Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00104

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text
CS22. 6o/90//I?


Morbidity and Mortality


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the S


634-5131


For release September 27, 1963 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333 Vol. 12, No. 38
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED SEPTEMBER 21, 1963


Indexes for 1961 and 1962 are included as a removable
In the future, the annual index will be included in the
A


in this issue.


POLIOMYELITIS A total of 10 cases of poliomyelitis
(6 paralytic) were reported for the week ending September
21, 1963. Two cases each were reported from Alabama,
Georgia, Virginia and Wisconsin, and single cases from
Pennsylvania and Michigan.
During the corresponding week in 1962, there were 29
cases reported. The cumulative total through the 38th


wee ico :nue b less t e-half the number re-
porte ng 1N62.
ASEP NINGITIS o three cases of aseptic
meningi b I~ rmont for the 38th week.
These case mulative total of an outbreak
in and around one munity during'the past eight weeks.
Epidemiologic and laboratory studies are in progress.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
38th Week Cumulative
Disease Ended Ended First 38 weeks
Disease Median
September 21, September 22, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis................ 94 107 --- 1,253 1,741
Brucellosis ..................... 6 9 15 273 306 557
DG lrl-,tc r ..................... 9 16 16 178 290 457
E..-: _-ptilli infectious .......... 42 62 62 1,149 1,368 1,368
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 741 934 898 31,873 41,050 27,220
Measles ........................ 737 788 788 359,225 443,515 396,521
Meningococcal infections ......... 30 31 31 1,798 1,597 1,688
Poliomyelitis, total.............. .10 29 203 265 565 2,117
Paralytic .................... 6 23 134 226 439 1,443
Nonparalytic ................. 5 44 25 91 469
Unspecified .................. 4 1 25 14 35 205
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 4,004 4,132 --- 255,339 237,093
Tetanus ........................ 6 13 -- 184 197
Tularemia...................... 8 3 --- 210 217
Typhoid fever ................... 19 15 26 381 447 580
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 5 6 --- 156 192 _
Rabies in Animals............... 84 45 61 2,826 2,879 2,850

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 4 Psittacosis: Calif. 1, Texas 1 58
EBoui-m 12 Rabies in Man: 1
Malaria: 66 Smallpox:
Plague: ITyphus, murine: Va. 1, Fla. 1 19


Reote








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS


Dengue Fever

Puerto Rico


A total of 11,341 cases of dengue fever had been
officially reported to the Puerto Rico Department of
Health as of September 23. This represents an increase of
2,545 cases during the past week. Although 65 of the 77
municipios have reported cases, 11 of these account for
78% of all cases. With the exception of Guayama and
Juncos, these municipios (see below) are located on the
north central coast or in the metropolitan San Juan area.



Reported Cases
Municipio Location Population* Through Sept. 23

Arecibo North Central Coast 69,879 1,283
Barceloneta North Central Coast 19,334 1,210
Bayamon Metropolitan San Juan 72,221 346
Ciales North Central Coast 18,106 324
Guoyama Southeast Coast 33,678 1,080
Guaynobo Metropolitan San Juan 39,718 246
Juncos Eastern Interior 21,486 1,139
Manati North Central Coast 29,354 1,638
Morovis North Central Coast 18,094 534
Rio Piedras Metropolitan San Juan 251,384 486
Vega Baia North Central Coast 30,189 558
S1960 Census



Further clinical observations reveal that the illness
appears to have a broad clinical spectrum with a great
many individuals able to carry on most normal activities
despite symptoms of fever, headache and muscle pain;
some, however, have been incapacitated for periods rang-
ing up to a week. There has been no significant rise in
high school absenteeism in any of the areas and. no
notable increase in hospital admissions.
A special study involving daily, house to house
surveillance of 100 households in Barriade Frailes
Llanos, Guaynabo, has revealed, thus far, 52 cases of
dengue fever-like illness among the 493 persons living in
this area. The initial cases appeared in early August; a
notable sharp increase in cases commenced in late
August and early September (see figure). Cases are still
occurring.
Persons in all age groups have been afflicted. Thirty-
two of the 52 cases have been female, yielding an attack
rate of 13 percent; the attack rate among males thus far
is 8 percent.
(Reported by Victor Gonzalez, A..D., Director, Bureau of
Health, Puerto Rico Department of HIealth, and a team
from the Communicable Disease Center.)


