Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00116

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

Prepared by the 6 31-5i,31

For release December 27, 1963 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333 bj. 2..
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THF ULiNT-,I-_gATff4 AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED DECEMBER 21, 1963


BOTULISM Three cases of botulism were reported this
week from Pennsylvania. These occurred in a single
family; the vehicle implicated was home-canned string
beans. (See epidemiological reports.) The total of 44
cases recorded thus far this year considerably exceeds
that of recent years:
1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958
Reported Cases of Botulism 44* 10 14 12 20 6

*Through 50th week only
Twenty-two of this year's reported cases relate to
commercially processed and distributed food stuffs,
including smoked whitefish chubs (17 cases), canned
tuna (3 cases), and canned liver paste (2 cases).


MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS Thirty-nine meningo-
coccal infections were reported by 18 States for the week
ending December 21. This raises the cumulative total to
2,251 cases thus far this year, compared to 2,048 cases
for a comparable period last year.
The net increase of approximately 200 cases this
year occurred entirely during the first half of the year.
Since July, the incidence has been essentially the same
as that observed during 1962.
Total cases to date this year and total cases over
the past five years are shown below:
1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958
Reported Meningococcal Infections 2251* 2150 2232 2259 2180 2581
*Through 50th week only


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
51st Week Cumulative
Disease Ended EndMedian First 51 weeks
December 21, December 22, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis ............... 25 43 -1,797 2,518 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 14 3 4 358 391 711
Diphtheria........ .9 5 18 290 449 827
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 16 8 22 1,510 1,770 1,769
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 637 898 898 42,013 52,502 39,306
Measles ........................ 3,406 3,461 4,316 384,179 472,229 425,602
Meningococcal infections ......... 39 39 39 2,291 2,087 2,203
Poliomyelitis, total .............. 6 19 29 429 881 3,240
Paralytic .................... 5 18 16 364 701 2,256
Nonparalytic .................. 1 7 46 127 643
Unspecified...................1 6 19 53 341
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 6,681 6,728 -- 332,166 306,964 ---
Tetanus ........................ 2 1 --- 272 289
Tularemia......... ......... 9 8 --- 286 299 ---
Typhoid fever ..... ............. 2 8 7 520 619 805
Typhus fever, tick-borne, 805
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 177 214 ---
Rabies in Animals............... 42 37 47 3,631 3,507 3,507


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Anthrax: 4 Psittacosis: c79
Botulism: Pa. 3 44 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: 103 Smallpox:
Plague: 1 Typhus, murine: 28

Figures for current week exclude missing reports from Alaska, Florida and Montana.







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS


Botulism Pennsylvania
An outbreak of Type B botulism in a Dauphin County,
Pennsylvania, family occurred in November following the
ingestion of uncooked, home-canned, cold-pack string
beans. Of four family members, three developed definite
clinical symptoms, one experienced equivocal illness.
The first to become ill was the 13-year-old son who
experienced some difficulty with vision approximately 20
hours after consuming the suspect beans at the noon meal
on Sunday, November 24. He stated that he experienced
a "flash" when he turned his head suddenly. On Tuesday
morning, he vomited after breakfast and .later in the day
noted double vision, "thickness" in his voice and had
some difficulty eating. By the third day, he had developed
obvious ptosis of the right eyelid; when he attempted to
drink, he choked and water came out of his nose.
The 12-year-old daughter experienced nausea and
vomiting on the Monday evening following the meal and on
the following day stated that her eyes "felt dizzy". By
Wednesday, she had evident diplopia, hoarseness and
difficulty swallowing.
The mother, aged 32, first experienced double vision
and hoarseness on Wednesday.
All three patients were hospitalized, tracheostomy
was performed on the children; all received antitoxin at
approximately four-hour intervals beginning about 1:00
A.M., Thursday, November 28. All recovered uneventfully.
The father who had eaten no beans complained of
numbness in his jaw and stiffness of his throat on Friday,
November 29, five days after the meal. This was ascribed
simply to anxiety. However, the following day, he com-
menced to have some difficulty with his vision. Following
antitoxin therapy, the symptoms abated. On further
questioning, however, it was learned that the father had
originally been served the beans but had scraped them
from his plate. He did consume the residual juice.
The rapidity of onset of neurological symptoms
appeared to correlate reasonably closely with the quantity
of beans consumed:

Quantity Interval eating
Patient Age Consumed to onset of neuro, symptoms

Son 12 1 cup 30 hours
Daughter 13 2/3 cup 48 hours
Mother 32 1/3 cup 60 hours
Father juice only 120-144 hours

