Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00118

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text






Morbidit)


I and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


634-5131


ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASE
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED




INFLUENZA One or more outbreaks of influenza-like The n
disease have now been reported from 34 States and the weekly for
District of Columbia. States reporting outbreaks for the threshold si
first time this week are Wisconsin, Rhode Island, Montana, week demon
and Arizona. Influenza A2 virus has been isolated or con- Arizona
firmed by serologic titer rise as the causative agent of been report
one or more outbreaks in 17 States and the District of County) with
Columbia. The State of Wisconsin reported a confirmed The two eler
outbreak due to influenza A2 virus for the first time this the area wer
week. The Mountain and West Coast States, except for cessive abs
Montana and Arizona, continue to report no more than the community-w
usual seasonal incidence of acute respiratory disease. of fever, hea


% Vol. 12, No. 9
STATES AND ON


e pneumonia-i ue a deaths reported
10 itieae ai above the epidemic
nce we en January 12, and this
strates a continued sharp rise.
- An outbreak of influenza-like illness has
ed from the town of Springerville (Apache
abrupt onset of illness about February 19.
nentary schools and one high school serving
e forced to close on March 1 because of ex-
;enteeism. The illness, which has shown
ide spread, is characterized by abrupt onset
dache, myalgia, and cough of 3-4 days dura-


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
9th Week Cumulative
Ended Ended First 9 weeks
Disease Median
March 2, March 3, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 27 23 --- 210 148 --
Brucellosis ..................... .4 10 13 51 55 94
Diphtheria ...................... 12 5 15 56 106 162
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 31 32 28 179 235 204
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 1,217 1,300 716 10,116 13,099 6,416
Measles ........................ 14,031 15,814 15,814 86,982 95,749 95,749
Meningococcal infections ......... 80 57 57 508 475 483
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 1 5 14 29 64 162
Paralytic.................... 1 3 11 26 38 94
Nonparalytic................ .. 1 3 2 12 50
Unspecified .................. 1 1 14 18
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 12,929 10,138 -- 86,807 77,646 -
Tetanus ........................ 6 4 --- 31 24 .
Tularemia...................... 5 1 --- 44 46 -
Typhoid fever................... 5 8 10 46 66 84
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 1 --- 3
Rabies in Animals ............... 71 69 85 523 589 712


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: Pa.-1 1 Psittacosis: N.Y.-2, Ohio-1 16
Botulism: Calif.-2 2 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: N.C.-2, Calif.-1 20 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 2


For release March 8, 1963


-------


COM UNIABE DSLAE :FN-L


r& u/7/!








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA-LIKE DISEASE OUTBREAKS, US.A.
.ir-.u ., 'r..- r r.':,.ch 6, 1963 By County


tion. Laboratory specimens are currently being obtained.
(Reported by Dr. Lloyd M. Farner, Commissioner of Pub-
lic Health, State Department of Health, Phoenix, Arizona.)
An outbreak of acute febrile respiratory disease has
been reported from the Hopi and Navajo Indian Reserva-
tions in the northern part of the State. The epidemic has
centered in the area about Keams Canyon and began about
February 23 when an increasing number of patients with
acute onsets of fever, myalgia, headache, and weakness
were seen in the outpatient clinics at the Keams Canyon
Indian Hospital. In the last 10 days, over 400 patients
with this symptomatology have been seen in the hospital
clinics. All age groups have apparently been affected.
Laboratory specimen collection and epidemiologic investi-
gation is presently under way.
(Reported by Dr. W. S. Baum, Medical Officer in Charge,
PHS Division of Indian Health, Area Medical Office,
Phoenix, Arizona.)
Georgia Influenza A2 virus isolates have been
obtained thus far from cases of influenza-like illness at
the University of Georgia in Athens and in the Atlanta
area. Influenza first appeared in Atlanta during the first
week of February (MMWR, Vol. 12, Nos. 7 & 8), and exces-
sive absenteeism was reported from several elementary
and high schools at about the same time. Percent absen-
teeism, by day, during the epidemic period, is given for
one large suburban high school (High School B) in the
figure (right).


