........ 3 1 2 6 65 7
Georgia............... 1 4 2 2 6 3 5
Florida............... 4 4 5 9 15 432 93

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 8 1 59 35 96 137 566 1,650
Kentucky.............. 1 12 8 22 49 234 420
Tennessee..........,.. .. 1 17 8 25 47 262 1,117
Alabama................ 1 7 20 5 25 17 45 35
Mississippi........... 10 14 24 24 25 78

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 1 5 10 4 37 20 58 65 1,258 4,377
Arkansas.............. 2 1 1 3 1 4 7 99 13
Louisiana............. 9 4 13 5 13 8
Oklahoma.............. 2 4 2 2 6 4 180
Texas................. 1 1 5 3 25 13 39 47 1,142 4,176

MOUNTAIN................. I 1 12 3 43 66 1,042 1,202
Montana .............. 7 1 9 5 111 490
Idaho................. 5 12 271 43
Wyoming ................ 1 5
Colorado.............. 1 13 9 276 278
New Mexico............ 3 3 10 NN NN
Arizona............... 1 10 23 300 195
Utah.................. 1 1 2 3 6 64 190
Nevada................ .- 15 6

PACIFIC .................. 1 1 10 6 74 84 158 170 1,359 2,881
Washington............ 3 3 7 10 20 234 931
Oregon................ ..- 1 13 8 21 24 175 565
California............ 1 7 5 58 68 126 114 717 1,326
Alaska................ 11 25 20
Hawaii................. 1 1 1 208 39

Puerto Rico.............. 2 5 13 2 15 21 9 114










102 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 23, 1963 AND MARCH 24, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia 'Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
rea Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
12th wk. 12 weeks 12th week 12thwk. 12th wk. 12th wk. 12th wk. 12 weeks 12th week 12 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 61 691 11,207 8,926 3 1 11 76 89 125 783

NEW ENGLAND......... 4 49 1,276 933 3 1 1
Maine.............. 9 39 277 -
New Hampshire...... 1 2 3 1i I
Vermont............ 1 45 96 1 -
Massachusetts...... 2 20 174 107 2 -
Rhode Island....... 5 79 38 -
Connecticut........ 1 12 936 415 -

MIDDLE ATIANTIC..... 10 93 806 607 2 7 4 4 26
New York........... 2 40 437 308 2 7 1 3 17
New Jersey......... 3 15 188 117
Pennsylvania....... 5 38 181 182 3 1 9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 11 116 1,444 1,006 1 5 11 24 94
Ohio............... 4 31 311 127 1 10 12 40
Indiana............. 1 16 113 209 2 1 10 12
Illinois........... 3 17 208 220 1 17
Michigan........... 2 36 373 208 1 18
Wisconsin........... 1 16 439 242 1 1 1 7

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 5 40 371 270 1 3 11 36 178
Minnesota.......... 1 8 40 35 1 1 4 7 55
Iowa............... 1 1 109 96 1 3 13 56
Missouri........... 2 19 16 26 1 2 9 34
North Dakota...... 1 170 69 3 2
South Dakota....... 2 5 1 4 27
Nebraska........... 8 1 I
Kansas............. 1 1 35 39 1 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC .... 8 143 881 719 1 1 15 15 7 144
Delaware........... 1 7 2 -
Maryland............ 1 21 47 26 2 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 -
Virginia............ 1 39 297 328 1 1 5 4 55
West Virginia...... 9 257 163 5 7 1 53
North Carolina..... 3 24 53 33 3 4
South Carolina..... 10 35 74 2 5
Georgia............ 1 8 33 1 1 3
Florida............ 2 28 152 92 3 1 2 24

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 6 56 1,424 1,369 1 1 7 9 15 83
Kentucky............ 3 20 60 173 1 2 5 5 34
Tennessee.......... 3 25 1,251 1,131 4 3 9 40
Alabama............ 7 57 5 1 1 1 9
Mississippi........ 4 56 60 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 4 71 1,061 1,014 1 4 18 30 25 158
Arkansas........... 5 10 4 7 4 5 11
Louisiana.......... 2 24 6 5 1 1 4 2 1 20
Oklahoma............ 15 25 14 2 2 2 11
Texas............... 2 27 1,020 991 1 5 22 19 116

MOUNTAIN............... 3 23 2,464 1,311 2 4 1 14
Montana............ 50 90 -
Idaho.............. 202 133 -
Wyoming............. 1 92 82 -
Colorado........... 2 5 1,283 414 -
New Mexico.......... 2 445 247 1 5
Arizona............ 1 5 262 163 4 1 9
Utah.............. 9 130 182 -
Nevada............. 1 -

PACIFIC............. 10 100 1,480 1,697 2 16 4 13 85
Washington......... 2 11 647 594 -
Oregon............. 4 26 36 2 I
California......... 6 79 731 996 1 13 4 13 84
Alaska............. 4 58 50 -
Hawaii ............. 2 2 18 21 1 1-
Puerto Rico......... 1 7 1 3 1