Canned by a relative, the beans had originally been
cooked and, while still hot, put in clean, boiled two-
quart jars and sealed. Received by the family two weeks
before eating, the jar was opened, resealed, and stored in
the refrigerator. The beans, without further cooking, were


served in a salad. An unpleasant, spoiled odor was noted
but discounted as usual with "salted beans" with which
the mother had been familiar in Germany.
The uneaten portion of the beans was examined in the
State Health Department Laboratory. Type B toxin was
demonstrated in the jar and Clostridium botulinum cultured
from the beans.
(Reported by Drs. William S. Gordon and D. L. Minter,
Harrisburg, Dr. Robert Roscoe, New Cumberland, and
Dr. William S. Schrack, Director, Division of Communica-
ble Diseases, Pennsylvania Department of Health.)

Dengue Fever Connecticut
A case of dengue fever has been reported in a 28-
year-old male resident of Puerto Rico who visited Con-
necticut. The patient lived at the outskirts of San Juan.
He arrived from Puerto Rico August 29 to visit his
mother in Hamden, Connecticut. Three days later, he be-
came ill with symptoms which included pain in his eye-
balls, chest, back, and abdomen, generalized weakness,
vomiting, and a fever to 1040. On September 4, a mor-
billiform rash was noted on his face, arms, chest, and
back.
Laboratory studies revealed a trace of albumen in
his urine, negative blood cultures, and hemaggluti-
nation tests as follows:

Hemogglutination Dengue
Inhibition
SLE EEE WEE I II III IV

9-4-63 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 <10
9-10-63 10 <10 <10 10 20 40 40


The patient recovered uneventfully and returned to
Puerto Rico on September 12.
Connecticut officials reported this patient as a case
of dengue fever after the hemagglutination tests were
received in mid-November.
(Reported by Robert Jordan, M.D.; Leonard Parente, M.D.,
Director of Health. Hamden; James C. Hart. M.D.. Di-
rector of Preventable Diseases Section, Connecticut
State Department of Health; and Dr. Philip H. Coleman.
Chief, Virology Laboratory, CDC.)

Editor Note: Thi: is the 18th imported case of clin-
ical dengue fever reported to the Communicable Dis-
ease Center thus far in 1963. All Victims are believed to
have acquired the disease while in either Jamaica or
Puerto Rico, where there have been epidemics of dengue-
like illness. For previous reports, see MMWR, Vol. 12,
pp. 270, 308, 310, 378, and 403.


430








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Salmonellosis Nebraska

Three weeks after an Omaha father acquired
"Boots", a pet puppy dog for his two children, the entire
family of four experienced diarrhea. The youngest, a
2-year-old, became ill with bloody diarrhea, vomiting,
and fever. Stool cultures from the 2-year-old, as well as
from the puppy, yielded Salmonella typhimurium.
"Boots" had never been ill to the knowledge of
the family. One of 9 in a litter, he had been acquired by
his new owner when this puppy, along with its litter
mates, was distributed to the patrons of a neighborhood
tavern. Attempts to locate the other 8 puppies and their
masters for further epidemiological study were unsuccess-
ful because no one could remember the recipients.
All known victims have recovered, following anti-
biotic therapy. "Boots" was also treated with a broad
spectrum antibiotic. Subsequent cultures have proven
negative.

(Reported by Dr. E. A. Rogers, Director of Health,
Nebraska State Department of Health, Dr. Edwin D.
Lyman, Health Officer, Douglas County Health Depart-
ment, Omaha, Nebraska, and an EIS Officer.)



Salmonellosis Ohio

A case ofgastroenteritis due to Salmonella typhimurium
in a 3-month-old Cincinnati, Ohio, infant appears to have


been acquired from a pet parakeet, which died 4 days prior
to the onset of the baby's symptoms.
The child had experienced diarrhea. A stool culture
grew S. typhimurium. The same organism was isolated from
the stools of 2 siblings, who were not ill.
On interviewing the family, the investigators from the
Cincinnati Health Department learned of the parakeet's
death. The deceased parakeet was no longer available for
culture. Therefore, the investigator visited the pet store
where the bird had been purchased. There had been no
illness among the personnel caring for the parakeets nor
had there been a history of any parakeets having been ill
or having died while at the shop. Cultures of droppings
were taken from parakeets present in the store at that
time. These proved positive for S. typhimurium.
Investigators could not find evidence of salmonellosis
in the birds at the distributing center, or at any of the
other stores which received parakeets from the same
distributor.
Because the birds had been fed dehulled millet seed,
impregnated with aureomycin, for 15 days prior to their
shipment, Ohio investigators believed the source of
contamination was local where antibiotic was not added to
the seed. They surmised that the local parakeet seed
might have been contaminated with mouse droppings.
(Reported by Dr. Thomas A. Cockburn, Assistant Health
Commissioner, Cincinnati Board of Health, Dr. Herman
Rehder, Veterinarian, Cincinnati Board of Health, and
Dr. Harold A. Decker, Chief, Division of Communicable
Diseases, Ohio State Department of Health.)