SCHOOL ABSENTEEISM
HIGH SCHOOL "B"-DEKALB COUNTY, GEORGIA
BY DAY FEBRUARY -MARCH'63


DAY OF ABSENTEE
20 SURVEY




1 I r:. .S Ki i1 2



.5 0 2 a



FEBRUARY MARCH

A telephone survey of 50 absentees at High School B,
chosen by random sample from 348 students absent on
February 21, revealed influenza-like illness in 49 (98
percent). Frequency of symptoms of the illness in these
49 absentees is shown below:

SYMPTOM NUMBER PERCENT
Fatigue and weakness 42 86
Fever (Range 100-103) 36 74
Sore throat 35 71
Cough 34 69
Headache 30 61
Myalgia 28 57
Coryza 28 57
G. 1. Complaints 9 18

(Continued on page 76)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


WEEKLY PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS


,60- / 18 e i c






50 l ES CENTRAL MIDDLE ATLANTIC
..! | eS ci.. 17 cites /




3 t I. Sc 4 tl

"
PAClFIC IDO1 WS CENTRAL S ATLANTIC
10 12 ci1ies ; 3 c6l0es 9 CIIIs

^^^^"^ ---^^ --^^


Pneumonia-influenza mortality During the week
ending March 2nd excess pneumonia-influenza rose to a
high peak, probably the crest of the 1963 wave. The 511
excess deaths reported this week by the 108 cities is
twice the number for the preceding week but includes
some reports delayed by the February 22nd holiday.
Excess mortality was high in all divisions but the
Mountain and Pacific. In this influenza season excess
mortality has not been recorded for the Pacific States and
in only minor degree from the Mountain States.
Marked increases were reported from the North and
South Central divisions and New England. High levels of
excess mortality continued in the Middle and South
Atlantic States.
Cumulative excess pneumonia-influenza mortality
since the week ending January 5th has now reached 1491
deaths. Corresponding numbers for the 1960 A2 influenza
epidemic and the 1962 influenza B epidemic were 3310
and 861 deaths, respectively.
Total deaths There were 14,930 deaths from all
causes reported during the week ending March 2nd, an
excess of 2889 above the expected number for this season. As
shown in the table and chart 6031 excess deaths were
recorded during the last four week period. Since the week
ending January 5th excess deaths from all causes have
reached a total of 9763. During comparable periods of the
1960 and 1962 epidemics 11,443 and 4424 excess deaths,
respectively, were recorded.


WEEK ENDING 4 Week Weekly
2-9 2-16 2-23 3-2 Total Average

Observed 13,554 13,112 12,755 14,930 54,351 13,588
Expected 12,122 12,091 12,066 12,041 48,320 12,080

Excess 1,432 1,021 689 2,889 6,031 1,508


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN 108 U S CITIES
Aeroge number per week by four-week pent







OF I I I
i I,'
OE | I '-


ii ,
tv _._


(See table, page 75)


UNITED STATES
IOe ctilos


4:~


EPIDEM=
THESHOLDt











72 Morbidity and Mortality W weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 2, 1963 AND MARCH 3, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
9th week First 9 weeks 9th week First 9 weeks 9th week 9th week