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (D). TOTAL DEATHS AMONG PERSONS 65 YEARS AND OVER IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be-published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


103


Area For weeks ending Area For weeks ending
3/2 3/9 3/16 3/23 __3/2 3/9 3/16 3/23


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn...........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn...........
Lowell, Mass.............
Lynn, Mass...............
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I............
Somerville, Mass.........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................
Allentown, Pa.............
Buffalo, N.Y...............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa........ .. ......
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y.............
Schenectady, N.Y.........
Scranton, Pa.............
Syracuse, N.Y..............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y.................
Yonkers, N.Y..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio..............
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio...........
Columbus, Ohio.............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind..................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis...............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill..............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind ..........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.........
Duluth, Minn.............
Kansas City, Kans........
Kansas City, Mo...........
Lincoln, Nebr............
Minneapolis, Minn........
Omaha, Nebr..............
St. Louis, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans............


194
41
31
36
46
16
28
29
54
47
19
31
31
68


43
26
122
32
20
35
65
79
1,198
29
403
167
27
99
27
50
60
53
21
16


54
42
568
188
152
97
79
303
43
28
24
19
32
113
20
101
21
32
26
78
50


50
23
35
138
34
105
49
223
53
24


240
30
24
42
40
20
24
29
30
63
9
27
24
54


37
34
103
26
17
26
52
47
1,060
19
442
178
20
91
16
28
55
42
20
21


43
36
462
150
150
94
73
308
47
31
43
23
40
145
17
113
21
18
35
90
47


30
11
21
110
18
83
40
268
56
39


199
35
24
34
26
33
22
27
32
45
6
44
29
54


30
29
125-
22
26
30
44
65
1,063
28
449
109
21
90
24
32
45
53
27
27


43
36
560
111
156
103
62
240
38
20
31
19
60
132
24
113
33
29
35
84
51


39
14
18
101
16
81
46
206
67
31


187
28
30
25
29
21
20
26
30
34
9
23
25
50


26
32
120
43
17
34
42
58
987
18
354
129
20
76
17
19
47
29
28
24


45
24
456
90
126
83
62
243
41
38
35
27
32
121
16
98
16
24
22
95
50


45
15
39
92
17
91
59
176
62
43


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga..............
Baltimore, Md.............
Charlotte, N.C...........
Jacksonville, Fla........
Miami, Fla...............
Norfolk, Va..............
Richmond, Va..............
Savannah, Ga.............
St. Petersburg, Fla......
Tampa, Fla...............
Washington, D.C...........
Wilmington, Del...........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala..........
Chattanooga, Tenn........
Knoxville, Tenn..........
Louisville, Ky............
Memphis, Tenn ............
Mobile, Ala..............
Montgomery, Ala..........
Nashville, Tenn..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex..............
Baton Rouge, La..........
Corpus Christi, Tex......
Dallas, Tex..............
El Paso, Tex..............
Fort Worth, Tex..........
Houston, Tex............
Little Rock, Ark.........
New Orleans, La..........
Oklahoma City, Okla......
San Antonio, Tex.........
Shreveport, La...........
Tulsa, Okla...............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex......
Colorado Springs, Colo...
Denver, Colo.............
Ogden, Utah...............
Phoenix, Ariz............
Pueblo, Colo.............
Salt Lake City, Utah.....
Tucson, Ariz.............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif..........
Fresno, Calif............
Glendale, Calif..........
Honolulu, Hawaii.........
Long Beach, Calif........
Los Angeles, Calif.......
Oakland, Calif...........
Pasadena, Calif..........
Portland, Oreg...........
Sacramento, Calif........
San Diego, Calif.........
San Francisco, Calif.....
San Jose, Calif..........
Seattle, Wash.............
Spokane, Wash............
Tacoma, Wash.............


72
161
21
49
56
31
56
20
81
67
129
41


68
19
25
61
76
31
31
46


30
6
9
83
13
35
103
36
118
72
60
33
25


19
15
63
10
58
10
31
31


21
20
26
28
34
300
51
29
68
35
60
132
28
76
49
31


76
138
24
29
57
29
40
18
88
69
84
20


44
44
34
148
87
23
22
56


37
17
9
76
19
39
143
58
114
38
72
35
57


11
17
85
9
80
7
26
43


10
25
21
18
38
311
92
17
74
36
43
131
28
74
32
28


San Juan, P.R............... 5 8 16 9


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages.................... 13,422
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 957
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............. 757
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 7,758


Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place ofoccurrence.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Illll l l 11 II 11111111 1 111111111111111iiI
3 1262 08864 1310

104 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report









U.S. DEPO.i Ol









Notew: Thes paildoal det are b.eed on w ykly teleffrt to the Commiti
able Disease Center by the lndividul StteU hkeo.t depatmet..
Sybole: --- Data net aalable
SQuantity ser
Procedures for construction of varlo.s morlity carves may be obtained bro
Stattitic Section, Commuicable Disease Center, Pabli Health Service,
U. S. Depmmelt of Hel.th, Educatio, and Welfare, Atlanta 22, Georgl.









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