Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00109

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text





Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


634-5131


For release April 12, 1963 ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA Vol. 12, No. 14
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED APRIL 6, 1963


INFLUENZA One or more outbreaks of influenza-like pneumonia-influenza deaths reported for 108 cities this
disease have now been reported from 41 States and the week continued to fall sharply for the third consecutive
District of Columbia. The State of Utah was the only one week following the peak reached during the week ending
to report outbreaks for the first time this week. Influenza March 16.
A2 virus has been isolated or confirmed by serologic titer Florida Serologic confirmation of influenza A2 in-
rise as the causative agent of one or more outbreaks in fection was obtained in eight sporadic cases seen in
32 States and the District of Columbia. States reporting Dade County during the month of February. No outbreaks
confirmed outbreaks for the first time this week are Ind- of influenza-like illness have been reported in the State
ana and Montana. Outbreaks are continuing to subside in during the current
most affected areas in the Eastern and Middle Western (Reported bh '4o l'Q0 M.D., M.P.H., State
United States, without evidence of further significant Health Off Clarence rp, M.D., Bureau of
involvement of the Pacific Coast region. The number of Preventa S/sease, Florida rB aBoard of Health).



Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE D A S: UNITE STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports oug i e
14th Week xogulative
Ended Ended First 14 weeks
Disease Median
April 6, April 7, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis ............... 28 30 --- 312 237 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 10 13 13 87 91 166
Diphtheria................. ..... 10 7 13 93 141 223
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 35 37 29 328 385 361
Hepatitis, infectious and serum.. 880 1,236 938 14,724 19,264 10,526
Measles........................ 15,908 22,077 19,197 160,806 193,171 184,278
Meningococcal infections......... 84 49 55 844 729 799
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 2 5 11 39 81 227
Paralytic .................... 2 5 10 35 54 164
Nonparalytic.................. 1 2 12 37
Unspecified ................... 2 15 26
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 9,789 8,538 --- 139,643 123,478
Tetanus ........................ 3 --- 46 35 --
Tularemia ...................... 3 11 --- 54 76
Typhoid fever ................... 15 5 11 95 108 136
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)... 2 1 --- 2 4
Rabies in Animals ............... 99 101 93 955 1,112 1,132

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. cum.
Anthrax: i Psittacosis: N.Y. 1 19
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Hawaii 2 26 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 2


Wekl


COMMUNIABLL DSEASL :I-Nlf


Fsf.P ,4) '/'


f__







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Indiana A small community outbreak of laboratory
confirmed type A2 influenza occurred in Johnson County
in central Indiana during late February and early March.
The disease was described as somewhat milder than that
of previous Asian influenza epidemics. The outbreak was
not accompanied by unusual school absenteeism. Four of
six sets of paired sera obtained from typical cases demon-
strated significant titer rises to the A2 antigen. One ad-
ditional sporadic case, from Wells County, in the north-
eastern part of the State has recently been confirmed
serologically as influenza A2.
(Reported by Dr. A. L. Marshall, Jr.. Director, Division
of Communicable Disease Control, Indiana State Board
of Health).

Montana The outbreak of acute febrile respiratory
disease reported from Eureka, Lincoln County, in Feb-
ruary (MMWR Vol. 12, No. 9) has been confirmed serologi-
cally as influenza A2 in two cases. No new outbreaks
were reported in the State during the past week.
(Reported by Dr. Mary E. Soules, Director. Disease Con-
trol, Montana State Board of Health.)

Ohio Influenza A2 virus has been confirmed as the
etiologic agent in outbreaks of acute febrile respiratory
disease observed in the Cleveland metropolitan area
earlier this year. It has been estimated that in excess of
2500 cases, representing all age groups, occurred during
the epidemic period which began in mid-January, reached
its peak some time in February, and now appears to be
subsiding.
(Reported by Dr. Winslow Bashe, Division of Communica-
ble Diseases, Ohio Department of Health.)