DENGUE FEVER CASES- Guoynobo,Puerto Rico-1963


weeding 3
week ending 3


10 17 24
August


1 r .. .... ,.


14p
September


Dengue Fever

Minnesota

Six cases of clinical dengue fever, one originating in
Puerto Rico and five in Jamaica, have been reported
from Minnesota.
One of these cases was that of a 21-year-old male
Nigerian, who had returned to Minnesota following a
twelve weeks' stay in Puerto Rico, on September 8. The
following day he experienced chills, sweating, pain on
eye movement, backache, headache, substernal pain,
elevated temperature, nausea, and dizziness over a two-
day period. No rash could be distinguished in this colored
patient. The patient had had malaria previously; a malaria
slide prepared at this time was negative. His white count
was 3,000 with 61% lymphs, 28% neutrophiles, and 10%
eosiniphiles. A urine specimen showed a trace of al-
bumen, occasional red cells, and 0-20 white cells.
This patient was exposed to mosquitoes during his
stay in Puerto Rico and a case of dengue had been diag-
nosed in a neighbor while he was in that region.
The remaining five cases occurred in a family rang-
ing in age from 5 to 37. The family had been in Jamaica
from July 24 until August 6. During their stay in Kingston,
their hostess' son had an illness similar to the one which
they experienced beginning August 9. The father was ill
for four days with retro-orbital pressure, photophobia,
chills, recurrent fever, and weakness. The. mother had a
similar illness lasting three days. All the children were
sick for one day with fever and weakness. In all five
members of this family, a generalized macular rash de-
veloped when their temperature returned to normal. All
had a leukopenia except the son who had an increase in
lymphocytes. The liver function tests were normal. There
was no jaundice. Urine specimens were also normal.
Laboratory specimens on all six cases are under
study.


310







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Botulism West Virginia

A 25-year-old West Virginia man died of botulism
within 24 hours after eating home canned green beans.
Six hours after ingestion, the patient experienced
severe abdominal cramping and vomiting, which caused
his admission to a hospital. At that time, his pupils were
noted to be dilated and fixed. In the hospital his vomiting
continued; he went into shock, and expired early the next
morning. At autopsy, the stomach and small bowel were
dilated, but otherwise there was no evidence of gastro-
intestinal pathology. The lungs were markedly edematous
and congested. The brain was mildly edematous.
The victim's wife had prepared six quarts of cold
pack green beans, obtained from the family garden, in
early July, 1963. Five of these quarts were consumed by
all members of the family (including the victim) at varying
intervals during the month of July. No member of the
family experienced any illness after eating from these five
cans. The remaining quart, opened approximately one
month after it was cold packed, was noted to have both a
milky appearance and a bad odor. The patient disregarded
advice from other members of his family and consumed ap-
proximately one-half the can of beans. No other member
of the family tasted the beans from this particular can.
Clostridium botulinum was cultured from the remain-
ing green beans. This is the first known case of botulism
from West Virginia.
(Reported by L. A. Dickerson, M.D., Director of Disease
Control, West Virginia State Health Department, and
Mrs. Virginia Black, Public Health Nurse, Wood County
Health Department.)


Staphylococcal Food Poisoning California

Twenty-two of 300 people attending a community
luncheon in Santa Cruz experienced vomiting, diarrhea,
cramps, chills, and prostration in varying degrees of
severity. The times of onset range from 2V hours to 6
hours following the meal, with a mean of 3% hours. Many
of the victims were hospitalized overnight; no fatalities
were recorded.
On the basis of interviews with the victims and
their families, only those who ate fish at the luncheon
became ill; individuals restricting themselves to other
items on the menu did not become ill.
The food was prepared by six volunteer members.
The codfish used was cut and breaded in corn meal and
flour, then fried in oil on a grill. After cooking, the fish
was placed in pans to cool, then dipped into a prepared
sauce, and finally placed in crocks covered with cloths
and stored overnight. The fish sauce was prepared from
tomato sauce, vinegar and spices, including garlic and
parsley. After cooking, the fish was not refrigerated, thus
providing at least 20 hours for incubation.
Cultures were obtained from the remaining fish and
other foods. Staphylococcus aureus was found in heavy
concentration in the fish and fish sauce.
The source of the staphylococcus organisms was
not determined. None of the volunteers admitted to being
ill, and none were observed to have skin lesions at the
time of the interview.
(Reported by L. Raynor Talley, Director of Sanitation,
Santa Cruz County Health Department, and Dr. Philip
K. Condit, Chief, Bureau of Communicable Diseases,
State Department of Health, Berkeley, California.)