1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 5 29 64 1 3 26 38 1 27 23

NEW ENGLAND................ -
Maine................. -
New Hampshire.........
Vermont ...............
Massachusetts.........
Rhode Island ..........
Connecticut .......... -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC .......... 1 2 5 27 1 1 5 14 1 1
New York............... 1 2 4 27 1 1 4 14 1
New Jersey........... -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 7 6 6 4 5 1
Ohio .................. 2 3 1 3 1
Indiana ............... 1 1
Illinois.............. 4 2 4 1 1
Michigan.............. 1 1 2
Wisconsin............. 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 4 1 1 2
Minnesota............. 2
Iowa.................. 2 I -
Missouri.............. 1 2 1
North Dakota...........
South Dakota ..........
Nebraska...............
Kansas................ -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 2 5 2 4 5 2
Delaware.............. 5
Maryland............... -
District of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia.............. 1 1
West Virginia..........
North Carolina........ 2 1 2 1
South Carolina.........
Georgia ..............- -
Florida................ 2 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 2 1 3 6
Kentucky............... 2 2
Tennessee................ 1
Alabama............... 1 I 1
Mississippi........... 1 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 9 11 9 8 1 2 6
Arkansas..............
Louisiana............. 8 3 8 3
Oklahoma................ .
Texas................. 1 1 8 1 5 1 2 5

MOUNTAIN................. 2 5 2 4 2 3
Montana................ 2 1
Idaho..................
Wyoming................
Colorado.............. 2
New Mexico.............
Arizona............... 2 2 2 2 2
Utah................... 1 1 1
Nevada................

PACIFIC.................. 4 4 3 2 7 4
Washington............ 2
Oregon................ 1 1
California............ 3 4 2 2 7 2
Alaska.................
Hawaii ................

Puerto Rico.............. 1









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 73


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 2, 1963 AND MARCH 3, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 9th week
lative lative Under 20 &
9th week 9 weeks 9th week 9 weeks 9th week 20 yr. over Total 9thweek
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 4 51 12 56 31 32 634 496 1,217 1,300 14,031 15,814

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 2 2 97 55 152 90 402 1,954
Maine................. 38 17 55 17 17 355
New Hampshire.......... 2 4 6 9 1 60
Vermont............... 1 1 2 6 16
Massachusetts......... 1 2 29 21 50 45 83 858
Rhode Island.......... 1 1 1 1 2 6 46 73
Connecticut........... 26 11 37 7 239 608

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 3 7 6 9 115 131 246 208 1,057 2,647
New York............... 2 2 2 8 59 66 125 116 439 1,629
New Jersey............ 1 20 37 57 39 155 672
Pennsylvania .......... 1 4 4 1 36 28 64 53 463 346

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 4 1 3 5 3 105 88 204 295 6,462 1,750
Ohio.................. -- 19 23 43 116 651 272
Indiana................ 1 1 22 6 28 22 164 196
Illinois.............. 4 2 1 1 13 26 43 46 314 330
Michigan .............. 4 2 50 33 88 102 2,281 763
Wisconsin............. 1 2 9 3,052 189

WEST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 3 39 5 16 2 1 18 13 39 83 768 445
Minnesota.............. 3 5 8 4 5 10 20 160 16
Iowa................... 3 29 1 2 3 20 230 287
Missouri.............. 1 2 8 3 15 19 91 26
North Dakota.......... 3 273 94
South Dakota.......... 2 6 2 2 4 3 5 18
Nebraska.............. 2 1 1 1 4 6 9 4
Kansas................ 2 1 1 2 3 12 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 1 11 9 3 84 47 135 144 1,244 1,081
Delaware............... 3 1 4 1 17 9
Maryland.............. 1 10 4 14 17 26 114
District of Columbia.. 1 4 4 8 5 3 44
Virginia.............. 1 1 12 6 20 34 257 384
West Virginia......... 1 15 3 18 28 354 355
North Carolina........ 1 2 1 11 8 19 23 46 26
South Carolina........ 1 3 3 2 5 12 117 21
Georgia............... 2 9 3 12 3 25 2
Florida............... 4 4 1 17 16 35 21 399 126

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 7 1 76 31 120 178 724 1,520
Kentucky............. 21 3 37 89 415 166
Tennessee............. 1 35 6 41 52 253 1,151
Alabama............ ... 1 6 9 16 25 9 29 57
Mississippi............ 1 11 6 17 28 27 146