Utah Small community outbreaks of influenza-like
illness were reported from two rural counties in southern
Utah (Beaver and San Juan) during the week ending April
6. San Juan County, in the southeastern corner of the
State, lies adjacent to sites of recent confirmed influenza
outbreaks in Apache and Navajo Counties in Arizona.
One serologically confirmed case has been reported from
San Juan County thus far. In addition, influenza A2 virus
has been isolated from 3 sporadic cases in Salt Lake
County, and one sporadic case in Cache County in the
northern part of the State has been confirmed sero-
logically.
(Reported by Dr. A. A. Jenkins, Director, Communicable
and Chronic Disease, Section, Utah State Department
of tHealth.)

Wisconsin Type A2influenza has been confirmed
serologically in 19 sporadic cases representing 13 coun-
ties frcm several geographic regions within the State.
No new outbreaks of influenza-like illness have been
reported.
(Reported by Dr. Josef Preizler, Director, Bureau of
Communicable Diseases, Wisconsin State Board of
Health.)


RABIES TRENDS 1962
Reports from the States indicate that the occurrence
of human and animal rabies infections has remained es-
sentially unchanged since 1960. Figure 1 illustrates
the annual occurrence of reported human rabies for the
period 1950-1962, while Figure 2 similarly portrays the
annual occurrence of reported .animal rabies for the same
period.

Human Rabies Only two human rabies deaths were
recorded in the United States in 1962, both in children not
receiving treatment. Pertinent information for each of
these patients is summarized in the table below:


U. S. HUMAN RABIES DEATHS
1962
Nature Length
Loclity Do.t A.g S.e of Incubation of Treatent Biting
Died Exposure Period Illness Animal
1. Comeron 7/24/ 4 M Unknown kn day. Non. Unknown;
County, 62 probably
Teao. dog
2. Caribou 10/8/ 11 N Btten 3 or 4 4 days one Unldentl.
County, 62 on weeks fled;
Idaho cheek pos. ibly
bot


This number is consistent with the occurrence of
reported human rabies cases for the previous two years
and is below the average annual occurrence of 11.6 cases
observed during the period 1950-1959.


NUMBER
REPORTED
CASES
30
25
20
15
io
5


FIGURE I
REPORTED CASES OF HUMAN RABIES
1950-1962


1950 '51 '52


I I I I I


'53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59 '60 '1 '62
YEAR


Animal Rabies The preliminary total of 3,550 re-
ported cases of animal rabies in 1962 represents a slight
decrease of 49 cases from the 1961 total. The East
North Central States experienced a substantial increase
in animal rabies cases as a result of increases in Ohio,
Indiana, and Wisconsin. A severe outbreak of skunk rabies
in Ohio resulted in an increase from 79 cases in 1961 to
380 cases in 1962. Illinois reports a marked fall in rabies
from 163 in 1961 to 93 in 1962. Michigan also observed a
decrease in reported cases.


114


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7khfi,








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


FIGURE 2
NUMBER REPORTED CASES OF ANIMAL RABIES
REPORTED
EASES 1950-1962


YEAR


Increases were noted in the West North Central, East
South Central, Middle Atlantic and Pacific areas. Min-
nesota attributed their increase of 79 cases to an increase
in skunk rabies and California's increase of 31 cases
was attributable to an outbreak of dog rabies along the
Mexican border in the vicinity of Tia Juana. In the west-
ern States Nevada reported its first case of fox rabies in
30 years.


The West South Central area showed a sharp decline
in reported cases. In Arkansas, cases decreased from 246
in 1961 to 70 in 1962, while Texas recorded a 175 case
decrease from the 1961 total.
The South Atlantic area also showed a general de-
crease although raccoon rabies, which has been endemic
in Florida for many years was reported in Georgia in 1962.



EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
Typhoid Fever One additional case of typhoid
fever in an individual returning from Zermatt, Switzerland,
was reported this past week from New York City. This
patient developed an illness on February 13, two days
before arrival in Zermatt. She remained in Zermatt until
February 25 and then returned to New York, where a stool
culture yielded S. typhi, phage type as yet unidentified.
Case number 9 reported last week a 32-year-old male
from New York City who visited Zermatt between March 8
and 19, with onset of illness on March 12, was originally
confirmed by stool culture reported as S. typhi. Subsequent
laboratory examination has identified the isolate as a
Shigella species. The total reported cases in the U. S.


