Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00103

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report

Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


I 0O MU IABEDSES CN E


For release April 26, 1963


ATLANTA 22, GEORGIA


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITE
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED APRIL 20, 1963


INFLUENZA The epidemic of A2 influenza continues
to wane. Influenza and pneumonia mortality for the United
States as a whole has returned essentially to expected
levels. The Mountain and Pacific Regions only report
deaths above the epidemic threshold. (See graph, p. 135).

Poliomyelitis Reported cases of poliomyelitis
during the first 16 weeks are at a record low level. Total
cases are less than half that reported for the comparable
period during 1962 and approximately one-sixth of the
median total over the past five years. Paralytic cases
are also sharply diminished over previous years, although
the reduction is less pronounced.(See table, right column).


POLIOMYELITIS CUMULATEDD WEEKLY) THROUGH 16TH WEEK
FOR PAST FIVE YEARS

1963 1962 1961 1960 1959
Paralytic 39 61 82 182 251
Total 43 89 127 252 354



EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS
Conjunctivitis Oklahoma
Between November 14 and 21, 1962, 41 of the 350
boarding students at Sequoyah Vocational School reported
to the school clinic with eye complaints. All reported


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous week)
16th Week Cumulative
Ended Ended First 16 weeks
Disease Median
April 20, April 21, 1958 1962 Median
1963 1962 1963 1962 1958 1962
Aseptic meningitis .............. 18 28 --- 352 292 ---
Brucellosis ..................... 13 9 11 106 110 201
Diphtheria...................... 1 11 11 97 160 244
Encephalitis, infectious .......... 28 34 31 407 471 411
Hepatitis, infectious and serum... 853 1,178 810 16,369 21,610 12,172
Measles ........................ 17,459 23,875 18,619 195,811 241,204 215,896
Meningococcal infections ......... 46 52 47 944 816 900
Poliomyelitis, total.............. 1 6 12 43 89 252
Paralytic .................... 1 6 5 39 61 182
Nonparalytic.............. ... 2 2 13 42
Unspecified ................. 5 2 15 28
Streptococcal sore throat
and Scarlet fever ............ 7,406 7,523 --- 154,463 138,981
Tetanus ........................ .2 4 --- 52 43
Tularemia...................... 3 1 --- 61 80
Typhoid fever................... 7 5 11 114 122 153
Typhus fever, tick-borne,
(Rocky Mountain spotted)...... 1 2 5 ---
Rabies in Animals............... 94 115 81 1,148 1,336 1,336


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Psittacosis: Calif. 1 21
Botulism: 5 Rabies in Man:
Malaria: Hawaii 1, Mo. 1 32 Smallpox:
Plague: Typhus, murine: 2


Weky


F s 5.W0/' 1' 7/16









131 Morbidity and Mor




symptoms of eye irritation but denied photophobia or puru-
lent discharge. Four patients gave a history of recent
sore throats but all denied fever or other systemic symp-
toms. One patient was observed to have cervical lymph-
adcnopathy. Ophthalmological examination of the patients
revealed minimal bulbar conjunctival erythema. There was
a lower tarsal follicular reaction, most marked in the
lower conjunctival cul-de-sac, as well as a few follicles
on the upper tarsus and occasionally on the bulbar con-
junctiva. Slit lamp examination of the upper limbus and
cornea was normal in all cases. The clinical history and
ophthalmological examination suggested the diagnosis
of viral conjunctivitis.
On November 26, the entire student body was ex-
amined with the aid of a magnifying loupe for the pres-
ence of acute follicular conjunctivitis. A total of 84 (27
percent) of 311 students examined were found positive.
In addition, three students demonstrated healed trachoma
and one boy was found with early active trachoma and
started on therapy.
The attack rate (36.8 percent) for female students was
significantly higher than that for male students (16.2
percent). Interestingly, the use of eye makeup among
female students was widespread and several supervisors
noted that it was common for several girls to share the
same eye makeup on any one day. The attack rate for
those using eye makeup was significantly higher than for
those not using eye makeup, as shown in the table beiow:

Group Number Conjunctivitis Rate Per 100
Used Eye Makeup 70 30 42.9
Used No Eye Makeup 54 14 25.9
Total 124 44 35.5


Extensive laboratory studies have not revealed an
etiologic agent. Bacteriologic and virologic examinations
were unrevealing, although cytologic examination of the
conjunctival cells was consistent with a viral conjunc-
tivitis. There was no serologic evidence of recent adeno-
virus infection.
(PVl>ortcd by Dr. 1. J. ]arin, Acting C(hie, l Di) vision of
Ini;an It Health; and thb (, onmmr nicabh/e Dti'as Centi r.)