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES


The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending December 21 was
738 as compared with an expected 769 weekly average.



TOTAL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE RECORDED IN
108 CITIES
WEEK ENDING
4 Week Weekly
11/30 12/7 12/14 12/21 Total Average
Observed 619 832 833 669 2,953 738
Expected 769 769 769 768 3,075 769
Excess -150 63 64 -99 122 -31


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN O08 U.S. CITIES
Average number perweek by four-week periods


RECOROEO


NUMBER ,. -
OF
DEATHS





I 960


I -

I^t


(See Table page 425.)


bI i
-.. : .4


19GI6 1962 1963


-










132 .losrloidilt and 1 lortalitl '% ekly Ileport


Table k CAS1S OF SPE(CIIEI) NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 21, 1963 AND DECEMBER 22, 1962


Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
51st week First 51 weeks 51st week First 51 weeks 51st week 51st week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 6 19 429 881 5 18 364 701 1 25 43

NEW ENGLAND.............. 8 9 8 8 2 1
Maine................. 2 2 --
New Hampshire......... -
Vermont............... -. 1 1 -
Massachusetts......... 3 7 3 7
Rhode Island.......... 1 1
Connecticut........... 2 1 2 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 5 119 89 5 94 67 2 10
New York.............. 1 12 61 7 42 1 8
New Jersey............ 4 9 3 9 -
Pennsylvania 5 103 19 5 84 16 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL ...... 4 58 139 4 47 106 1 5
Ohio................. 8 20 4 18 1
Indiana................ 1 4 24 1 3 19
Illinois.............. 3 17 62 3 16 45 4
Michigan.............. 20 21 20 17 1
Wisconsin............. 9 12 4 7 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 3 8 41 3 6 30 1 2
Minnesota............... 4 7 4 7 1 2
Iowa.................... 7 3
Missouri ............... 2 1 12 2 7 -
North Dakota.......... 1 5 3 -
South Dakota........... 1 1 2 1 1 2
Nebraska.............. 1 8 1 8 -
Kansas.... ....... -

SOUTH ATLANTIC............. 2 103 76 2 88 66 2
Delaware............... 1 1
Maryland............... 3 2 1 1
District of Columbia.. 1 2 1 1
Virginia................. 21 8 16 8 1
West Virginia.......... 4 17 4 17
North Carolina........ 1 6 13 1 5 11
South Carolina........ 1 9 6 1 8 6
Georgia.............. 22 17 21 14
Florida............... -- 36 11 --- 32 8 --- --- 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 2 74 82 1 2 68 69 2 6
Kentucky......... ...... 1 30 1 24 I
Tennessee.............. 1 12 12 1 11 6 1
Alabama ............... 53 22 48 22 1 2
Mississippi........... 1 9 18 1 9 17 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 3 29 332 1 2 28 255 1 1
Arkansas.............. 5 22 4 19 -
Louisiana............. 2 14 32 2 14 29 -
Oklahoma.............. 1 32 1 23 -
Texas ................ 1 9 246 1 9 184 1 -

MOUNTAIN................. 7 20 5 15 2 6
Mon ana ............... -- 4 --- 3 -- -
Idaho................. 1 2 1 1
Wyoming .............. 2 1
Colorado.............. 1 4 3 2 5
New Mexico............ 1 2 2
Arizona ............. 3 4 3 3 1
Utah..................... 2 2
Nevada ................ 1 1

PACIFIC .................. I 2 23 93 1 2 20 85 15 11
Washington............ 2 5 2 5 2 2
Oregon................ 2 7 1 5 1
California............ 1 2 19 81 1 2 17 75 10 9
Alaska................
Hawaii..................... 2

Puerto Rico.............. _- 1 5 13 1 4 13










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 433


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 21, 1963 AND DECEMBER 22, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 51st week
lative lative Under 20 &
51st week 51 weeks 51st week 51 weeks 51st week 20 yr. over Total 51st week