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 U.S CITIES
Average number per week by four-week periods


SUMMARY OF PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS

The weekly average number of pneumonia-influenza
deaths for the four-week period ending September 21 was
336 as compared with an expected weekly average of 384.




PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 108 CITIES


(See Table, Page 319)


311










312 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Tahb i. (ASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 21, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 22, 1962



Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
SCumu- Spotted) Cumu- Cumu-
lative lative lative
38th wk. 38 weeks 38th week 38th wk. 38th wk. 38th wk. 38th wk. 38 weeks 38th week 38 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963

UNITED STATES.... 30 1,798 4,004 4,132 6 5 8 19 381 84 45 2,826

NEW ENGLAND......... 2 112 237 270 1 11 26
Maine.............. 17 9 82 2 1
New Hampshire...... 4 1 12
Vermont............ 4 16 1 1 *12
Massachusetts...... 1 53 34 64 1 6 1
Rhode Island....... 10 16 13 -
Connecticut........ 1 24 162 109 2

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 2 248 99 94 1 74 4 2 90
New York........... 116 66 53 1 34 3 1 67
New Jersey......... 1 35 19 20 5 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 97 14 21 35 1 1 23

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 4 276 279 167 1 37 11 2 447
Ohio .............. 1 77 31 29 1 15 5 263
Indiana............ 1 36 83 6 1 2 42
Illinois........... 1 52 32 53 9 2 64
Michigan........... 1 84 105 49 2 41
Wisconsin.......... 27 28 36 5 3 37

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2 115 65 160 3 2 2 23 22 10 722
Minnesota........... 22 6 1 3 9 1 175
Iowa .............. 1 7 24 36 1 2 6 3 275
Missouri........... 1 34 3 2 2 1 14 4 119
North Dakota....... 12 27 54 1 29
South Dakota....... 5 4 6 1 1 2 80
Nebraska........... 24 1 3 26
Kansas............. 11 1 62 1 1 2 2 18

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 8 332 503 534 5 5 51 11 7 397
Delaware........... 4 2 1 2 3 1
Maryland............ 1 50 7 4 8 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 6 4 -
Virginia........... 1 74 77 78 8 5 3 142
West Virginia...... 1 17 252 135 1 6 2 2 106
North Carolina..... 3 58 39 14 3 6 11
South Carolina..... 17 34 37 1 3 7
Georgia............ 1 27 3 1 2 3 1 61
Florida............ 1 79 85 265 2 15 1 1 69

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 1 133 952 906 2 4 50 4 2 225
Kentucky........... 28 66 60 10 2 1 108
Tennessee.......... 1 60 823 786 21 2 100
Alabama............. 23 20 42 2 9 1 17
Mississippi........ 22 43 18 4 10 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 164 505 601 1 2 2 70 17 10 545
Arkansas........... 11 1 4 2 1 24 3 1 59
Louisiana .......... 67 2 1 22 41
Oklahona........... 29 5 5 48
Texas.............. 57 502 596 1 1 19 9 9 397

MOUNTAIN............. 59 820 869 4 1 16 11 106
Montana............ 3 30 41 -
Idaho.............. 6 75 83 -
Wyoming ............ 4 5 10 1
Colorado........... 16 285 310 2 6 1 16
New Mexico......... 4 257 236 3 6 33
Arizona............ 9 94 108 1 7 3 47
Utah ............... 14 74 81 -
N
PACIFIC...... ...... 11 359 544 531 2 49 4 12 268
Washington......... 28 113 117 2 -
Oregon ............. 25 5 14 2 2 7
California......... 11 286 392 356 2 42 4 10 252
Alaska.............. 12 19 26 1 9
Hawaii ............ 8 15 18 2
Puerto Rico........ 6 1 1 12 -

