Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00120

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
r pi'* vU W 7 f el "


Morbidity and Mortal i L|



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFA "

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE j pAPR 19C3

Prepared by the i 634-51

For release March 22, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA 12, No. 11
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 16, 1963


INFLUENZA One or more outbreaks of influenza-like
disease have now been reported from 37 States and the
District of Columbia. States reporting outbreaks for the
first time this week are New Hampshire, Idaho, and
Alaska. Influenza A2 virus has been isolated or confirmed
by serologic titer rise as the causative agent of one or
more outbreaks in 25 States and the District of Columbia.
States reporting confirmed outbreaks for the first time this
week are Vermont, Rhode Island, Arkansas, and Tennes-
see. With the exception of localized outbreaks in Idaho,
Montana, and Alaska and the more widespread community
outbreaks in Arizona reported in last week's MMWR (Vol.


12, No. 10), the Mountain and West Coast States continue
to report no more than the usual seasonal incidence of
acute respiratory disease. The number of pneumonia-
influenza deaths reported weekly for 108 cities has re-
mained above the epidemic threshold since the week
ending January 12, and this week demonstrates a con-
tinued rise.
The following reports are from areas of the country
currently experiencing new or widening outbreaks of
influenza-like disease:
Alaska An increased incidence of acute respira-
tory disease has been noted in the city of Juneau, begin-


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
llth Week Cumulative
Disease Ended Ended Median First 11 weeks
March 16, March 17, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis ............... 23 17 -- 252 180 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 9 4 14 65 63 134
Diphtheria ...................... 8 13 10 72 123 187
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 33 18 24 232 22 268
Hepatitis, infectious and serum.. 949 1,217 858 12,076 15,581 7,997
Measles ....................... 13,553 17,654 17,106 114,461 129,905 129,905
Meningococcal infections......... 70 51 51 628 571 613
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 2 2 5 33 68 186
Paralytic.................... 1 2 4 29 42 107
Nonparalytic................. 2 12 56
Unspecified.................. 1 1 2 14 23
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 11,086 9,721 108,931 96,719
Tetanus ........................ 2 2 --- 35 29 ---
Tularemia...................... 4 5 --- 48 55 ---
Typhoid fever ................... 5 9 10 64 91 108
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... -- 3
Rabies in Animals............... 88 130 106 694 798 912


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
CAnum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Psittacosis: Ga. 1 17
Botulism: 2 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Hawaii 2 22 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 2


L- ~










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS

FEBRUARY 1963 AND FEBRUARY 1962


CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS: By Reporting Area February 1963 and February


1962 Provisional Data


February Cumulative February Cumulative
Reporting Area January-February Reporting Area January-February
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962
NEW ENGLAND............... 32 65 75 130 EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 135 77 247 154
Maine.................... 1 3 1 6 Kentucky................. 12 11 21 22
New Hampshire............. 1 0 2 0 Tennessee................ 59 22 96 44
Vermont.................. 0 0 0 0 Alabama.................. 47 40 102 80
Massachusetts............ 13 43 37 86 Mississippi.............. 17 4 28 8
Rhode Island............. 1 4 3 8
Connecticut.............. 16 15 32 30 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ........ 214 229 459 458
Arkansas................. 10 11 30 22
MIDDLE ATLANTIC............ 455 494 985 988 Louisiana................ 56 98 105 196
Upstate New York......... 39 40 85 80 Oklahoma................. 13 8 37 16
New York City........... 268 274 574 548 Texas .................... 135 112 287 224
Pa. (Excl. Phila.) ...... 10 14 25 28
Philadelphia............. 62 62 126 124 MOUNTAIN.................. 48 31 86 62
New Jersey............... 76 104 175 208 Montana.................... 0 0 00
Idaho.................... 0 1 0 2
EAST NORTH CENTRAL......... 146 139 302 278 Wyoming................... 3 0 3 0
Ohio ..................... 34 13 61 26 Colorado................ 5 2 12 4
Indiana................... 3 12 9 24 New Mexico............... 10 10 18 20
Downstate Illinois....... 11 18 21 36 Arizona................... 23 13 39 26
Chicago .................. 66 59 149 118 Utah..................... 0 1 3 2
Michigan................. 29 28 56 56 Nevada.................... 7 4 11 8
Wisconsin ................ 3 9 6 18
PACIFIC................... 187 155 393 310
WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 33 33 68 66 Washington............... 13 5 30 10
Minnesota ................ 4 6 13 12 Oregon ................... 2 4 7 8
Iowa..................... 3 2 3 4 California............... 168 146 350 292
Missouri ................. 13 11 26 22 Alaska................... 1 0 2 0
North Dakota.............. 0 0 0 0 Hawaii.................... 3 0 4 0
South Dakota.............. 2 6 5 12
Nebraska................. 6 2 10 4 U. S. TOTAL............... 1,657 1,666 3,553 3,332
Kansas................... 5 6 11 12
TERRITORIES............... 53 41 109 82
SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 407 443 939 886 Puerto Rico.............. 52 38 105 76
Delaware................. 3 9 13 18 Virgin Islands........... 1 3 4 6
Maryland................. 42 61 90 122
District of Columbia..... 52 61 115 122
Virginia................... 26 44 51 88
West Virginia............ 3 5 6 10
North Carolina........... 48 55 138 110 Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
South Carolina........... 53 54 114 108 through previous months.
Georgia................... 58 59 155 118
Florida.................. 122 95 257 190