(Continued on page 120)


Pneumonia-influenza mortality The number of
pneumonia-influenza deaths reported in 108 cities con-
tinues to decline. For the week ending April 6, the number
reported was 618, an excess of 109.
Every division reported a decline including the Paci-
fic and Mountain States which last week reported in-
creases.
Excess deaths from all causes declined from 873
last week to 321.
Comparison with 1960 A2 Epidemic Cumulative
excess mortality since the week ending January 5th is
compared with the 1960 data in the following table:


Four-week average pneumonia-influenza mortality -
As seen in the accompanying table and chart, the average
number of pneumonia and influenza deaths during the four-
week period ending April 6 showed a decline.

PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS

WEEK ENDING*
4 Week Weekly
3/16 3/23 3/30 4/6 Total Average

Observed 1,120 957 777 618 3,472 868
Expected 533 526 518 509 2,086 522

Excess 587 431 259 109 1,386 346
Includes corrections for previous weeks.


CUMULATIVE EXCESS MORTALITY SINCE THE FIRST WEEK
OF THE YEAR

ALL CAUSES OF DEATH
Pneumonia-
Influenza 65 and Over All Ages
1963 1960 1963 1960 1963 1960

3,478 4,184 10,264 7,688 17,004 13,687







PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 U.S CITIES
Average number per week by four-w.ek periods

.., --,




NUMBER
O- --- -ii
(EATHS ag -









(See table, page 119)


115










116 Morlbiritl and Mortality Weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 6, 1963 AND APRIL 7, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
14th week First 14 weeks 14th week First 14 weeks 14th week 14th week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES...... 2 5 39 81 2 5 35 54 28 30

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 1 1 1 1
Maine............... -
New Hampshire......... -
Vermont................ -
Massachusetts ........ -
Rhode Island.......... 1
Connecticut........... 1 1 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 6 29 1 6 16 3 1
New York.............. 1 4 29 1 4 16 2 -
New Jersey............. 1 -
Pennsylvania 1 1 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........ 1 9 9 1 8 6 7 3
Ohio.................. 1 3 4 1 2 4 5 -
Indiana............... 3 2 -
Illinois................ 4 2 4 2
Michigan.............. 2 2 2 -
Wisconsin ............. 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 1 6 1 1 3 1 2
Minnesota.............. 1 1 1 1 1
Iowa.................. 3 2 -
Missouri................. 1 2 1 -
North Dakota......... -
South Dakota........... -
Nebraska............. -
Kansas................. -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 3 6 2 5 2
Delaware.............. -
Maryland............. -
District of Columbia. 1 2
Virginia.............. 1 I -
West Virginia......... -
North Carolina........ 2 1 2 1
South Carolina........ -
Georgia............... 1 1
Florida............... 2 2 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 2 1 1 5 3
Kentucky .............. 2
Tennessee.............. 1 -
Alabama ............... 2 1 1 1
Mississippi........... 5 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 2 10 17 2 10 14 1 2
Arkansas.............. -
Louisiana............. 9 4 9 4 -
Oklahoma.............. -
Texas................. 2 1 13 2 1 10 1 2

MOUNTAIN................. 5 4 2
Montana............... 2 1-
Idaho.................. -
Wyoming................ -
Colorado............... 2
New Mexico............. .
Arizona............... 22 2 2
Utah ..... ........... 1 -
Nevada.................

PACIFIC.................. 1 8 6 1 7 4 11 14
Washington ............. 1
Oregon ................ 1 1
California......* ..... 1 7 6 1 6 4 10 13
Alaska................ -
Hawaii................ -

Puerto Rico.............. 2 2 5 2 2 5 -









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 117


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 6, 1963 AND APRIL 7, 1962 (Continued)



Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Area Cumu- Cumu- 14th week
lative lative Under 20 &
14th week 14 weeks 14th week 14 weeks 14th week 20 yr. over Total 14th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 10 87 10 93 35 37 438 371 880 1,236 15,908 22,077

NEW ENGIAND................ 3 1 1 36 31 71 55 690 2,914
Maine................... 19 16 35 21 6 205
New Hampshire......... 2 1 3 2 48
Vermont............... 3 3 2 109 87
Massachusetts ......... 2 1 13 9 25 26 170 1,478
Rhode Island........... 1 1 2 3 3 56 119
Connecticut........... 2 2 1 349 977