1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES..... 14 358 9 290 16 18 324 272 637 898 3,406 3,461

NEW ENGIAND............... 1 8 1 60 40 102 104 334 119
Maine................. 32 16 48 50 6 1
New Hampshire......... 11 7 18 6 18
Vermont............... 1 5 3 8 1 50 18
Massachusetts......... 6 4 6 10 36 200 33
Rhode Island.......... 2 1 3 4 7 1 1 8
Connecticut........... 5 4 11 10 77 41

MIDDLE ATIANTIC.......... 8 24 6 3 66 54 120 223 785 399
New York............... 4 13 5 2 37 30 67 94 443 212
New Jersey............ 1 4 6 11 17 29 144 97
Pennsylvania.......... 3 7 1 1 23 13 36 100 198 90

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 50 35 3 42 37 90 151 601 1,438
Ohio................. 1 1 15 9 30 47 88 255
Indiana............... 6 10 3 8 12 19 82 42
Illinois.............. 23 17 2 1 7 8 33 245 81
Michigan............... I 6 5 22 13 35 45 123 245
Wisconsin ............. 1 15 2 1 5 7 63 815

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 10 188 2 48 1 22 13 39 32 142 178
Minnesota............. 1 10 15 2 3 11 121
Iowa.................. 6 139 1 4 4 5 79 22
Missouri.............. 1 13 1 5 3 8 4 14 16
North Dakota............ 6 8 1 9 49 19
South Dakota........ 1 12 1 14 1 3 -
Nebraska .............. 6 1 11 4 3 7 9 -
Kansas ................ 1 8 1 4 5 3 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 23 4 72 1 2 36 19 56 89 431 283
Delaware.............. 1 1 3 1 1
Maryland............... 6 4 10 10 68 3
District of Columbia.. 1 4 4 3
Virginia.............. 12 1 1 3 4 8 14 41 -
West Virginia......... 1 17 2 19 14 221 206
North Carolina........ 5 5 7 2 9 23 17 13
South Carolina........ 17 1 2 3 1 79 4
Georgia ............... 3 4 23 2 4 6 3 2
Florida ............... -- 3 --- 24 --- 2 --- --- --- 17 --- 51

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 14 22 30 8 39 73 218 67
Kentucky.............. 3 10 1 12 15 94 4
Tennessee.............. 6 3 19 5 24 44 121 60
Alabama............... 5 16 1 1 2 5 2 1
Mississippi........... 3 1 1 9 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 38 3 72 1 26 14 40 60 155 103
Arkansas.............. 9 4 3 2 5 8 1
Louisiana.............. 1 9 3 36 9 2 11 10 1
Oklahoma.............. 5 20 6 12
Texas................. 15 12 1 14 10 24 36 142 102

MOUNTAIN ................. 10 5 3 6 31 38 85 439
Montana............... --- -- --- --- -- -- 1 --- 124
Idaho................ 2 29 49
Wyoming................ 1 7
Colorado .............. 3 2 2 12 11 17 104
New Mexico............ 1 2 1 1 8 NN NN
Arizona................ 3 12 14 30 67
Utah .................. 5 4 4 3 8 88
Nevada.......,......... 1

PACIFIC.................. 2 26 4 9 7 39 81 120 128 655 435
Washington............ 1 2 11 13 26 183 84
Oregon................ 3 1 5 13 18 28 126 52
California ............ 2 21 4 8 6 30 56 86 64 343 163
Alaska............... -- -- --- 10 ---
Hawaii................. 2 2 1 3 3 135

Puerto Rico.............. 1 13 24 8 32 13 85 22










434 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: LNITDI) STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 21, 1963 AND DECEMBER 22, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcil Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt,.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
51st wk. 51 weeks 51st week 51st wk. 51st wk. 51st wk. 51st wk. 51 weeks 51st week 51 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 39 2,291 6,681 6,728 2 9 2 520 42 37 3,631

NEW ENGLAND......... 2 133 583 523 13 32
Maine.............. 19 73 12 2 2
New Hampshire...... 4 3 19 15
Vermont............. 6 49 1 14
Massachusetts...... 59 90 100 6 1
Rhode Island....... 1 13 48 60 -
Connecticut........ 1 32 320 332 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 9 329 261 335 1 89 2 118
New York............ 2 153 146 189 1 46 1 89
New Jersey......... 3 53 37 73 6
Pennsylvania....... 4 123 78 73 37 1 29