(Continued on Page 317)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INDEX 1961 VOLUME 10


DISEASE


Anthrax

Brucellosis

Cholera

Coxsackie Infections
(See also meningitis, aseptic)

Diphtheria

E. coli, enteropathogenic

Encephalitis

Erythema Infectiosum

Exanthematous Disease, Epidemic
Unknown Etiology

Food and Water-Borne Disease Outbreaks

Chemical Poisoning

Clostridium botulinum

Clostridium perfringens
(food-borne)

Hepatitis

Nicotinic Acid Poisoning

Salmonellae

Shigellae

Staphylococcus



Trichinosis

Unknown Etiology

Hepatitis
(See also Food and Water-Borne
Disease Outbreaks)

Histoplasmosis

Infectious Mononucleosis


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES


No. 21,46

No. 18


STATE REPORTS


No. 22,28


No. 32,33,34,36,42


No. 15,25,38




No. 46


No. 26,35



No. 1,2,22

No. 8,33,47

No. 45

No. 19

No. 9,14


No. 12

No. 12


No. 4,5,25

No. 29


No. 12




No. 12

No. 12

No. 12,27



No. 12

No. 12,28

No. 11,17,32,37,50


No. 6,10,13,17,26

No. 42

No. 21,30,41

No. 48

No. 3,10,1 I ,16,
19,27,28,30,51

No. 2,6,7,16




No. 1,3,4,6,7,10,
13,20,23,26,34,35
42,47

No. 5

No. 29


313


INTERNATIONAL


No. 51








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INDEX 1961 VOLUME 10 (Continued)


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES


STATE REPORTS


INTERNATIONAL


Influenza
1960-61 Summary
Influenza B
(See also Respiratory Disease)


Influenza A2


Meningitis, Aseptic
(See also Coxsackie infections)

Meningitis, Meningococcai

Mesenteric Adenitis

Neuromyasthenia, Epidemic

Plague


No. 14,15,23,36,37,38,40


Relapsing Fever


No. 2,3,4,9,23,39

No. 14

No. 2,3,26,31,
33,38,42,43


No. 43


Respiratory Disease, Acute
(See also influenza)


Salmonellosis (See Food and Water-Borne
Disease Outbreaks and Typhoid)

Shigellosis (See Food and Water-Borne
Disease Outbreaks)


Smallpox


Streptococcal Infection and
Rheumatic Fever

Trypanosomiasis (T. cruzi)

Tularemia

Typhoid Fever (See also Food and
Water-Borne Disease Outbreaks)

Typhus, Murine


Yellow Fever


314


DISEASE


No. 39
No. 48-52
No. 46-50


No. 12,14,15


No. 20,48,49,
50

No. 4-9,15,16,
24,50


No. 31


No. 3,20


No. 36


Poliomyelitis


Q Fever

Rabies


No. 24

No. 31,35


No. 6


No. 47-52


No. 10,46


No. 5,9,13,14,
42,52


No. 19

No. 45

No. 3

No. 4,8


No. 44


No. 15








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INDEX 1962 VOLUME 11


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES


STATE REPORTS


INTERNATIONAL


Anthrax

Brucellosis

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Cholera

Coxsackie Infections (See also
meningitis, aseptic)

Diphtheria


Encephalitis




Erythema Infectiosum

Food and Water-Borne Disease Outbreaks

Botulism


Chemical Food Poisoning

Clostridium perfringens


Hepatitis

Mushroom Poisoning

Nicotine Poisoning

Salmonellae


Shellfish Poisoning

Shigellae


Staphylococcus



Streptococcus


Typhoid Fever

Unknown Etiology

Viral Gastroenteritis


Page 74


Pages 259,264


Pages 234,235


Pages 240,280


Pages 235,240


Pages 250,251


Page 226






















Pages 106,121,178,
354,355,360


Page 90


Pages 2,82,88,282,
283

Pages 227,232,266,
267,272,274,275,
280,282,290,291,
330,331

Pages 146,147



Pages 66,67,72,162,
336,394,395

Page 178

Pages 26,32,314,315,
363,368,378,379

Pages 58,59

Page 218

Page 216


Pages 11,16,50,51,
90,106,202,218,323,
328,338,378,386,392

Page 256

Pages 154,155,291
296

Pages 136,144,194,
200,338,346,347,
352,410

Pages 2,3,122,123,
155

Pages 98,99,104,120

Pages 322,323

Pages 202,203


Page 243


DISEASE


315








316


DISEASE

Hepatitis (See also Food and W
Borne Disease Outbreaks)