Puerperal Sepsis New York State

During the period November 9 to November 19, 1962,
seven cases of post-partum infection occurred among
patients on a hospital obstetrical service in New York
State. All suffered sudden onset of fever, with tempera-
tures up to 1040F. Cultures of the cervix from all patients
yielded hemolytic streptococci and each patient re-
sponded promptly to treatment with combinations of
penicillin and broad spectrum antibiotics. The shortest


tality Weekly Report


observed period from admission to onset of illness was
48 hours.
During the period of the outbreak, a house staff
member who had been in contact with all seven cases
was observed to have a sore throat and a draining parony-
chia. Cultures of both his throat and finger yielded hemo-
lytic streptococci. The house officer was barred from
duty on November 17, given a course of penicillin therapy,
and allowed to return to work following clinical recovery
and conversion of his throat cultures to negative. No
subsequent cases have been observed.
While cultures were not available for serotyping, the
epidemiological evidence pointed to the resident house
staff member as the source of infection. No other members
of the nursing or house staff were observed to be ill.
(Reported b\ Virginia L. Oliver, Epidemiologist, Neu
York State Department of Health.)


Typhoid Paratyphoid Mortality
Over the past 60 years, there has been an almost
2,000-fold decrease in the typhoid-paratyphoid mortality
rate in the United States. The mortality from typhoid and
paratyphoid fell from 31.3/100,000 population in 1900 to
0.016 in 1960. It is estimated that in the neighborhood of
25,000 deaths in the U. S. were due to these diseases. In
the last three reporting years, the reported deaths have
been less than 25 yearly 21 in 1960, 22 in 1959, and
23 in 1958.
It is interesting to note that a public water supply
was first chlorinated in 1908. From the accompanying
graph, it is seen that the downward trend was already
present before chlorination of water supplies became a
widely accepted public health measure.

TYPHOID-PARATYPHOID MORTALITY
IN THE UNITED STATES
1900-1960

1---- D~oth Regiktroffon Strw1 (I)
Z "\1 -~--- L-or. Clrltif (2
Io.n \*l**oO. (2
2 Larq*CatI..ie


a 20
g
o
o
o "




o



1900 i910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960


12 lJOn'tta A,,...C0. UdS~otA.OCi~'.S" IC1 ZIOS 2107. MOrO. 4e00










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


WEEKLY PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS


Pneumonia-influenza mortality During the week
ending April 20, pneumonia-influenza deaths in the 108
cities increased reflecting a late seasonal rise in the
Mountain and Pacific States. All other geographic divi-
sions remained within expected ranges although some
divisions reported slight increases over figures reported
during the previous week. These are in part the result of
reports delayed during the week of the Easter holidays.




WEEK ENDING
WEEK EN G 4 Week Weekly
3/30 4/6 4/13 4/20 Total Average

Observed 7,387 6,918 6,289 6,673 27,267 6,817
Expected 6,829 6,782 6,729 6,670 27,010 6,753

Excess 558 136 -440 3 257 64


(See table, page 139).


Deaths among persons 65 years and over as shown
in the accompanying table and bar chart, deaths from all
causes at ages 65 and over declined to expected levels
during the four-week period ending April 20.