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 3 4 9 2 3 51 23 76 86 1,090 3,238
Arkansas.............. 2 1 1 9 3 12 13 121 64
Louisiana............. 10 7 17 16 14 8
Oklahoma .............. 3 4 1 2 1 3 6 184
Texas ................. 1 4 1 2 30 12 44 51 955 2,982

MOUNTAIN ................ 1 4 16 10 74 63 891 629
Montana............... 1 2 3 17 9 91 223
Idaho................. 11 9 275 22
Wyoming............... 1 1 2 1 34 10
Colorado.............. 11 18 113 211
New Mexico............ 9 3 12 2 NN NN
Arizona............... 3 12 16 234 117
Utah.................. 1 4 3 7 8 133 46
Nevada ................ 2 11

PACIEIC.................. 1 7 6 72 98 171 153 1,393 2,550
Washington............ 1 18 17 36 22 255 977
Oregon................. 14 13 27 13 303 437
California............ 1 7 5 39 64 103 117 572 1,116
Alaska................- 1 4 5 1 34 14
Hawaii................ 229 6

Puerto Rico.............. 1 2 24 4 28 20 12 156











74 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS FUNDED


MARCH 2, 1963 AND MARCH 3, 1962 (Continued)


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7 '7- E ..-.--.. 8 -i 1 ,3-8 1,272
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S 18 ,jil I, *1

S. .. ., i 4 1,2
S .. ......... 1 .
'' .......... .. 5 1 86
..... ..... .. .1 187
.' *. -. . 7
183 182
S ........... 3 736 731
........ 2 433 259
: -............ 1 4 200 164
................. 2 7 199 153
S.... ...........

F .U:.:............. 10 72 2,130 1,960
S -......... 6 477 789
............. 1 3 36 60
'- .......... 9 59 1,567 1,038
S .. ............ 4 25 57
............... -
"' I 5


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IB 71 60 523











5 5 21
5 I 15

6

2 7 67
1 25
2 1 3 B
2 15
2 13
i 1 6

2 17 28 i 122
7 6 38
1 2 10 35
1 2 5 24
3 2
S 5 22
1 1


13 8 2 98




S2 39
5 2 34
3 -

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2 2 20

6 13 12 53
1 7 24
7 25
1 2 1 4


8 18 13 97
6 2 7
3 1 14
2 8
S 13 10 68


________ ______ t 4


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5 5


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I1









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




Table 4 (A). TOTAL DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o

For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 12/1612/23 1Area 2/ 2
2/9 2/16 2/23 3/2 2/9 2/16 2/23 3/2


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. .............
Bridgeport, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass. ..........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, Mass. .............
Lynn, Mass. ...............
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New Haven, Conn. ..........
Providence, R.I. ..........
Somerville, Mass. .........
Springfield, Mass ........
Waterbury, Conn. ..........
Worcester, Mass. ..........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ..............
Allentown, Pa. ............
Buffalo, N.Y. .............
Camden, N.J. ..............
Elizabeth, N.J. ...........
Erie, Pa. .................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J. .............
New York City, N.Y .......
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...........
Reading, Pa. ..............
Rochester, N.Y. ...........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa. .............
Syracuse, N.Y. ............
Trenton, N.J. .............
Utica, N.Y. ...............
Yonkers, N.Y. .............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio.................
Canton, Ohio................
Chicago, Ill. .............
Cincinnati, Ohio ...........
Cleveland, Ohio.............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio................
Detroit, Mich. ............
Evansville, Ind. .........
Flint, Mich. ..............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. ................
Grand Rapids, Mich .......
Indianapolis, Ind. ........
Madison, Wis. .............
Milwaukee, Wis. ...........
Peoria, Ill. ..............
Rockford, Ill. ............
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio................
Youngstown, Ohio...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn. .............
Kansas City, Kans. .......
Kansas City, Mo. .........
Lincoln, Nebr ............
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ............
St. Paul, Minn. ...........
Wichita, Kans. ............