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2 353 615 642 2 67 4 536
Ohio............... 99 67 105 29 1 309
Indiana............ 1 47 71 84 1 7 52
Illinois........... 72 97 134 1 13 75
Michigan........... 1 100 207 192 13 1 50
Wisconsin........... 35 173 127 5 2 50

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 141 157 71 1 2 29 19 13 985
Minnesota........... 28 14 10 1 3 4 5 270
Iowa............... 7 45 27 3 7 4 341
Missouri........... 41 9 6 2 19 3 2 177
North Dakota....... 1 17 71 6 2 41
South Dakota....... 7 15 8 1 2 2 100
Nebraska........... 25 1 1 33
Kansas............. 2 16 3 14 2 23

SOUTH ATIANTIC...... 4 417 627 595 3 1 83 3 7 529
Delaware........... 4 2 13 4 1
Maryland............. 58 43 20 2 12 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 8 4 1 -
Virginia........... 2 90 288 127 13 3 1 219
West Virginia...... 23 219 127 7 6 114
North Carolina..... 2 82 25 80 1 18 16
South Carolina..... 24 39 32 9 10
Georgia............ 34 7 1 1 2 85
Florida............. --- 94 --- 194 --- --- -- -- 18 --- 82

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1 152 1,290 924 1 72 4 6 280
Kentucky........... 33 11 43 14 4 6 126
Tennessee.......... 1 71 1,207 835 31 134
Alabama............. 25 10 11 11 20
Mississippi........ 23 62 35 16 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 9 212 595 596 86 7 4 677
Arkansas........... 14 8 1 34 3 1 91
Louisiana.......... 5 86 7 9 26 1 3 51
Oklahoma............. 1 36 24 2 6 3 62
Texas.............. 3 76 556 584 20 473

MOUNTAIN............ 4 84 1,537 1,824 20 3 138
Montana............ --- 3 --- 27 --- -- --- I --- .-
Idaho.............. 6 45 142 -
Wyoming............ 7 116 154 -
Colorado........... 4 25 583 707 6 16
New Mexico......... 5 477 395 6 41
Arizona............ 13 174 238 7 3 67
Utah............... 20 138 161 3
Nevada........... 5 4 11

PACIFIC............. 5 470 1,016 1,218 1 1 61 2 5 336
Washington......... 40 185 337 3 -
Oregon.............. 1 35 21 49 2 13
California......... 4 366 778 820 1 53 2 5 314
Alaska,............. --- 15 --- 1 --- --- --- --- 1 --- 9
Hawaii............. 14 32 11 1 2 -
Puerto Rico......... 8 8 2 2 14 1 15










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 43"





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS UNDER I YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area / / Area
11/30 12/7 12/14 12/21 11/30 12/7 12/14 12/21


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............... 7 10 9 8
Bridgeport, Conn.......... 3 3 3 1
Cambridge, Mass........... 3 3
Fall River, Mass.......... -
Hartford, Conn............ 3 4 8 4*
Lowell, Mass............... 3 1 1
Lynn, Mass................ 2 1 -
New Bedford, Mass......... 1 3 1*
New Haven, Conn........... 7 2 2*
Providence, R.I........... 7 3 5
Somerville, Mass.......... 2 -
Springfield, Mass.......... 1 1 2
Waterbury, Conn .......... 1 4 1 2
Worcester, Mass............ 3 3 3 2*

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y............... 5 3 1 2
Allentown, Pa............. 3 -
Buffalo, N.Y............... 3 10 4 7
Camden, N.J............... 2 3 4 4
Elizabeth, N.J............. 3 4 2 2*
Erie, Pa.................. 2 2 4 2
Jersey City, N.J.......... 1 3 6 2
Newark, N.J................ 4 5 23 9
New York City, N.Y........ 66 90 94 75
Paterson, N.J............. 3 4 1 1
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 29 34 16 21
Pittsburgh, Pa........... 3 21 15 10
Reading, Pa............... 1 1 4 1
Rochester, N.Y............ 2 5 10 7
Schenectady, N.Y.......... 1 1 1 1*
Scranton, Pa............. 1 2
Syracuse, N.Y.............. 5 4 7 3*
Trenton, N.J.............. 4 3 1
Utica, N.Y................. 2 1 5
Yonkers, N.Y............... 2 2 2 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................ 2 4 3 4*
Canton, Ohio............... 2 1 5 2
Chicago, Ill.............. 35 44 67 45
Cincinnati, Ohio........... 13 13 16 5
Cleveland, Ohio............ 14 19 10 6
Columbus, Ohio............ 8 7 11 6
Dayton, Ohio............... 6 7 2 2
Detroit, Mich............. 20 24 31 17
Evansville, Ind........... 4 3 1 -
Flint, Mich............... 3 6 2 4
Fort Wayne, Ind........... 3 5 7 3
Gary, Ind................. 3 2 7 5
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 1 5 3 1
Indianapolis, Ind......... 10 17 13 7
Madison, Wis............. 1 4 2*
Milwaukee, Wis............. 10 12 7 5
Peoria, Ill................. 1 3 1
Rockford, Ill ............. 1 2 2 1
South Bend, Ind.......... 3 3 3
Toledo, Ohio............... 9 3 9 6
Youngstown, Ohio........... 3 1 1 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.......... 3 3 3
Duluth, Minn............... 1 2
Kansas City, Kans......... 9 2 1 1
Kansas City, Mo............ 6 9 8 3
Lincoln, Nebr............. 1 5
Minneapolis, Minn......... 8 8 10 9
Omaha, Nebr................ 9 10 4 5
St. Louis, Mo.............. 19 18 8 13
St. Paul, Minn............. 5 6 6
Wichita, Kans............. 8 5 1 2