DEATS AT AGE 65 AND OVER IN 08 U S. CITIES
Average number per wek by four-week periods
II'_

BOaN1---------------'4 ---


NUMBER
OF
DEATiS

-


isa 1 t962
-ii-un rsr -~r-x o-~lu











136 Morlidlitl and lIortalilt Weekly Reporl


Ta.ble i CASI:S 01 SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS FNDE)

APRIL 20, 1963 AND APRIL 21, 1962



Poliomyelitis, Aseptic
Poliomyelitis, total cases Poliomyelitis, paralytic nonparalytic Meningitis
Cumulative Cumulative
Area
16th week First 16 weeks 16th week First 16 weeks 16th week 16th week
1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962 1963 1962


UNITED STATES...... 1 6 43 89 1 6 39 61 18 28

NEW ENGLAND.............. 1 1 .- 1 -
Maine................... 1
New Hampshire......... -
Vermont .............. -
Massachusetts......... -
Rhode Island.......... -
Connecticut............. 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC............ 1 6 30 1 6 17 1
New York............... 1 4 30 1 4 17 1
New Jersey............. -
Pennsylvania 1 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL......... 11 9 10 6 1 3
Ohio................... 4 4 3 4 1 -
Indiana............... 3 2 1
Illinois............... 5 2 5 1
Michigan.............. 2 2 1
Wisconsin............. -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 6 1 3 2 1
Minnesota............. I 1 2 1
Iowa................... 3 -2 -
Missouri.. ............. 1 2 I -
North Dakota.......... -
South Dakota...........
Nebraska.............. -
Kansas ............... -

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... 1 4 7 1 3 5 1
Delaware.............. -
Maryland.............. -
District of Columbia.. 1-
Virginia.............. 1 1-
West Virginia.........
North Carolina ........ 2 1 2 1 -
South Carolina ........ -
Georgia............... 1 1 -
Florida................ 1 1 3 1 1 2 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 1 3 3 1 2 2 3 3
Kentucky............. .... 1 1 1 2 1
Tennessee............. 1 1 1 1 -
Alabama............... 2 1 1 1 -
Mississippi........... 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL........ 4 10 22 4 10 19 2 1
Arkansas.............. i 1 1 1 I -
Louisiana............. 1 9 5 1 9 5 -
Oklahoma .............. 1
Texas................. 2 1 16 2 1 13 2

MOUNTAIN.................. 5 4 1 1
Montana............... 2 1
Idaho.................. -
Wyoming................
Colorado.............. 1
New Mexico............. -
Arizona............... 2 2 1
Utah.................. 1 -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC .................. 8 6 7 4 8 17
Washington ............ 2 1
Oregon................. 1 1 1
California............. 7 6 6 4 5 16
Alaska ..... .........
Hawaii.. ............ -

Puerto Rico.............. 2 5 2 5









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 137


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 20, 1963 AND APRIL 21, 1962 (Continued)


Brucellosis Diphtheria Encephalitis, Hepatitis, Measles
infectious infectious and serum
Area
Cumu- Cumu- 16th week
lative lative Under 20 &
16th week 16 weeks 16th week 16 weeks 16th week 20 yr. over Total 16th week
1963 1963 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1962
UNITED STATES...... 13 106 1 97 28 34 436 365 853 1,178 17,459 23,875

NEW ENGLAND.............. 3 2 31 27 58 48 703 2,569
Maine.................. 15 12 27 14 5 142
New Hampshire.......... 5 3 8 3 2 10
Vermont ............... 3 90 89
Massachusetts......... 2 5 4 9 22 162 1,318
Rhode Island.......... .- 1 1 1 12 131
Connecticut........... 6 8 14 5 432 879

MIDDLE ATLANTIC.......... 4 16 7 4 85 73 158 161 1,502 5,845
New York.............. 3 11 1 3 49 43 92 89 552 3,021
New Jersey............ 1 9 15 24 28 579 2,460
Pennsylvania.......... 1 4 6 1 27 15 42 44 371 364

EAST NORTH CENTRAL....... 1 7 1 8 4 4 89 60 152 302 8,068 2,962
Ohio.................. 2 21 11 32 62 612 779
Indiana............... 3 7 4 11 77 349 279
Illinois.............. 1 7 1 3 33 16 50 91 919 802
Michigan.............. 1 3 2 27 28 55 61 2,687 852
Wisconsin............. 1 1 1 1 4 11 3,501 250