MIDDLE ATLANTIC........... 4 2 13 14 8 93 86 179 204 1,471 4,798
New York............... 3 2 8 11 3 56 53 109 83 715 2,561
New Jersey............. 1 9 18 27 62 387 1,808
Pennsylvania .......... 1 4 3 5 28 15 43 59 369 429

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 6 7 2 4 58 53 117 246 6,615 2,428
Ohio................... 1 18 17 40 75 668 486
Indiana ............... 3 8 4 12 26 246 385
Illinois.............. 1 6 2 1 14 11 26 50 465 576
Michigan ............. 1 1 1 13 16 29 87 1,512 729
Wisconsin............. 1 2 5 5 10 8 3,724 252

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 5 65 28 1 14 19 42 90 832 526
Minnesota............. 6 15 1 2 3 18 154 28
Iowa................... 3 47 1 7 5 12 30 406 393
Missouri.............. 1 4 1 3 4 9 19 157 26
North Dakota.......... 1 1 2 3 7 100 63
South Dakota........... 3 7 2 1 13
Nebraska.............. 1 3 4 2 9 3 14 3
Kansas ................ 2 2 4 6 11 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 1 4 18 4 8 64 26 97 178 1,752 1,334
Delaware............. 1 1 157 5
Maryland.............. 2 2 6 4 10 19 74 104
District of Columbia. 3 4 67
Virginia.............. 1 2 16 4 24 30 293 427
West Virginia.......... 1 13 3 17 18 623 389
North Carolina........ 1 1 20 9 29 72 81 88
South Carolina........ 3 2 3 8 50 53
Georgia ............... 1 5 6 2 31
Florida............... 1 1 3 7 1 4 7 5 13 22 468 170

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 1 2 8 2 53 33 105 144 720 1,533
Kentucky............... 13 6 28 62 322 136
Tennessee.............. 1 1 1 2 28 16 54 51 275 1,132
Alabama............... 1 7 10 7 17 11 58 113
Mississippi........... 2 4 6 20 65 152

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 7 4 14 3 4 36 33 73 95 1,222 3,973
Arkansas.............. 2 1 1 1 3 4 14 51 31
Louisiana............. 13 5 18 15 8 11
Oklahoma.............. 2 4 1 2 6 126
Texas................. 2 3 4 9 3 3 22 24 49 60 1,163 3,805

MOUNTAIN................ 1 1 9 5 34 56 1,080 880
Montana............... 1 2 3 8 118 242
Idaho.................. 9 6 172 28
Wyoming............... -. 2 2 4 4 12 6
Colorado .............. 7 15 200 305
New Mexico.............. 2 1 3 5 NN NN
Arizona............... 5 14 318 230
Utah...................... 1 3 3 4 206 69
Nevada ............... 54 -

PACIFIC.................. 1 1 8 12 75 85 162 168 1,526 3,691
Washington............ 1 18 12 31 30 173 1,216
Oregon................ 12 14 26 20 234 655
California............. 1 1 8 11 45 59 104 101 835 1,754
Alaska................. 1 17 14 18
Hawaii ................ -- 270 48

Puerto Rico.............. 1 7 17 4 21 38 14 164







118 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 6, 1963 AND APRIL 7, 1962 (Continued)


Meningococcal Streptococcal Tickborne
Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
14th wk. 14 weeks 14th week 14th wk. 14th wk. 14th wk. 14th wk. 14 weeks 14th week 14 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 84 844 9,789 8,538 3 2 3 15 95 99 101 955

NEW ENGLAND......... 4 57 1,061 598 4 2 6
Maine............... 1 10 86 22 -- 1
New Hampshire...... 2 8 1 2 5
Vermont............ 1 2 4 40 -
Massachusetts...... 23 181 114 2 -
Rhode Island....... 6 68 51 -
Connecticut........ 2 14 714 370 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 8 109 749 602 3 12 4 2 30
New York............ 5 50 545 329 2 9 4 2 21
New Jersey......... 2 18 131 102
Pennsylvania........ 1 41 73 171 1 3 9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 11 138 1,419 1,159 5 24 41 128
Ohio............... 7 42 283 97 1 13 29 58
Indiana............ 17 194 111 1 3 8 17
Illinois........... 2 19 205 249 1 3 2 23
Michigan........... 1 41 372 468 1 2 2 20
Wisconsin........... 1 19 365 234 1 3 10