ning about the first of March. There has been some in-
crease in industrial absenteeism in the area but little
increase in school absenteeism.
(Reported by F. 0. Wicks, M.D., Division of Public Health,
Alaska Department of Health and Welfare).
Arkonsos A laboratory confirmed outbreak of type
A2 influenza has been reported from Jefferson County in
the central part of the State. The outbreak has thus far
been confined to a single small community (pop. 980)
where cases have occurred largely among adults. Earliest
cases were observed in mid-February; the epidemic is now
past its peak. Serologic confirmation has been obtained
in two cases thus far.
(Reported b) ]. T. Herron, AM.D.. William L. Bunch, Jr.,
MI.D., Arkansas State Health Department).

Arizona Follow-up As part of epidemiologic
studies undertaken during the outbreak of influenza on the
Hlopi Indian Reservation .M''I" I Vol. 12, No. 'i surveys
of two vill.. in the area of Second Mesa were done in
order to determine attack rates for influenza-like disease.


Both villages experienced substantial outbreaks, which
had subsided just prior to the survey. The overall attack
rate for 317 people surveyed (the total population of both
villages) was 31 percent. Age specific attack rates are
given in the table below:


AGE GROUP POPULATION CASES ATTACK RATE %

0-4 65 22 34
5-14 84 27 29
15-24 32 9 28
25 -34 32 9 28
35 49 22 9 41
50 64 27 11 41
65 + 23 6 26
Unknown 22 5 23

Totals 317 98 31



(Reported by Dr. W. S. Baum, Area Medical (,' .. Division
of Indian Health, Phoenix, Arizona, and the Communicable
Disease Center).









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Idaho A limited outbreak of influenza-like illness,
thus far confined to a single small community, has been
reported from Latah County in the northwestern part of the
State. The outbreak was first noted in late February and
is now past its peak. The illness was clinically com-
patible with influenza, although laboratory confirmation
is not available. School-age children appeared to be in-
volved most, several schools in the community having
been closed at the height of the epidemic.
(Reported by Dr. John A. Mather, Chief, Preventive Medi-
cine, Idaho Department of Health).
New Hampshire Seven counties in southern New
Hampshire reported outbreaks of influenza-like illness
during the week ending March 16. Four of these counties
lie adjacent to sites of recent outbreaks in the neigh-


boring States of Maine and Vermont. It is estimated that
the epidemic began in early March and probably reached
its peak last week. Cases have been relatively mild
clinically, causing moderate increases in school absen-
teeism in several areas. Laboratory confirmation is not
yet available.
(Reported by Dr. William Prince, Bureau of Communicable
Disease, New Hampshire State Health Department).
Ohio Twenty-eight of Ohio's 88 counties have re-
ported outbreaks of influenza-like illness since January 1.
Hamilton, Franklin, Highland and Scioto Counties have
each had two or more laboratory confirmed cases (by virus
isolation or rise in titer). Nineteen of the 28 counties re-
porting acute febrile respiratory disease are in the south-
(Continued on page 92)