WEST NORTH CENTRAL....... 12 81 28 2 21 11 43 106 906 1,148
Minnesota............. 6 15 1 4 15 191 9
Iowa.................. 9 60 1 1 2 4 19 388 995
Missouri.............. 4 1 10 2 13 23 193 44
North Dakota........... 1 1 2 3 4 89 93
South Dakota.......... 3 7 4 4 11 1 2 5
Nebraska .............. 4 4 2 29 43 2
Kansas................ 2 4 5 1 6 15 NN NN

SOUTH ATLANTIC........... I 19 2 8 45 38 87 152 1,686 1,230
Delaware............. ... 3 123 7
Maryland ............... 2 2 3 6 10 144
District of Columbia. 2 3 3 26
Virginia.............. 1 14 10 27 27 455 338
West Virginia.......... 1 9 2 11 23 761 351
North Carolina........ 1 1 2 12 7 19 47 55 38
South Carolina........ 3 3 4 7 17 102 43
Georgia............... .6 2 7 9 2 3 21
Florida............... 1 8 2 3 5 8 20 184 262

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL....... 2 8 1 49 29 81 153 850 1,971
Kentucky.............. 19 9 31 67 334 353
Tennessee............. 1 1 24 13 37 41 400 1,430
Alabama............... I 7 1 4 3 7 23 100 93
Mississippi........... 2 4 6 22 16 95

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL ....... 7 13 6 36 29 67 62 1,185 4,007
Arkansas ............. 2 1 1 5 1 6 4 121 7
Louisiana............. 2 9 6 16 11 6 6
Oklahoma.............. 2 5 2 2 1 24 120
Texas................. 3 5 5 22 20 43 46 1,034 3,874

MOUNTAIN................. 1 1 25 11 58 51 1,096 1,052
Montana............... 3 3 3 107 255
Idaho................. 4 13 220 34
Wyoming.............. 2 2 2 47 20
Colorado............... 1 1 9 12 197 326
New Mexico............ 1 3 3 6 1 NN NN
Arizona............... 11 14 439 329
Utah .................. 1 18 5 23 4 79 88
Nevada................ 2 7

PACIFIC.................. 3 1 10 12 55 87 149 143 1,463 3,091
Washington............ 1 13 14 32 22 271 895
Oregon................ 5 2 9 19 295 806
California............ 3 1 10 11 36 68 104 93 803 1,339
Alaska................ 1 2 3 7 17 22
Hawaii................ 1 1 2 77 29

Puerto Rico.............. 8 14 5 19 24 23 66









138 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table ,. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

APRIL 20, 1963 AND APRIL 21, 1962 (Continued)



Infections Sore Throat & Tetanus Typhus Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in Animals
Scarlet Fever (Rcky Mt.
Area Cumu- Spotted) -."- iC,,,-,,-
lative I lative lative
16th wk. 16 weeks 16th week 16th wk. 16th wk. 16th wk. 16th wk. 16 weeks 16th week 16 weeks
1963 1963 1963 1962 1963 1963 1963 r["j t.3 1 r, [i1,3

UNITED STATES.... 46 944 7,406 7,523 2 3 7 114 94 115 1,148

NEW ENGLAND......... 5 67 969 437 5 8
Mine .............. 10 10 11 -
New Hampshire...... 2 10 -- 5
Vermont............ 2 1 38 I 2
Massachusetts ..... 3 31 119 87 3 -
Rhode Island....... 6 70 42 -
Connecticut........ 2 16 759 259 1

MEDDLE ATLANTIC..... 9 120 443 444 14 2 6 34
New York............ 4 54 251 295 10 2 5 24
New Jersey......... 2 21 126 70 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 3 45 66 79 3 1 10

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 8 150 1,118 847 1 7 2 34 147
Ohio................ 2 45 113 87 2 24 70
Indiana............. 1 18 144 120 I 7 19
Illinois........... 1 20 256 135 1 2 1 1 27
Michigan........... 4 48 379 214 I 1 20
Wisconsin.......... 19 226 291 1 1 1 11