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 4 48 292 280 3 21 20 218
Minnesota........... 1 10 22 33 1 8 4 65
Iowa................ 2 46 98 1 6 9 68
Missouri............ 2 21 11 10 1 2 4 44
North Dakota....... 1 123 42 1 1 5
South Dakota....... 3 14 4 2 2 30
Nebraska............ 1 10 1 2 3
Kansas............. 1 75 93 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 16 174 1,009 739 2 1 1 16 14 4 167
Delaware........... 1 11 17 -
Maryland........... 1 26 66 23 1 2
Dist. of Columbia,. 3 3 7 -
Virginia............ 9 46 249 247 1 4 3 63
West Virginia...... 9 183 152 5 6 1 62
North Carolina..... 3 27 29 32 3 4
South Carolina..... 11 24 102 5
Georgia............ 10 7 1 3 7
Florida............ 3 41 444 152 2 1 4 1 26

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 18 80 1,346 1,107 1 1 1 8 8 9 94
Kentucky........... 26 126 104 2 4 3 39
Tennessee.......... 6 31 1,071 893 1 1 5 3 5 44
Alabama............ 4 11 47 10 I 1 1 11
Mississippi........ 8 12 102 100 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 15 99 845 739 1 1 1 20 17 18 193
Arkansas........... 5 2 7 2 12
Louisiana.......... 9 45 3 5 I 5 2 23
Oklahoma............ 2 17 24 2 2 13
Texas.............. 4 32 842 708 1 1 6 13 16 145

MOUNTAIN............ 2 27 1,457 1,525 1 2 1 17
Montana............ 1 1 63 59 -
Idaho.............. 150 175 -
Wyoming............ 1 72 117 -
Colorado........... 6 444 639 -
New Mexico......... 2 324 205 1 1 8
Arizona............ 5 293 238 9
Utah................ 10 111 92 -
Nevada ............ 1 2 -

PACIFIC............. 6 112 1,611 1,789 9 25 8 7 102
Washington......... 11 507 555 -
Oregon............. 5 25 44 2 1
California......... 6 91 754 1,013 8 21 8 7 101
Alaska............. 4 45 140 -
Hawaii.............. 1 280 37 1 2
Puerto Rico......... 6 3 3 4









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (B). REPORTED PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


119


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


F or weeks ending For weeks ending
Area 1 3/23 3/_____ Area3/ 3
3/16 3/23 3/30 4/6 3/16 3/23 3/30 4/6


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn..........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................
Allentown, Pa.............
Buffalo, N.Y...............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J...........
Erie, Pa..................
Jersey City, N.J.........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y.............
Schenectady, N.Y..........
Scranton, Pa..............
Syracuse, N.Y............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y.................
Yonkers, N.Y...............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis..............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio...............
Youngstown, Ohio...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn...............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo...........
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr ..............
St. Louis, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans..............


5
1
4*
10
6
0
4
2
1
1
3
1


8
0
3
2
1
4
5
15
5
8


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 21 16 12 6
Baltimore, Md............ 6 10 9 1
Charlotte, N.C........... 6 4 4 3
Jacksonville, Fla........ 6 6 0 2
Miami, Fla............... 2 2 1 1
Norfolk, Va.............. 8 9 1 5
Richmond, Va.............. 6 5 2 5
Savannah, Ga............. 9 7 8 6
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 11 7 5 6
Tampa, Fla............... 11 6 7 4
Washington, D.C.......... 14 19 8 11
Wilmington, Del.......... 5 6 0 5