WEEKLY PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS


UNITED STATES
08 0tn


Pneumonia-influenza deaths During the week end-
ing March 16th, 585 excess pneumonia-influenza deaths
were reported. This is the largest excess number recorded
in any week since the first appearance (1957) of influenza
A2 in this country. During 1957-58 the greatest number of
excess deaths was 542 during the week ending November
9, 1957. In the 1960 influenza A2 epidemic, 508 excess
deaths were reported during each of the weeks ending
February 13th and 20th.
The cumulative total of pneumonia-influenza deaths
reported since the week ending January 5, 1963, is 2,640.
In 1960, the corresponding number was 3,813. However,
during the current epidemic, excess deaths began to in-
crease later in the season than in 1960 and are still at
high levels.
During the current week, increases occurred in the
South Central, West North Central and Mountain States.
The New England and East North Central States remained
at approximately last week's levels. Decreases were re-
ported by the Middle and South Atlantic States. No excess
mortality has thus far been observed in the Pacific States.
Excess deaths from all causes during the week end-
ing March 16th were 1,977. Although the weekly excess
for all causes has now decreased for two weeks, the
cumulative total of 14,334 deaths now exceeds the com-
parable total for 1960.
As shown in the accompanying table and chart an
excess of 136 infant deaths was reported during the four-
week period ending March 16th. The excess was concen-
trated in the weeks ending March 2nd and 9th.


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
2/23 3/2 3/9 3/16 Total Average
Observed 701 832 870 765 3,168 792
Expected 764 760 756 752 3,032 758
Excess -63 72 114 13 136 34




DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 108 U.S. CITIES
Average number per week by four-wk penods





|- -~
NUMBER -
Ho
DEATHS -




S '. .' I H


(See table, page 91)


EPIDEMIC
HRlEMHLD











88 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reporl


Table i. CASIS OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEFKS ENDED

MARCH 16, 1963 AND MARCH 17, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis


Area


Cumulative Cumulative
llth week Firstll weeks llth week First 11 weeks 11th week llth week


NEl








MID




EAS







WES









SOU











EAS






WES






MOU










PAC







Pue


1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 2 2 33 68 1 2 29 42 23 17

W ENGLAND .............. 1 -
Maine...................- -
New Hampshire........ -
Vermont............... -
Massachusetts........- -
Rhode Island.......... 1 -
Connecticut...........-

)DLE ATLANTIC.......... 5 27 5 14 4 2
New York............... 4 27 4 14 4
New Jersey............ -
Pennsylvania I 1 2

T NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 8 7 1 7 5 6 1
Ohio.................. 1 2 4 1 1 4
Indiana............... 1 1 1
Illinois.............. 4 2 4 --
Michigan............... 2 2 5 1
Wisconsin........... -

T NORTH CENTRAL...... 1 4 1 1 1
Minnesota.............--
Iowa.................. 2 1
Missouri............... 1 2 1
North Dakota........... 1
South Dakota..........
Nebraska..............
Kansas.................

TH ATLANTIC............... 3 6 2 5 2 3
Delaware...............
Maryland..............
District of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia............... 1 -
West Virginia.......... 1
North Carolina........ 2 1 2 1
South Carolina........
Georgia .............. 1 1 1 -
Florida.............. 2 2 1 2

T SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 2 1 1
Kentucky.............. -
Tennessee.............. 1
Alabama............... 1 -
Mississippi ...... 1

T SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 1 1 10 12 1 1 10 9 1
Arkansas.............
Louisiana............. 1 1 9 4 1 1 9 4
Oklahoma.............
Texas................. 1 8 1 5 1

JNTAIN................. 5 4 2
Montana............... 2 -
Idaho ................ -
Wyoming...............
Colorado.............. 2
New Mexico...........
Arizona............... 2 -
Utah................... 1 -
Nevada ...............

:IFIC .................. 5 5 4 3 9 7
Washington ........... 1
Oregon................ 1 1
California............. 4 5 3 3 8 7
Alaska ...............
Hawaii.................

erto Rico............... 2 2 4










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 89


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 16, 1963 AND MARCH 17, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- llth week
lative lative Under 20 &
llth week 11 weeks llth week 11 weeks llth week 20 yr. over Total llth week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 9 65 8 72 33 18 486 405 949 1,217 13,553

NEW ENGLAND.............. 3 1 84 49 138 73 387
Maine.................. 51 21 72 19 7
New Hampshire.......... 2 3 8 16 1
Vermont ............... 6 55
Massachusetts......... 2 18 10 30 24 101
Rhode Island........... 1 1 1 3 4 17
Connecticut........... 12 12 24 8 206