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 58 300 211 1 5 24 31 259
Minnesota.......... 10 23 25 1 3 3 72
Iowa............... 2 50 88 1 14 14 90
Missouri........... 1 25 15 1 1 3 2 6 48
North Dakota....... 1 151 38 2 1 7
South Dakota....... 3 2 3 4 36
Nebraska........... 1 14 3 3
Kansas.............. 1 3 59 59 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 8 188 584 645 1 1 1 22 33 11 210
Delaware........... 1 10 7
Maryland............ 1 27 41 30 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 5 -
Virginia........... 2 49 178 183 3 13 4 77
West Virginia...... 1 10 145 153 5 8 3 75
North Carolina .... 1 30 63 16 3 4
South Carolina..... 12 13 104 5
Georgia............ 11 1 1 2 7 1 16
Florida............ 3 45 133 147 1 1 6 5 3 33

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 3 88 1,154 1,350 1 2 11 4 11 106
Kentucky........... 1 29 145 195 2 3 2 46
Tennessee.......... 1 34 978 1,078 1 7 1 8 49
Alabama............ 1 12 13 15 1 1 2 1 11
--. -ip ....... 13 18 62

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2 105 684 692 1 1 20 23 18 234
Arkansas........... 5 1 2 1 1 8 1 1 18
Louisiana.......... 46 3 2 5 1 1 26
Oklahoma........... 1 19 86 37 2 17
Texas.............. 1 35 594 651 5 21 16 173

MOUNTAIN ............. 32 1,130 1,336 1 2 1 23
Montana............ 1 92 45
ii .. ............ ... 1 161 205
....... .. 1 14 69 I -
Colorado........... 7 390 424 I
New Mexico......... 2 238 307 1 12
Arizona............ 6 147 165 11
Utah................ 11 87 121 -
Nevada............. 3 1 -

PACIFIC.............. 8 136 1,024 1,561 1 28 5 4 127
.:, [., .......... 1 12 371 545 -
r, ............. 6 28 40 2 1
California ......... 7 112 536 944 1 24 5 4 120
Alaska............. 4 54 17 6
Hawaii............. 2 35 15 2
Puerto Rico......... 4 4 34 1 1 3 4










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (D). TOTAL DEATHS AMONG PERSONS 65 YEARS AND OVER IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


139


Area For weeks ending Area For weeks ending

_3/30 4/6 4/13 4/20 _3/30 4/6 4/13 4/20


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn...........
Cambridge, Mass...........
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass...............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass .........
New Haven, Conn............
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y................
Allentown, Pa..............
Buffalo, N.Y..............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa...................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J...............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y............
Schenectady, N.Y.,........
Scranton, Pa.............
Syracuse, N.Y..............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y................
Yonkers, N.Y...............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio................
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill...............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio............
Dayton, Ohio..............
Detroit, Mich...............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich.................
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Cary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis..............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill..................
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa.........
Duluth, Minn.............
Kansas City, Kans........
Kansas City, Mo..........
Lincoln, Nebr............
Minneapolis, Minn........
Omaha, Nebr..............
St. Louis, Mo............
St. Paul, Minn...........
Wichita, Kans............


165
18
30
22
41
18
24
18
32
46
14
41
18
33


28
19
97
29
16
36
39
41
958
18
383
258
20*
72
29
26
46
37
18
26


35
25
435
124
99
68
53
176
31
29
21
21
43
88
24
78
22
22
18
72
42


41
18
12
78
26
86
41
155
72
27


138
26
19
20
20
15
18
19
22
42
6
19
26
35


24
33
72
20
19
29
42
51
949
29
312
91
17*
83
26
26
37
44
12
15


31
18
480
94
135
69
36
154
20
30
34
12
23
76
16
82
15
25
43
56
50


38
18
20
92
13
86
45
141
63
23


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga..............
Baltimore, Md.............
Charlotte, N.C............
Jacksonville, Fla........
Miami, Fla...............
Norfolk, Va..............
Richmond, Va..............
Savannah, Ga..............
St. Petersburg, Fla......
Tampa, Fla...............
Washington, D.C..........
Wilmington, Del...........