Influenza

Influenza B


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




INDEX 1962 VOLUME 11 (Continued)

SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES STATE REPORTS

ater- Page 83 Pages 58,59,74,80,
186,187,370,371


Pages 1,2,9,10,17,18,25,26,
33,34,41,42,49,50,57,58,65,
66,73,74,81,89,97,105,106,
113,122,129


Influenza A2


Pages 130,202


Leptospirosis

Listeria monocytogenes

Malaria

Meningitis, Aseptic
(See Coxsackie Infections)
Parathion Deaths

Poliomyelitis




Psittacosis

Rabies

Post-vaccinal complications

Relapsing Fever

Respiratory Disease, Acute
(See also influenza)

Rickettsialpox

Salmonellosis (See Food and Water-
Borne Disease Outbreaks)

Shigellosis (See Food and Water-
Borne Disease Outbreaks)

Smallpox


Pages 50,58,66,
168


Page 314

Page 216


Pages 106,107


Pages 113,114,115,129,131
137,139,217,218,219,241,
242,248,297,298,299,303,
304,401,402,403,408



Pages 138,144

















Page 272


Pages 187,192

Pages 409,411,
416


Page 168


Pages 34,35

Pages 258,395,400

Pages 362,363

Page 42

Pages 371,376


Pages 170,171


Pages 8,16,24,32,
40,48.16.64,72,
80.8S, .1,. 12,
168,192,264,280


Staphylococcus Infection

Tick-Bite Paralysis

Tularemia

Typhoid Fever (See also Food and Water-
Borne Disease Outbreaks)

Typhus Fever


Pages 152,171,176

Pages 2 i:.48

Page 378

Pages 98,99,104,
120,130

Page 410


INTERNATIONAL










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 317


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 21, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 22, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 38th week
lative lative Under 20 &
38th week 38 weeks 38th week 38 weeks 38th week 20 yr. over Total 38th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 6 273 9 178 42 62 373 324 741 934 737 788

NEW ENGIAND.............. 1 8 1 2 48 31 79 80 25 56
Maine.................. 24 7 31 19 3 5
New Hampshire........... 7 3 10 5 -
Vermont............... 1 1 3 4 1 7 8
Massachusetts.......... 6 1 12 4 16 51 9 27
Rhode Island......... 2 2 2 2 2 1
Connecticut........... 4 12 16 4 4 15

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 1 6 21 9 14 105 81 186 169 77 95
New York............... 3 13 7 9 58 49 107 99 52 47
New Jersey............. 1 3 11 13 24 26 16 34
Pennsylvania.......... 2 5 2 5 36 19 55 44 9 14

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 29 23 3 8 54 55 117 174 237 229
Ohio.................. 1 3 19 16 39 48 19 34
Indiana............... 5 5 1 5 6 6 32 26
Illinois.............. 18 12 2 4 4 7 11 47 11 19
Michigan.............. 5 3 1 1 30 25 55 57 116 90
Wisconsin ............. 1 2 2 6 16 59 60

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 2 152 37 3 5 15 7 25 51 13 14
Minnesota............. 8 15 2 2 2 4 4 2 1
Iowa.................. 2 113 1 1 1 2 3 16 7 3
Missouri.............. 11 1 1 1 1 2 13 -
North Dakota........... 1 1 3 2 5 4 7
South Dakota........... 8 11 3 3 2 3
Nebraska.............. 6 8 1 2 9 -
Kansas............... 6 5 8 7 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC............ 1 15 3 40 10 13 38 31 70 125 39 67
Delaware.............. 1 3
Maryland.............. 4 2 9 4 13 11 6 7
District of Columbia.. 1 2 2 3 1
Virginia............. 1 7 3 4 8 14 18 5
West Virginia......... 1 3 1 4 16 19
North Carolina......... 4 2 1 13 8 21 41 1 1
South Carolina......... 3 15 2 2 2 5 5 9
Georgia................ 3 12 3 -
Florida................ 1 9 6 8 6 14 20 32 8 22