MIDDLE ATLANTIC........... 1 4 7 10 9 102 98 200 145 884
New York.............. 1 3 2 9 3 61 59 120 64 110
New Jersey............. 1 8 18 26 37 230
Pennsylvania.......... 1 4 1 6 33 21 54 44 544

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 4 1 5 2 1 72 53 131 284 6,037
Ohio................... 23 16 42 88 590
Indiana............... 2 12 4 16 22 210
Illinois.............. 4 2 1 17 11 28 49 349
Michigan .............. 2 20 20 40 119 1,772
Wisconsin............. 1 1 2 5 6 3,116

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 7 50 4 25 6 1 15 11 30 90 1,146
Minnesota............. 4 3 15 2 2 6 34 390
Iowa................... 7 38 1 1 4 4 8 25 437
Missouri................ 2 1 1 7 3 11 16 106
North Dakota.......... 2 3 204
South Dakota.......... 2 7 3 1 -
Nebraska.............. 2 1 2 3 1 9
Kansas................ 2 1 2 2 10 NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC............. 2 13 2 1 50 34 84 137 1,235
Delaware.............. 1 3 3 42
Maryland............... 7 3 10 28 47
District of Columbia.. 2 3 5 3 2
Virginia.............. 1 1 4 6 10 26 325
West Virginia......... 1 1 7 3 10 12 316
North Carolina........ 1 17 11 28 35 42
South Carolina........ 3 1 2 3 5 4 118
Georgia............... 1 3 1 2 3 7 4
Florida............... 4 7 3 10 22 339

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 8 1 49 38 94 145 576
Kentucky.............. 13 7 27 56 133
Tennessee ............. 1 24 12 36 49 266
Alabama................ 1 7 8 10 18 25 136
Mississippi........... 1 4 9 13 15 41

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 4 1 10 1 34 22 58 107 891
Arkansas.............. 2 1 1 1 4 5 17 3
Louisiana............. 5 3 8 17 22
Oklahoma............... 2 4 1 2 3 10 7
Texas................ 1 5 27 13 42 63 859

MOUNTAIN.................. 1 21 7 55 46 1,007
Montana............... 7 1 8 125
Idaho.................. 6 7 150
Wyoming................ 1 7
Colorado............... 8 15 257
New Mexico............. 3 3 6 2 NN
Arizona................. 13 12 307
Utah.................. 1 11 3 14 7 157
Nevada............... 2 4

PACIFIC .................. 1 1 1 12 4 59 93 159 190 1,390
Washington............. 1 12 10 25 23 225
Oregon.................. 8 14 22 29 316
California............ 1 1 1 11 4 38 67 105 130 680
Alaska................. 1 2 7 7 47
Hawaii................ 1 122


Puerto Rico.............. 1 3 18 8 26 32 16


17,654

1,975
262
49
22
1,027
144
471

3,130
1,840
919
371

1,545
207
269
438
479
152

960
18
676
129
88
47
2
NN

1,249
8
142
48
445
298
14
29
10
255

1,973
529
1,235
57
152

3,337
37
38
97
3,165

577
163
21

234
NN
86
73


2,908
1,188
600
1,101
6
13

139


I










90 M1orbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table i CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLI DISEASES: UNITII) STATES

FOR WEEKS INDED

MARCH 16, 1963 AND MARCH 17, 1962 (Continued)


M ,-rlnF,' cal ri i ... -.
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cuu- Cumu-
lative ------- lative lative
llth wk. 1 weeks llth week llth wk. l1th wk llth wk. llthwk. 11 weeks llth week 11 weeks
196 1 .* i ,: 1 r,. I .

UNITED STATES.... 70 628 11,086 9,721 2 4 5 64 88 130 694

NEW ENGLAND........ 4 45 1,333 657 1 3 -
Maine.............. 9 111 42 -
New Hampshire ..... 1 1 5
Vermont............ 1 8 38 1 1
Massachusetts...... 1 18 232 120 2
Rhode Island ..... 1 5 105 23
Connecticut........ 1 11 872 434 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 7 83 733 627 5 22
New York........... 3 38 437 382 5 16
New Jersey......... 2 12 139 106 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 33 157 139 6

EAST NORTH CENTRAL. 14 105 1,405 998 2 1 4 5 35 83
Ohio................ 1 27 255 99 1 1 23 30
Indiana............ 1 15 207 181 2 3 9 11
Illinois........... 14 235 199 1 1 1 2 17
Michigan........... 8 34 416 277 1 1 18
Wisconsin.......... 4 15 292 242 -- 1 7