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala...........
Chattanooga, Tenn.......
Knoxville, Tenn..........
Louisville, Ky............
Memphis, Tenn............
Mobile, Ala...............
Montgomery, Ala..........
Nashville, Tenn..........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex...............
Baton Rouge, La...........
Corpus Christi, Tex......
Dallas, Tex...............
El Paso, Tex.............
Fort Worth, Tex...........
Houston, Tex..............
Little Rock, Ark.........
New Orleans, La..........
Oklahoma City, Okla......
San Antonio, Tex.........
Shreveport, La...........
Tulsa, Okla...............

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex......
Colorado Springs, Colo...
Denver, Colo..............
Ogden, Utah..............
Phoenix, Ariz.............
Pueblo, Colo..............
Salt Lake City, Utah.....
Tucson, Ariz..............

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif..........
Fresno, Calif ............
Glendale, Calif ..........
Honolulu, Hawaii.........
Long Beach, Calif........
Los Angeles, Calif.......
Oakland, Calif...........
Pasadena, Calif ..........
Portland, Oreg............
Sacramento, Calif........
San Diego, Calif.........
San Francisco, Calif.....
San Jose, Calif..........
Seattle, Wash.............
Spokane, Wash...........
Tacoma, Wash..............


57
116
23
30
51
20
47
19
72
39
85
28


38
56
28
83
77
14
19
40


32
17
11
80
17
51
70
35
101
39
70
30
29


20
13
55
9
88
9
38
41


16
29
25
20
38
358
59
18
69
32
47
113
15
94
25
32


55
128
6
21
48
20
43
14
72
45
97
19


36
23
27
79
81
23
19
50


26
13
16
78
10
35
69
35
58
56
45
13
41


15
17
69
10
53
8
37
38


12
28
35
15
26
332
60
21
91
45
54
121
20
94
33
21


63
142
19
33
35
21
49
16
81
48
86
21


39
35
33
42
66
21
29
36


21
22
17
67
20
29
83
45
91
33
51
34
30


28
12
72
13
57
8
33
26


15
30
26
19*
38
311
44
19
59
41
51
111
21
89
34
32


San Juan, P.R............... 9 19 20 10


OCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................... 11,838
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 540
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............. 701
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,673


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTF: All deaths by place o occurrence.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1111111111111111111111111111111111
3 1262 08864 1294


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Suspect Smallpox Great Britain

A 2-month-old Pakistani child has been hospitalized
in London with a rash suspicious of smallpox. The child
departed Karachi April 22, 1963, aboard BOAC Flight 701,
arriving in London on the afternoon of the same day.
Nine days prior to departure, the child was vaccinated
against smallpox. Appropriate laboratory studies have been
undertaken, but as yet the clinical diagnosis of smallpox
is unconfirmed. Three individuals, also aboard BOAC
I l:ehi 701 from Karachi to London, have since continued
their travels to the United States, arriving at Idlewild Air-
port late in the evening of April 22. The names of these
individuals and their destination addresses have been
transmitted to local health authorities in the areas of
declared destination.
(Reported by Dr. Ralph WI. McComas, Division of Foreign
Quarantine, Paris, France, and Dr. W. G. Simpson, Epi-
demiologist, Dirision of Foreign Quarantine, Washington,
D. C.).

Yellow Fever Peru

The Government of Peru has officially reported 9
cases and 2 deaths from yellow fever in Ayna, Lamar
Province, Ayacucho Department.


Yellow Fever Bolivia

The Government of Bolivia has officially reported 8
deaths due to yellow fever in Caranazi, Canton, Nor
Yungas Province, La Paz Department.


Notes: These provisional data sar based oa weekly telerams to the Coimmuai-
cable Disease Center by the individual State health departments.
Symbol: --- Data noi available
uantity e.ro
Procedures (fo construction of various mortality carves may be obtained frot
Statistics Section, Communicable Disease Center, Public Health Service,
U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta 22, Georgia.


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