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 13 1 13 2 2 35 20 55 79 51 28
Kentucky.............. 3 10 2 12 19 11 4
Tennessee............. 6 1 3 2 2 14 7 21 38 38 22
Alabama.............. 4 10 5 2 7 11 1 2
Mississippi........... -- 6 9 15 11 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 32 3 27 1 5 32 13 48 83 63 60
Arkansas.............. 7 2 1 1 2 5 2
Louisiana............. 8 3 10 6 3 9 32
Oklahoma.............. 5 6 1 1 -
Texas.................. 12 9 5 25 9 37 46 62 58

MOUNTAIN ................. 9 1 5 4 14 7 48 47 83 45
Montana............... 3 6 7 3 31 13
Idaho ................. 10 11 3 8
Wyoming ............... 1 3
Colorado.............. 3 4 2 13 9 12 4
New Mexico............ 1 2 1 1 1 8 NN NN
Arizona................ 3 9 11 27 15
Utah.................. 5 4 4 8 2 10 5
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.................. 2 16 1 4 9 13 32 79 113 126 149 194
Washington ............ 2 2 16 18 24 17 35
Oregon ................ 1 3 6 10 18 12 16 42
California ............ 1 12 1 4 7 13 23 51 74 79 83 58
Alaska................. 2 2 11 28 13
Hawaii................ 1 1 1 5 46

Puerto Rico................ 12 17 3 20 25 4 66










318 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



Table CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

SEPTEMBER 21, 1963 AND SEPTEMBER 22, 1962 (Continued)



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
38th week First 38 weeks 38th week First 38 weeks 38th week 38th week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962

UNITED STATES....... 10 29 265 565 6 23 226 439 5 94 107

NEW ENGLAND.............. 3 5 3 5 44 1
Maine ........... ..... -
New Hampshire........ -
Vermont................ 1 1 43
Massachusetts......... 2 4 2 4 1
Rhode Island.......... 1 -
Connecticut........... 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC........... 1 1 86 61 1 1 67 43 6 3
New York............... 7 46 5 30 4 3
New Jersey............ 1 1 6 1 1 6 -
Pennsylvania 1 78 9 1 61 7 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL ....... 3 5 36 60 1 4 26 42 11 29
Ohio.................. 8 16 4 14 3 9
Indiana............... 2 2 9 1 1 6 1
Illinois.............. 2 12 24 2 11 14 3 11
Michigan.............. 8 7 1 8 6 5 8
Wisconsin............. 2 1 6 4 1 2 2-

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........ 1 4 27 1 4 17 3 14
Minnesota ........... 3 6 3 6 3 13
Iowa.................. 5 2 -
Missouri.............. 7 2 1
North Dakota.......... 3 1 -
South Dakota.......... 1 1 -
Nebraska.............. 1 1 5 1 1 5
Kansas................ -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 4 6 37 42 4 5 34 36 1 2 2
Delaware ............. 1 1 1 -
Maryland.............. -
District of Columbia.. 2 1
Virginia.............. 2 6 7 2 5 7 1
West Virginia......... 1 5 1 5 1
North Carolina......... 1 3 5 3 4 -
South Carolina ........ 1 6 5 1 5 5 -
Georgia................ 2 4 14 10 2 4 13 9 -
Florida ............... 6 8 6 5 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 2 4 56 49 4 52 38 1 2
Kentucky.............. 1 21 1 15 1
Tennessee............. 8 9 8 4 1 -
Alabama............... 2 3 43 17 3 39 17 1
Mississippi........... 5 2 5 2 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 12 24 252 8 23 197 4 13
Arkansas.............. 1 4 7 1 3 7 4
Louisiana............. 4 14 18 4 14 16 -
Oklahoma.............. 11 9 1
Texas.................. 7 6 216 3 6 165 4 8

MOUNTAIN.................. 1 12 1 8 1
Montana............... 3 2 -
Idaho................. 1 2 1 1 -
Wyoming............... 2 1 -
Colorado.............. -. -
New Mexico............. -
Arizona............... 3 3 1
Utah.................. 1 1 -
Nevada..............- -