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 35 293 337 1 3 22 28 167
Minnesota.......... 1 7 47 20 1 1 5 6 51
Iowa................ 109 116 1 9 11 53
Missouri............ 2 17 8 18 1 4 5 32
North Dakota....... 1 120 45 1 2
South Dakota....... 2 2 2 4 26
Nebraska........... 8 1 1
Kansas.............. 7 137 2 1 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 12 135 945 663 2 14 16 8 129
Delaware ........... 1 25 4 -
Maryland............ 20 52 46 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 3 -
Virginia............ 8 38 312 226 7 2 50
West Virginia...... 1 9 234 142 5 5 4 46
North Carolina..... 1 21 91 60 3 4
South Carolina..... 10 25 32 1 3
Georgia............. 1 7 1 2 3
Florida............. 1 26 206 150 2 3 1 2 23

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 6 48 2,098 1,641 2 6 12 25 74
Kentucky........... 2 15 200 256 1 4 5 29
Tennessee.......... 3 22 1,564 1,285 1 4 4 19 37
Alabama............. 7 77 1 1 4 1 8
Mississippi........ 1 4 257 100 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 11 67 958 1,117 2 14 16 29 128
Arkansas........... 1 5 4 2 7 1 7
Louisiana.......... 3 22 9 4 3 2 18
Oklahoma............ 2 15 32 23 1 2 9
Texas............... 5 25 913 1,088 2 4 13 26 94

MOUNTAIN............ 2 20 1,780 1,670 -- 2 1 10
Montana............ 38 51 -
Idaho.............. 142 148 -
Wyoming............ 1 128 157 -
Colorado........... 3 720 674 -
New Mexico......... 2 297 339 1 1 5
Arizona............ 4 286 176 5
Utah............... 2 9 163 123 -
Nevada .............. 1 6 2 -

PACIFIC............. 11 90 1,541 2,011 13 16 5 81
Washington......... 2 9 460 853 -
Oregon............. 1 4 27 38 1 1
California......... 88 73 835 1,101 12 16 5 80
Alaska............. 4 104 5 -
Hawaii............ 115 14 -
Puerto Rico......... 2 5 4 3 2 1











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 91





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER 1 YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending

S2/23 3/2 3/9 3/16 2/23 3/2 3/9 3/16


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.............
Bridgeport, Conn..........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass...............
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn............
Providence, R.I..........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn............
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................
Allentown, Pa............
Buffalo, N.Y ..............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J...........
Erie, Pa..................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J................
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y.............
Schenectady, N.Y..........
Scranton, Pa.............
Syracuse, N.Y.............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y................
Yonkers, N.Y..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio...............
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio...........
Columbus, Ohio............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis.............
Milwaukee, Wis.............
Peoria, Ill.................
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.........
Duluth, Minn..............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo...........
Lincoln, Nebr..............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr...............
St. Louis, Mo..............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans..............


15
3
1
3
8
1
0
2
7
5
0
3
1
3


6
3
9
4
2
1
6
6
81
3
34
5
0
4
0
2
3
4
0
1


5
1
51
7
26
13
3
23
1
4
0
2
2
8
6
9
5
6
0
8
1


4
0
3
2
0
8
6
12
4*
4


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............. 10 11 8 17
Baltimore, Md............ 15 11 30 15
Charlotte, N.C........... 5 7 8 6
Jacksonville, Fla........ 2 5 5 0
Miami, Fla............... 2 2 7 2
Norfolk, Va............. 5 7 5 15
Richmond, Va............. 19 8 10 2
Savannah, Ga............. 1 1 1 1
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 0 0 3 1
Tampa, Fla ............... 4 6 7 4
Washington, D.C.......... 12 22 21 10
Wilmington, Del.......... 5 4 6 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 7 15 5 9
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 4 5 5 0
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 3 2 0 0
Louisville, Ky........... 6 9 8 15
Memphis, Tenn............. 7 10 10 13
Mobile, Ala............... 5 4 1 4
Montgomery, Ala.......... 3 7 1 4
Nashville, Tenn.......... 4 4 9 13