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrece.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga...............
Baltimore, Md............
Charlotte, N.C..........
Jacksonville, Fla........
Miami, Fla...............
Norfolk, Va.............
Richmond, Va.............
Savannah, Ga.............
St. Petersburg, Fla......
Tampa, Fla...............
Washington, D.C..........
Wilmington, Del...........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala..........
Chattanooga, Tenn........
Knoxville, Tenn..........
Louisville, Ky............
Memphis, Tenn............
Mobile, Ala..............
Montgomery, Ala..........
Nashville, Tenn..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex...............
Baton Rouge, La..........
Corpus Christi, Tex......
Dallas, Tex..............
El Paso, Tex.............
Fort Worth, Tex..........
Houston, Tex ............
Little Rock, Ark.........
New Orleans, La..........
Oklahoma City, Okla......
San Antonio, Tex.........
Shreveport, La...........
Tulsa, Okla...............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex......
Colorado Springs, Colo...
Denver, Colo............
Ogden, Utah...............
Phoenix, Ariz ............
Pueblo, Colo..............
Salt Lake City, Utah.....
Tucson, Ariz.............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif..........
Fresno, Calif............
Glendale, Calif..........
Honolulu, Hawaii.........
Long Beach, Calif........
Los Angeles, Calif.......
Oakland, Calif..........
Pasadena, Calif..........
Portland, Oreg...........
Sacramento, Calif........
San Diego, Calif.........
San Francisco, Calif.....
San Jose, Calif..........
Seattle, Wash...........
Spokane, Wash...........
Tacoma, Wash.............


13
16
3
4
6
3
2
1

5
20
4


13
2
2
8
7
5
6
7


1
3
6
10
8
7
23
5
16
8
11
6
2


1

16
2
11
1
5
6


San Juan, P.R.............. (---) (---) (___) (---)


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age.............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


11,868
501
669
6,794




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ll 1262 08864 01111
3 1262 08864 0411


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Dengue Puerto Rico

Fo'r the week ended December 21, -.. cases of
dengue-like illness were reported to the Puerto Rico
Department of Health. The total reported to date is
24,933 cases.
On the basis of reported cases, no evident trend can
yet be detected in the course of the epidemic. Reported
numbers of cases by week for November and December are
shown below:

Week Ended No. of Coses

November 9 962
16 916
23 1733
30 473
December 7 1011
14 1278
21 783
(Reported by Rafael Timothee, M.D., Director, Preventive
Medical Services, Puerto Rico Department of Health, and
a team from the Communicable Disease Center.)


In addition to the established procedures for
reporting morbidity and mortality, the Com-
municable Disease Center welcomes accounts of
interesting outbreaks or cases. Such accounts
should be addressed to:
Lawrence K. Altman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Atlanta, Georgia 30333


EI E'i1r TS CDEPT


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The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, with a circu-
lation of 10,500 is published by the Communicable Dis-
Center, Atlanta, Georgia.


Chief, Communicable Disease Center
Chief, Epidemiology Branch
Chief, Statistics Section
Asst. Chief, Statistics Section
Chief, Surveillance Section
Editor, MMWR


James L. Goddard, M.D.
A. D. Langmuir, M.D.
R. E. Serfling, Ph.D.
I. L. Sherman, M.S.
D. A. Henderson, M.D.
L. K. Altman, M.D.


436