PACIFIC................. 18 57 16 53 27 42
Washington............. 1 2 1 2 2 -
Oregon................ 2 5 1 5 2 -
California............ 15 50 14 46 23 42
Alaska ............... -
Hawaii ................ -

Puerto Rico.............. 5 11 4 11










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (B). REPORTED PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN REPORTING CITIES


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)0


319


For weeks ending a For weeks ending
Area _9/7 9/ 9/21 8/1 Area97
8/31 9/7 9/14 9/21 8/31 9/7 9/14 9/21


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. ............. 7 4 4 7
Bridgeport, Conn. ......... 4 4 2
Cambridge, Mass. .......... -
Fall River, Mass. ......... 1 3 3-
Hartford, Conn. ........... 1 2 -
Lowell, Mass. ............. 1 3 2
Lynn, Mass ............... 1 2 -
New Bedford, Mass. ........ 1 1 3
New Haven, Conn ........... 1 1 -
Providence, R.I. .......... 6 1 3 3
Somerville, Mass. ......... 2 -
Springfield, Mass. ........ 6 2 4 6
Waterbury, Conn. .......... 3 1 7
Worcester, Mass. .......... 5 5 2 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. .............. 1 4 1 1
Allentown, Pa. ............. 1 1
Buffalo, N.Y. ............. 8 8 2 -
Camden, N.J. .............. 1 2
Elizabeth, N:J. ..........
Erie, Pa. ....... ;......... 2 3
Jersey City, N.J. ......... 6 3 4 2
Newark, N.J. .............. 3 4 1
New York City, N.Y. ....... 44 33 42 42
Paterson, N.J ............. 1 2 3
Philadelphia, Pa. ......... 14 15 13 11
Pittsburgh, Pa. ........... 7 1 5 1
Reading, Pa. .............. 2 1 2 5
Rochester, N.Y. ........... 7 14 5 5
Schenectady, N.Y. ..........
Scranton, Pa. ............. 1
Syracuse, N.Y. ............ 4 2 3
Trenton, N.J. ............. 2 1 1
Utica, N.Y. ................ 3 1 2 5
Yonkers, N.Y. ............. 2 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................. 1 1 -
Canton, Ohio................ 3 1 -
Chicago, Ill. .............. 36 33 30 30
Cincinnati, Ohio........... 4 4 -
Cleveland, Ohio............. 6 1 3 5
Columbus, Ohio.............. 2 2 5 3
Dayton, Ohio................ 2 1 1
Detroit, Mich. ............ 4 5 9 9
Evansville, Ind. .......... 1 1 1 1
Flint, Mich. .............. 1 4 5 3*
Fort Wayne, Ind. .......... 2 2 3 4
Gary, Ind. ................ 7 3 1
Grand Rapids, Mich. ....... 3 6 2*
Indianapolis, Ind. ........ 4 2 4 1
Madison, Wis. ............. 3
Milwaukee, Wis. ........... 1 2 2 4
Peoria, Ill. ...............
Rockford, Ill. ............ 2 4
South Bend, Ind. .......... 3 3 3 3
Toledo, Ohio................ 2 5 3 1
Youngstown, Ohio............ 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa........... 1 1 1 2
Duluth, Minn. .............
Kansas City, Kans. ........ 3 1 4 1
Kansas City, Mo. .......... 1 4 8 5
Lincoln, Nebr. ............ 5 1 4 2
Minneapolis, Minn. ........ 1 2 3
Omaha, Nebr. .............. 1 2 3 2
St. Louis, Mo. ............ 5 11 3 7
St. Paul, Minn. ............ 1
Wichita, Kans. ............ 6 4 4 4


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. .............. 1 1 4 3
Baltimore, Md. ............ 5 5 4 2
Charlotte, N.C. ........... 2 1 3
Jacksonville, Fla. ........ 2 2 2
Miami, Fla ................ 1 2 I
Norfolk, Va. .............. 3 1 2
Richmond, Va. .............. 1 2 2 1
Savannah, Ga. .............. 3 5 4 4
St. Petersburg, Fla. ...... 10 9 5 4
Tampa, Fla ................ 2 1 1 3
Washington, D.C. .......... 6 10 11 6
Wilmington, Del. .......... 1 2 3