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 3 0 3 1
Baton Rouge, La.......... 4 3 1 0
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 1 4 2 1
Dallas, Tex............... 14 9 16 9
El Paso, Tex.............. 6 4 8 5
Fort Worth, Tex......... 2 6 8 2
Houston, Tex.............. 12 19 7 6
Little Rock, Ark......... 5 1 8 7
New Orleans, La.......... 14 11 10 16
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 3 9 4 5
San Antonio, Tex......... 15 6 14 9
Shreveport, La........... 0 8 4 5
Tulsa, Okla............... 1 1 5 3

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 7 5 7 3
Colorado Springs, Colo... 0 1 0 2
Denver, Colo.............. 15 13 11 15
Ogden, Utah............... 1 0 1 3
Phoenix, Ariz............. 5 11 2 8
Pueblo, Colo.............. 2 0 2 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 1 5 3 3
Tucson, Ariz,............ 0 2 1 5

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 1 1 1 0
Fresno, Calif............ 4 3 3 4
Glendale, Calif.......... 2 1 1 1
Honolulu, Hawaii.......... 8 9 6 5
Long Beach, Calif........ 1 12 2 5
Los Angeles, Calif....... 41 33 32 32
Oakland, Calif........... 16 5 3 9
Pasadena, Calif.......... 1 0 1 l*
Portland, Oreg............ 5 8 8 8
Sacramento, Calif........ 3 5 5 3
San Diego, Calif......... 8 5 7 13
San Francisco, Calif ..... 5 9 17 9
San Jose, Calif.......... 2 6 1 1
Seattle, Wash............ 12 6 8 8
Spokane, Wash............ 4 4 2 5
Tacoma, Wash.............. 2 2 3 2*

San Juan, P.R............... 6 6 3 3


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


13,970
1,118
765
8,278


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place o occurrence.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Ill11All l llllHMI lll
3 1262 08864 1450


Morbidilt and Mortalit% Weekly Report


ern naf of the State. Increased pneumonia-influenza
-.. was reported from the cities of Canton, Cincin-
nati, CIveland, and Toledo during February and early
arch. Outbreaks now appear to be waning for the State
as a hole.
Re? rtfsd a rn. :irs i :asbe, diisioa of Cosrn.ica-
i 5 isefscs, Obit pirtrent ci He itb.)
Pennsylon a Four counties, representing widely
separated regions of the State, reported new outbreaks of
infuenza-like illness during the week e-_ March 9.
School absentee rates as hgh as 30 percent have been
observed in some affected areas. i; *.-_ -r-.n" n.r
deaths for Count totaled 32 for the week
:-. M : March 9, his being the highest number recorded
for any week during the past six years. This :-; _:. is far
out of proportion to other indices of epidemic activity in
the count's, however.
F- i.: County has reported serologic confirma-
tion of influenza infection in 20 cases thus far. None
of these cases came from community-wide outbreaks,
however.
(Repforted b D. Sctrack. Jr., r.D., Di ision of Co-
wlicab;e Disease Controi, fPenrs'l ania Department

Rhode Island Type A- influenza has been confirmed
*: : ... in two or more cases from Newport and
Providence Counties, the sites of reported outbreaks
earlier this year. No new epidemic foci have been ob-
served in the State during the past week.
Reprted b) Dr. ja-es E. Bo.es, DOtision of Epideri-
'i.), Rhode Islar'd Departrment of Heathb.)
Vermont Laboratory confirmation has been obtained
n two cases seen during recent outbreaks in Essex
County. Twelve of the State's 14 counties have reported
one or more outbreaks of influenza-like illness thus far
this year.
Reported i' Dr. Linus i. Leavens, Director, Communica-
ble Disease Contlrl, err-on Departzrent of Health.)


Immunization Information for International Travel
1962 edition
Public Health Service Publication No. 384
The following information should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


CITY:
CENTER:



CLINIC HOURS:
FEE:


Hartford, Connecticut
Connecticot State Department of Health
119 Capitol Avenue
Tel. 527-6341, x-2344
By appointment only
Yes


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INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Typhoid Zermatt, Switzerland

Over 80 cases of typhoid fever have been reported
from several countries, including the United States, which
are believed to derive from a common-source exposure in
the winter resort town of Zermatt, Switzerland. The ex-
posure is reported to have occurred in mid to late Febru-
arv; the nature of spread, whether by food or water, is yet
unknown. A number of strains isolated have been phage
type E-l. 'This type is common in the United States, ac-
counting for about one third of the cases.)