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 10 6 3 3
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 18 19 25 12
Knoxville, Tenn......... 7 7 7 3
Louisville, Ky........... 51 60 35 26
Memphis, Tenn........... 56 17 9 17
Mobile, Ala.............. 2 0 0 1
Montgomery, Ala.......... 10 4 5 1
Nashville, Tenn......... 10 18 11 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 13 14 10 12
Baton Rouge, La.......... 5 2 2 1
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 3 1 2 1
Dallas, Tex............... 25 8 12 6
El Paso, Tex.............. 2 7 7 3
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 3 3 3 7
Houston, Tex............. 8 15 14 10
Little Rock, Ark......... 20 8 8 5
New Orleans, La.......... 31 14 8 9
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 9 2 2 2
San Antonio, Tex......... 9 18 8 6
Shreveport, La........... 9 16 14 14
Tulsa, Okla.............. 6 2 7 0

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 4 3 5 1
Colorado Springs, Colo... 5 7 4 2
Denver, Colo............. 9 7 13 9
Ogden, Utah............... 0 1 0 0
Phoenix, Ariz............ 7 6 6 4
Pueblo, Colo............. 0 0 0 0
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 2 1 4 0
Tucson, Ariz.............. 6 5 7 1

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 1 0 0 0
Fresno, Calif............ 1 4 1 3
Glendale, Calif.......... 1 0 0 0
Honolulu, Hawaii......... 2 0 0 1
Long Beach, Calif........ 1 2 1 1
Los Angeles, Calif....... 13 23 25 14
Oakland, Calif........... 3 2 2 8
Pasadena, Calif.......... 1 1 1 1*
Portland, Oreg........... 5 1 2 4
Sacramento, Calif ........ 7 5 5 1
San Diego, Calif ......... 2 1 5 3*
San Francisco, Calif ..... 6 7 11 6
San Jose, Calif.......... 5 1 7 3
Seattle, Wash........... 1 5 5 5
Spokane, Wash............ 1 0 0 5
Tacoma, Wash............... 1 2 1 2*

San Juan, P.R............... 4 1 2 2


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages...................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


12,153
618
775
6,936


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Iii1111 II III Ii I II IIM 1
3 1262 08864 1302


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


traced to Zermatt now stand at eight, with one additional
case reported with onset of illness before arrival in
Zermatt.
(Reported by Dr. Tibor Fodor, Epidemiologist, Bureau of
Preventable Diseases, New York City Health Department).


Typhoid Fever Los Angeles, California

A chicken salad partly prepared by a 51-year-old
retired chef for his granddaughter's birthday party was
responsible for 8 confirmed and 6 suspected cases of
typhoid fever in the Los Angeles area.
The party was held in a private home in Pacoima,
California, on February 16. It was attended by 83 persons,
who were mostly high school students. The first clinical
illness began on February 21. The existence of the epi-
demic was not suspected, however, until 2 persons with
fever and symptoms of gastroenteritis were admitted to a
private hospital on March 10. Widal tests showed both had
high tigers. These two patients were then transferred to
the Los Angeles General Hospital with a presumptive
diagnosis of typhoid fever.
Following recognition of the disease, the Los
Angeles County Health Department contacted all persons
who had attended the party. Sixteen individuals were found
to have symptoms suggestive of typhoid fever and were
admitted to Los Angeles General Hospital. Of these, eight
patients have had confirmatory evidence, while two were
discharged with a diagnosis of febrile illness other than
typhoid fever. The remaining six are still under observa-
tion. Incubation periods in the confirmed cases ranged
from 5 to 24 days.
Three of the cases were younger children who did
not attend the birthday party but ate in their own homes
some of the chicken salad served at the party.
Salmonella typhi has been isolated from stool speci-
mens submitted by the grandfather. He has no history of
typhoid fever, but did have "trouble with gallstones" in
1935. He worked as a food handler and cook from 1955
through 1962.
For control purposes, the Los Angeles City Health
Department obtained two stool specimens one week apart
from each person who attended the party. Family contacts
of diagnosed cases were immunized against typhoid fever
and have been kept under surveillance for 35 days.
(Reported by Philip K. Condit, M.D., Chief, Bureau of
Communicable Diseases. State of California Department
of Public Health.)


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
Plague San Francisco
The Division of Foreign Quarantine on March 29, 1963,
declared uninfected the local area in San Francisco de-
scribed for rodent plague (MMWR, March 15, 1963). An
intensive program of investigations and rat :rapping
revealed no additional evidence of infected animals.





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