276
46
27
35
60
35
27
28
54
64
17
58
26
56


74
33
137
57
45
46
103
103
2,086
42
597
187
25
104
20
34
76
47
43
55


57
32
867
164
224
129
108
439
58
51
50
34
53
146
19
153
36
38
53
100
60


58
33
52
176
28
120
66
289
63
58


276
44
31
33
77
38
24
32
63
74
15
48
34
61


58
26
147
67
43
46
76
121
2,188
33
333
161
25
101
30
40
90
61
28
57


85
38
863
205
216
136
100
376
45
50
36
23
49
134
36
150
28
28
55
107
60


62
22
58
173
37
126
61
302
71
50


316
60
44
53
82


292
39
20
45
49
26
25
39
38
71
13
50
25
45


48
30
161
41
46
53
69
109
1,883
30
883
271
40
120
29
63
72
65
25
41


58
34
857
190
181
110
104
384
38
51
55
30
42
171
42
145
35
22
28
98
68


43
24
39
132
20
123
89
236
67
44


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. ..............
Baltimore, Md. ............
Charlotte, N.C. ...........
Jacksonville, Fla. ........
Miami, Fla. ............. .
Norfolk, Va. ..............
Richmond, Va. .............
Savannah, Ga. .............
St. Petersburg, Fla ......
Tampa, Fla. ...............
Washington, D.C. ..........
Wilmington, Del. ..........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala. ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........
Knoxville, Tenn. ..........
Louisville, Ky. ...........
Memphis, Tenn. ............
Mobile, Ala. ..............
Montgomery, Ala. ..........
Nashville, Tenn. ..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. ..............
Baton Rouge, La. ..........
Corpus Christi, Tex ......
Dallas, Tex. .............
El Paso, Tex. ............
Fort Worth, Tex. ..........
Houston, Tex. ............
Little Rock, Ark. ........
New Orleans, La. .........
Oklahoma City, Okla ......
San Antonio, Tex. ........
Shreveport, La. ...........
Tulsa, Okla. ..............


141
400
48
67
116
69
145
38
91
76
241
68


132
70
37
126
136
46
38
89


40
36
32
159
31
85
186
67
232
76
103
48
97


MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex. ...... 52
Colorado Springs, Colo. ... 14
Denver, Colo. ............. 150
Ogden, Utah................. 15
Phoenix, Ariz. ............ 116
Pueblo, Colo ............. 21
Salt Lake City, Utah....... 53
Tucson, Ariz. .............. 52

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. .......... 23
Fresno, Calif. ............ 54
Glendale, Calif. .......... 54
Honolulu, Hawaii............ 43
Long Beach, Calif. ........ 73
Los Angeles, Calif. ....... 616
Oakland, Calif. ........... 89
Pasadena, Calif. .......... 22
Portland, Oreg. ........... 108
Sacramento, Calif. ........ 69
San Diego, Calif. .......... 95
San Francisco, Calif. ..... 222
San Jose, Calif. .......... 33
Seattle, Wash. ............ 176
Spokane, Wash. ............ 44
Tacoma, Wash. ............. 48

San Juan, P.R. .............. 36


135
386
29
73
94
71
116
40
78
88
270
63


98
58
43
132
138
46
51
71


36
35
33
158
39
70
197
79
185
100
111
79
63


44
12
120
16
76
15
47
38


154
302
35
32
95
87
102
36
98
77
204
51


116
45
33
72
112
45
38
53


35
32
27
143
36
88
173
62
195
84
124
60
63


44
17
148
14
105
16
42
52


157
303
54
105
101
69
108
49
100
92*
253
68


130
39
37
124
136
55
57
91


37
19
16
163
33
68
236
73
219
129
110
65
54


42
22
116
13
120
15
52
62


68
48
186
69
31
54
92
167
2,024
48
675
272
34
140
37
70
94
84
28
30


93
71
1,208
284
258
175
129
520
60
44
44
43
60
174
45
164
35
44
44
131
70


65
34
61
218
49
169
75
390
79
48


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 14,930
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 1,053
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............ 831
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 8,563


NOTF: All deaths by place of occurrence.