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala. .......... 3 1 1 3
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........ 6 3 1 6
Knoxville, Tenn. .......... 4 1 2 1
Louisville, Ky. ........... 8 7 11 10
Memphis, Tenn. ............. 5 7 11 3
Mobile, Ala. .............. 1 1
Montgomery, Ala. .......... 1 6 5 2
Nashville, Tenn. .......... 2 1 2 4

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. .............. 6 3 6 1
Baton Rouge, La. .......... 1 2 2 2
Corpus Christi, Tex ......-
Dallas, Tex. .............. 2 2 3 2
El Paso, Tex. ............. 2 1 2
Fort Worth, Tex. .......... 1 1 2
Houston, Tex. ............. 2 3 5 3
Little Rock, Ark. ......... 5 1 5 6
New Orleans, La. .......... 7 3 3 1
Oklahoma City, Okla. ...... 1 1 1
San Antonio, Tex. ......... 3 1 2 3
Shreveport, La. ........... 1 3 7 4
Tulsa, Okla ............... 3 2 2 4

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex. ...... 2 5 4
Colorado Springs, Colo. ... 3 2 4
Denver, Colo. ............. 4 7 4 2
Ogden, Utah................. 2 1 4
Phoenix, Ariz. ............ 2 3 2 5
Pueblo, Colo. ............
Salt Lake City, Utah....... 1 2
Tucson, Ariz. ............. 1 2 3

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. ...........
Fresno, Calif. ............ 1
Glendale, Calif ..........
Honolulu, Hawaii............ 1 1
Long Beach, Calif. ........ 1
Los Angeles, Calif. ....... 15 14 9 17
Oakland, Calif. ........... 1 1 5 1
Pasadena, Calif. .......... 1 -
Portland, Oreg. ........... 2 1 2*
Sacramento, Calif. ........ 3 1 2 2
San Diego, Calif. ......... 2 1 2
San Francisco, Calif. ..... 1 5 4 2
San Jose, Calif. .......... 1 3 2
Seattle, Wash. ............ 3 1 2 3
Spokane, Wash. ............ 1
Tacoma, Wash. ............. 1 1

San Juan, P.R. .............. 3 1 3 (---)


"Current Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities


4(A) Total Mortality, all ages....................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


10,981
329
711
5,999


NOTF: All deaths by place of occurreuce.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ll I1262 08864 0346III111111 I I
3 1262 08864 0346


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES

Cholera Korea

Korea declared Pusan infected with cholera as of
September 21. Thirty-nine cases, including 10 deaths,
have been reported.
Seoul was declared infected with cholera as of
September 23. One cholera case has been reported.
In addition to the cases of cholera reported in Korea,
the following countries have also been rtportJd to be
infected with cholera:

Burma
Federation of Malaya
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Macao
Pakistan
Philippines'
Thailand


Cholera Japan

Japan declared Yokohama a non-infected local area
with cholera as of September 21, after a case of cholera,
imported by ship, had been reported.


Smallpox Poland

Poland declared Wroclaw (Breslau) free of smallpox
as of September 9.

Smallpox Switzerland

A case of laboratory confirmed smallpox in a Swiss
nurse, who had visited Africa, was reported August 31
(see MMWR, Vol. 12, page 292). This 70-year-old nurse
had visited the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambarene,
Gabon, beginning July 19, 1963. On her return trip, be-
ginning August 8, she visited Port Gentil and Libreville,
Gabon, Bordeaux and Paris, France. She arrived in Zurich
on August 17.
A transitory rash began August 19 and lasted a few
days. Because of pain in her ear, which developed 7 days
after the rash, she consulted a physician and on August
30 was hospitalized in Zurich.
In early July, 1963, prior to her departure for Gabon,
the patient had been revaccinated against smallpox in
Zurich; the result of revaccination is not known.
(Reported in "Weekly Epidemiological Record" published
by the World Health Organization.)


Note.: These provisions d4ata re based as weekly telegrnms t the CO. i.
cable Disease Center by the ladividal State bealth departments.
Symbols: --- Data nst s.*itable
Q oatity uero
Procedures for construction of various mortality curves ray be obtased fro
Statistics Section. Commusicable Diasese Cater, Public Health Sevice,
U. S. Departmet of Health, Edo etiou, ad Welfaue, Atlaste 2. Georgia.


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