14 21 29
50 48 39
35 28 38
42 40 59
71 53 69
554 495 562
98 91 94
38 49 36
113 92 1 122
66 57 66*
103 108 1 95
186 202 219
26 35 41*
176 139 132
54 58 73
49 40 51

24 (---) 28


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08864 1468


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Additional outbreaks of influenza-like illness have
been reported from Screven, Douglas, and Ware Counties.
Specimens have been obtained from these areas and are
currently being processed at the State laboratories.
(Reported by W. J. Murphy, M.D., Director, Epidemiology,
Georgia Department of Public Health and a team from
CDC.)

Montana An outbreak of acute febrile respiratory
disease resembling influenza has been reported from the
town of Eureka (Lincoln County), and began about Febru-
ary 15. The outbreak has been community-wide, and char-
acterized by sudden onset of fever, headache, mylagia and
cough of 4-5 days duration. One death in an elderly woman
has been reported. Over 600 cases have occurred to date.
Specimens are being collected. Serologic evidence of
infection with A2 influenza virus has been obtained from
one student at the University of Montana at Missoula.
There is as yet no evidence, however, of an unusual in-
crease in febrile respiratory disease at this institution.
(Reported by Dr. Mary E. Soules, Director, Disease Con-
trol, Montana Board of Health.)


New York During the week of February 17, in-
creasing incidence of influenza-like disease was noted in
the cities of Rochester, Buffalo, and Binghamton. In-
creased school absenteeism has occurred in Cayuga,
Syracuse, Rensselaer, Otsego, Allegany, Hamilton, St.
Lawrence, and Steuben Counties during the week of
February 18-25.
Serologic evidence of A2 influenza infection has
been obtained from 3 cases in Nassau and Westchester
Counties and in one case from Columbia County. Six
paired sera from individuals in the city of Syracuse have
shown significant rises in influenza A2 antibody titer and
6 of 10 paired sera collected in Rochester have demon-
strated similar rises. A2 influenza virus has been isolated
from )2 individuals in Albany County.
reported d by Dr. Robert M. Albrecht, Director, Epidemiol-
ogy Division, New York Department of Health.)


Rhode Island Outbreaks of influenza-like illness
have been noted in Providence and Newport Counties be-
ginning in early and mid-February. In a private boys'
school in the Woonsocket area, absenteeism reached 23
percent on February 20. Normal absenteeism in this
school is 4 percent. Illness characterized by sudden
onset of shaking chills, headache, malaise, fever and
cough of 3-4 days duration was the major cause of ab-
senteeism.
A single serum pair from Woonsocket City has demon-
strated a significant rise in A2 influenza antibody titer.
(Reported by Dr. James E. Bowes, Acting Director, Di-
vision of Epidemiology, Rhode Island Department of
Health.)


Wisconsin Milwaukee An outbreak of influenza-
like illness began at the Veterans Administration Hospi-
tal in Milwaukee about February 11. Serologic evidence
of influenza A2 infection was obtained in paired sera
from 2 patients. Since that time, influenza-like illness
has occurred in epidemic proportions throughout the city.
During the week of February 18, paired sera obtained from
six persons in Milwaukee demonstrated significant rises
in influenza A2 antibody titer in 3 instances.
Other areas of the State report sporadic cases of
influenza-like disease, with no unusual school or in-
dustrial absenteeism.
(Reported by Dr. Josef Preizler, Director, Bureau of Com-
municable Diseases, Wisconsin State Board of Health and
Dr. E. R. Krumbiegel, Commissioner of Health, City of
Milwaukee Health Department.)


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